Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/00917
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness Fla
Publication Date: June 18, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:00917

Full Text









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PAGE 4A


JUNE 18, 2007 Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 25c VOLUME 119 No. 169



Bomb rocks Afghan capital


Legal eagles
Community Legal Services of
Mid-Florida Inc. celebrates
new location with an open
house./Page 2A
:SAFE DRIVING
On the road
;Sheriff's office to teach class-
es introducing new teen driver
.skills challenge./Page 2A
WEEK'S VOTING RECORDS:
Key votes
1'0 Learn how your
U.S. lawmakers
o Congress.
m/Page 4A

WORTH QUOTING:

One of the
hardest truths of
parenthood is
that you never
know how well
you've done
till it's too late
to do anything
about it.

COLUMN, PAGE 12A
GONE TOMORROW:
FT%'a-ST


Airport problem
Officials mount a daylight raid
Sunday at an airport in Italy
to keep fast-multiplying wild
hares off runways./Page 8A
TIMELESS CLASSICS.:


Veterans of flight
Good upkeep keeps 920th
Rescue Wing's aging fleet
in flight./Page 3A
LEGAL LIMBO:
Gitmo waltz
Legal experts say that many
legal roadblocks remain for
the terror detentions at
Guantanamo Bay./Page 9A
FREE TO ROAM:


No more curfew
Residents in Baghdad emerged
from their homes at the end of
a four-day lockdown to find
.more woes./Page 14A


Annie's Mailbox ........ 8B
Com ics ............ . 9B
Crossword ............ 8B
Editorial ............ 12A
Entertainment ......... 7B
Horoscope ........... 9N
Lottery Payouts ........ 7B
Movies .............. 9B
Obituaries ............ 6A
Weird Wire ............ 8A
Two Sections


6 18411578 2011025 I 5


Deadliest attack

since American

invasion kills 35

Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - The
deadliest insurgent attack since
the U.S.-led invasion of
Afghanistan in 2001 destroyed a
bus full of police instructors at
Kabul's busiest transportation hub
on Sunday, killing 35 people and
wounding 52, officials said.
The enormous suicide blast,
which raised the specter of an
increase in Iraq-style bombings
with heavy casualties, was at least


the fourth attack against a bus car-
rying Afghan police or army sol-
diers in Kabul in the last year. The
blast sheared off the bus' metal sid-
ings and roof, leaving a charred
frame.
"Never in my life have I heard
such a sound," said Ali Jawad, a 48-
year-old who was selling phone
cards nearby. "A big fireball fol-
lowed. I saw blood and a decapitat-
ed man thrown out of the bus."
The explosion was the fifth sui-
cide attack in Afghanistan in three
days, part of a sharp spike in vio-
lence around the country In the
south, in Kandahar province, a
roadside bomb killed three mem-
bers of the U.S.-led coalition and
an Afghan interpreter. The sol-
diers' nationalities were not
released, but most in the coalition


are American.
Condemning the Kabul attack,
President Hamid Karzai said the
"enemies of Afghanistan" were try-
ing to stop the development of
Afghan security forces, a key com-
ponent in the U.S.-NATO strategy
of handing over security responsi-
bilities to the Afghan government
one day, allowing Western forces to
leave.
A self-described Taliban
spokesman, Qari Yousef Ahmadi,
said a Taliban suicide bomber
named Mullah Asim Abdul
Rahman caused the blast. Ahmadi
called an Associated Press
reporter from an undisclosed loca-
tion. His claim could not be veri-
fied.
Please see BOMB/Page 9A


Building on past


Some of Citrus County's finest were out early Saturday morning helping raise the
of Citrus County build. Team work was the order of the day as Chris Binkerd, left,
the ladder while Cpl. Joe Casola, center, from the Citrus County Sheriff's Office ha
Withlacoochee Technical Institute makes sure the board stays put. The five Rotar
with Habitat on this home.

Habitat for Humanity building framework


CRISTY LOFTIS
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
This fall a group of volunteers will
build a house filled with hope and
love - literally
Aside from raising $60,000 to build
a Habitat for Humanity home. Black
Diamond residents \\rote messages
of encouragement. prayer and friend-
ship on 2-by-- boards to be used to
build the frame of the house.
It's with people like this that
Habitat for Humanity of Citrus
Count has been able to more than
double the numberof houses built for
low income, hardworking families
each year, executive director Terry
Steele said
Since 1993 when Habitat was
formed in Citrus, the community has
funded and helped to build 32 homes.
At first just one house was built
each year 'lTwo years ago they started


FOR MORE INFO
N The next date for potential
Habitat home recipients to learn
more is Thursday at Seven Rivers
Presbyterian Church from 10
a.m. to noon. For more inform
tion, call 563.2744.
building three a year. Next year
Steele expects to build seven to 10
houses and between 12 and 15 the fol-
lowing year.
"I'm working on stuff for 2010."
Steele said.
The aggressive building schedule is
only possible because of the generos-
ity of the community
Take Black Diamond's donation
given Thursday: Black Diamond com-
munity members were interested in a
Habitat project because it provides
hardworking, low-income people
with an opportunity to own a home.
"That's the Amnerican dream - to


Associateu dess
Afghans carry a victim Sunday after a bomb blast in
Kabul, Afghanistan. The bomb ripped through a police
bus in a crowded civilian area, killing at least 35 peo-
ple and wounding at least 52.


success


.17













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DAVE SIGLER'Cr.r-r.rcie
walls on another Habitat for Humanity
From Citrus County Fire Rescue, holds
mmers and Jeremy Laughlin, right, from
y Clubs of Citrus County also partnered


?forfuture in county

be able to afford a home," said Kevin
Conway. Black Diamond Habitat
Committee chairman.
With donations from residents, the
Black Diamond Foundation and
Black Diamond corporate friends, it
took just three weeks to raise the
money necessary for a complete
Habitat house. And not only are they
gi ing money, but the golfcommunity I
residents will soon create a work
schedule to complete the man-poiwer
hours needed to physically build the
house.
"This is our way of showing the
Citrus County community that Black
Diamond cares." Conway said.
He said Black Diamond is the first
residential community to sponsor a
Habitat house in Citrus and he chal-
leinges other communities to do the
same
Each Habitat home built is three to
Please see HASITAT/Page 4A


Push for biofuels squeezes refinery expansion


Oil companies

wary of future

investment

Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A push
from Congress and the White
House for huge increases in
biofuels, such as ethanol, is
prompting the oil industry to
scale back its plans for refinery
expansions. That could keep


gasoline prices high, possibly
for years to come.
With President Bush calling
for a 20 percent drop in gaso-
line use and the Senate now
debating legislation for huge
increases in ethanol produc-
tion, oil companies see growing
uncertainty about future gaso-
line demand and little need to
expand refineries or build new
ones.
Oil industry executives no
longer believe there will be the
demand for gasoline over the
next decade to warrant the bil-
lions of dollars in refinery


expansions - as much as 10
percent increase in new refin-
ing capacity - they anticipated
as recently as a year ago.
Biofuels such as ethanol and
efforts to get automakers to
build more fuel-efficient cars
and SUVs have been portrayed
as key to countering high gaso-
line prices, but it is likely to do
little to curb costs at the pump
today, or in the years ahead as
refiners reduce gasoline pro-
duction.
A shortage of refineries fre-
quently has been blamed by
politicians for the sharp price


spikes in gasoline, as was the
case last week by Sen. James
Inhofe, R-Okla., during debate
on a Senate energy bill.
"The fact is that Americans
are paying more at the pump
because we do not have the
domestic capacity to refine the
fuels consumers demand,"
Inhofe complained as he tried
unsuccessfully to get into the
bill a proposal to ease permit-
ting and environmental rules
for refineries.
This spring, refiners, ham-
Please see OIL/Page 5A


Agency:


No more


burying


tortoises


Nature activists

hail decision

TERRY WITT
terrywitt@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
In a move applauded by
environmentalists, the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conser-
vation Commission voted this
week to adopt an interim poli-
cy halting the entombment of
gopher tortoises in their bur-
rows.
After July 30, the agency will
no longer issue permits allow-
ing people to entomb gopher
tortoises in their burrows.
New permits will require relo-
cation of the ground-dwelling
turtles.
Tortoises often build their
underground burrows on high
and dry land, prime areas for
residential and business
development Under the exist-
ing policy, if a burrow is on a
development site, the
landowner can purchase an
incidental take permit to
entomb the animals.
The permits will continue to
be issued after July 30, but lan-
guage in the permit allowing
entombment of tortoises will
be removed and replaced with
a written requirement to relo-
cate them, said Greg Holder,
FWC team leader for develop-
ing tortoise conservation
measures.
Holder said FWC has devel-
oped a draft conservation
management plan for the ani-
mals that, among other things,
calls for 614,000 acres of natu-
ral tortoise habitat to be con-
served for the species' long-
term survival.
He said FWC hopes to give
formal approval to the man-
agement plan in September.
Elimination of the entomb-
ment would become a perma-
nent policy and the species'
threatened status would be
approved.
Ray Ashton, founder of
Ashton Biodiversity Research
and Preservation Institute, a
private research firm for tor-
toises, hailed Tuesday's deci-
sion by FWC as a major break-
through.
"Nearly two decades of one
of the greatest conservation
travesties has come to an end,"
said Ray Ashton, founder of
Ashton Biodivertisy Research
and Preservation Institute, in
a written statement
Ashton has been part of the
stakeholder group that worked
with Holder to reform tortoise
conservation policies. The
group frequently met in
Lecanto at the Lecanto
Government Building.
The first major changes in

Please see TORTOISES/Page 4A


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2A MONDAY, JUNE 18, 2007 Loc~ CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To serve and protect


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Inverness Mayor Bob Plaisted presents Tommy Blackmon, head attorney from Community Legal Services of Mid-Florida Inc., a procla-
mation welcoming the group to its new home Friday during an open house at the new office at 106 N. Osceola Ave. in Inverness.
Citrus County Commissioner John Thrumston, left, also presented a proclamation from the Citrus County Commission to the service.


Community Legal Services ofMid-Florida Inc.


DAVE PIEKLIK
dpieklik@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle


Going through the legal process can
cause anxiety, but an Inverness office
helps calm those nerves by welcoming
those who need legal assistance the most
with a warm and inviting touch.
Community Legal Services of Mid-
Florida Inc. hosted an open house Friday
to invite county leaders and residents
into its new office at 106 N. Osceola Ave.,
which opened in March. Though the
event was partly to put the new location
on display, it could open the door for
someone who is in need.
The CLSMF motto is "Putting Justice
in Everyone's Reach," and the non-profit
service provides free legal assistance in
civil matters for low-income individuals
in 12 counties. With its hardwood floors,
plush carpets, bookcases and other fur-
nishings, spokeswoman Tyra Peters


believes the Inverness office sends a
message.
"People that don't have a lot of money
and need legal service should still be
able to go to a nice law office," she said.
"Our clients walk in and they believe,
from a visual perspective, they're in a
professional law office," added Advocacy
Director Glenn Shuman.
The local office has moved around a bit
since it started in 1980 before finding
what Shuman said is its permanent
home; past locations included Floral City
and the Old Courthouse. Now, managing
attorney Tommy Blackmon said the
office is conveniently close to the Citrus
County Courthouse.
The office includes three attorneys
and three support staff, as well as a
reception room and conference room.
And in a creative way of providing fund-
ing for the office, there are two apart-
ments in the two-story building that can
be rented out.


celebrates new location
At the open house, office staff were
presented proclamations calling the day
"Community Legal Services of Mid-
Florida-Day," where the service was rec-
ognized for its community impact. In
2006, 6,726 cases the service handled
were closed, 357 of which were in Citrus
County.
County Commissioner John Thrumston
thanked staff for providing high-quality
legal assistance in such areas as family
law, elder law and taxes, saying, "It's
something that's well needed."
"It is really one of the most fulfilling
things an attorney can do, or even a non-
attorney," CLSMF board member Joe
Mason said after receiving the proclama-
tion.
Inverness Mayor Bob Plaisted present-
ed a similar proclamation from the city,
telling everyone, "Sometimes ... people
fall through the cracks. It's a real blessing
to you as an addition to our community,
and our city."


Classes introduce


new teen driver


skills challenge


Sheriffs office

running event

Special to the Chronicle
Vehicle control and crash
avoidance often are driving
skills associated with more
experienced drivers, however,
teen drivers face the same risks
on the road.
The Citrus County Sheriff's
Office has scheduled two pilot
classes to introduce its latest
youth program called the Teen
Driver Challenge. This month,
the classes will run on back-to-
back Fridays and Saturdays:
June 22-23 and June 29-30.
The classes are designed to
target teen drivers 15 to 19 years
of age and are taught by certi-
fled agency driving instructors.
The program's goal is to instill
in young drivers the knowledge
and hands-on experience need-
ed to exercise vehicle control
and crash avoidance.
The two-day course includes
four hours of classroom instruc-
tion Friday, and eight hours at
the driving range Saturday.
Class participants will tackle
exercises such as the
forward/reverse serpentine;
threshold, plus anti-lock brak-
ing system (ABS) braking; figure
8; brake and turn; brake and
escape; off-road recovery and
more.
Application packets are avail-
able at the Sheriff's Operations
Center in downtown Inverness,


plus at each of the sheriff's
office community resource
offices in Hernando, Beverly
Hills, Crystal River, Homosassa
Springs, South Dunnellon and
Inverness. Applicants must
include a check for the class fee
of $100, made payable to the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office,
which is refundable provided
the teen completes and partici-
pates in all 12 hours of instruc-
tion. If not, the sheriff's office
will retain the fee. Times and
locations for the two-day course
will be shared when class mem-
bers are selected.
The Teen Driver Challenge is
designed primarily for those
with a Florida operator's
license and at least some expe-
rience behind the wheel.
However, teens with only a
Florida learner's permit will be
admitted to the two pilot class-
es, provided they are escorted to
and from the driving range by a
licensed driver. After that,
licensed operators will be given
first preference.
For the course at the driving
range, participants should use
the vehicle they drive the most.
Pickup trucks or other vehicles
with a high center of gravity will
be allowed only at the discre-
tion of the instructors.
After the two pilot classes,
the sheriff's office will offer
one class a month while it eval-
uates the countywide need for
classes in the future. Dates for
future Teen Driver Challenge
classes will be posted on the
Sheriff's Office Web site at
www.sheriffcitrus.org.


VACATIONING?
* Remember to take photos during the trip, to submit to the
Dream Vacation Photo Contest.
* Send in a photo with a brief description of the trip. Include
the names of anyone pictured, and include a contact name
and phone number on the back.
* Weekly winners will be published in the Sunday Chronicle.
* At the end of the year, a panel of judges will select the best
photo during the year and that photographer will win a prize.
* Submit photos to the Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.


School board meets
for workshop today
The Citrus County School Board
will meet today for a special meet-
ing and workshop.
Finance director Kenny Blocker
will provide board members with
an overview of the 2007-08 budg-
et. Board members also will learn
about legislative changes that will
affect the district.
The meeting begins at 1 p.m. at
the District Services Center, 1007 W.
Main St., Inverness. For more infor-
mation, call 726-1931, ext. 2206.
Keep watching mail
for absentee ballot
Any voter who has requested an
absentee ballot by mail should
expect to receive their ballot in the
next few days, according to the
Citrus County Supervisor of
Elections Office.
Voters may request an absentee
ballot for the June 26 special gen-
eral election in person, by calling
341-6740 or e-mail at www.vote
citrus.com. The deadline is 5 p.m.




8FARIS
* Air Boat Rides
S Boat Rentals
SPontoon Boat Tours
SFishing Guides
o Gift Shop
Yulee Dr. Homosassa


County BRIEFS=
Wednesday.
Ballots must be retumed by 7
p.m. Election Day. Early voting is
June 18 to 23.
For information, call 341-6740.
Recycle phone books
through July 15
Residents can recycle old tele-
phone books through July 15 at
any of the county's 12 recycling
dropoff collection centers, by plac-
ing the directory in the rear open-
ing of the container marked for
"Plastic Bottles."
Phone books can also be recy-
cled at the following locations:
* Home Depot, 70 N. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River.
* Crystal River Chamber of
Commerce, 28 N.W. U.S. 19,
Crystal River.
* Homosassa Chamber of
Commerce, 3495 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
* Inverness Chamber of


Commerce, 401 Tompkins St.,
Inverness.
Call (352) 527-7670, or e-mail
landfillinfo@bocc.citrus.fl.us with
questions.
Diabetes screenings
offered July 2-3
Free diabetes screenings will be
offered from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
July 2 and July 3 at Walgreens,
4029 S. Suncoast Blvd., in
Homosassa. For more information,
call (800) 713-3301.
Volunteers needed
for local program
The Doctor Ride program, pro-
viding rides to and from medical
appointments for people 65 or
older who can't drive and who
have no one to take them, needs
volunteer drivers.
For information about volunteer-
ing or to make a reservation for a
ride, call 746-3796.


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2AMONDAY, JUNF 18, 2007


CiTRus CouNn- (FL) CHRONICLE


LOCAL












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MONDAY
JUNE 18, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Sunrise
Police find two bodies
in trunk of car
Police are investigating the
death of a man and woman
whose bodies were found
stuffed in the trunk of a car
Saturday night, authorities said.
A citizen watched a gray car
back into a parking spot at an
apartment complex and saw
three men flee around 9:30 p.m.
The witness flagged down a
police officer, who opened the
trunk of the car and discovered
the two bodies, Sunrise Police
spokesman Lt. Robert Voss
said.
Police also found blood on
the bumper and trunk of the car,
he said.
The names and ages of the
victims were not released.
Police did not reveal how they
died. Voss said they were wait-
ing for the medical examiner to
arrive.
Voss said they are treating it
as a homicide.

Miami

One dead, six hurt
in party shooting
A 20-year-old man was killed
and six other people were
injured early Sunday when four
men with guns and white ban-
dannas on their faces opened
fire at a graduation party, police
said.
Authorities were searching for
the four suspects, and the
shootings were believed to be
gang related, police said.
About 300 people were at a
graduation and birthday party
that began Saturday night and
continued into the early morning
at the Polish American Club in
Miami, police said.
At about 1 a.m., the four gun-
men entered the party and
began arguing with people,
police said. They then started
shooting, hitting six people
between the ages of 15 and 20,
police said. A pregnant woman
was injured as a result of the
chaotic scene.\
Those injuredwere taken to
hospitals. A 20-year-old man
died at Jackson Memorial
Hospital's trauma unit, police
said. He was not immediately
identified.
Two other victims were in crit-
ical condition Sunday. The rest
were in stable condition, police
said.

Clearwater

Former Phillies training
home set for demolition
Fans came to Jack Russell
Memorial Stadium for decades
each spring to see Mike
Schmidt and other Philadelphia
Phillies greats during spring
training. Soon the 52-year-old
stadium, which fans counted
among the last old-time Florida
spring training venues, will be
nothing but dust and rubble.
A demolition crew hired by
the city of Clearwater is set to
begin tearing down the stadium,
which had fallen into disrepair
even before the Phillies moved
to a new facility in 2004. The
field, dugouts and an office
building will remain as part of a
baseball academy.
The stadium was named for
Jack Erwin Russell, who pitched
15 years in the major leagues
before moving to Clearwater
and becoming a city commis-
sioner. The senior Russell died
in 1990 at 85.

Tallahassee

No ticket wins Lotto;
next jackpot $19 million
No ticket matched all six
Florida Lotto numbers, produc-
ing an estimated $19 million
Jackpot for the next
drawing, lottery offi-
cials said Sunday.
A total of 236
ns! i.ott tickets matched five


numbers to win
$2,075.50 and 8,775 tickets
matched four numbers for $45.
The winning Florida Lotto
numbers selected Saturday: 7-
10-13-16-22-24.
- From wire reports


Colleges lose federal funds


Three state universities'

axed from Upward

Bound program

Associated Press

TAMPA - The University of South
Florida is among three major schools in
the state that lost funding for a program
to recruit low-income and first-genera-
tion college students.
The U.S. Department of Education
cut Upward Bound funding at USF, the


University of Florida and Florida A&M
University, along with dozens of other
colleges nationwide. The program
encourages disadvantaged students to
seek higher education.
'"How can you let a program go that
has 41 years in the community?" said
Robert Davis, an Upward Bound alum-
nus who now runs the program at USE
Jane Glickman, spokeswoman for the
U.S. Department of Education, said the
213 schools nationwide that didn't get
funding this year scored lower on appli-
cations than the 775 schools that did get
support. The agency has about $265 mil-
lion to support the program.
There are "always more projects


than we can fund," Glickman said.
The panel that reviewed USF's fund-
ing request said the university's plan
was "overly ambitious" and that it
failed to show why it needed the
$650,000 grant. USF's annual grant was
the largest of any Florida school.
Nationwide, Upward Bound assists
high school students from low-income
families whose parents lack college
degrees and is geared toward helping
students pursue higher education. It
provides students with a range of serv-
ices, including instruction in reading,
math and science, entrance exam
preparation, exploration of education
opportunities and assistance in filling


Veterans





of the air


Associated Press
TOP .-Reservists with the 920th Rescue Wing, are shown working on the tail section of a 1964 HC-130 P/N Hercules,
extended range refueling model on May 17 at Patrick Air Force Base. The airplanes flown by the elite, often-called-on 920th
Rescue Wing are among some of the oldest in the Air Force fleet. ABOVE: Staff Sgt. Angel Velasquez, Helicopter Crew Chief
with the 920th Rescue Wing, works on a 1990 HH-60G PAVE HAWK helicopter on May 17 at Patrick Air Force Base.


aging fleet in flight
shortfall. He said that during President
Clinton's administration, procurement
spending fell to less than 20 percent of
the national defense budget for the first
time in 50 years.
"The average Navy plane today, for the
first time in history, is older than the
average warship," Thompson testified.
Military analyst Hellman said aging
airplanes are a major issue.
The Air Force is spending its
resources on aircraft like the the F/A-22
Raptor and Joint Strike Fighter, which
are replacing a range of aging fighter
planes, instead of some of its older trans-
port planes.
"It's a problem that's probably going to
get worse before it gets better," Hellman
said.
Aging transport planes, such as the C-
130s, will have to wait Some are being
replaced with the C-130J, the newest ver-
sion, but there have been relatively few
replacements.
Avionics and other upgrades in the
older C-130s keep them flying reliably,
Hellman said. The 920th Rescue Wing
has not had any major problem or crash
since the unit started in 1969 as the 301st
Rescue Squadron.
'"An aircraft like that you can get away
with to a certain extent," Hellman said.
"They tend to check them extensively"
But even with the upgrades and good
maintenance, an older plane will wear
even faster because of the heavy use and
the harsh desert conditions in Iraq and
Afghanistan.
Kirkpatrick said that having older air-
planes that are upgraded and well main-
tained is not a problem. There are older
airplanes than those at Patrick, such as
some KC-135s, at an average of 42 years.
Lt Col. Robert Lipira, a navigator with
the 920th Rescue Wing, said he does not
see much difference in the C-130s he's
been flying since 1987. The key is good
maintenance.
Lipira likened it to a 1965 Mustang
whose engine has been replaced, parts
well-lubricated and whose oil is changed
regularly. That car would run great
"It's not the same engine from 40 years
ago," he said. "It's not the same propeller
from 40 years ago."


Senior Airman Adam Olliges with the
920th Rescue Wing is shown working on
a 1964 HC -130 P/N Hercules, extended
range refueling model at Patrick Air
Force Base.
Wing, have deployed to Iraq, Afghanistan,
Africa and other places around the
world. About 15 members of the 920th
Rescue Wing returned home May 8
aboard one of the unit's C-130s after serv-
ing in the Horn of Africa.
But the delayed return of other airmen
from Afghanistan highlighted problems
with Air Force planes, though not one
from the 920th Rescue Wing. The 40 air-
men were delayed by several days, arriv-
ing May 11, after mechanical problems
grounded a C-17 in an undisclosed loca-
tion.
The average Air Force warplane is now
almost three times older than 8.5 years in
1967.
The Air Force wants to buy new planes
to lower the average age of its fleet to 15
years during the next two decades. That
would cost an estimated $400 billion,
according to a USA Today analysis.
Loren Thompson, defense analyst with
Washington-based Lexington Institute,
testified in February 2002 before the
Senate Budget Committee about the


Iment


PATRICK AIR FORCE BASE - The
airplanes flown by the elite, often-called-
on 920th Rescue Wing are among some of
the oldest in the Air Force fleet
The average age of all warplanes: 23.5
years.
The average age of C-130 transport
planes at Patrick: 40 years.
But the 920th commander, Col. Steve
Kirkpatrick, said the wing has carried out
its missions without major problems,
serving in Iraq, Afghanistan and in civil-
ian rescues, including hundreds after
Hurricane Kartina.
"It's a challenging mission, but they are
still reliable and do their mission well,"
Kirkpatrick said. "We obviously spend a
lot of time making sure our people have
the proper training and equipment"
The C-130s at Patrick are used to trans-
port airmen and equipment and for aeri-
al refueling of Pave Hawk helicopters,
which are modified Black Hawks. They
have been used in combat rescue mis-
sions in Southwest Asia and in Africa.
"You would think that they would be
high priority," said Christopher Hellman,
a military policy analyst with the Center
for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation.
"Eventually structural fatigue is going to
take its toll."
But Kirkpatrick said the unit has some
of the most experienced mechanics who
keep the planes in reliable condition.
He said the fleet of planes at Patrick is
flown about 1,300 hours a year On aver-
age, two C-130s and two to four HH-60G
helicopters are flown each day.
The 920th Rescue Wing, which flies the
transport plane, is a combat reserve unit
of about 1,200 highly trained airmen
whose primary mission is to rescue
downed pilots or troops injured or
pinned behind enemy lines.
The 920th also trains with NASA for
the rescue of astronauts in case of a
launch accident. It supports Cape
Canaveral Air Force Station rocket
launches and is sometimes called for
civilian rescues far at sea.
Airmen from Patrick Air Force Base,
including those from the 920th Rescue


K Ti
N


'1


'S.' /


4~'\
I
~


Good upkeep keeps 920th Rescue Wing's
R. NORMAN Mooo DY
Florida Today


t applications and financial aid docu-
;nts.
President Bush proposed cutting the
ogram in his 2007 budget.
USF is funding a similar program
s year with its own money and, like
my other universities, hopes
ngress will act on a proposal last
ek to restore $120 million to pro-
ims that lost funding.
About 130 high school students a year
-nt through USF's Upward Bound
ogram. The school said 95 percent of
'ward Bound students entered col-
ge. About 2,500 students graduated
m college during the USF program's
ir decade history.


Officials


tap into


tainted


water
Associated Press
WEST PALM BEACH -
Faced with a depleted water
supply and extreme drought
conditions, the city of West
Palm Beach decided this
spring to bypass a water filtra-
tion step and instead pump
treated sewage water into its
well fields, officials said.
Utility managers opted to
not filter the treated sewage
water through a marsh, a
process that takes two years.
Instead, officials blended the
reuse water with millions of
gallons of water from old Palm
Beach County quarry pits then
sent that water to well fields
that serve more than 100,000
customers.
"It sounds a little bit, it
sounds - how should I say -
disgusting. It doesn't sound
appetizing," Mayor Lois
Frankel said. "But our water is
tested every day, and we have
very good water."
Officials developed the plan
after water managers ordered
the city on April 3 to stop
pumping from Lake
Okeechobee, which dropped
to record-low water levels this
year. Without Lake
Okeechobee, the city had trou-
ble replenishing its water sup-
ply
"Changing a system cannot
be done overnight," Frankel
said. "We got a little bit blind-
sided."
City water managers decid-
ed to pump water from rock
pits, blended it with treated
sewage water, send it to the
well field and refill Clear
Lake. Customers were not
informed of the temporary fix,
but city officials said there was
no public risk
The phone at the city's pub-
lic utilities office rang unan-
swered Sunday. A call placed
to the mayor's office by The
Associated Press was not
immediately returned Sunday

National Guard

equipment

being replaced
Associated Press
CAMP BLENDING - The
Florida National Guard is begin-
ning to get $86 million in replace-
ment equipment for vehicles and
supplies left in Iraq and
Afghanistan, but a Florida sena-
tor said the resupply effort is "a
drop in the bucket"
Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla, said
the $1 billion Congress recently
approved to restore Guard equip-
ment around the nation is a "drop
in the bucket, but it's a step in the
right direction."
Nationally, the Guard needs
$38 to $50 billion for equipment
Florida needs about $340 million.
Roughly $61 million worth of
the equipment coming to Florida
includes about 120 Humvees,
more than 40 heavy, four-wheel
drive vehicles and 35 other spe-
cialized trucks. About 35 semi-
tractors and more than 120 trail-
ers of various sizes also are slated
to come, along with medical, com-
munications and other equip-














CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4A MONDAY, JUNE 18, 2007


HABITAT
Continued from Page 1A

four bedrooms and built for a
family that qualifies. Potential
families must be willing to com-
mit 500 hours of volunteer work
on Habitat homes, live in the
county for one year, meet income
requirements and have $1,500
for closing costs. People must
also agree to take five classes
that focus on budgeting, mort-
gages, being a good neighbor and
how to make basic home repairs
and maintain a home.
So far Habitat has helped
provide homes for about 50
adults and about 90 children,
Steele said.
"This is what it's all about,"
Steele said.
He can't begin to count the
number of groups that have
helped sponsor houses and
families since Habitat began.
Some people sponsor whole
houses, like the six Lutheran


TORTOISES
Continued from Page 1A

tortoise policy occurred last
year when FWC began the
process of upgrading the status
of gopher tortoises to threat-


How YOUR LAWMAKERS VOTED


Key-votes for the
week ending:
June 15


By Roll Call
Report Syndicate


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The Black Diamond Habitat Committee presented Terry Steele, center, from Habitat for Humanity of
Citrus County, with $60,000 to build another Habitat home for hardworking residents who can qual-
ify for the program and are willing to put In 500 hours of labor.


churches that dedicated a
home last week. Others, like
the Crystal River Women's
Club, give each house a mail-


ened and eliminated a require-
ment for developers and
builders to have tortoises test-
ed for Upper Respiratory Tract
Disease if they were to be
moved off site.
Many in the tortoise conser-
vation community felt
Tuesday's vote by the FWC


.box and fire extinguisher.
Sponsors include car dealer-
ships, grocery stores, politi-
cians, government officials and


commission to halt entomb-
ment of the animals was a huge
step forward in saving the
species. Animal rights advo-
cates considered the policy
inhumane.
Jim Bierly, a Sugarmill
Woods environmentalist who
has been involved in gopher


people who just want to help.
"We couldn't grow," Steele
said, "without these wonderful
people with us."


tortoise conservation for many
years, was jubilant after hear-
ing about the end to entomb-
ment.
"Oh, I think it's fantastic. I
never thought it would come,"
he said. "Just on Suncoast
Parkway 1, I think 12,000 were
killed."


cw
-Ut


0
C-
in!
at
=5
ON


0
cE
in=
=tDt


Homeland-Security Budget Members approved, 268-150, a
$36.3 billion Department of Homeland Security budget for
fiscal 2008. up 17 percent from 2007 levels. In part, the bill yes - -
restores civil seri:re lob protections and tightens security at
U S chemical plants A yes vote was to pass H.R 2638
Homeland-Security Overhead: Members rejected, 201-221.
a bid to freeze admirnstrative costs IOr Homeland Secunry
Secretary Michael Chertohf at rhe 2007 level A yes vote yes - -
backed a measure to cut the budget for Chertofl's, e-ecujve
operations by 19.9 million, or 11 percent (H P 2638'
Immigration Enforcement: Members, voted. 286-12- to
increase wf i9 I million fiscal 2008 spendring for a voluntary
PrOcgrar in which occal police departrrenti enforce teeral yes -
Immigration laws.. A yes vote backed the amenridmer.ci o.er
arguments. tha local police dislke the pr,:cgram tH ' 2:6381
Alberto Gonzales: Senators failed, 53.38, to get the 60', votes
needed to end a GOP filibuster and Iadance a "no-conii.
dence' resolution against Atty. Gen Alberto Gonr.ales A yes - no yes
vote backed a Democratic measure IS.IP 141 f3ulting
Gonzales lor his role in the U S attorney firing scandal
Virginia Coastal Drilling. Senators defeated. 3-44. an
amendment to H.R. 6 authoniring e ploration for natural gas
off the Virginia coaia it the state gues its apprjal A yes vote - no no
backed a measure that s.h.ughrt t1o breach rte federal moratc-
rlum on drilling oT' the Atlantic and Patrfic coasts.
Nuclear Power: Senalors fabled, 56-39. an amendment that
sought to allow utilities tO count nuclear-generateld lecltrcity
in meeting proposed tederal mandates tiha they produce at - no yes
least 15 percent oi their electricity torm renewable ,sources A
yei vote oppred the amendment to H.R 6.
� 2007 Thomas Reports Inc.
Telephone: (202) 737-1888


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic battery
arrest
Christopher L. Harris, 18, of
Crystal River, at 2:15 a.m. Sunday
on a charge of domestic battery.
Reports said he pushed and struck
his girlfriend.
He was held without bond.
DUI arrests
Israel E. Piedra, 29, of 5510 S.


Babalon, Homosassa, at 11:07 p.m.
Saturday on a charge of driving
while license suspended or revoked,
habitual offender.
Bond was set at $5,000.
Vernon H. Mondt, 25, of 2144
23rd Ave., St. Petersburg, at 9:48
p.m. Saturday on charges of driving
under the influence, possession of
less than 20 grams of marijuana and
possession of drug paraphernalia.
Reports said Mondt was swerving


into the oncoming lanes on U.S. 41
near Floral City, causing other driv-
ers to avoid head-on collisions.
Total bond was set at $2,000.
Roy Daniel Christ, 61, of 6125 W.
Riverbend Road, Dunnellon, at 8:55
p.m. Saturday on a charge of DUI.
Bond was set at $1,000.
Other arrests
Nicole Bethamy Tucker, 20, of
81 S. Columbus St., Beverly Hills, at
8:40 a.m. Sunday on a charge of


petit theft.
Bond was set at $250.
Richard Jesse Moralis, 32, of
4275 N. Modelwood, Beverly Hills,
at 2:38 a.m. Sunday on a charge of
resisting an officer without violence.
Bond was set at $500.
Adam Andrew Huntley, 18, of
1321 Lakeview, Invemess, at- 10:48
p.m. Saturday on a charge of aggra-
vated battery with a deadly weapon.
Reports said he cut a man with a knife.


Bond was set at $5,000.

Crystal River Police
Arrests
Anthony Wayne Dabney, 22, of
81 S. Adams St., Beverly Hills, at
6:39 p.m. Saturday on a warrant
charging him with battery.
Bond was set at $500.
George E. Moon, 18, of 1151 NW
19 No. 122, at 1:31 p.m. Saturday
on charges of possession of a con-


trolled substance, resisting or
obstructing an officer and petit theft.
Reports said officers were called
to the Crystal River Mall when a store
manager said that a man who stolen
a hat a few days earlier had retumed
and was wearing the same hat.
The manager identified Moon to
officers. Moon ran off; when officers
caught him, they discovered he was in
possession of cocaine, the report said.
Bond totaled $10,750.


CITRUS COUNTY WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


C -~ -r Ft U 3


r7CiU T Y


City H
Daytona Bch. 89
Ft. Lauderdale 87
Fort Myers 92
Gainesville 94
Homestead 89
Jacksonville 92
Key West 88
Lakeland 91
Melbourne 87


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
ptcldy
tstrm
ptcldy
ptcldy
tstrm
tstrm


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


MARINE OUTLOOK


Winds becoming southwest from 5 to 10
knots. Seas 1 to 2. Bay and inland waters
will have a light chop. Partly cloudy with a
chance of afternoon thunderstorms.


FOUR DAY OUTLOOK
r : TODAY Exclusive daily forecast by:
High: 91 Low: 71 r
Partly sunny, chance of afternoon
S.':^ . thunderstorms.
TUESDAY
High: 91 Low: 70
Hot and humid with mainly afternoon and
evening thunderstorms.

S WEDNESDAY
High: 89 Low: 71
Mostly cloudy with scattered showers and
thunderstorms.
THURSDAY
High: 89 Low: 70
Mostly cloudy with scattered showers and
thunderstorms.


Gulf water
temperature



820
Taken at Egmont Key


LAKE LEVELS
Location Sat. Sun. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.98 27.90 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.38 34.37 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 34.18 34.17 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 35.99 35.99 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data Is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Sunday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Sunday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year


94/65
100/63
71/90
80
+0

0.00 in.
2.48 in.
10.90 in.
20.64 in.


*As of 6 p.m.from Hernando County Airport
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder-
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE


Sunday at 3 p.m. 30.07 in.
DEW POINT
Sunday at 3 p.m. 62
HUMIDITY
Sunday at 3 p.m. 35%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees and grasses were light and
weeds were absent.
"Light - only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Sunday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


SUNSET TONIGHT ..........................8:31 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW....................6:32 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY.........................9:58 A.M.
MOONSET TODAY........................11:48 P.M.


BURN CONDITIONS

Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. A burn ban is in effect.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
Information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES

The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.


TIDES
Tide times are for the mouths of the rivers.
Monday Tuesday
High/Low High/Low High/Low High/Low
9:35 a/4:45 a 8:16 p/4:19 p 10:10 a/5:24 a 9:05 p/5:07 p
7:56 a/2:07 a 6:37 p/1:41 p 8:31 a/2:46 a 7:26 p/2:29 p
5:43 a/11:29 a 4:24 p/-- 6:18 a/12:34 a 5:13 p/12:17 p
8:45 a/3:44 a 7:26 p/3:18 p 9:20 a/4:23 a 8:15 p/4:06 p


Sunday
City H L Pcp.
Albany 85 59
Albuquerque 94 64
Asheville 86 55
Atlanta 90 71
Atlantic City 88 67
Austin 89 71 .90
Baltimore 89 62
Billings 67 51 .05
Birmingham 97 71
Boise 72 48
Boston 88 63
Buffalo 81 64
Burlington, VT 79 63 .03
Charleston, SC 90 68
Charleston, WV 93 56
Charlotte 90 62
Chicago 91 70
Cincinnati 95 63
Cleveland 84 69
Columbia, SC 91 70
Columbus, OH 93 63
Concord, N.H. 85 56
Dallas 82 701.21
Denver 97 56
Des Moines 89 70
Detroit 89 71
El Paso 96 69
Evansville, IN 93 67
Harrisburg 89 61
Hartford 87 60
Houston 81 73 .65
Indianapolis 93 71
Jackson 93 69
Las Vegas 10479
Little Rock 88 71 .19
Los Angeles 69 60
Louisville 95 68
Memphis 95 71
Milwaukee 80 67
Minneapolis 92 70
Mobile 92 69
Montgomery 96 68
Nashville 95 '62


Monday
Fcst H L
sunny 84 59
sunny 96 66
ptcldy 86 61
ptcldy *90 70
sunny 86 64
ptcldy 92 74
ptcldy 91 67
ptcldy 71 52
ptcldy 90 70
sunny 81 48
sunny 81 60
ptcldy 86 68
ptcldy 80 58
sunny 90 74
ptcldy 92 65
ptcldy 95 68
tstrm 92 65
ptcldy 94 70
ptcldy 90 67
sunny 96 70
ptcldy 93 70
sunny 82 51
ptcldy 88 75
ptcldy 81 53
tstrm 83 62
ptcldy 91 73
sunny 10172
tstrm 91 70
ptcldy 91 68
sunny 86 59
tstrm 89 75
ptcldy 91 68
tstrm 90 72
sunny 10378
tstrm 87 69
ptcldy 71 62
ptcldy 93 72
tstrm 91 73
tstrm 89 65
tstrm 80 58
tstrm 87 73
ptcldy 92 71
ptcldy 90 72


Sunday Monday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 89 72 tstrm 87 74
New York City 90 64 sunny 87 68
Norfolk 87 63 sunny 92 71
Oklahoma City 80 71 .22 tstrm 84 69
Omaha 88 70 tstrm 79 59
Palm Springs 10772 sunny 10767
Philadelphia 89 67 sunny 90 69
Phoenix 10880 sunny 10882
Pittsburgh 90 58 ptcldy 89 66
Portland, ME 86 53 sunny 77 54
Portland, Ore 63 54 ptcldy 73 50
Providence, R.I. 87 59 sunny 84 59
Raleigh 89 64 .09 sunny 96 70
Rapid City 92 58 ptcldy 74 51
Reno 88 58 sunny 92 57
Rochester, NY 85 63 ptcldy 87 65
Sacramento 95 54 sunny 92 60
St. Louis 94 74 tstrm 88 71
St. Ste. Marie 79 51 tstrm 84 60
Salt Lake City 83 65 sunny 85 63
San Antonio 88 71 ptcldy 92 76
San Diego 71 63 ptcldy 70 61
San Francisco 75 51 ptcldy 70 54
Savannah 84 67 sunny 93 72
Seattle 58 52 .01 ptcldy 68 50
Spokane 66 46 sunny 74 48
Syracuse 82 62 ptcldy 85 62
Topeka 88 70 tstrm 82 65
Washington 90 64 ptcldy 93 71
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 111 Goodyear, Ariz. LOW28 Estes Park, Colo.
WORLD CITIES


MONDAY
CITY HIL/SKY
Acapulco 85/79/ts
Amsterdam 71/50/sh
Athens 77/74/s
Beijing 88/71/pc
Berlin 77/61/pc
Bermuda 81/72/pc
Cairo 96/60/s
Calgary 64/45/pc
Havana 88/75/pc
Hong Kong 89/78/ts
Jerusalem 87/64/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


75/58/pc
65/52/sh
84/58/pc
73/55/ts
82/64/s
80/63/pc
74/57/sh
78/67/s
83/60/pc
58/48/sh
75/60/pc
84/66/pc
70/58/pc


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SCourthouse office
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2- "' 106 W. Main
= . . St., Inverness,
- j . j FL 34450
S....
No

Who's in charge:
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Tom Feeney................................ Production Director, 563-3275
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Crrus CouNnY (FL) CHRONIcLE



Ethanol


hits snag


at the


pumps

Associated Press
ALBANY, N.Y. - Steve
Williams does what millions of
American motorists can't: Fill
up on cheaper, ethanol-based
fuel from a local gas station.
Advocates, including farm-
ers and President Bush, have
offered E85 - a blend of 85
percent ethanol and gasoline
- as an affordable way to help
the nation grow itself toward
energy independence with a
cleaner-burning fuel. They
would like to see more people
like Williams, who filled up his
2003 Ford Explorer with E85
on a recent morning.
But there's a big hitch for
this fuel of the future. There
are too few pumps. While there
are about 5 million "flexible
fuel" vehicles on U.S. roads
that can handle E85, there are
only 1,145 public stations that
offer the fuel nationwide,
according to the National
Ethanol Vehicle Coalition.
The nation's roughly 167,000
retail gas outlets have been
slow to invest the tens of thou-
sands of dollars it takes to add
E85 - especially when certifi-
cation for the dispensers is in
limbo and the market is so
new. Many drivers don't even
know their recent-model flexi-
ble fuel cars can handle E85.
'"A lot of times a car is a per-
son's largest investment, so
they're cautious. 'I'm putting
alcohol in there? What!? Are
you kidding?'" said Christian
King, whose Mobil stations in
Albany and 70 miles north in
Warrensburg are the only ones
in New York offering E85 to
the public.
E85 is cheaper than regular
unleaded gasoline. But since
ethanol has less energy than
gasoline, fuel economy drops
10 percent to 15 percent when
cars run on E85.
Michelle Kautz, deputy
director of the ethanol coali-
tion, said E85 needs to be
priced proportionately less
than standard gasoline to pro-
vide the value to drivers. She
said ethanol prices tend to be
lower in the Midwest corn belt,
but higher on the coasts
because of transportation
costs. There are no pipelines
to transport ethanol, so the
fuel has to be trucked or
shipped by rail.
New York officials tried to
give E85 a boost through a
series of incentives last year
under former Gov. George
Pataki, who made ethanol a
signature environmental issue.
New York waived the roughly
40 cents a gallon in state gaso-
line taxes, offered to pay up to
50 percent of the installation
costs for station owners up to
$50,000, and approved a law
giving stations the legal right to
sell alternative fuels from out-
side distributors.
Despite all the effort, King
in May became the first station
owner in New York to offer
E85 to the general public.
Ralph Bombardiere of the
New York State Association of
Service Stations and Repair
Shops said his members have
been slow to sink money into
dispensers and tanks because
of "unknowns" in the market.
Complicating matters is that
Underwriters Laboratories
has been undergoing a lengthy
review since October to see if
E85 dispensers are worthy of
the UL seal. The widely
respected safety and stan-
dards lab was concerned that
ethanol could corrode fuel dis-
pensers.
Some larger retailers were
close to adding a significant
number of E85 fueling stations
before October, she said, but
"once they heard of the UL
decertification, they stopped."


OIL
Continued from Page 1A

pered by outages, could not
keep up with demand and
imports were down because of
greater fuel demand in Europe
and elsewhere. Despite stable
- even sometimes declining -
oil prices, gasoline prices
soared to record levels and
remain well above $3 a gallon.
Consumer advocates main-
tain the oil industry likes it that
way
"By creating a situation of
extremely tight supply, the oil
companies gain control over
price at the wholesale level,"
said Mark Cooper of the
Consumer Federation of
America. He argued that a
wave of mergers in recent
years created a refining indus-
try that "has no interest in cre-
ating spare (refining) capacity."
Only last year, the Energy
Department was told that
refiners, reaping big profits
and anticipating growing
demand, were looking at boost-
ing their refining capacity by
more than 1.6 million barrels a
day, a roughly 10 percent
increase. That would be
enough to produce an addition-
al 37 million gallons of gasoline
daily
But oil companies already
have scaled those exr usion
plans back by nearly 40 per-
cent More cancellations are
expected if Congress passes
legislation now before the
Senate calling for 15 billion
gallons of ethanol use annually
by 2015 and more than double
that by 2022, say industry and
government officials.
"These (expansion) deci-
sions are being revisited in
boardrooms across the refining
sector," said Charlie Drevna,
executive vice president of the
National Petrochemical and
Refiners Association.
With the anticipated growth
in biofuels, "you're getting
down to needing little or no
additional gasoline produc-
tion" above what is being made
today, said Joanne Shore, an
analyst for the government's
Energy Information
Administration.
In 2006, motorists used 143
billion gallons of gasoline, of
which 136 billion was pro-
duced by U.S. refineries, and
the rest imported.
Drevna, the industry lobby-
ist, said annual demand had
been expected to grow to about
161 billion gallons by 2017. But
Bush's call to cut gasoline
demand by 20 percent -
through a combination of fuel


MONDAY, JUNE 18, 2007 5A


Refinery expansions scaled back
The oil industry is scaling back its plans to expand refineries. More refinery
cancellations are expected if Congress passes legislation calling for 15
billion gallons of ethanol use by 2015 and more than double that by 2022.


U.S. oil refining
capacity*
18 million 17.3
barrels million
per day .


2

I 1
14' 0' oI
'97 '99 '03 '06 1980
* No data available for 1998


U.S. ethanol production Future ethanol re-
quirements under
5 billion gallons per year considered bill
4.8 billion. 40 billion gallons
4 peryear ,
|| 30 36 billionrl


1990 2000 2006


SOURCES: National Petrochemical and Refiners Association; Senate Energy AP
and Natural Resources Committee; Renewable Fuels Association


efficiency improvements and
ethanol - would reduce that
demand below what U.S.
refineries make today, he said.
"We will end up exporting
gasoline," said Drevna.
Asked recently whether
Chevron Corp. might build a
new refinery, vice chairman
Peter Robertson replied, "Why
would I invest in a refinery
when you're trying to make 20
percent of the gasoline supply
ethanol?"
Valero Corp., the nation's
largest refiner producing 3.3
million barrels a day of petro-
leum product, recently boosted
production capacity at its Port
Arthur, Texas, refinery by
325,000 barrels a day. But com-
pany spokesman Bill Day said
some additional expansions
have been postponed.
"That's not to say we've
changed our plans," Day said
in an interview. "But it's fair to
say we're taking a closer look at
what the president is saying
and what Congress is saying"
about biofuels. He said there's
a "mixed message" coming out
of Washington, calling for more
production but also for reduc-
ing gasoline demand.
"It's something that we have
to study pretty carefully," said
Day.
Ron Lamberty of the
American Coalition for
Ethanol said all the talk about
biofuels threatening gasoline
production is the "latest
attempt to blame ethanol on
Big Oil's failure to meet our
energy needs."
"The ethanol industry con-
tinues to grow while oil refin-
ers continue to make excuses
for maintaining their prof-
itable status quo," said
Lamberty
Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D.,
said consolidation of the oil
industry into fewer companies
has left them with no incentive
to expand refineries.
"It's a perverted system that
does not act as a free market
system would act," said
Dorgan. "If you narrow the
neck of refining, you actually
provide a greater boost to
prices which is a greater boost
to profitability."


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In the 1980s, Blumenthal
said at a recent hearing, refin-
ers were producing at 77.6 per-
cent of their capacity, "which
allowed for easy increases in
production to address short-


Associated Press
ConocoPhillips' Los Angeles Refinery is seen in a file photo. A push from Congress and the White
House for huge increases in biofuels such as ethanol is prompting the oil industry to scale back its
plans for refinery expansions. That could keep gasoline prices high, possibly for years to come.


Richard Blumenthal, the
attorney general of
Connecticut, wants Congress to
require refiners to maintain a
supply cushion in case of unex-
pected outages.

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CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


William
Barrett Sr., 85
BEVERLY HILLS
William C. Barrett Sr., 85,
Beverly Hills, died Saturday,
June 16, 2007.
Born in New Britain, Conn.,
to Joseph A. and Felina H.
( P henix )
Barrett, he
moved here in
1989 from
Southington,
Conn.
Mr. Barrett
was a member of Hope
Lutheran Church in Citrus
Springs and a veteran of World
War II, having served in the
U.S. Air Force as a sergeant
and control tower operator. He
received a letter from
President Harry S. Truman
extending his thanks for Mr.
Barrett's honorable service.
He was commander of CBI
(China, Burma and India).
He was a life member of
Edward W Penno Post No. 4864
in Citrus Springs, a member of
Parks and Recreation in New
Britain, Conn., from the mid
1960s through the 1970s and he
enjoyed traveling and the out-
doors.
He was preceded in death by
his son, William C. Barrett Jr.
He is survived by his wife of
61 years, Johanna Barrett of
Beverly Hills; sons, Gary
Barrett and his wife Melanie of
Coventry, Conn., Deane Barrett
and Wade Barrett, both of
Beverly Hills and Robin
Barrett and wife Cheryl of
Beverly Hills; and grandchil-
dren, Gary Barrett Jr. of
Chicago, Ill., Michael Barrett of
Bristol, Conn., and Dylan
Barrett and Joey Barrett, both
of Berlin, Conn.
Fero Funeral Home with
Crematory, Beverly Hills.

Courtland
Crawford. 92
LECANTO
Courtland L. Crawford, 92,
Lecanto, died Friday, June 15,
2007, at Avante of Inverness.
Born June 10, 1915, in
Carrollton, Ky., to Milton and
Rebbeca (Boughn) Crawford,
he moved to Lecanto in 1980
from Hamilton, Ohio.


M r
Crawford was
a retired den-
tal tech, and a
World War II
veteran, hav-
ing served in the U.S. Army
and was a recipient of the
Purple Heart. He was a mem-
ber of the VFW
He is survived by his daugh-
ter, Barbara Anne Charlton of
Lecanto and two grandchil-
dren.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory, Lecanto.

Darrel
Heckert, 59
INVERNESS
Darrel Heckert, 59,
Inverness, died Saturday, June
16, 2007, at the Hospice Care
Unit at Citrus Memorial
Hospital in Inverness.
Born Sept. 18, 1947, in
Ripley, WVa., he moved here in
1988 from Indianapolis, Ind.
Mr. Heckert was a truck driv-
er and enjoyed motorcycling
and restoring antique cars.
He was preceded in death by
his brother, Charles Larry
Heckert, on July 4, 2006.
He is survived by one son, Guy
Heckert of Tampa; four daugh-
ters, Charlene Heckert of
Hernando, Megan Heckert of
New Port Richey, Ronnie
Heckert of Inverness and
Susan Carr and husband Jeff of
Lewiston, Maine; his mother,
Jo A. Curtis of Hernando; three
sisters, Annette LaPlante and
husband Richard of Inverness,
Charlene LeClair and husband
Norman of Auburn, Maine, and
Lisa Gaines of Hernando; and
four grandchildren.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness.

Thomas
Jackman, 57
CRYSTAL RIVER
Thomas E.
Jackman, 57,
Crystal River,
died Saturday,
June 16, 2007,
at his home.
Born Nov.
22, 1949, in Detroit, Mich., he
moved to Crystal River two
years ago from Leesburg.


Mr. Jackman was a sales rep-
resentative for a Cingular call
center and a U.S. Army
Veteran, serving from 1967 to
1972.
He is survived by his wife,
Barbara A. Jackman of Crystal
River; his mother, Maxine V
Jackman of Westland, Mich.;
two sons, Shawn P Jackman
and Eric T. Jackman, both of
Holland; two sisters, Sue
Campion of Northville, Mich.,
and Nancy Jackman of
Finchburg, Wis.; one brother,
David Jackman of Detroit,
Mich.; and one grandson,
Calvin Jackman.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory, Lecanto.

David
MacDonald, 79
BEVERLY HILLS
David MacDonald, 79,
Beverly Hills, died Saturday,
June 17, 2007,
at the
Diamond
Ridge Health
&
Rehabilitation
Center in
Lecanto under the care of their
staff and Hospice of Citrus
County.
Born April 21, 1928, in
Sommerville, N.J., to David
and Daisy MacDonald, he
moved here in 1979 from
Hunterdon County, N.J.
Mr. MacDonald was a retired
purchasing agent in the plas-
tics manufacturing industry
and served in the U.S. Navy.
He was Protestant.
He was preceded in death by
his first wife, - Barbara
MacDonald, in 2001.
He is survived by his wife,
Shirley MacDonald; one broth-
er, Lee Bilanich of
Jacksonville; and one sister,
Jeanetta Gaskill of New Jersey.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness.

Marjorie Muir, 84
ALLENTOWN, PA.
Marjorie 0. Muir, 84,
Allentown, Pa., formerly of
Homosassa, died Saturday,
June 9, 2007, at her home.
Born in Philadelphia, Pa.,
she lived for many years in St.


Thomas, Virgin ,
Islands.
She is sur-
vived by her . .
husband ,
Robert C. Muir
Jr; three chil-
dren, JoAnne
Domke of Marjorie
M i a m i , Muir
Richard R.
Freihofer of
Parrish and Stanley H.
Freihofer of Southwest
Ranches and their families.
A memorial service is
planned for a later date in St.
Thomas, Virgin Islands.
Noto-Wynkoop Funeral
Home, Phillipsburg, N.J.

George
Murray, 77
BEVERLY HILLS
George (Dave) Murray, 77,
Beverly Hills, died Saturday,
June 16, 2007.
Born Sept. - ,'. ,
19, 1929, in
Shipschawana,
Ind., to Cecil
and Emily .' .
G a d s o n . .
Murray, he 4
came to
Beverly Hills
36 years ago George.
from Pinellas Murray
Park, where
he had lived
since 1958.
Mr. Murray
was a retired
heavy equip-
ment operator mechanic with
Caterpillar; Carroll
Contracting and Isaacson
Contracting; a World War II
U.S. Army veteran; a member
of American Legion Post No.
155; operated the Pencil Hut
at Howards Flea Market; was
a caller and taught square
dancing in Beverly Hills and
at the Key Training Center
and was a part of the Three
Musketeers on TV in St.
Petersburg teaching square
dancing.
He was preceded in death
by his wife of 55 years, Delores
D. Murray, on Aug. 26, 2004,
and three brothers, Jack,
Chuck and Norman.
He is survived by two sons,


Robert D. Murray and wife
Lisa of Beverly Hills, Dale
Murray and wife Donna of
Gainesville; a daughter,
Sandra Lenzen and husband
Dick of Holder; a brother,
Joseph Murray and wife Lois
of South Bend, Ind.; two sis-
ters, Betty Rife of Beverly Hills
and Jean Starkweather of
Elkhart, Ind.; nine grandchil-
dren, five great-grandchildren.
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory, Inverness.

Mary Smit, 74
INVERNESS
Mary Anne Smit, 74,
Inverness, died Thursday, June
14, 2007, in Inverness.
Born May 5, 1933, in East
Chicago, Ill., to Joseph Melvan
and Mary Habzanski, she
moved here in 2002 from
Tampa.
Mr. Smit was a homemaker.
She enjoyed gardening orchids
and playing cards with her
family
She was Protestant..
She was preceded in death
by two brothers.
She is survived by her hus-
band of 37 years, Martin Smit of
Inverness; three sons, John See
of Crystal River, Jerry Smit of
Brant Lake, N.Y, and Martin J.
Smit Jr. of Melbourne; two
daughters, Pamela Ruth See of
Chicago, Ill., and Denise Sue
Smit of Geneva, Ill.; and four
grandchildren, Mary K See,
Roberta See, Patricia Smit and
Jacob Smit.
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory, Inverness.

Mary Walsh, 100
BEVERLY HILLS
Mary Susan Walsh, 100,
Beverly Hills, died Saturday,
June 16, 2007, at the Hospice
House in Lecanto.
Born April 17, 1907, in Walsh,
Ontario, Canada, to William
and Susan (Durham) Walsh,
she came here in 2000 from
Bennington, Vt.
Mrs. Walsh retired from
Macy's Department Stores in
White Plains, N.Y, as a secre-
tary of personnel with 25 years
of service. Following her


retirement from Macy's, she
ran the Four Corners East
Antique Shop in Bennington,
Vt., for 25 years.
She was Presbyterian.
She and her late husband,
Walter Walsh, were married in
1935 in New Rochelle, N.Y.
She is survived by her son,
Richard Walsh and wife
Rosemarie of Citrus Hills; four
grandchildren, Geoffrey, Colin,
Jennifer and Melanie; and one
great-grandson, Jacob.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness.
Funeral NOTICES
George Murray. The Service
of Remembrance for Mr George
(Dave) Murray, 77, Beverly Hills,
will be at 11 am. Wednesday,
June 20, 2007, at the Beverly
Hills Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes with the Rev. Gordon
Condit and the Rev Larry Geiger
officiating. Interment will follow
at the Florida National
Cemetery, Bushnell, with full
military honors. Friends may
call from 4 to 7 p.m. Tuesday at
the Beverly Hills Chapel.
Friends who wish may send
memorials to Hospice of Citrus
County at Lecanto.
Mary Smit The Service of
Remembrance for Mrs. Mary
Anne Smit, 74, Inverness, will be
at 1 p.m. Wednesday, June 20,
2007, at the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes. Friends
may call from 11 am. until the
hour of service Wednesday, June
20,2007, at the Inverness Chapel
of Hooper Funeral Homes.
Cremation will be under the
direction of Hooper Crematory,
Inverness.
Mary Walsh. A celebration of
life memorial service for Mrs.
Mary Susan Walsh, 100,
Beverly Hills, will be at 10 a.m.
Wednesday, June 20, 2007, at
the Hospice House in Lecanto
with Hospice Chaplain Larry
Geiger officiating. Traditional
funeral services will be Friday
from the Horn & Thomas
Funeral Home in Pawling,
N.Y, with burial to follow at
the St. Johns Cemetery in
Pawling, N.Y In lieu of flowers,
memorials are suggested to
Hospice of Citrus County for
Camp Good Hope, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL 34464.


'Beautillions' offer black males rites of passage


Associated Press


RICHMOND, Va. - Just 30
minutes before the Phi Beta
Sigma "beautillion" starts, a year
of planning for the boys' glitter-
ing debutant ball threatens to
unravel: What should be a trio of
white-gowned female escorts is
only a duo.
That could mean one "beau"
won't have a partner for the intri-
cate ballroom dance the boys
have practiced for weeks.
"I think it's gonna turn out
OK," organizer Elmer Seay Jr
says.
There's more at stake than a
fancy dance. The beaus in white
tails and glinting white shoes are
young black men, honor roll stu-
dents bound for college.
Seay has challenged statistics
showing young black males bat-
tling grim rates of joblessness,
poverty and unintended father-
hood. He has arranged career
forums and corralled the teens
into dance classes and etiquette
lessons.
Most important, he and his fra-
ternity brothers have offered
genuine concern for their future.
By evening's end, beaus
Jarratt Day, Mark Turner II and
Kevin Wyatt will emerge as
upright, goal-oriented men.
The Links, a Washington-
based social group for affluent
black youths, has spent 50 years
hosting black-aimed coming-out
functions - cotillions for girls
and increasingly popular beau-
tillions for boys as young as 9.
'African-Americans weren't
permitted to participate in the
cotillions that were held mainly
by white, aristocratic social
clubs," explains Janet Walker,
head of The Links.
Today, these events draw
black parents seeking opportu-
nities to highlight the good in
their sons.
'A lot of people are just fed up
with the way that black men are
portrayed in the media," Walker
says.
In addition, beautillion partic-
ipants get scholarships, and con-
tacts.
"If you want to go to fraterni-
ties or college and stuff, this is a
step," says 17-year-old Julian


Carol's
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352 746-7595


Associated Press
Mark Turner places a medal on his son, Mark Turner II, marking the right of passage from boyhood
to manhood during Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity's Sixth Annual Scholarship Beautillion, a male debu-
tante ball on Sunday at the Wyndham Hotel in Richmond, Va. Beautillions are one of several rites of
passage taking place across the nation giving black males positive reinforcement.


Alford.
In a studio, Kevin Wyatt claps
and tumbles to African music as
the beaus practice a celebratory
dance.
There's plenty to celebrate.
For starters, no more stiff ball-
room moves.
"The type of dancing we were
doing? Boring, I'm not going to
lie to you," the 17-year-old says
after practice.
His ball cap tilted to the side, a
tiny diamond dotting his ear,
Wyatt is an academic-minded
baseball player who volunteers
with children. But he worries


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about his future.
"I fear that I'm going to give up
and not keep going," he says, as
the studio clears.
While others celebrated the
desegregation of schools in the
'50s, Charles Crute Jr. remem-
bers an uncle warning that
blacks would abandon their


sense of community.
"I've grown and matured to
understand what he meant-we
lost ourselves," the 58-year-old
former detective says as six pro-
fessional black men with him
agree.
It's five days before the beau-
tillion, and the men of Phi Beta


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Sigma have met to iron out
details.
They're multi-degreed, repre-
senting decades of black male
success. They've paved the way
and worry today's black men
have fallen behind.
"We need black men to look at
the home and at the children
that are theirs," says James
Quash Sr, 84.
The men created the
Richmond beautillion in 2001,
mimicking an event they saw in
Washington.
The idea is to recognize young
black males who are doing right,
while giving them an official cer-
emony that says it's time to grow
up.
They've groomed 42 boys and
seen them off to schools like
Howard University in
Washington and' Morehouse
College, in Atlanta.
Still, what started as 16 poten-
tial beaus this year shrank to
eight by the second group meet-
ing. And five of the remaining
group - including Julian Alford
,with his two jobs, church and
wrestling - were just too busy to
commit
On the night of the beautillion,
Seay can finally relax as the
third young woman arrives. Soft


string music starts .and the
starched beaus take the spot-
light, twirling their dates in dain-
ty pirouettes.
As Mark Turner II finesses his
way across the floor, his father
watches with pride. The elder
Turner drove eight hours from
Atlanta to attend, one of several
recent gestures to smooth a rela-
tionship strained by distance
and tension with his former wife.
"He's going to start to deal
with things that unfortunately
his mother can't help him with,"
the elder Turner says.
Mark, 18, a tennis player with
a 3.7 grade point average, says
things have been "in the middle"
since his dad began visiting
more. "I was open to the oppor-
tunity, but bitter," he says.
As the music winds down, the
three fathers line up across from
their sons. Mark holds a blue
candle, his father a medallion, as
a man in African garb explains
the significance of the ceremony
transforming three boys into
three men.
One by one, each dad offers
his son words of encouragement
Turner hangs the medallion
around his son's neck, whispers
"I love you," and hugs the new-
found man.


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Too many hares
MILAN, Italy - Wild hares at
Milan's Linate airport seem to have
only one thing on their mind, and
their excessive mating and growing
numbers have blocked takeoffs,
landings and radar systems.
Officials on Sunday mounted a
daylight raid to keep these furry
creatures off the runways, part of a
twice-annual capture to keep the
airport population under control.
"There are always hares at the
airport, the problem is that lately
there were too many, and they
cause problems with the radar and
sensors that monitor the airport,"
said Nicoletta Angioni, spokes-
woman for SEA, the company that
operates Milan's airports.
Blowing whistles and waving
their arms frantically, some 200 vol-
unteers spooked the hares out of
their holes and into waiting nets.
The animals - 57 hares and four
wild rabbits - were put in wooden
crates and transferred to a wildlife
preserve, officials said.
Usually, the hare hunts take
place overnight, when the airport's
runways aren't terribly busy, but
because there were so many hares
this season, officials mounted a
daylight capture so volunteers
could better catch their bounding
prey.
The airport reopened after a
hare delay of just a few hours.
Landscape bandit
ANAHEIM, Calif. - There was
the Miami Vice bandit, the Fanny
Pack bandit, even the Band-Aid
bandit - all named for memorable
outfits or unique characteristics that
bank tellers recalled after the
holdup.
Now police are looking for a rob-
ber named for his smell: the
"Landscape bandit."
"He smells like dirt - that's what
people always remember," said
Anaheim police Sgt. Tim Schmidt.
"It's not like he hasn't bathed in
month. It's just he's been outside
working in the dirt."
The man, who wears a wide-
brimmed hat, has robbed three
banks in Southern California since
April and two out of three tellers
mentioned his distinctive odor to
investigators.
The most recent heist took place
on June 4 at the Fullerton
Community Bank in Anaheim, and
was recorded on tape by security
cameras.
The photos show a heavyset
man about 5-feet-6 and dressed in
a green jacket passing a note to
tellers.
Police say unique names help
law enforcement officers recognize
potential suspects and inspire the
general public to call in with tips.
Try, try again
JAIPUR, India -A 73-year-old
man who failed his 10th grade high
school exams for the 39th time
vowed Friday to try again next year
in the hopes that an education will
improve his job and marriage
prospects.
Shivcharan Jatav, a farmer from
the desert state of Rajasthan in
western India, had no formal edu-
cation as a child. He has been try-
ing to pass the exams since 19Q9,
when an army recruiter told him it
would improve his chances of
being accepted into the military.


z-j -


Associated Press
A hare runs on Linate airport runway as it tries to escape during a three-hour hunt that was carried
out at the airport in Milan, Italy, in the early hours of Sunday. The airport was forced to close between
5 and 8 a.m. and 12 flights were rescheduled, as 200 volunteers used some 4 kilometers of nets in
order to capture the hares and move them to a safe haven.


"Since then I have been trying to
pass this examination, but without
any success," Jatav said, days
after receiving the bitter news that
he had failed again.
Jatav passed only one subject
- the ancient language of Sanskrit
- and he said he scored just 103
out of a total of 600 in the exami-
nations.
Even though he is too old to join
the.army he has kept at it, hoping
to become a more eligible bache-
lor.
"I could not get married as the
girls told my family members that I
was not properly educated. It's my
fate that deprived me of education
and a married life," he said.
Still, he has no regrets. "I am a
happy and contented person," said
Jatav.
Safe snake
RAYVILLE, La. - The chief
deputy of Richland Parish didn't
just capture the 8-foot snake that
had stopped highway traffic. He
recognized it.
That let Chief Deputy Terry
Thompson reunite the one-eyed
boa constrictor with its owner, who
had lost it when he moved to
Rayville in March.
Thompson said that when he got
to the spot where the snake had
been spotted Friday morning, he
was told that a driver had tried to
run over the boa and shoot it.
A man and his wife stuck around
to make sure the snake did, too.
One look told Thompson it was-
n't poisonous. "I caught it by the
tail, pulled it out, and picked it up
and put it into a pillowcase," he
said.
Then he looked it in the face and
realized they'd been introduced.
Last year, Thompson said, Chad
Foote brought the snake into inves-
tigators' office to show it off. Foote
had recently bought it at a good
price because of the missing eye.
After a few phone calls, Foote
and his long-lost pet were reunited.
"He said he never thought he
would see his snake again,"
Thompson said.
'Cream of Wheat' man
LESLIE, Mich. -A man widely
believed to be the model for the
smiling chef on Cream of Wheat


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boxes finally has a grave marker
bearing his name.
Frank L. White died in 1938, and
until this week, his grave in
Woodlawn Cemetery bore only a
tiny concrete marker with no name.
On Wednesday, a granite grave-
stone was placed at his burial site.
It bears his name and an etching
taken from the man depicted on
the Cream of Wheat box.
Jesse Lasorda, a family
researcher from Lansing, started
the campaign to put the marker
and etching on White's grave.
"Everybody deserves a head-
stone," Lasorda told the Lansing
State Journal. He discovered that
White was born about 1867 in
Barbados, came to the U.S. in
1875 and became a citizen in
1890.
When White died Feb. 15, 1938,
the Leslie Local-Republican
described him as a "famous chef'
who "posed for an advertisement of
a well-known breakfast food."
Old dogs, new home
TOKYO - Japan has a new
nursing home for a swiftly graying
population - dogs.
The country's first nursing home
for dogs comes with round-the-
clock monitoring by veterinarians
and a team of puppies to play with
the aging pooches to help them
keep fit, a pet products company
said Wednesday.
Owners pay $800 a month to
keep their dogs at the Soladi Care
Home, which opened Friday,
according to a joint release by
Soladi Co. and the Endo Veterinary
clinic in Tochigi, eastern Japan.
The home can accept 20 dogs
at a time and will feed them spe-
cially fortified food.
Researchers say that a boom in
pet ownership in Japan, coupled
with better health care and a more
balanced diet, has led to a surge in
elderly pets in Japan.
That has spurred doting owners
to turn to vitamins, aromatherapy
and even acupuncture to help their


A box of Cream of Wheat is
shown Thursday in Detroit. The
man widely believed to be the
model for the Cream of Wheat
man finally has a grave marker
bearing his name and image.
Frank L. White, who died in
1938, may have been an
American icon.

companions through their old age.
Stadium sitter
YORK, Pa. -A high school stu-
dent warmed all 5,200 seats in a
new minor league baseball stadium
before its inaugural game.
It took Todd McCormick about
three hours to sit in each seat of
Sovereign Bank Stadium, the new
home of the York Revolution, on
Friday. That's about 29 seats per
minute.
McCormick, 17, of Springfield
Township, started at 11:50 a.m. in
Row N in right field. He finished
around 3 p.m., two hours before
gates opened for the game against
the Newark Bears.
"It'll hurt in the morning, but right
now I don't feel anything,"
McCormick said in the middle of
his quest.
"The Revolution said this would
serve two purposes: It'll bring luck
and I'll get to check all of the
chairs."
The Revolution ended up losing
to the Bears, 7-4.


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Natalie Meilinger holds her son Jack, 3 months, in their Palatine,
II., home near a baby monitor that's receiving a transmission from
the space shuttle this week. Since June 10, Meilinger's baby mon-
itor has been picking up black-and-white video from inside the
space shuttle Atlantis.


Spaced out
PALATINE, Ill. -An elementary
school science teacher in this
Chicago suburb doesn't have to
turn on the news for an update on
NASA's space mission. She just
turns on her video baby monitor.
Since Sunday, one of the two
channels on Natalie Meilinger's
baby monitor has been picking up
black-and-white video from inside
the space shuttle Atlantis. The
other still lets her keep an eye on
her baby.
"Whoever has a baby monitor
knows what you'll usually see,"
Meilinger said. "No one would ever
expect this."
Live video of the mission is avail-
able on NASA's Web site, so it's
possible the monitor is picking up a
signal from somewhere.
"It's not coming straight from the
shuttle," NASA spokeswoman
Brandi Dean said. "People here
think this is very interesting and you
don't hear of it often - if at all."
Doug Phelps, a member of an
amateur radio club in neighboring
Schaumburg, has an explanation.
His organization, the Illinois
chapter of the Motorola Amateur
Radio Club, rebroadcasts NASA
video as a public service. It is likely
the monitor is picking up the video
because amateur radio operates
on the same frequency as baby
monitors.
Members of Phelps' club have
picked up audio from baby moni-
tors in the past.
"If you had a receiver in the right
frequency, anybody in the public
can pick up this signal," he said.
Wildfire T-shirts
FARGO, Ga. - Firefighters from
across the nation have helped bat-
tle massive wildfires in the
Okefenokee Swamp this spring.
Now they've got a souvenir.
To raise money for new fire
trucks, the tiny city of Fargo has
been selling hundreds of T-shirts
geared toward those fighting the
swamp blaze, which has been


dubbed the "Bugaboo."
The shirt shows a fire plow and
helicopter among flames and
swamp critters. It says: "The Big
Sweaty Bugaboo - Teamwork Is
Not An Option, It's A Lifestyle."
Mayor Robbie Lee said the city
saw a fundraising opportunity when
hundreds of firefighters began
arriving in southern Georgia two
months ago to help fight wildfires
that started near Waycross.
Lisa Johnson, Fargo's city clerk,
said Friday that she has been
amazed at the response. Since the
$20 shirts went on sale May 25,
the city has raised more than
$17,000.
Lee said he does not believe T-
shirt sales alone will raise $70,000
for a new wildland fire truck or
$150,000 for a 3,000-gallon fire
tanker. He said the city will do the
best it can with whatever money it
can raise.
Fargo, population 380, relies on
a volunteer fire department with
just two trucks that are more than
25 years old and prone to break-
downs, Lee said.
Circus parade
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.
- The circus came to town Friday,
but a few wayward animals put on
their own show.
Four zebras and three horses
from the Ringling Bros. and
Bamum & Bailey Circus took an
unscheduled run on a road just
outside World Arena, where the cir-
cus was performing this weekend.
"Some people were in cars.
Some people were on foot. We
had a little parade going on," said
Carrie Coleman, veterinary techni-
cian for the circus.
The animals were being walked
into the arena from a corral in the
parking lot to practice when noise
from nearby Interstate 25 spooked
the zebras, Coleman said.
The animals were recaptured
unharmed, and no one was hurt,
officials said.
- From wire reports


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An Afghan police investigation team inspects the ruins of a police bus Sunday in Kabul, Afghanistan after a bomb blast.


BOMB
Continued from Page 1A

Zemeri Bashary, the
spokesman for the Interior
Ministry, said late Sunday that
35 were killed and 52 wounded
in the blast. Karzai's office said
22 police instructors died, indi-
cating that 13 of the dead were
civilians.
At least one person survived
the 8:10 a.m. bus blast. Nasir
Ahmad, 22, a janitor at the
police training academy, was
sitting in the back of the bus
when the bomb exploded.
Speaking from a hospital bed
where he was recovering from
wounds to his face and hands,
he said: "There were between
30 to 40 police instructors in
the bus."
It was the only full sentence
he managed to utter before
stopping from exhaustion.
At the entrance to the hospi-
tal, a blue plastic trash can
overflowed with the bloodied
shoes and sandals of victims.
Interior Minister Zarar
Ahmad Muqbal said initial
indications were that a suicide
bomber boarded the bus as it
stopped to pick up police
instructors at an open-air bus
station in central Kabul. Such a
suicide attack would represent
a sizable jump in lethality com-
pared to more typical Taliban
suicide bombings, which often
kill far fewer people.


Bus bomb attack
At least 35 people were killed Sun-
day when a bomb ripped through
a police bus in Kabul in the dead-
liest insurgent attack in Afghanistan
since the U.S. led invasion began
in 2001.
STAJIK.
TURK

Kabul
AFGHAN. PAK

,) ' 1' 0 m i
0 100 km
SOURCE: ESRI AP

Maj. John Thomas, a
spokesman for NATO's
International Security
Assistance Force, said it was
too early to tell if the attack was
a sign of more lethal bombings
to come, or heavier involve-
ment by al-Qaida. NATO com-
manders have long predicted a
rise in suicide attacks this year.
A civilian bus was driving
just in front of the police vehi-
cle and was damaged, when the
bomb went off. A police officer
at the scene said the civilian
bus' position likely prevented
more civilian casualties.
Afghan government officials,
police and army soldiers are
commonly targeted by insur-
gents trying to bring down
Karzai's U.S.-backed govern-
ment, and buses carrying


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Afghan police and army sol-
diers are common targets.
In May, a remote-control
bomb hit an Afghan army bus
in Kabul, killing the driver and
wounding 29 people. In
October, a bomb on a bicycle
exploded as a police bus went
by in Kabul, wounding 11. Last
July, a remote-controlled bomb
blew up near an Afghan army
bus in downtown Kabul,
wounding 39 people on board.
Police seem to be taking
notice, and one officer suggest-
ed Afghans are beginning to
equate police with danger
rather than safety.
"We are afraid now that the
police are increasingly coming
under attack," said Allah
Bubani, a 22-year-old recent
graduate of the police training
academy who said he likely
knew some of the instructors
killed in the attack. "Nowadays
the ordinary people are scared
of the police, because they fear
an attack on the force would
also harm them."
At least 307 Afghan police,
army or intelligence personnel
have been killed in violence so
far this year through June 15,
according to an AP tally of fig-
ures from the U.S., U.N., NATO
and Afghan authorities.
The European Union on


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Sunday took coD
Germany of the WV
sion to train Afghan
EU, which will hav
law enforcement
experts at the Kal
center, said the a
nothing to diminish
mination to mainta
port for the constru
Afghan police force
Sunday's death to
that of a September
car bombing that ki
ple and wounded 16
Insurgency-relate
has killed more tha
ple in Afghanistan
mostly insurgents, i
an AP count based
from U.S., NATO,
Afghan officials.
Dr. Asadullah, a h
er at Jamhuriat ho
two Pakistanis, tw
and one Korean na
among those wound
At one point S
Interior Minister a
tal director revised
death toll of 35 dow
a government offi
Health Ministry s
condition he not b
because of the sens
matter said the g
may have been tryi
play the severity of


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Experts: More


roadblocks ahead


for Gitmo trials


Los Angeles Times
GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba
- Inside of a week, a U.S. fed-
eral court, retired Gen. Colin
Powell and two military judges
assigned to the war-crimes tri-
bunals here dealt serious
blows to the Bush administra-
tion's efforts to detain and
prosecute terror suspects.
Some legal scholars and ana-
lysts predict more obstacles to
trials for any of the estimated
385 foreign prisoners at the
-l yU.S. military detention com-
-- ' pound here in Southern Cuba.
But others believe that the
F - - system could be salvaged with
repairs to its rules and proce-
.. . jdures and if the prisoner popu-
,-.- lation was reduced to just
those likely to face charges.
There are an estimated 300
prisoners who authorities have
Associated Press no plans to prosecute.
"The government talks about
(the Guantanamo prisoners)
ntrol from being the worst of the worst, but
Western mis- obviously not all of them are
i police. The like that," said Amos N. Guiora,
e 200 police, Case Western Reserve Univ-
and justice ersity law professor and direc-
bul training tor of the Institute for Global
attack "does Security Law and Policy
h our deter- Guiora proposes that the
ain our sup- U.S. government create a
action of the domestic court to try terrorism
*." cases, one that would give
ill exceeded defendants most but not all of
r 2002 Kabul the U.S. constitutional protec-
illed 30 peo- tions of federal criminal
67. courts, along with rights due
ed violence prisoners of war, as recognized
n 2,400 peo- by the Geneva Conventions.
n this year, "Part of this process would
according to imply the release of individu-
I on figures als who need not be there,"
U.N. and Guiora said. '"At the end of the
day we should be left with just
health work- those who do pose a threat to
)spital, said national security."
o Japanese Guiora and others have ar-
;tional were gued that the Bush administra-
ded Sunday tion's insistence that it has the
unday, the right and responsibility to detain
nd a hospi- any foreigner it designates an
1 the initial enemy combatant for the dura-
vn to 24, but tion of its open-ended war on
cial in the terrorism has damaged the im-
peaking on age of the United States abroad.
e identified "The international commu-
itivity of the nity is very upset with the fact
government
ng to down- A /
the attack


we've said we can hold a citizen
of the world indefinitely with-
out charges or trial," said Scott
Silliman, a retired Air Force
colonel and judge advocate
now heading Duke University
Law School's Center on Law,
Ethics and National Security.
Silliman added that ignoring
the international chorus of.
criticism could dissuade allies
from contributing troops or
backing for the wars in Iraq.
and Afghanistan.
Jeff Addicott, another for-
mer military judge now head-
ing the Center for Terrorism
Law at St. Mary's University in
San Antonio, agrees that the
number of detainees poses a
public relations problem for
the U.S. government.
But he believes some of the
blame lies with those countries
that have refused to take'
responsibility for their citizens:
"We've got 80 people we've"
cleared for release and want to
move out, but their govern-
ments won't take them back,"
Addicott said. Many of the oth-
ers unlikely to be prosecuted
may be rehabilitated and
released once Guantanamo
detention authorities judge
them to pose no further threat
to U.S. security, he said.
The main obstacle to bring-
ing terror suspects to justice,
Addicott said, was the disagree-
ment between the United
States and most other countries
as to whether the war on terror
should be governed by the laws
of war defined by the Geneva
Conventions, which never envi-
sioned nonstate combatants
like those in al-Qaida.
"We're trying to fit a square
peg into a round hole. We never
used the laws of war in this kind
of a situation," Addicott said.
The commissions were put on
indefinite hold last week when
two military judges exposed a
technical glitch in the jurisdic-
tional rules that will require the
Pentagon to re-evaluate any
potential defendant to deter-
mine if he was an -"unlawful
alien enemy combatant" or a sol-
dier in his national armed forces
entitled to defend himself


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1OA MONDAY. JUNE 18, 2007


Cut gas tax
Rescind the gas tax increase
and I will buy gas here instead
of buying everything in
Hernando County.
Cut the sheriff's budget in
half, elect a new sheriff like
the one in Maricopa County,
Ariz., to replace the politician
we now have. Public safety
will improve and property
taxes could be cut in half.
Maurice Krugman
Homosassa

Hurting people
I've got to wonder if you are
working on a screen play for
"Hostel III." The two letters
leading the Saturday, June 9
"Letters to the Editor" section
seem like a good start.
The first from H.T Morgan
of Homosassa not only lists the
gory details of a murder but
then requests the other news
agencies stoop to the level of
Fox and repeat these details
and supply even more gory
details for his reading gratifi-
cation. "More coverage,
please" he begs. Does he want
color photos, too? I am not
going to address the racial
overtones of his letter.
The second from Bob
Womack of Crystal River
extols the virtues of torture
and the supposed information
that can be extracted only by
torture. He obviously has little
understanding of the psycholo-
gy of torture and the moral
implications of its use.
He himself says "the infor-
mation can often be validat-
ed." This implies a second or
third source for verification. If
they verify the information
without torture, why not go to
them first? If you have to tor-
ture the second or third
source and the information
doesn't match, and it won't,
who is lying?
Ask anyone who has been
tortured and they'll tell you
that they either told the tortur-
er anything they wanted to
know, true or not, just to make
the pain stop or told them
nothing at all just to prove
they can't be broken. Either
way, the information is next to
useless.
Womack asks why people
continue to torture other peo-
ple if it doesn't work. The rea-
son is simple, people like hurt-
ing other people. They like
having a sense of power over
other people, the ability to
inflict pain without them-
selves suffering consequences.
This is the real reason for tor-
ture; any information gained
is secondary.
I ask Womack if he is aware
of any valuable information
that has been obtained by tor-
ture that was not available by
any other means? If not, how
does he know it works?
Oh yeah, funny joke, make
them listen to rock and roll
records ... ha, ha ...
Oscar R. Fick Jr.
Beverly Hills

Who's the clean one?
"Keep dogs out" (Emma
LoCastro, June 11) referring to
dog owners, who would occa-
sionally like to dine out with
their canine in tow, as "trou-
ble-makers" is narrow-minded
and misinformed.
SRestaurant owners who
choose to permit dogs on the


premises will do so and dogs
would be welcome in outdoor
eating sections only as long as
they are restrained. As a mul-
tiple dog owner who believes
my spoiled and much-loved
critters are much cleaner, cer-
tainly better behaved, and def-
initely more mannerly than
most restaurant patrons, I
don't understand why this mat-
ter has become such a big
issue.
I've been to local establish-
ments where customers were
enjoying their meals as their
quiet dogs rested at their feet.
At these same establishments,
there were annoying people
talking on cell phones, wear-
ing hats indoors, displaying
dirty, bare feet in flip-flops
and hairy armpits in sleeve-
less shirts, along with scream-
ing, undisciplined children
disrupting the entire restau-
rant!
Servers would no more "be
obligated to keep a watchful
eye on one's pet" than on
one's child.
As far as sanitation, I won-
der about kitchens at restau-
rants Ms. LoCastro has
inspected. Mold, spills, rotten
food, roaches, flies, rodents
and maggots plus grease,
grime, and human hair (no
nets required) are frequently
commonplace at restaurants
with an outward appearance
of cleanliness. There're also
the unappetizing porous,
chipped cups and plates, lip-
stick and dried food on


washed dishes and silver-
ware.
Personally, I'd take my
chances eating next to "Fido,"
breathing his doggie air with
pleasure. It's easy to figure out
which is more of a risk - the
germs and crud that's obvious
and certain indoors behind
those batwing doors and at
every table or the companion-
ship of a well-behaved dog
beneath his master's dinner
table outdoors.
Joanie Welch
Inverness

Trailers trashed
"The FEMA trailer we were
standing in didn't have an air
conditioner. The people who
used to live there stole it. They
also took all the lights, every
appliance, all the locks and
door knobs. They even took
the toilet.
"Turns out, almost one out
of every 10 FEMA trailers
loaned rent-free to victims of
hurricanes Katrina and Rita
are returned so badly trashed
they can't be used again,
according to FEMA. The gov-
ernment then tries to get what
it can at auction. Trailers
(what's left of them) that cost
taxpayers upwards of $20,000
sometimes sell for just pen-
nies on the dollar.
'"And what happens to the
former trailer occupants who
trashed them? So far, not
much. FEMA has the authority
to send a letter demanding


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OPINION


Two phone books
I, too, would like to know
how come I got two phone
books again this year. I also
got two last year. What a waste.
Another junket
What is this little junket
some of the county commis-
sioners are going on again? You
would think they know their job
by now and stop spending tax-
payers' dollars for their little
trips in the name of furthering
knowledge. And needless to
say, you can guess which com-
missioners are going. They bet-
ter realize they're going to
need these tax dollars for the
upcoming lawsuit.
Big business
After my 55 years on this
Earth, one thing I've learned
about in this country: It does-
n't matter if they're Democrat
or Republican, they work for
big business and big business
only. My whole life, government
has worked for big business
and never for the people. But
now the Senate is taking up
energy legislation. In the
1970s, when we had the gas
crunch, the federal government
said we were not going to rely
on foreign oil. Now two-thirds
of our oil is foreign oil, so they
never did nothing about it ...
People are sick of paying over
$3 a gallon for gas, and the oil
companies are gouging us.
Now the Senate's taking up a
bill that would require cars to
get more mileage, which we
should have done in the '70s.


payment for damages, that is,
if the offending residents can
be found. FEMA doesn't-have
the authority to prosecute and
officials say trying to punish
someone for ruining a trailer
may cost more than it's
worth." - David Mattingly,
CNN correspondent.
Folks, please contact your
elected officials and demand
action on this waste of taxpay-
er money!
Tom Morgan
Homosassa

Make leaders listen
It is amazing that our lead-
ers have no interest in repre-
senting the interests of the
people who have helped them
get elected.
A majority of Americans do
not want amnesty for illegal
immigrants. Why would any
sane American reward law-
breakers?
Let us call and tell our
"leaders" Bush and the sena-
tors to listen and represent the
citizens of this great country
and not the interests of people
of other nations!
Minesh Baxi
Homosassa


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Wrong places Q |
Two things in the
Wednesday, June 13,
Sound Off: "Gazebo
hangout" and "Hard
to find." Under f
"Gazebo hangout,"
they say if you're
going to do a crime, CALL
do it in front of the
police. Maybe they 563.
don't know what jay-
walking is. Why don't
we get like The Villages and put
an overpass so even the old
people can get over to the
Cooter park? That's just a
thought. Now "Hard to find,"
maybe they're looking in all the
wrong places, to quote part of
a song - I think it was coun-
try/western. So you guys have
a great, great day....To the lady
at the Crystal River Mall on
Wednesday last week....at
about 3 p.m., supposing that
she did observe the person
who, in her mind, was acting
strange, I might just say:
Maybe she should get a life
and stay out of things if she
doesn't have all the facts.


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CITRUS COUN'Iy (FL) CHRONICLE

I They should have had
it by the '90s to
where the average car
got 35 mpg ... but
They never did any-
thing because the car
companies paid them
off.
Cancel it!
g579 I was calling about
) the landscaping proj-
ect being nixed on
(County Road) 486. I
think that the board did well in
stopping a landscaping project
in view of the fact that many of:
the county-maintained roads
where people attempt to com-
mute by bicycle or walk don't
even have shoulders, and peo-
ple on roads like Rock Crusher
Road and Citrus Avenue are
often taking their life in their
hands.
Really, we need money put
into projects that provide pub-
lic safety. Beautification could
be done by other concerned
citizens who may want to do
plantings in those areas, like
medians.
Defending Europe
This is in answer to Betty
from Holland, who called in to
say we should keep our
defense missiles out of Europe
because Europeans like peace,
not war. As I remember, a cer-
tain country in Europe liked
war so much they invaded
Holland and other European
countries - not once, but
twice - and both times, we
Americans had to fight those
countries' wars for them.
Maybe next tire Europe gets
into trouble, we should let
them try to get out of it them-
selves. Lorraine from America.
Duct tape solution
Nowadays when you read the
newspaper or watch news on
TV, there's a lot being said
about global warming. They
say most.of this is caused by
man letting gases and hot air
into the atmosphere. I think I
have found a cure for this glob-
al warming problem: duct
tape. Every U.S. citizen should
carry a roll of duct tape in
their pockets or pocketbooks.
When they see a politician,
apply some duct tape to their
lips, over their lips.
This will greatly reduce the
hot air going into the atmos-
phere and, thus, reduce global
warming.





1 S L[ k -43
m/^~^^.14[]/f~


I









CITRUS COUNTfY (FL), CHRONICLE


Letters to the EDITOR=


Not up to
Took my wife to a
office today After m
filled out a bunch o
she was taken into a
see a doctor. A girl c
the room and said s
put her information
computer. Yes, it wa
information on the
just filled out. The g
know how to operate
puter and it took he
hour to type the infi
in.
We finally got hor
hours later, missing
appointment and de
order our supper ou
the eating place to ]
order and had to tel
four times what we
besides explaining
three times. Now thi
the first time this ha
opened.
My question is: W
of young people act
they're stupid? Can'
what people are say
them? Can't they un
English? Why are tl
job that they are no
for and wasting peo
I found that a lot
run slow here in Fl
if you can't understand
English or your hav
time doing a job an
hear, tell someone.A
shouldn't be doing t
you're doing.


Real citizens
After spending fo
ensuring this count
doms are preserved
pating as a Marine
Global War on Terr
Iraq (twice), I am al
the situations at ho:
This country was
on the basis of legal
ition. But never has
tion reached such e
'proportions. In the
families came to Ar
from all over Europ
these lower-middle
Europeans took a b
Island and became
grants. They also ha
decency to learn th


job of the land (English), pay taxes
and contribute in one way or
a doctor's another.
ny wife Presently, it is estimated
f papers, that 10 million to 20 million
a room to illegal Mexican immigrants
came into roam the
he had to N For more streets of the
on their Letters to United
is the same the Editor. States.
papers she PAGE 12A "Illegal
iirl didn't Alien
te the com- Mexicans presently constitute
:r over an over 29 percent of the federal
brmation prison population" (Senator
Martinez). Approximately
ne three 400,000 illegal Mexican aliens
an who have committed crimes
decided to and have been given a depor-
ut. Called station order are currently at
lace an large somewhere in the U.S.
11 the girl It is argued that a lot of
wanted these illegal Mexican immi-
it to her grants are hard workers and
uis is not are doing the job that no
as hap- American citizen would want.
This is the most narrow-mind-
hy do a lot ed argument that could possi-
t like bly be put forward! A study
't they hear conducted by The Pew
ying to Hispanic Center concluded an
understand estimated 12 million illegal
hey doing a Mexican immigrants are in
t trained this country now, and broke
pole'ss time? down their numbers into these
of things jobs fields: 299,000 landscap-
orida, but ers, 167,000 painters, 75,000
and machine operators, 49,000
ing a hard brick masons, 93,000 roofers,
id you can't 400,000 construction workers,
Maybe you 128,000 in food preparation
he job and 436,000 cooks. Do these
jobs sound like the type of jobs
Jake Little that Americans despise hold-
Homosassa ing? The answer is a clear and
Homosa simple, NO!
3' rights Plenty of Americans would
rightS gladly take these jobs, but
ur years many workplaces would
ry's free- rather hire an illegal Mexican
d by partici- immigrant who'd be willing to
in the work for $6 per hour versus a
orism in U.S. citizen of this country
appalled by who would work for $9 per
me! hour. As an American, I
founded believe in fighting for my
I immigra- country! I gave up much to
immigra- protect the things I have
d'pidmic worked hard for to have and


past, many
nerica
pe. Most of
class
oat to Ellis
legal immi-
ad the
e language


preserve! Let's not just give
them away for free!
Dan Restivo
Inverness

Kickball success
The first annual Rotaract
Kick for a Cause Kickball
Tournament was a huge suc-
cess! With more than 300 in
attendance and 16 teams, this
year's players were out to win.
The Kick for a Cause
Tournament was a charity
event for the Citrus County
Foster Parents' Association to
raise funds to help families
who give so much back to our
youth.
The Rotaract Club of Citrus
County would like to thank
our sponsors including the
Chronicle, Offshore Diving
Adventures, Brashear's
Pharmacy, Citrus Kia, Village
Toyota, CFCC, Skidmore's,
Suncoast Chiropractic, Crystal
Chevrolet, Wayne and April
Saxer of Killingsworth Realty,
Capital City Bank, Don and
Barbara Shook, Boys & Girls
Clubs, Withlacoochee Electric,
Nichols Lumber Co., Bay
Area, Flowers Baking Co.,
Sweetbay, Cuppy's Coffee,
Coastal Trophy, Pizza Hut,
Papa Johns, Wal-Mart and The
Plantation.
In addition, we extend our
thanks to Brad Thorpe of the
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation Department for all
of his generous help, the
Crystal River Rotary and a
very special thank-you to Marc
Shapot of CFCC. We look for-
ward to next year!
Citrus County Rotaract is a
service organization for the
age group of 18 to 30. Meetings
are bimonthly and are held at
6:30 p.m. at the First
Presbyterian Church in
Crystal River. Please visit for
more details or call 201-1511.
Alan Monroe
Citrus County Rotaract


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Endorsement LETTERS


Make a difference
There's an important elec-
tion coming up in our area.
The very most important thing
is that we get out and vote.
There's been no lack of com-
plaining about our state, county
and city governments in recent
years, but there has been a lack
of voting. This past primary
election was a good example.
The voting numbers were
pathetic. You can't make a dif-
ference if you don't take the
time to vote. Let's change those
numbers on June 26 by having
a voter turnout that will truly
dictate the changes we want
In Crystal River, council seat
No. 3 will be up for grabs. Do
you want lower taxes? Do you
want more fiscal responsibili-
ty? Do you want upcoming
growth well planned and in the
best interests of those already
here? Do you want less rhetoric
and more action taken for our
water quality? These are issues
you can make a difference with
if you just take the time to vote.
In my mind, there is only one
candidate with a strong desire
and no hidden agenda to con-
front these burning concerns.
That's Maureen McNiff. Her
concern for the city is genuine.
Why else would she attend
every council meeting, volun-
teer for the ZBA, Waterfronts
Board and Planning
Commission. Let's move for-
ward with Maureen. We've seen
the past and I sure don't want
to go back there. Do you? Just
get out and vote!
Gail Jannarone
Crystal River

Proven leader
As a retired paratrooper,
past president of the Citrus
County Young Republicans
and active participant in my
community, I respect one thing
most of all. Leadership! I sup-
port people who exercise lead-
ership, especially when it is
done for the good of others.
A great example of this is
Charlie Dean!
Rep. Dean grew up in Citrus
County, volunteered for the
Marine Corps, taught in our
schools, elected to sheriff and
finally was elected by the peo-
ple to represent us in the state
house.
Dean has worked hard to
protect our citizens, our
homes and our environment.
As a leader, Dean understands
actions speak louder than
words, that it's all about
accomplishments.
That is why I endorse Dean
for State Senate!
Jimmie T. Smith
Hernando

Listens to people
Sophia Diaz-Fonseca is
interested in the voters' needs,
and not deterred by negativity;


she's always upbeat.
Tenacious, she seeks the best
solution for a problem, one
that will help the most people.
She is eager to research and
resolve issues.
Diaz-Fonseca would be a
great representative for us in
Tallahassee. She is ready to
"make a difference." She is
the best candidate for State
Representative because she
takes time to listen to the peo-
ple.
Yes, a vote for Sophia Diaz-
Fonseca is a vote for the peo-
ple.
Phronsie E. Stokeley
Inverness

Proven record
We want to urge Citrus
County Citizens to vote for a
person who will not only lis-
ten, but will fight for the
issues that are important.
Sophia Diaz-Fonseca has a
proven record of listening to
those she represents and get-
ting issues resolved.
Although, her opponent
Ron Shultz advertises that he
"has always fought for us," we
personally know that is not the
truth. Several years ago, we
-- +A LU Qh11 1i1z 10rn5.


went LU oiultz lur i
resolving a tax issue
to some property wE
As the Property Apy
was not interested i
to solve our problem
Shultz pushed us of
one else in the App:
office and our probi
never resolved.
We were very disz
in Shultz. Diaz-Fons
like that; she listens
to help however she
Please vote for So
Fonseca on June 26
will.


Showing co
Suzan Franks is a
geous contender for
Senate. The problem
lack of fairness in th
property tax system
as well as problems
with the regressive I
Florida's sales taxes
serious attention.
Unfortunately, the
been few Florida pc
with the courage to
problems and sugge
tions. Suzan Franks
those few.
Rather than appe
voters who want ade
ernmental services
paying for them, Suz
is willing to take the
position that revenue
sary. She is willing t
that without increase
our Department of (
and Families will re
functional, the Class


Amendment will remain an
unfulfilled dream, and the
Medically Needy program will
continue to be a sham, to name
only a few areas needing
increased financial support in
Florida.
In the interest of Florida's
fiscal integrity, the worth of
Florida's state and local gov-
ernmental programs, and the
fairness Florida's tax structure,
Suzan Franks has had the
courage to speak about the
need for a state income tax to
replace the unfair sales and
property tax systems. Suzan
Franks does this, knowing that
to bring such an unpopular
idea into public debate will
cost her politically. However, it
is time for the people of
Florida to face the facts
regarding the need for fair and
equitable revenue sources.
In the words of Joe Biden,
"There are some things that
are worth losing an election
over." If Suzan Franks loses her
race for State Senate because
of her political courage, she
will do so with my vote.
Lee Pitre
Inverness

Consensus builder


ntep us On June 26, the city of Crystal
e relating River will hold an election for a
e owned. vacant seat on the city council.
praise, he This is an extremely impor-
n helping tant election for the city since
nf to some- the city will be faced with deter-
raiser's mining how to deal with the
l s reduced tax revenues mandated
[lem was by the state legislature in addi-
tion to other monetary concerns
appointed affecting the citizens of Crystal
seca is not River.
s and tries Mike Gudis, a candidate for
e Dia-. the vacant seat, is a certified
6phia Diaz- government financial manager,
6; we sure with 40 years of accounting and
budgeting experience.
Sally Cook Mike has been extremely
Hernando active in the community for the
past 15 years, having served on
urage the city council for four years
and he is now serving as a mem-
coura- ber of the planning commission.
the State In addition, he has served as
ms with the president of the Boys & Girls
te current Clubs and was president of the
in Florida, Friends'of the Homosassa
associated Wildlife Park Gudis also serves
nature of on the boards of the Cancer
s, demand Society and the Crystal River
Youth Advisory Committee.
ere have I served on the council with
politicians Mike and have observed during
face these the past 10 years that he is a
*st solu- consensus builder, who listens
is one of to all sides before coming to a
conclusion.
alto those I know of nobody else that is
equate gov- more qualified to fill this City
without Council seat that Mike Gudis.
uan Franks Your vote for Mike Gudis is
e is npopulneces very important to the future of
o point out the city of Crystal River
ed funding: Please join with me in voting
Children for him.
*main dys- Ed Tolle
s Size Crystal River


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MONDAY, JUNF 18, 2007 11A


OPINION


-.1.1- "1 �- � 1. --1 - N �,� I.-.,,-, I












12A
IVUONDIAY
JUNE I 8, 2007
\ , ,, ,: ,, " .. ~. l. .:.' l.h-'.: ,, ,. |T.


N CHRONICLE_
\ -


S "Politics is the art of the
possible."

Otto Von Bismarck


ENDORSEMENT


Schultz has edge



in competition for



House District 43


In the three-way race for
District 43 of the Florida
House of Representatives,
two candidates really stand out:
Democrat Sophia Diaz-Fonseca
and Republican Ron Schultz.
No-party-affiliation candidate
David Gregory's heart is in the
right place, yet by his own admis-
sion his candidacy is more of a
statement about the state of poli-
tics than a sincere bid for office.
Interestingly, Gregory's dismay
about the role lobbyists play in
the political process
is the antithesis of THE I.
the campaign strate-
gy employed by State
Schultz. District
Schultz served as
Citrus County's OUR 01
property appraiser Ron S
for 16 years. Rather deserves
than extensive local
campaigning, he YOUR OPli
assumes Citrus chnr.on.ier.ro
Countians know cnnmme-nt
\who he is and have C 'r,,o,,c
formed their opin-
ions about him. Having been re-
elected several times, he
believes he is viewed favorably.
Schultz is unabashed about
targeting Tallahassee insiders -
including lobbyists who write big
checks - in his campaign
efforts. Rather than going door
to door locally in hopes of $10
contributions, he's gone on the
record with where he stands
about an array of issues and lob-
byists who find his positions to
their liking have been courting
him.
It's unusual for a candidate to
spell out how big business infus-
es itself into campaigns, but Ron
Schultz is an unusual person.
He's also an intellectual who can
wrap his brain around complex,
detailed matters such as the tax-
ation and insurance issues con-
fronting lawmakers. History
shows Schultz is a fighter and -


despite lobbyist campaign con-
tributions - would not base his
votes on outside pressure, but on
what he believes to be best.
While Schultz thrives on mak-
ing sense of complicated mat-
ters, it is Diaz-Fonseca who bet-
ter connects with people. She's
bright, articulate, energetic and
likeable. As a former Inverness
City Council member, she's
familiar with the workings of
government and has gained
exposure to state-level matters
in the course of her
SSUE: council work. She's
a civic-minded
House activist who has
43 race. demonstrated a
true commitment to
PINION: Citrus County.
chultz Her belief that
support. county health
departments are
VION: Go to underutilized
ine..,:m ,:, resources, that per-
.:c.'u t.: meable concrete
editoral ' should be used in
construction of
roads and sidewalks to benefit
the environment, and that alter-
native fuel sources and energy
sources need to be tapped are on
target.
Yet it is Schultz who has a
broader understanding of the
varied issues facing the
Legislature in the immediate
future. His tenacity and ability to
immediately immerse himself in
matters in which he's already an
expert will be of great value to
District 43 constituents.
Both Diaz-Fonseca and Schultz
would face a steep learning
curve as freshman legislators.
However, it is Schultz who is best
equipped to hit the ground run-
ning. Sophia Diaz-Fonseca is a
formidable candidate, but Ron
Schultz would be the more effec-
tive legislator We recommend
voters support Schultz in the
Tuesday, June 26, election.


CHRONICLE ENDORSEMENTS
* Charlie Dean. Senate District 3 seat.
* Ron Schultz, State House District 43 seat.


Turning lane S o
Where is our turning
lane? We waited so long
and finally got a turning
lane at North Annapolis
Avenue by the Art Center
after so many people were
hurt and killed. Now
they've widened the road CL
and we don't have a turn- ALL
ing lane, so if you're com- 563-
ing up to take a right onto
North Annapolis by the
Art Center, you've got people flying
up behind you. There already have
been accidents and a lot of people
are going to get hurt and killed.
Show some courage
Finally a commissioner with
courage. Thank you, Chairman
Dennis Damato, for speaking up for
Tom Dick and the rest of us who are
sick and tired of this nonsense they
*are pulling on him. Don't let up.
Flying the flag
This message is for the person
Idoking for a flag without the hard-
ware. You can find them down at
Floral City Hardware in Floral City.
They have the flags there. And also,
I'T like to make a comment about
the new format for the newspaper: I


-0579


enjoy reading it like this.
Phonebook needed
I'm calling regarding the
lady with the two telephone
books wondering why one
household gets two tele-
phone books. I would glad-
ly take a telephone book
from her. I've been asking
for a telephone book now
for seven years. They will


not send me one because I
live on a dirt road. I'd love to have
your phonebook. Please, somebody
give me a phonebook. What do I
have to do to get a phonebook?
Deputy's identity
A Citrus County Sheriff's deputy
came to my residence. I asked for
identification and he did not give it to
me. I really would have appreciated it
because, being a woman alone, I've
heard about impersonators. I really
wish that their officers would give
identification. I shouldn't have really
had to have asked. And then after I
asked him, he still didn't give it to
me. So I don't know who he, you
know, thinks he is, but I am a citizen
and I do have rights, too.


The best a father can give


EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan .............................publisher
Charlie Brennan ............................... editor
Neale Brennan ...... promotions/community affairs
Kathie Stewart ..................circulation director


r
H
I


LETTERS/


Truly blessed
I feel truly blessed by all of the
great support I have received from
our communities in the recent pri-
mary election for State House District
43. Everyone, from the new friend-
ships I've made, to old friendships I
had the opportunity to renew, from
those who contributed time, financial
support, encouragement and advice,
as well as, to all of you who voted for
me, my sincere, heartfelt, thank you.
This was a new experience for me,
having never run.for elected office
before. Our second-place finish in a
five-candidate field speaks volumes
about your efforts on my behalf. I am
very much looking forward to working
with you again in the future. Until
then, may God bless.
Winn Webb
Inverness

Cost of getting even
I have never met June Fisher or Tom
Dick and only know what I have read.
Less than a year ago, Dick was just a
great long-term county employee who
stepped up and did the job as adminis-
trator when the five wonder workers
fired the last administrator.
Then we come to the present that a
man with 25-plus years of service is
fired for trying to save the same money
the commissioners seem so good at
wasting! But when I see this farce
come to the present point and not one
of these clowns steps up and even acts
as if they have any ethics or moral
fiber, I am mad! My taxes are being
wasted to serve the ego of the new
boss! How can any of them not ask
Fisher to remove herself as.hearing
officer when she is the one filing the
charges? Surely in any sense of fair-
ness, that should have been a base
requirement
Did Dick break the law or place any-
one in legal danger? No! was the word


OPINIONS INVITED
S The opinions expressed in Chronicle edi-
torials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
* Viewpoints depicted in political car-
toons, columns or letters do not neces-
sarily represent the opinion of the edito-
rial board.
" Groups or individuals are invited to
express their opinions in a letter to the
editor.
* Persons wishing to address the editorial
board, which meets weekly, should call
Linda Johnson at (352) 563-5660.
1 All letters must be signed and include a
r hone number and hometown, including
letters sent via e-mail. Names and
hometowns will be printed; phone num-
bers will not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit letters for
length, libel, fairness and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than 350
words, and writers will be limited to
three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to (352) 563-3280; or e-
mail to letters@chronlcleonllno.com.

from the very people who would prose-
cute any such case. If I were selected
for a jury in this matter, I would be
very generous in the assured settle-
ment to Dick He has been treated
unfairly for sure. And we will pay the
price for this, as I am assured he will
win his case.
Our elected officials were totally
wrong to allow Fisher to drag the coun-
ty into a mess like this without forcing
a face-saving meeting of all parties.
She had a right to be upset that her
assistant went beyond her directions....
But the taxpayers should not have to
pay for her to get even! We have lost
the stability of management again...
and I can only feel it reflects poorly on
commissioners and Fisher and her
ability to manage and form a functional
staff.
To fire Dick for trying to save money
is the height of stupidity! Surely a less-
er option would have been the better
way out! But then, this is Circus


dom has passed.
I have fathered three kids, step-
fathered two more, the youngest now
16. And there is not one of them for
whom I wouldn't like to have a do-over
so I could fix something I did or do
something I should've.
But when you read these essays you
realize that so often what a child
remembers best and values most is not
what you did or didn't do. I'm nct say-
ing those things don't matter. But what
matters more is that you are "there."
Predictably, dependably, reliably
there. Indeed, putting aside food and
shelter, arguably the most fundamen-
tally important thing you give a child is
simply your presence.
We change the equation when we
are there.
I know that defies conventional wis-
dom in a culture that normalizes
father absence and happily pretends
the interchangeability of woman and
man. It allows a man to give a child
absence and tell himself it doesn't mat-
ter, because so long as there is food on
the table and mom in the house, the
child will be fine regardless.
But to read those essays - and if
your child wrote one, what would it
say? - is to recognize that for the self-
ish delusion it is.
You may fool yourself. You don't fool
your children at all.

Leonard Pitts, a columnist for the
Miami Herald, can be reached at
1 Herald Plaza, Miami, FL or by
e-mail at lpitts@miamiherald.com.


County at its best!
John Cassell
Homosassa
Desalination plant
There has been much rhetoric con-
cerning the water shortage and the build-
ing of the sheriff's EOC $14 million mon-
strosity. You can be sure that price will
soar as construction begins. It always
does. It is no brain twister to establish
priority between an assured water supply
and the proposed EOC boondoggle.
The commissioners have established a
pay scale for usage of water charging the
users of more water a higher rate. This
scheme will never produce another gal-
lon of water. The premise is based on a
faulty assumption. By the way, the same
idea is true concerning the use of gaso-
line. The tax and spend politicians will
tell you by taxing gasoline somehow we'll
conserve the use of gasoline. Not true.
Not one gallon of fuel will ever material-
ize because of taxes.
Instead of spending $14 million plus on
a new EOC building, the commissioners
should be buying a water detsliainuuon
plant The technology has been around
for more than 60 years. Before 0i'l iiv
ment, I worked for a company that manu-
factured water desalination plants li-r the
U.S. Navy and the AIrihb nations With the
Gulf of Mexico on our doorstep, we could
be assured of an endless a-iipply of\\ water
Now to the new EOC building. The
sheriff has said there is a need to central-
ize control in time of a disaster. If the dis-
aster struck the new facility, then we
would lose control of everything at one
time. How about the people who will
work there? How will they get to work
due to a disaster? The smart way is to
decentralize, not concentrate everything
in one place. "Elementary, my dear
Watson."
Marvin H. Weibley
Lecanto


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions on any subject. You do not need to leave your name and have up to 30 seconds to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


A few words for dad: I
received a letter a
while back It might
have been from your kid.
Actually, I received a
stack of letters - short
essays, to be exact - writ-
ten by 12th graders partici-
pating in a Father of the
Year essay contest spon-
sored by the National
Center for Fathering. The Leona:
topic: "What My Father OTI
Means To Me." I sat down VOl
intending to glance at a
handful of the pieces, but
before I knew it, I had read them all.
They left me wondering about the men
who inspired the words.
One girl - maybe your daughter -
wrote:
"My father is my heart and I couldn't
imagine my life without him.... I never
had to look for him because my Dad is
always around.... After I was raped, my
father made a vow he would never let
anything else happen to me and noth-
ing has ever since."
Or maybe your kid is the one who
wrote:
"My father is a role model to me. He
was a part of my life ever since I was
born. What I love about him the most is
that he never lied to me a day in my
life. When I am around him I feel ...
safe."
If one of those is your child, if that
even sounds like what he or she would
say, congratulations on a job well done.
And happy Father's Day.
But truthfully, most of the essays did


Mike Arnold ..........................managing editor
Founded in 1891 Curt Ebitz .............................citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Mac Harris ...... ................citizen member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


to the Editor


not exactly glow with
praise. So maybe your kid
is the one who wrote:
"What my father means
.`T" to me? He doesn't mean
anything to me. The reason
- I say this is because grow-
ing up I really never spoke
to my father. I don't know
why, but he has never really
been in my life and I have
d Pitts never cared to ask why."
IER Or maybe your kid wrote:
CES "My father means noth-
ing to me because he hasn't
been there for me when I
needed him. He thinks he should only
come around on my birthday and on
Christmas. He needs to be a better
father."
Or maybe this is your kid:
"My father left my mother when I
was 3 years of age. Many times my
father made promises to me and could
not keep them. My father never made
it to any of my birthdays after he told
me he would be there. I would sit in
front of my apartment and wait for him
to come and he never came. There
wasn't a time when I did not cry after
my birthday parties."
Is that your child talking? God help
you if it is.
One of the hardest truths of parent-
hood is that you never know how well
you've done till it's too late to do any-
thing about it. When that child who
once clung to your shin becomes a man
looking you in the eye, you realize with
an abruptness that the time for mold-
ing personality and imparting life wis-


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MONDAY, JUNE 18, 2007 13A


RTIC US COUNTY FL) E













Cs, ~S\


6iD:'~ ]~,2: I U '**" '~N<;/ \ \ / (2.( 7)


MONDAY
JUNE 1 8, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Unearthed


Six killed in car show crash


Associated Press
A 1957 Plymouth Belvedere
buried under the city's court-
house lawn 50 years ago is
pictured Friday after it was
unveiled in Tulsa, Okla. A con-
crete vault encasing a 1957
Plymouth Belvedere buried a
half-century ago may have
been built to withstand a
nuclear attack but it couldn't
beat back the natural
onslaught of moisture, organ-
izers of the car's unveiling
found.

Space station fixes
computer glitch
HOUSTON - Restoration of
a failed computer system
returned life to a regular rhythm
on the international space station
Sunday, as two astronauts took
the fourth spacewalk since space
shuttle Atlantis docked with the
outpost a week ago.
'We're slowly moving back
into a normal mode of opera-
tions," station commander
Fyodor Yurchikhin radioed
Mission Control in Moscow.
The "normal mode" included
the last spacewalk of the mis-
sion, a previously unscheduled
fourth trip outside the space sta-
tion to finish up tasks originally
scheduled for last Friday's third
spacewalk. Astronauts on the
third spacewalk had the
unplanned job of repairing a ther-
mal blanket which had peeled
back near Atlantis' tail during the
June 8 launch.

World .

Reading


Associated Press
A 50-year-old female orang-
utan, Gypsy, holds and
"reads" a magazine Sunday
at the Tama Zoological Park
in Tokyo.

U.S. restates support
for embattled leader
FAISALABAD, Pakistan -
Top U.S. officials visiting Pakistan
this weekend reiterated their con-
fidence in the country's presi-
dent, Gen. Pervez Musharraf,
even as thousands of people
took to the streets to demand his
ouster.
Musharrafs public support
here has been in free fall since
March 9, when he suspended
the nation's chief justice, a move
that was widely seen as a bid to
consolidate power before elec-
tions expected this year. Since
then, a campaign to reinstate the
judge, Iftikhar Mohammed
Chaudhry, has evolved into a full-
fledged movement to end eight
years of military rule.
Iran condemns the
knighting of Rushdie
TEHRAN, Iran - Iran on
Sunday condemned Britain's
decision to knight Salman
Rushdie, the author who was
forced into hiding for a decade
after the leader of the Iranian rev-
olution ordered his assassination.
Iran Foreign Ministry
spokesman Mohammad Ali
Hosseini said granting Britain's
highest honor to Rushdie insult-
ed the Muslim world.
"Awarding a person who is
among the most detested char-
acters in the Islamic society is
obvious proof of anti-Islamism by
ranking British officials," Hosseini
said.
- From wire reports


Associated Press

SELMER, Tenn. - There were no
guard rails between the crowds of specta-
tors and a public highway where a drag-
racing car bolted out of control, killing six
people during a charity fundraising
event
The Tennessee Highway Patrol
declined to make any statement Sunday
about road conditions or safety proce-
dures during the Saturday evening
parade of cars.
"It ain't really safe to do anything with
drag cars on a city street," said 19-year-
old spectator Garett Moore, who said he
was about 15 feet away from the wreck,
but was uninjured. 'They shouldn't have
done it"
Tennessee Highway Patrol spokesman
Mike Browning said the six who were


killed included two 15-year-old girls and a
17-year-old girl. The accident injured 18
others, including a 5-year-old boy, who
were taken to hospitals in Tennessee and
Mississippi.
Authorities on Sunday identified the
driver as pro drag racer Troy Warren
Critchley, an Australian who is now based
in Wylie, Texas. He suffered minor
injuries and was taken by car to a nearby
hospital for treatment
There were no criminal charges
against Critchley, Browning said.
Mourners placed small votive candles,
flowers, a teddy bear and a ceramic angel
at the crash site Sunday.
The crash happened during an "exhi-
bition burnout" - when a drag racer
spins his tires fast enough to make them
smoke - at the Cars for Kids charity
event in Selmer


On amateur video of the crash, broad-
cast on WMC-TV in Memphis, the car's
engine is heard revving loudly before the
vehicle speeds down the highway. After a
few hundred feet, the car skidded off the
road in front of a drive-in restaurant
Selmer Police Chief Neal Burks said
"bodies were flying into the air when it
happened."
There was a guard rail along at least
part of the highway, but not along that
stretch.
Drivers of other dragsters in the
parade had been spinning their tires and
then accelerating quickly, but everyone
else put on the brakes before going past
the guard rails, Moore said.
"This is definitely not the kind of road
you should be drag racing on," Moore
said. "This isn't a flat open surface like
you have at a race track"


Baghdad's lockdown lifted


Associated
Iraqis shop Sunday at a market in central Baghdad. The Iraqi capital sprung to life Sunday after a four-day curfew to thwart
lence after a provocative attack on a Shiite shrine in Samarra last week.


Residents emerge to find traffic, higher prices and other woi


Associated Press

BAGHDAD - Residents
emerged from their homes
Sunday at the end of a four-day
lockdown and found them-
selves caught in traffic
spawned by hundreds of new
police and army checkpoints.
Many wondered if the extra
security and the curfew
imposed after last week's
bombing of a major Shiite
shrine had only created incon-
venience and delayed an
inevitable explosion of
revenge attacks.
"The militias will still take
revenge, today or tomorrow,"
said agricultural materials
merchant Nasser Ali Jaber, a
56-year-old Shiite father of
three.
The bombing of the Askariya
shrine north of Baghdad was
the second there in 16 months.
The first, which destroyed the
glistening golden dome,
unleashed a torrent of Shiite-
Sunni violence that continues
to this day.
As the Baghdad curfew
ended, the U.S. military
reported it killed 14 suspected
insurgents and captured 20
others in separate operations


over the weekend. At least 37
other people were killed or
found dead in sectarian vio-
lence Sunday.
Three U.S. soldiers were
killed Saturday in explosions
near their vehicles - two in
Baghdad and one in Kirkuk
province, the U.S. military
reported. The deaths raised to
3,524 the number of U.S. serv-
ice members who have died
since the war began, according
to an Associated Press count
One mosque was known to
have been attacked in
Baghdad and several were tar-
geted south of Baghdad,
including a major Sunni
shrine that was leveled by an
explosion outside Basra, Iraq's
second largest city. There was
no repeat of the wholesale
attacks on Sunni mosques and
clerics that took place after
last year's bombing.
But the ban on vehicle traf-
fic and large gatherings led to
steep price hikes for fuel and
fresh food as well as longer
power outages than normal
because people were forced to
remain home, putting an addi-
tional burden on the power
grid.
Sunday saw some of the


longest gas lines since Iraqis
began suffering what are now
chronic shortages. The lines
stretched for a mile or longer,
in some cases weaving around
several blocks, stretching from
main roads deep into side
streets.
Black marketeers posi-
tioned their jerry cans of gas
near the lines, charging three
times the pump price.
Residents complained they
had run out of fuel to power
generators and fresh food and
said merchants were price-
gouging.
For Mona Abdul-Hussein, a
32-year-old engineering lectur-
er and mother of two, little
came from the lockdown aside
from higher food prices and
longer power outages.
"I think things will get worse
now," she said of a possible
outburst in sectarian violence.
The end of the lockdown
came a day after Lt Gen.
Raymond Odierno, a top U.S.
commander in Iraq, acknowl-
edged that security forces have
full control of only 40 percent
of Baghdad, now in the fifth
month of a major U.S.-led
security push that may be the
U.S. military's last


Except for street sweei
hard at work in bright ora
or yellow vests, and mui
pal workers watering tr
the city of some six mill
people was tense Sun(
w ith greatly stepped-up sE
rity.
Vendors weaved betw
cars waiting in traffic, sel
paper fans, soft drinks and
sues to mop brows dripping
temperatures that hit 112.
Feeding the tension i
city that has been on edge
much of the past four ye
army and police command
raced through the capil
streets in pickup tru
mounted with machine gi
To great relief, they h
followed government ord
to stop shooting in the ai
clear traffic or w
motorists coming too close
Security was particul
tight on bridges, with I:
police and soldiers searcl
trucks for bombs. Sev
bridges, which link the m
ly Sunni Karkh region on
west bank of the Tigris r
to the Shiite-domina
Rusafa area on the oppo
side, have been targeted
suspected Sunni militant


Assocated Press
Authorities work the scene of a vehicle
crash Saturday in Selmer, Tenn. A drag-
racing vehicle lost control during a parade
and spun into a crowd of bystanders on
Saturday, killing six people and injuring up
to 18, authorities said.


Abbas


swears in


Emergency


Cabinet

Associated Press

IRAMALLAH, West Bank -
Ignoring Hamas' vehement
protests, Palestinian President
Mahmoud Abbas on Sunday
swore in a new government
without his political rivals, out-
lawed Hamas militias and said
he'll push hard for a restoration
of foreign aid to the Palestinians
after a punishing 15-month boy-
cott.
The blockade of Hamas-ruled
Gaza intensified, meanwhile, as
Israel halted fuel shipments. A
run on fuel, bread and other
basic supplies intensified, driv-
ing the price of a box of
Marlboro cigarettes - a reliable
gauge of shortages - up by a
LHamas seized control of Gaza
last week after five days of
Press intense fighting against forces
tvio- loyal to Abbas' Fatah. The
takeover prompted Abbas to dis-
solve a Fatah-Hamas coalition
government and appoint a new
eS Cabinet excluding the Islamic
group.
The hurried swearing-in cere-
pers mony of the new Cabinet left the
inge Palestinians effectively with two
nici- governments -the Hamas lead-
ees, ership headed by deposed
lion Prime Minister Ismail Haniyeh
day, in Gaza and the new Cabinet led
ecu- by the Western-backed econo-
mist Salam Fayyad in the West
een Bank
lling 'The first priority of our gov-
Itis- ernm ent is security and the
ig in security situation," Fayyad told
reporters.
n a Fayyad, an independent, will
for retain his post as finance minis-
'ars, ter and also serve as foreign
idos minister in the emergency gov-
tal's ernment The small Cabinet is
icks dominated by independents.
uns. In his speech, Fayyad stressed
lave that the government represent-
ders ed Palestinians in the West
ir to Bank and Gaza. The
yarn Palestinians claim both areas
e. for a state, but the internal strife
early has endangered that goal.
raqi Abbas cleared the way for the
thing Cabinet to take power by issuing
eral a decree that annulled a law
ain- requiring the government to be
.the approved by parliament, which
river is dominated by Hamas. He also
ated issued a decree outlawing
)site Hamas' militias "'due to their
d by military coup against the
s. Palestinian legitimacy and its
institutions."


Chicago mob trial focuses on long unsolved murders


Associated Press

CHICAGO - It seemed like a
good idea at the time. A gang of
burglars decided in December
1977 to break into the home of
Tony Accardo, one of the most
powerful men in organized
crime history, and rob his base-
ment vault
Accardo was not amused.
Six men Accardo blamed for
the heist were swiftly hunted
down and murdered, according
to papers filed by federal prose-
cutors in preparation for
Chicago's biggest mob trial in


years, sched-
uled to begin
Tuesday.
And that's
only one of the
grisly tales
jurors are likely
to hear at the
trial stemming
from the FBI's
"Operation
Family Secrets"
investigation of
18 long-
unsolved mob
murders all-


Frank
Calabrese
Sr.
is among a
dozen alleged
mobsters set
for trial.


egedly tied the Outfit, Chicago's


organized crime family
"This unprecedented indict-
ment puts a hit on the mob," U.S.
Attorney Patrick J. Fitzgerald
said in announcing the charges
in April 2005.
Reputed top mob bosses head
the list of defendants - James
Marcello, Frank Calabrese Sr.
and wisecracking Joseph 'Joey
the Clown" Lombardo. Four co-
defendants include a retired
Chicago police officer, Anthony
Doyle.
Another defendant, alleged
extortionist Frank "The
German" Schweihs, has been


tentatively dropped from the
trial for health reasons.
Accardo, the notorious mob
boss whose home was hit by the
burglars, died in 1992 at age 86.
He boasted that he never spent a
night in jail.
The case has already made
the kind of headlines that might
seem the stuff of novels and
movies. A federal marshal
assigned to guard a star witness
was charged with leaking infor-
mation about his whereabouts to
organized crime.
That witness - Nicholas
'Calabrese, brother of Frank


Calabrese Sr - knows four
decades of mob history from the
inside and really does have a
link to the movies. He is expect-
ed to testify against his brother
Nicholas Calabrese pleaded
guilty to several counts in May
and admitted that he took part in
14 mob murders including that
of Tony "The Ant" Spilotro,
known as the Chicago Outfit's
man in Las Vegas. Spilotro, who
inspired the character played by
Joe Pesci in the movie "Casino,"
and his brother were beaten to
death and buried in an Indiana
cornfield in 1986.










* MLB/2B, 4B
* College baseball/3B
* College football/4B
* Scoreboard, MLB standings/6B
* Entertainment/7B


B
MONDAY
JUNE 18, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


of


Argentine wins

US. Open with

5-over-par 285

Associated Press


OAKMONT, Pa. - Unlikely cham-
pion. Familiar scenario.
Angel Cabrera hit all the right
shots to hold off Tiger Woods and
Jim Furyk by a stroke on a Sunday of
survival at the U.S. Open, shooting a
1-under-par 69 at brutal Oakmont
and giving Argentina its first major
championship in 40 years.
And for the second straight major,
Woods played in the final group and
couldn't deliver in the clutch.
Woods squandered birdie chances
with his wedge and his putter, and
Furyk paid for a risky choice of driv-
er on the 306-yard 17th hole and fell
out of the lead with a bogey.
That left Cabrera as the winner,
and yes, he signed for the right
score.
The only other Argentine to win a
major was Roberto de Vicenzo in the
1967 British Open at Hoylake. He
was equally famous for signing for
the wrong score a year later at the
Masters, keeping him out of a play-
off.
"It is very difficult to describe at
the moment," an elated Cabrera
said. "Probably tomorrow, when I
wake up with this trophy beside me,
I will realize I won the U.S. Open."
Cabrera made his share of mis-
takes - everyone did on this brutal-
ly tough course outside Pittsburgh-
but he overcame late bogeys on the
16th and 17th holes with a perfect
tee shot and a par that gave him the
victory
Even so, this major will be remem-
bered for gaffes by the guys chasing
him.
Woods, a runner-up to unheralded
Zach Johnson at the Masters, played
the final 32 holes at Oakmont with
only one birdie. He missed a birdie
putt from 6 feet on the 13th, and the
only clutch putts he made on the
back nine were for par.
"He put a lot of pressure on Jim
and I, and we didn't get it done," said
Woods, who closed with a 72 and
extended his dubious streak of
never winning a major when he was-
n't leading going into the final
round.
Faryk, the 2003 U.S. Open champi-
on who grew up in western
Pennsylvania, ran off three straight
birdies on the back nine and was
tied for the lead when he opted to
hit driver on the 17th, where the tees
were moved up. He hit so far and
enough left that he had no angle to
the pin, and the lie was so deep that
he didn't even reach the green. His
8-foot par putt caught the lip and
spun away.
Needing birdie on the final hole,
Furyk dropped the club after con-
tact, and his long putt never had a
chance.
Cabrera, who had two of just eight
sub-par rounds in the tournament
and finished at 5-over 285, was in the
clubhouse watching two of the best
players in golf try to catch him.
As poorly as Woods hit the ball in
Please see ANGEL/Page 6B


Associated Press
Angel Cabrera of Argentina kisses his trophy Sunday after winning the 107th U.S. Open Golf Championship at the Oakmont Country Club In Oakmont, Pa.,
Cabrera won the tournament with 5-over-par 285.


About all this Open lacked was a dancing bear


OAKMONT, Pa. - The
bear that wandered out
on the seventh hole I
Sunday morning at lt' l
Oakmont Country Club
got away just in time. .
Just like Phil Mickelson '
so famously predicted,
danger lurked every-
where. Tim Dahlberg
Mickelson wasn't AP SPORTS
around for the weekend,
though he was surely COLUMNIST
watching at home with a
smile on his face as the carnage back and
unfolded on a hot and sticky after- chance.


noon before Angel Cabrera finally


emerged as a most
unlikely U.S. Open
champion.
Before that happened,
the third round leader
gagged his way to a
triple bogey on the first
hole and was never
heard of again. The best
player in the world
looked like a 10-handi-
capper when he bladed
a chip over a green,
chunked the next one
nearly cost himself any


Five different times players had


at least a share of the ledd only to
fall by the wayside by making dou-
ble bogey or worse.
It took forever to finish, and with
good reason. No one seemed to
want to hit a shot for fear of what
might happen next
This wasn't a U.S. Open. It was a
demolition derby on spikes.
"The next time they have the
Open here I might go fishing," Rory
Sabbatini said.
Thankfully, another of Mickel-
son's predictions didn't come true.
No one was injured, if you don't
count the bruised egos of a lot of
awfully good players.


They headed toward the player's
parking lot muttering among them-
selves about another typical U.S.
Golf Association setup and another
familiar result. The best player this
week had finally been identified,
but even he could only get within
five strokes of par by the time it
mercifully ended on an anti-climat-
ic tap-in by Tiger Woods.
Oakmont had always been billed
as one of the toughest Open courses
ever. But those who spent the last
four days hacking out of the thick
rough and trying to keep their balls
Please see DAHLBERG/Page 6B


Edwards snaps


winless streak


Associated Press
BROOKLYN, Mich. - Carl
Edwards won four races in his
first full season, finishing an
impressive third in the Nextel
Cup standings.
That quick success made
Edwards believe wins would
be easy to come by Instead, it
took him 19 months to race his
way back into Victory Lane.
He finally did it Sunday,
overcoming an early speeding
penalty and holding off Martin
Truex Jr. to win at Michigan
International Speedway and
snap his 52-race Nextel Cup
winless streak.
"It was very difficult to stay
composed, especially when
Martin was closing in," Ed-


wards said. "To me, second
place would have felt the same
as chopping off my arm. I want-
ed to win. That's it."
But Truex, who has not fin-
ished lower than third the past
three races, brushed the wall
in the closing laps and lost his
momentum. It cost him a
chance to run down Edwards,
who handily beat Truex to the
line to grab his first win since
Nov. 11, 2005, at Texas.
Please see EDWARDS/Page 6B
Carl Edwards does his winner's
backflip Sunday at the finish
line after winning the Citizens
Bank 400 auto race at
Michigan International
Speedway in Brooklyn, Mich.
Associated Pres


%~,, ...j


I


Hamilton snags


2nd straight win


Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS - Lewis
Hamilton is as surprised as any-
body by his sensational start in
Formula One.
The 22-year-old En-
glishman fought off a
couple of challenges
from Mercedes Mc-
Laren teammate and
two-time world champi-
on Fernando Alonso on
Sunday to win the U.S.
Grand Prix, the second Le
straight victory for the Han
first black driver in Fl's
61-year history.
"Coming into the season,
being realistic, I never expected
anything like this, but I hoped to
do well," Hamilton said. 'This is
just insane."


-
*I


This latest win, coming on the
heels of his inaugural F1 victory
a week earlier in the Canadian
Grand Prix, gave Hamilton his
seventh top-three finish in as
many starts-- one of his
numerous unprecedent-
ed feats for a rookie.
After being tied for
the top with his team-
mate, Hamilton took an
eight-point lead in the
standings with his win
in Montreal and will
vis now carry a 10-point
ilton margin over Alonso into
the French Grand Prix
in two weeks.
The two finished 1-2 for the
third time this season, but this
time the order was reversed
from Malaysia in April and last
month's race at Monaco.


ts"













1-4A --- TiiA- IF BA EA--ITU CUT-(L) JR-~L


2B MONDAY, JUNE 18, 2007


Bonds hits 1st at Fenway


Associated Press

BOSTON - Barry Bonds
added baseball's oldest ball-
park to his longball list and was
back on his way to the sport's
most hallowed record.
The San Francisco slugger
hit his 748th career homer in
Boston's 9-5 victory over the
Giants on Sunday, adding
Fenway Park, the Red Sox and
knuckleballer Tim Wakefield
to his totals and moving within
seven of Hank Aaron's mark.
But his sixth-inning solo shot
merely cut Boston's lead to 8-4,
and Manny Ramirez padded
the lead with his second homer
in as many games. Ramirez was
2-for-4 with three RBIs, David
Ortiz had a pair of doubles, and
Wakefield (7-7) pitched well
before faltering in the sixth to
help the Red Sox complete the
three-game sweep.
Wakefield allowed five runs
and eight hits with a walk, strik-
ing out three in 5 2-3 innings.
He allowed a solo homer to
Pedro Feliz - his ninth of the
season (and the 98th of his
career) - while becoming the
441st different pitcher to feed
Bonds' home run habit
Bonds has now homered in 36
ballparks, adding Fenway to the
list in his third game at the ball-
park that was the first home of
the first man to top 700 homers.
Bonds passed Babe Ruth and
his 714 total last year, and
resumed his pursuit of Aaron's
755 with 11 homers in his first
76 at-bats this year; he has just
three in 91 at-bats since.
The crowd, with a fair
amount of Giants orange scat-
tered throughout, offered some
brief applause before the clap-
ping was overwhelmed by the
hometown jeering. One fan
about eight rows behind the
Giants on-deck circle held up a
T-shirt that said "Huge Giant
Head."
Matt Morris (7-4) lasted just
four innings for San 1Fancisco,
allowing eight runs and nine
hits. He walked two and struck
out two.
Devil Rays 7, Rockies 4
DENVER - Jonny Gomes hit a
pair of two-run homers, Carlos
Pena hit a solo shot into the third
deck at Coors Field and Tampa
Bay avoided being swept with a 7-
4 win over Colorado on Sunday.
Gomes had the fourth multi-
homer game of his career and first
since June 11 of last season
against Kansas City. Gomes, who
now has four homers this season,
finished the day with three hits and
four RBIs.
Ty Wigginton extended his hit-
ting streak to 11 games with two
doubles and a single and Carl
Crawford had four singles for the
Devil Rays, who snapped a four-
game losing streak.
Scott Kazmir (5-3) moved up the
Devil Rays' all-time win list with his
26th career win, tying Albie Lopez
and Esteban Yan for second place.
Victor Zambrano leads with 35 wins.
Al Reyes pitched the ninth for
his 16th save in 16 chances.
Tampa Bay manager Joe
Maddon was ejected by home plate
umpire Ted Barrett in the seventh
after the two exchanged words near
the mound. It's the first time Maddon
has been ejected this season.
Indians 5, Braves 2
CLEVELAND - Fausto
Carmona pitched seven-plus
innings to help the Cleveland
Indians avoid a three-game sweep
with a 5-2 win over the Atlanta
SBraves on Sunday.
. Casey Blake extended the
majors' longest hitting streak of the
season to 26 games as Cleveland
Swon for only the third time in eight
games.
Chipper Jones got his 2,000th
hit and Scott Thorman hit his
eighth homer for Atlanta.
Thorman ruined Carmona's bid
for his second career shutout by
hitting a drive to right to lead off the
Eighth inning. Carmona (8-2) was
charged with two runs and five hits.
He struck out five.
Joe Borowski worked the ninth
for his 100th career save. He is 20-
for-22 in save chances this year.
Angels 10, Dodgers 4
LOS ANGELES - Howie
Kendrick and Orlando Cabrera had
three hits each and drove in a
combined three runs, helping the
Angels clinch the second Freeway


Series of the season.
Kelvim Escobar (8-3) allowed
three runs and eight hits in seven
innings. The right-hander struck out
eight and walked two.
The Angels dropped the opening
game, then won the final two of the
interleague series, giving them a 5-
1 record against the Dodgers this
season.


Associated Press
San Francisco Giants left fielder Barry Bonds, right, and Boston Red Sox catcher Doug Mirabelli
watch Bonds' 748th career home run Sunday off of pitcher Tim Wakefield during the sixth inning of
their interleague baseball game at Fenway Park in Boston.


Randy Wolf (8-5) gave up four
runs and seven hits in five innings,
walked three and struck out one in
losing for the second time in three
games.
Cardinals 10, Athletics 6
OAKLAND, Calif. - Ryan
Ludwick hit a go-ahead, three-run
homer in the seventh inning and
drove in a career-high five runs,
leading St. Louis to their first inter-
league series win in four tries this
season.
Colby Lewis (0-2) allowed three
straight singles to start the seventh
before Ludwick's high drive landed
in the elevated seats in left-center
for his third homer. Lewis' streak of
24 straight retired batters ended on
Albert Pujols' base hit up the mid-
dle to start the rally.
The Cardinals' comeback kept
Anthony Reyes from becoming the
first St. Louis pitcher to lose nine
straight games to start a season
since Danny Jackson did it from
April 27 to July 2, 1995.
Russ Springer (3-0) struck out
two in a perfect sixth to win for the
second time in as many days.
Tigers 7, Phillies 4
PHILADELPHIA-- Justin
Verlander lost his bid for another
no-hitter early and watched Detroit
come through late, scoring five
runs in the seventh to rally and
beat Philadelphia.
The Tigers used three pinch-hit-
ters in the seventh, including Gary
Sheffield who hit for Verlander and
knocked in a run off Geoff Geary
(1-2) that cut it to 3-2.
Craig Monroe and Magglio
Ordonez followed with consecutive
two-RBI hits to complete the rally
for a 6-3 lead.
Todd Jones pitched the ninth for
his 17th save in 21 chances.
Twins 10, Brewers 9
MINNEAPOLIS - Justin
Momeau hit the first pitch in the
bottom of the ninth inning over the
baggie in right field for his third
walk-off homer of the season for
Minnesota.
The blast by the reigning AL
MVP bailed out teammate Lew
Ford, whose two fielding miscues
in the top of the inning allowed
Milwaukee to tie the game off clos-
er Joe Nathan (3-1).
Filling in for the injured Torii
Hunter, who was hit by a pitch on
the left hand in the first inning, Ford
had a career-high four RBIs, but
nearly cost the Twins the game in
the ninth.
Ford lost a sky-high popup in the
Metrodome's white roof, and
Prince Fielder turned it into an
inside-the-park homer to make the
score 9-8.
Astros 10, Mariners 3
HOUSTON - Mike Lamb hit a
grand slam and drove in five runs
and Houston completed a three-
game sweep.
Lamb was exceptional through-
out the weekend series, going 8-
for-10 with two homers, eight RBIs
and three doubles.
His grand slam into the bullpen
came in the first inning and gave


starter Roy Oswalt (7-4) some
breathing room to pick up his first
win since May 12. Oswalt wasn't
sharp, allowing a season-high 12
hits but giving up just three runs in
5 2-3 innings.
Jarrod Washburn (5-6) lasted
just three innings in his shortest
start of the season. The lefty
allowed a season-high seven runs
and six hits with three walks.
Nationals 4, Blue Jays 2
TORONTO - Ryan Zimmerman
homered for the second straight
game for Washington, which over-
came Frank Thomas' record 244th
homer as a designated hitter.
Thomas tied it at 2 with a solo
homer in the third inning, moving
him past Edgar Martinez for the
most by a DH in major league his-
tory. It was his ninth of the season,
the 496th of his career and first
since May 31 against the Chicago
White Sox.
Micah Bowie (4-2) allowed two
runs and four hits over six innings,
matching his longest start of the
season, to win his fourth straight
decision. He walked three and
struck out a season-high six.
Josh Towers (2-5) allowed four
runs and seven hits over seven
innings for Toronto, which had won
three straight. He walked one and
struck out four.
Royals 5, Marlins 4
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Brian
Bannister won his fourth consecu-
tive start, Esteban German drove in
the go-ahead run and Kansas City
improved to 8-4 in interleague play.
They Royals have won all four
series this season against National
League teams - St. Louis,
Philadelphia, Colorado and Florida.
Bannister (4-3) worked six-plus
innings, allowing four runs and nine
hits with a walk. Bannister has
given up five earned runs in 28
innings in June. He was 0-3
through May.
Octavio Dotel got three outs for
his fifth save in five chances.
Left-hander Scott Olsen (5-6)
took the loss, giving up five runs -
four earned - and 10 hits with
three walks. He struck out five.
Diamondbacks 6, Orioles 4
BALTIMORE - Chad Tracy sin-
gled in the go-ahead run in the
eighth inning, and Arizona capital-
ized on another poor performance
by the Baltimore bullpen in a victo-
ry that extended the Orioles' losing
streak to eight.
Eric Bymes and Chris Snyder
homered for the Diamondbacks,
who outscored Baltimore 21-11
during a three-game sweep.
Brandon Webb (7-4) allowed
three runs, two eamed, and seven
hits in seven innings for Arizona.
The 2006 Cy Young winner is 4-1
in his last five starts.
Chad Bradford (0-4) picked up
the loss. He recorded just one out
in the eighth and was charged with
two runs, one earned.
Rangers 11, Reds 4
CINCINNATI - Kevin Millwood
got his first victory in two months,
and Marlon Byrd hit his first homer


in nearly a year and drove in three
runs for Texas.
Sammy Sosa pinch-hit and
grounded into a forceout, leaving.
him one homer away from becom-
ing the filth to reach 600. Byrd took
his place in right field and had a
breakout game, helping the Rangers
take two of three in a matchup of the
leagues' worst teams.
Bronson Arroyo (2-8) matched
his career high by losing his sixth
straight decision. He allowed seven
runs and eight hits in six innings.
Pirates 8, White Sox 7
PITTSBURGH - Nate McLouth
had a career-high four RBIs and
Jose Bautista homered and drove
in two runs for the Pirates.
Jack Wilson scored three runs,
and Xavier Nady's two-run single in
the seventh broke a 5-5 tie and
proved to be the winning hit for
Pittsburgh, which finished its inter-
league homestand 4-2.
Juan Uribe had two hits and two
RBIs for the White Sox, who had a
five-run fourth inning but lost for
the 17th time in 21 games.
Shawn Chacon (3-1) pitched 1
2-3 scoreless innings to get the win
and Matt Capps earned his fifth
save despite allowing two
unearned runs in the ninth.
Padres 11, Cubs 3
CHICAGO - Mike Cameron hit
two homers and the San Diego
Padres knocked a season-high five
in all in an 11-3 victory over the
Chicago Cubs on Sunday.
One day after a bench-clearing
altercation, the Padres had no trou-
ble connecting against the Cubs.
Cameron hit a two-run shot to
center in the first inning and followed
Adrian Gonzalez's two-run drive in
the third with a homer off Rich Hill
(5-5) that made it 5-1. Khalil Greene
added a three-run homer off Sean
Gallagher in the fifth, and Rob
Bowen hit a solo drive against
Michael Wuertz in the eighth.
That was plenty for Greg
Maddux (6-3), who allowed three
runs and seven hits in his second
start against the Cubs since they
traded him to the Los Angeles
Dodgers at the deadline last July.
He struck out one and did not walk
a batter in winning his 339th game.
Yankees 8, Mets 2
NEW YORK - Alex Rodriguez
hit his major league-leading 27th
homer, Chien-Ming Wang came
within one out of a complete game
and the New York Yankees won
the second Subway Series of the
season Sunday night with an 8-2
victory over the stumbling Mets.
Johnny Damon and Jorge
Posada also homered, helping the
Yankees win for the 11th time in 12
games. They finished their finest
homestand in nine years with an 8-
1 record and split the six-game
season series with their crosstown
rivals for the third straight year.
Wang (7-4) struck out a career-
high 10 and walked one. He scat-
tered six hits, sending the NL East
leaders to their 11th defeat in 13
games.


Devil Rays 7, Rockies 4
TAMPA BAY COLORADO
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Iwmra 3b 5 01 0 Tveras cf 5 0 2 0
BHarrs ss 5 00 0 KMtsui 2b 4 1 1 1
Crwfrd If 5 14 0 Hlliday If 3 1 2 1
Wggntn 2b 5 13 0 Helton lb 2 0 0 0
CPena 1b 4 122 Atkins3b 3 0 0 0
DYong cf 4 110 Hawpe rf 4 1 1 1
Gomes rf 3 334 Tlowzki ss 3 1 1 0
Nvarro c 4 00 0 Innetta c 4 01 1
Kazmirp 201 1 Cookp 2 000
Dukes ph 1 00 0 TMartn p 0 0 0 0
Wtsick p 0 00 0 Sullivan ph 1 0 0 0
Glover p 0 00 0 Affeldt p 0 0 0 0
Norton ph 1 000 Spbrgh ph 1 0 0 0
Reyes p 0 00 0 Corpas p 0 0 0 0
Totals 39715 7 Totals 32 4 8 4
Tampa Bay 020 013 010- 7
Colorado 111 000 010- 4
DP-Tampa Bay 1, Colorado 2. LOB-
Tampa Bay 6, Colorado 8. 2B-Wigginton
2 (16), CPena (13), Gomes (4), lannetta
(5). HR-CPena (16), Gomes 2 (4),
KMatsui (2), Holliday (12), Hawpe (12).
SB-Taveras (16), Tulowitzki (2). CS-
Tulowitzki (3). S-KMatsui.
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
Kazmir W,5-3 6 6 3 3 4 5
Witasick 1 1 0 0 2 0
Glover 1 1 1 1 0 2
Reyes S,16 1 0 0 0 0 2
Colorado
CookL,4-4 6 10 6 6 0 0
TMartin 1 0 0 0 0 1
Affeldt 1 3 1 1 1 0
Corpas 1 2 0 0 0 0
T-2:56. A-31,190 (50,449).


Roy


FLORIDA


yals 5, Marlins 4
KANSAS CITY


ab rhbi


ab rh bi


Amzga ss 3 11 0 DJesus cf 4 1 1 0
Uggla 2b 3 000 EGrmn 2b 3 0 1 1
HaRmzdh 402 1 Teahen rf 4 1 1 0
MiCbr 3b 4 00 0 MiSwy dh 3 0 00
Wlnhm If 4230 Brown If 3 1 1 1
Hrmida rf 4 12 2 Gthrght If 0 0 0 0
Olivoc 4000 Gordon3b 4 1 21
Boonelb 3 021 Shealy lb 4 0 1 0
Abrcrb pr 0 00 0 LaRue c 4 0 1 1
Carroll ocf 3 000 TPena ss 4 1 2 0
Totals 32410 4 Totals 33 510 4
Florida 011 002 000- 4
Kansas City 013 001 00x- 5
E-Carroll 2 (2). DP-Florida 1. LOB-
Florida 5, Kansas City 7. 2B-HaRamirez
(17), Willingham 2 (19), Boone (10),
EGerman (8). HR-Hermida (6). SB-
Willingham (4), Abercrombie (6), DeJesus
(2). CS-HaRamirez (5). S-Uggla,
Carroll. SF-Boone.
IP H RERBBSO
Florida
Olsen L,5-6 6 10 5 4 3 5
JuMiller 2 0 0 0 0 1
Kansas City
Bannister W,4-3 6 9 4 4 1 1
Greinke 2 0 0 0 0 2
Dotel S,5 1 1 0 0 0 1
Bannister pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
T-2:30. A-19,433 (40,785).
Indians 5, Braves 2


ATLANTA


CLEVELAND


ab rhbi ab r hbi
Jhnson 2b 4010 Szmore cf 4 0 00
Harris If 4 01 1 Mchels If 4 01 1
Rnteria ss 4 000 Blake 3b 4 0 1 0
CJones dh 4 020 VMrtnz c 4 1 1 0
AJonescf 4 00 0 JhPlta ss 3 1 1 0
McCnn c 4 00-0 Garko lb 4 1 0 1
Frncur rf 401 0 Nixon dh 1 000
Thrmn lb 4 131 Dllucci dh 0 000
YEscbr 3b 310 0 Gutirrz rf 4 2 21
Brfield 2b 3 001
Totals 352 8 2 Totals 31 5 6 4
Atlanta 000 000 020- 2
Cleveland 000 014 00x- 5
E-McCann (8), Thorman (3), Barfield
(9). LOB-Atlanta 8, Cleveland 6. 2B-
Harris (9), CJones (15), JhPeralta (11).
HR-Thorman (8). SB-Gutierrez (1).
CS-Thorman (1).
IP H RERBBSO


Atlanta
Davies L,3-6
Paronto
McBride
Cleveland


51-3 6
12-3 0
1 0


Carmona W,8-2 7 5 2 2 2 5
RBetancourt 1 1 0 0 0 2
BorowskiS,20 1 2 0 0 0 1
Carmona pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
T-2:51. A-33,429 (43,415).
Angels 10, Dodgers 4
LOS ANGELES (A) LOS ANGELES (N)
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Figgins 3b 6 12 2 Furcal ss 5 22 1
OCbera ss 5 13 1 Pierre cf 5 0 1 0
Aybarss 1 00 0 Grcprr lb 4 033
VGrero rf 311 1 JKent 2b 4 000
Mosely p 000 0 LGnzlz If - 3 0 0 0
Hyns If 1 00 0 Btemit3b 4 0 0 0
Quinlanl If 5021 Kemprf 3 01 0
Hlnbrnlb 411 0 Tomkop 0 000
Mathws cf 1 21 1 Saenz ph 1 0 1 0
HCrsco p 0 00 0 Brxtn p 0 0 0 0
Kndrck 2b 5232 Lbrthal c 4 0 1 0
Napolic 3l101 Wolfp 0 000
Willits cf 3 12 1 Ethier ph 1 1 1 0
KEscbr p 3 01 0 Hndrck p 0 0 0 0
Evans rf 1 000 Seanez p 0000
Loneyrf 1 000
TAbru3b 1 1 1 0
Totals 41101610 Totals 36 411 4
Los Angeles (A) 004 001 320- 10
Los Angeles (N) 100 010 101- 4
E-Lieberthal (1). LOB-Los Angeles
(A) 11, Los Angeles (N) 9. 2B-OCabrera
(22), Kendrick (7), Willits (8), Garciaparra
(12). HR-Matthews (10), Furcal (1). SB-
Matthews (11), Kendrick (3), Kemp (2). S-
KEscobar, Wolf. SF-Napoli, Garciaparra.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles (A)
KEscobar W,8-3 7 8 3 3 2 8
Moseley 1 1 0 0 0 0
HCarrasco 1 2 1 1 0 0
Los Angeles (N)
Wolf L,8-5 5 7 4 4 3 1
Hendrickson 2-3 2 1 1 1 0
Seanez 2-3 33 3 1 1
Tomko 12-3 4 2 2 0 2
Broxton 1 0 0 0 0 3


T-3:12. A-56,000 (56,000).
Tigers 7, Phillies


ab rhbi


PHILA


DETROIT
Gmdsn cf
Infante cf
Planco 2b
Monroe If
MOrdz rf
Casey lb
Rodney p
Maroth ph
TJones p
IRdrgz c
Inge 3b
NPerez ss
CGillen ss
Vrlnder p
Shffield ph
Seay p
Thmes lb

Totals 38
Detroit
Philadelphi


LOB-Detroit 8, Philadelphia 12. 2B-
MOrdonez (33), Inge (9), Utley (30),
Rowand (16). 3B-Dobbs (2). SB-
Granderson (8), Rollins (13).
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
Verlander W,8-2 6 7 3 3 2 6
Seay 2-3 2 0 0 0 1
Rodney 11-3 2 1 1 1 2
TJonesS,17 1 1 0 0 0 0
Philadelphia
Eaton 61-3 6 3 3 2 2
GearyL,1-2 0 1 1 1 0 0
Zagurski 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Y-Hernandez 1-3 5 3 3 1 0
Mesa 1 0 0 0 0 2
Sanches 1 0 0 0 1 0
Geary pitched to 1 batter in the 7th,
YHernandez pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
HBP-by Verlander (Dobbs). WP-
Sanches.
T-3:33. A-45,537 (43,647).
Red Sox 9, Giants 5
SAN FRAN BOSTON
ab rhbi ab r hbi
DRbrts cf 4 00 0 JDrew rf 3 2 1 0
Winn If 401 1 Pedroia 2b 4 2 1 0
Drham2b 5 00 DOrtizdh 3 22 1
Bonds dh 3121 MRmrz If 4 123
BMolna c 4 00 0 Yukilis lb 4 1 2 2
Klesko lb 3 00 0 Lowell 3b 4 1 1 1
Feliz 3b 421 1 WPena cf 3 000
Schrhlt rf 4 131 Crisp cf 1 01 0
Vizquel ss 4 12 1 Mrbelli c 3 0 1 1
JLugo ss 4 000
Totals 355 9 5 Totals 33 911 8
San Francisco 002 102 000- 5
Boston 205 100 10x- 9
DP-San Francisco 1, Boston 1. LOB-
San Francisco 7, Boston 5. 2B-Winn
(18), Vizquel (9), JDrew (9), DOrtiz 2 (27),
MRamirez (14), Lowell (19). 3B-
Schierholtz (1). HR-Bonds (14), Feliz (9),
MRamirez (10). SB-DRoberts (11),
Vizquel (5). CS-Crisp (3).
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
Morris L,7-4 4 9 8 8 2 3
Chulk 2 0 0 0 0 3
JSanchez 1 1 1 1 0 2
Hennessey 1 1 0 0 1 0
Boston
Wakefield W,7-7 52-3 8 5 5 1 3
Delcarmen 2-3 0 0 0 2 0
Lopez 0 0 0 0 1 0
Pineiro 12-3 1 0 0 0 0
Okajima 1 0 0 0 0 1
Lopez pitched to 1 batter in the 7th,
Pineiro pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
HBP-by Hennessey (Mirabelli), by
Morris (Pedroia). WP-Wakefield. PB-
Mirabelli.
T-2:56. A-36,137 (36,109).
Cardinals 10, Athletics 6
ST. LOUIS OAKLAND
ab rhbi ab r hbi


Tguchi cf
Spiezio dh
Pujols lb
JEcrcn rf
Rolen 3b
Ludwck If
Miles 2b
GBnntt c
Ryan ss


501 1 Buck rf
5 12 1 Ellis2b
3 21 0 Swisher cf
421 0 Cust dh
511 1 ShStwrt If
533 5 DJnson lb
402 0 Crosby ss
3 00 1 Scutaro 3b
411 1 Kendall c


5 1 1 0
4100
5000
5233
4 100
4010
3122
2010
4021


Totals 38101210 Totals 36 610 6
St. Louis 110 200 420- 10
Oakland 500 000 100- 6
E-Scutaro (3), JKennedy (3), Marshall
(1). DP-St. Louis 1, Oakland 2. LOB-St.
Louis 10, Oakland 8. 2B-Cust (8), Crosby
2 (12), Kendall (7). HR-Spiezio (3),
Ludwick (3), Cust (9). SB-Taguchi (4),
Ludwick (3). SF-GBennett.
IP : H RERBBSO
St. Louis
Reyes 5 7 5 5 33
Springer W,3-0 1 0 0 0 0 2
TJohnson 2-3 1 1 1 0 0
RFranklin 11-3 2 0 0 0 0
Isringhausen 1 0 0 0 0 0
Oakland
JKennedy 5 7 4 3 4 1
Lewis L,0-2 1 4 4 4 0 1
Casilla 1 0 0 0 1 2
Marshall 2 1 2 1 3 0
Lewis pitched to 4 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by Reyes (Scutaro), by Reyes
(Ellis). WP-JKennedy.
T-3:08. A-35,077 (34,077).
Yankees 8, Mets 2
NEW YORK (N) NEW YORK (A)
ab rhbi ab r hbi
JBRyes ss 401 0 Damon dh 5 1 22
LDucac 1 00 0 Jeterss 4 1 1 0
RCstroc 211 0 BAbreurf 3 1 1 0
Beltran cf 4 011 ARod 3b 2 22 3
Wright 3b 410 0 Posada c 4 1 12
CDIgdo lb 401 1 Matsui If 4 1 1 0
JoVlntn dh 3010 Cano 2b 4 01 0
ShGrn rf 3000 MeCbrcf 4 010
Gotay2b 3 01 0 Cairo Ib 3 1 1 1
Gomez If 2 000
Totals 302 6 2 Totals 33 811 8
NewYork (N) 000 000 101- 2
NewYork (A) 221 010 02x- 8
DP-New York (N) 1, New York (A) 3.
LOB-New York (N) 3, New York (A) 5.
2B-RCastro (1), CDelgado (15),
JoValentin (9), ARodriguez (15), Cairo (3).
3B-BAbreu (2). HR-Damon (4),
ARodriguez (27), Posada (9). CS-
JBReyes (9). SF-ARodriguez.
IP H RERBBSO
New York (N)
OHernandez L,3-342-3 7 6 6 1 6
Schoeneweis 11-3 1 0 0 0 1
Heilman 1 2 2 2 0 0
Feliciano 1 1 0 0 0 0
New York (A)
WangW,7-4 82-3 6 2 2 1 10
MMyers 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Heilman pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
HBP-by Feliciano (Cairo), by
OHernandez (BAbreu), by Wang (Lo
Duca). WP-Wang.
T-3:00. A-55,060 (56,937).
Nationals 4, Blue Jays 2
WASHINGTON TORONTO
ab rhbi ab r hbi


CGzmn ss
Blliard 2b


Zmrmn 3b
DYong dh
s 4 Keams rf
Schndr c
ab rhbi Batista lb


3 12 0 Rollins ss 5 0 1 1
2 00 0Vctrnorf 4010
4100 Utley2b 5 130
5 112 Howard lb 5 0 00
3 02 3 Rwandcf 3 1 1 1
4 00 0 Werth If 1 00 0
0 00 0Dobbslf 2 1 1 0
1 00 0 Helmsph 1 000
0 000 Bourn cf 1 01 0
5 12 0 Nunez 3b 5 121
3 120 Ruiz c 2 00 0
2 00 0 Brajasc 1 000
2 121 Eaton p 3 02 1
2 00 0 Gearyp 0 00 0
1 11 1 Zgurskip 0 000
0 000 YHndz p 0 00 0
1 00 0 Mesap 0 00 0
Burrelph. 1 00 0
Sanches p 0 0 0
8712 7 Totals 39 412 4
100 000 510- 7
a 011 001 010- 4


Logan cf
Fick If
Lngrhn cf


4 00 0 Riosrf
4 01 1 VWells cf
4 11 1 Glaus 3b
4 11 0 Thmas dh
4 12 1 AHill 2b
4 00 0 Thgpen lb
3 01 1 Stairs ph
0 00 0 JPhllps c
3 11 0 Zaun c
2 00C0 Lind If
Clayton ss


Totals 324 7 4 Totals 29 2 4 2
Washington 020 110 000- 4
Toronto 101 000 000- 2
DP-Washington 1, Toronto 2. LOB-
Washington 2, Toronto 4. 2B-DYoung
(16), Kearns (18), Glaus (11). HR-
Zimmerman (12), Thomas (9). SF-AHill.
IP H RERBBSO


Washington
Bowie W,4-2
Colome
Rauch
CCordero S,11
Toronto
Towers L,2-5
Frasor
Accardo


7 4 4 1 4
0 0 0 0 2
00002


T-2:14. A-28,867 (48,900).


SUNDAY'S BOX SCORES


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNici.E


MATC)R ]LiEA4GuE BASEBALL












MONDAY, JUNE 18, 2007 3B


Associated Press
Rice's Aaron Luna (9) celebrates with teammates Sunday after hitting a two-run home run in the ninth inning against North Carolina in
a College World Series baseball game in Omaha, Neb. Rice beat North Carolina 14-4.





Owls egg Tarheels


Associated Press

OMAHA, Neb. - Rice
jumped on North Carolina
with a six-run second inning
and Joe Savery pitched six-
plus solid innings to make it
stand up and beat the Tar
Heels 14-4 Sunday night in the
College World Series.
The Owls, who failed to
score in their last 23 innings
at the 2006 CWS, have 29 runs
in their first two games and
are-the lone unbeaten team in
Bracket 1. -
They'll play Wednesday
against the winner of
Tuesday's Louisville-North


Carolina elimination game.
One more victory would put
the Owls (56-12) in the best-of-
three championship series
that starts Saturday.
North Carolina (54-14) used
a CWS-record eight pitchers
against the Owls. But a
bullpen that had been a key in
five come-from-behind victo-
ries in the NCAA tournament
wasn't up to the task after
freshman starter Alex White
lasted only 1 1-3 innings.
Each of Rice's starting posi-
tion players had at least one
hit, with Diego Seastrunk
going 3-for-5 and Aaron Luna
hitting a two-run homer in the


ninth.
It was the most runs surren-
dered by North Carolina in
119 games, since a 15-8 loss to
Maryland on March 17, 2006.
Danny Lehmann, Seastrunk
and Brian Friday all doubled
in the second as the Owls con-
verted six hits into six runs.
They scored in all but three
innings and finished with 14
hits.
Savery (11-1), the
Philadelphia Phillies' first-
round draft pick, allowed four
runs on seven hits before ldhv-
ing with one 'out in the sev-
enth.
Cole St. Clair allowed three


hits the rest of the way and
earned his ninth save.
For White (6-6), it was his
second straight poor start in
the NCAA tournament. He
went 3 1-3 innings in a loss to
South Carolina in super
regionals, allowing six runs
on five hits. He gave up the
same number of runs and hits
in two fewer innings Sunday
North Carolina's bullpen
came into the game having
allowed just six runs in 29 2-3
innings ini the national tour-
nament. The Tar Heels' seven
relievers gave up eight runs in
7 2-3 innings against the Owls.


Louisville bumps


off Mississippi St.,



keeps hope alive


Associated Press
OMAHA, Neb. - Those
Louisville sluggers kept the
Cardinals alive at the College
World Series.
Chris Dominguez hit two of
his team's four home runs and
the Cardinals scored in double
digits for the third consecutive
game, eliminating Mississippi
State 12-4 on Sunday.
Louisville's latest offensive
surge overshadowed a strong
performance by freshman
pitcher Justin Marks, who held
the Bulldogs to two singles
before taking a hard shot to his
left leg in the sixth inning.
Now the Cardinals (47-23) play
Tuesday against the loser of
Sunday night's Rice-North
Carolina game. Mississippi State
(38-22) went two games and out
or the first time in seven CWS
appearances since the 1971
Bulldogs went winless here.
"To get here, you feel like
you've got to score runs, and
we've always said you have to
swing your way to Omaha,"
Louisville coach Dan Mc-
Donnell said. "Obviously, you
have to pitch and defend.
Everything counts. But you
have to score runs."
The Cards' bats certainly got
them to Omaha for the first
time. And their bats will deter-
mine how long they stay They
have seven home runs, 33 hits
and 22 runs in their first two
games.
Louisville came into the
NCAA tournament batting .304
and averaging 6.7 runs. Those
numbers have ballooned to
.370 and 9.9 the last 10 games.
They've scored 10 or more runs
five times in the tournament.
"They're a ballclub that's
been hot the last couple weeks
with the bat," Mississippi State
coach Ron Polk said. "It's not
that our kids didn't try. We
closed the ball game down a lit-
tle bit. Every time we did, it
seemed like they got a two- or
three-run home run. That third
baseman is a hoss, boy."
That third baseman is
Dominguez, who has hit eight
home runs the last eight games
after hitting seven in his first


56 games.
The Cardinals found them-
selves fighting for survival
after squandering leads of 5-0
and 10-4 in Friday's 15-10 loss
to Rice.
Sunday, the Cards broke out
to an 8-0 lead - and never fold-
ed. After Mississippi State
scored three runs in the bottom
of the sixth, Louisville came
back with three in the seventh,
highlighted by Dominguez's
two-run shot to left.
"It was one of those games
where you just couldn't stop
them," Polk said.
With the wind blowing out at
19 to 25 mph, Logan Johnson
hit his third homer in five CWS
at-bats after Boomer Whiting
singled leading off the game
against Chad Crosswhite (8-5).
Dominguez, who also home-
red against Rice, hit his first of
the game to make it 3-0 in the
second. Daniel Burton's three-
run shot in the fourth gave
Louisville its eight-run lead.
"When the wind is gushing
out like that," McDonnell said,
"you blink and a team scores
three runs."
It was the fifth time in the
NCAA tournament the
Cardinals hit at least three
home runs, running their total
to 20 in 10 games. The four
homers Sunday were their
most since they hit eight
against Marshall on April 1.
Marks (9-2), who held
Oklahoma State to one run on
one hit in 6 1-3 innings in super
regionals, cruised through the
first five innings. But in the
sixth, Mitch Moreland's sharp
comebacker hit him on his left
knee. The shot left him
writhing on the mound, and he
later was diagnosed with a
bruise.
After Marks composed him-
self, he walked Brian LaNinfa
on four pitches, and Brandon
Turner followed with a three-
run homer that barely cleared
the wall in left center.
"We were down 8-0, and I
was trying anything to get us
going," Turner said. "But every
time we got something, the
next inning they got the exact
same or a little more."


Former president recalls days playing first base


Associated Press

Long before George H.W. Bush
stepped foot in the Oval Office, he
strolled to the plate at the first College
World Series.
Bush was a slick-fielding first base-
man for Yale 60 years ago, when col-
lege baseball's national champi-
onship was played at Hyames Field
on the campus of Western Michigan. It
was a small ballpark on a picturesque
hillside in Kalamazoo, Mich. - a real-
life field of dreams for college players
in 1947.
"I remember going out there and
thinking, 'Well, we're pretty darned
lucky as an Ivy League team to be in
the big time here,' "the former presi-
dent recently told The Associated
Press by telephone. "But there we
were."
Bush said the experience is some-
thing he and his teammates carried
with them long after they put down
their bats and gloves.
"I think competitive sports is good
for anybody in any practice in life,"
said Bush, still a big baseball fan who
follows the Houston Astros and the
Texas A&M women's softball team. "I
know in politics, it helps to be com-
petitive and it helps to learn about
sportsmanship and practice sports-
manship. So I found that my modest
baseball career at Yale was extraordi-
narily helpful to me, and when I got
into politics or got out into life in busi-
ness."
Eight teams are in Omaha this
weekend, hoping to win a national
title in the Nebraska city that has
been home to the College World
Series since 1950.
"But it all started in Kalamazoo,"
said Norm Felske, who was Yale's
catcher. "There's no doubt about it."
California coach Clint Evans is
often credited with the concept of a
College World Series, and his Jackie
Jensen-led Bears team swept Ethan
Allen's Yale squad in a best-of-three
series for the first national title.
"It was a landmark situation to have
the first one and to be on the team that
won it, especially with Clint being
instrumental in putting it together,"
said former Cal outfielder Palmer,
now 82 and living in Pleasant Hills,
Calif.
Baseball commissioner Happy
Chandler threw out the ceremonial
first pitch, and major league umpires
Ed Hurley and Bill McKinley worked


Associated Press
Babe Ruth, left, presents Yale baseball captain George H. W. Bush the original manuscript of "The Babe Ruth Story" at
Yale Field in New Haven, Conn., in this June 5, 1948, file photo. Bush was the first baseman on the Yale team that lost
to California in the first College World Series in Kalamazoo, Mich., in 1947. Second from right is James T. Babb, Yale's
head librarian, and at right is William C. Celentano, mayor of New Haven.


the two games.
"It made you feel kind of impor-
tant," Palmer said.
Bush, who recently celebrated his
83rd birthday, remembers the excite-
ment of playing for a national title.
"We thought about it a lot and
talked about it in the locker room," he
said. '"A lot of us on the team were vet-
erans and we had come back from the
war, so maybe that made it a little less
apprehensive. On the other hand, it
didn't deduct from our enthusiasm
and our desire to win, which we did
not do."
Instead, the title went to the
California team led by Jensen, the


Bears' ace pitcher who starred as an
outfielder in the majors. The Bears
won the first game in which the first
few innings were played in a steady
rain. Yale led 4-2 before some strat-
egy by Allen, a former major lea-
guer, backfired in the seventh
inning.
"We walked the eighth hitter to get
to the pitcher, and it was Jackie
Jensen," Bush said. "He hit one that's
still rolling out there in Kalamazoo."
That big hit tied the game, and the
Bears scored twice more in the eighth
before breaking it open with an 11-
run ninth.
"That was a real shame because it


was a close game up until that point,"
Felske said, the disappointment in his
voice still evident.
Jensen went 2-for-2 with two RBIs
in the series and started the second
game on the mound. He was the 1958
AL MVP and a three-time All-Star for
the Boston Red Sox before retiring
after the 1961 season. He died in 1982.
"We knew that Jensen played foot-
ball at Cal," said Felske, 83, and living
in Montauk, N.Y. "I don't think he was
that well known as a baseball player
But after that series, we all sure knew
him."
Yale rallied in the second game
from a 7-2 deficit and tied it in the


sixth inning, but Cal went ahead to
stay the following inning. Felske tried
to throw out Palmer at second base,
but the ball got away from shortstop
Art Moher. John Ramos scored from
third with what ended up the winning
run in an 8-7 victory
"We'll get together every now and
then and it still comes up, even
though there aren't too many of us
left," Palmer said.
Yale found its way back to
Kalamazoo the next year. Southern
California came out on top in three
games, with the final game ending on
a triple play - with Bush on deck
"It was a traumatic experience and
letdown for Yale," said Bush, the team
captain. "All of us felt that way. You
learn to go with the flow and get on
with your life, and that's what all of us
did."
After he became president in 1989,
Bush kept his baseball memories
close by Tucked in his Oval Office
desk was his Yale first baseman's mitt
"He was a good teammate and he
was even a sort of politician then,"
Felske said with a laugh.
Allen regarded Bush as one of the
best defensive first basemen he had
seen. But he was quick to point out to
scouts that Bush was "all glove and no
hit" - a label Bush disputes.
"I think it was grossly unfair
because I think my average was about
.240 or .250," he said with a chuckle.
"And I think if I were playing today in
the bigs, I'd probably get about 8 mil-
lion bucks a year for that."
When asked if he might have had
the bat to go with the glove had he
used aluminum like today's college
players, Bush said: "Hey, I might have.
I hadn't thought about that"
Palmer didn't realize he played
against Bush until several years later
when a former teammate showed him
the box scores.
"He didn't do very well," Palmer
said, pointing out Bush went 0-for-7
against Cal. "That's all right with me
because I'm not a Republican."
Politics aside, the players in that
first series share a bond.
"When you go to the Yale Club, you
go in the bar and you'll see pictures of
the 1947 and 1948 Yale baseball
teams," Felske said. "With a few
breaks, we probably would've won at
least one of those years. But, when
you think about it, our first baseman
became president. Wow, how about
that?"


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Winning, not speaking, Saban's priority



Winning, not speaking, Saban's priority


Associated Press

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. - Ala-
bama's Nick Saban is a football
coach, not a pitch man. His
domain is the football field and
film room, not the podium and
banquet circuit
It's in his contract. Right
there on Page 11.
The Crimson Tide coach
knows, after all, that he'll be
judged on wins and titles
rather than speeches and com-
mercials, anyway
"Here's what everybody
needs to understand: Why did I
get hired here? To do what?
Coach football, right? I'm a
coach," Saban said Friday in an
interview with The Associated
Press.
It's why his eight-year, $32
million contract, approved by
university trustees Thursday,
stipulates that he doesn't have
to make more than 15 appear-
ances a year at alumni gather-
ings and other such functions.
Don't expect to see him in com-
mercials or on billboards either
Saban said he had a similar
limit in place at LSU and other
stops. It's why he chose to
recruit and hire a staff instead
of saying yes to many of the 100
or so requests for appearances
that poured in during his first
two months on the job.


Associated Press
Alabama head football coach Nick Saban talks to the media Thursday about signing his contract, at
North River Yacht Club in Tuscaloosa, Ala. Alabama trustees approved an eight-year, $32 million con-
tract for Saban on Thursday.


"It's a full-time job to run this
football program and the guys
that are on this team and get
them to all do what they're sup-
posed to do," Saban said. "I
think that's what people expect.
"How many public appear-


ances can you do? How many
commercials can you make?"
It's a trade-off most Alabama
fans will likely accept even if
they'd love a little bigger slice
of the $4 million-a-year coach's
time.


"This is the way I've always
done it," Saban said. "I do it
because I know what my prior-
ities are. I know what's impor-
tant to being successful."
He also knows that his hiring
in January raised expectations


for a team that went 6-7 last
season and hasn't had sus-
tained success in a decade.
Saban did, after all, lead LSU
to a Southeastern Conference
championship in his second
season and a share of the
national title two years later
He prefers to talk about "the
process" of achieving those suc-
cesses instead of predicting
when (or if) they'll happen.
"You've got to be realistic
about your expectations," he
said. "Expectations can be a
negative when you have high
expectations and they're not
realistic and they don't come to
fruition and everybody gets a
negative attitude."
When something bad hap-
pens along the way, he won't be
among those surprised.
"Something's going to go
wrong. Count on it," he said.
"Everybody talks about the
SEC championship that we
won in the second year (at
LSU) or the national champi-
onship we won in the fourth
year. But we lost to UAB the
first year."
Saban and his wife, Terry,
have already had some highs
and lows during their first six
months since he left the Miami
Dolphins.
The biggest high: 92,000-plus
fans filling Bryant-Denny


Stadium for a spring game,
believed to be a national
record for what essentially
amounts to a scrimmage.
"Never was there a more
heartfelt moment by the
Sabans (than) to see that kind
of support for what we're trying
to do as what there was at the
spring game, with all those
people coming to support the
team," Saban said.
"I want people to understand
that and realize that, because
we went through a lot to get
here."
The lows: He was roundly
criticized in Miami for leaving
a couple of weeks after vowing,
"I'm not going to be the
Alabama coach."
He admits to making mis-
takes, but says he was just try-
ing to stay focused on the team,
not himself.
"I was forced to make state-
ments that I shouldn't have
made relative to our future,
and I was criticized for it,"
Saban said. '"And rightfully so. I
did it I don't want to have
grudges and I do care what
people think But I don't criti-
cize others.
"I've got to be responsible for
my own self-determination
when it comes to that stuff and
do the best we can to do it the
right way in the future."


Jockey, 65,



not riding



into sunset



quite yet

Associated Press


OKLAHOMA CITY - About a decade ago,
Remington Park jockey Jimmy Brooks had an
idea for a trifecta of sorts - having three gener-
ations of the same family ride in the same race.
It hasn't come to pass yet, but with his father
Roy Brooks, still riding, the odds are getting bet-
ter.
"He said, 'Cameron wants to ride, and that all
three of us could ride in the same race,' " Roy
Brooks recalled of the conversation aboul
Jimmy's son, who then was in grade school. "I
said, 'Well, I don't know if I can last that long.'
"But I'm still going."
To this day, Roy Brooks - who will turn 66 on
Aug. 1 - remains one of Remington Park's top
jockeys, finishing in second place in the stand-
ings during the just-completed meet with 48
wins on 324 mounts. Jimmy Brooks missed most
of the meet with a broken pelvis, but plans tc
return to the track, and Cameron Brooks - now
18 - plans to begin pursuing a riding license.
Cameron Brooks is hoping his grandfather
doesn't retire until they can all race together.
"I don't want him to (quit). I love watching
him," Cameron Brooks said. "I'm ready to gel
out there with him. I hope I can be half as suc-
cessful as him."
Roy Brooks' grandson isn't his only admirer
His longevity in a profession in which injury or
physical ailments claim many careers and fewx
riders are able to remain competitive past their
mid-50s has won Roy Brooks the respect of
many in the industry.
"I tell him every chance I get that he's my
hero, and I mean that," said fel-
low jockey G.R. Carter, the
Oklahoma City's track's peren-
nial leading rider. "It's not like
he's just a token figure that's is creel
just around for the hell of it.
You have to do your best to beat me, but
him or he'll beat you. He takes
no prisoners." bother m
As Roy Brooks tells it, his rid-
ing career began by accident, ride 1
when he thought he could do a
better job than the jockeys rid- (a nigh
ing a horse of which he was a doesn
part-owner. Brooks won his first doesn
career race aboard Star Lady me at a
Bruce in 1967 at long-gone
Greer Downs in Mangum, but
not before some adventure.
"I lost both stirrups and still
won the race," he said. "I don't
know how I kept from falling off. I was so cotton
mouthed I couldn't talk, I couldn't spit, nothing
I was scared to death."
Brooks rode at obscure Oklahoma "brush
tracks" through the early 1970s, long before the
state legalized pari-mutuel wagering. Thanks ir
part to family ties - Brooks' cousin, Jack
Brooks, was a top quarter horse trainer - he
was able to ride a few races at La Mesa Park ir
New Mexico, then a more prominent track than
those in Oklahoma.
"His work ethic has always been so good,'
Jack Brooks said. "Being a good rider, he works
so hard at it. That's what makes him so success-
ful."
From La Mesa Park, Roy Brooks jumped to
Ruidoso Downs, one of quarter horse racing's
premier tracks. For 15 years, he rode some of
the nation's best quarter horses, although the
annual trip from Oklahoma to New Mexico did
n't always please his son.
"I didn't really want to ride at first," Jimmy
Brooks said. "We had to go (to New Mexico), and
I wanted to stay here with my friends. Then one
year, my dad ran second in the All Americar
(Futurity). When I saw how much he made ..
that's when I decided to get into it"


Associated Press
3 jockey Roy Brooks is pictured April 2, 2006,
t after he won the $200,000 Oklahoma Futurity,
aboard Painted First at Remington Park.
Roy Brooks was ready to give up riding, but
r Remington Park. opened in 1988 in Oklahoma
City, which is about 35 miles from his ranch. The
chance to ride again in his home state rejuve-
t nated his interest. He's never won a riding title
- at Remington Park - although he's consistently
been near the top of the standings at
. Oklahoma's largest track - but he has won
r three at Fair Meadows in Tulsa.
V "I can go home and rest up and come back
r and ride," he said. "I don't have to go very far ...
f and I can keep my farming operation going.
"I don't have any problems with my health,
V just an achy back and stuff like that. Old age is
creeping up on me, but it does-
n't bother me. ... I can ride 10
Old age races (a night) and it doesn't
bother me at all."
ing up on Neither Equibase nor The
Jockeys' Guild keeps records,
it doesn't but there aren't many jockeys
over 60. Besides Brooks, there's
ne ... I can Richard Rettele of Northville,
Mich., who will turn 67 on Aug.
.0 races 8. Rettele rides quarter horses,
it but said he doesn't have near as
it) and it many mounts as Brooks.
't bother The oldest rider ever to win a
thoroughbred race in the U.S. is
all. Frank Amonte Sr., who was 69
when he won at Suffolk Downs
on Aug. 10, 2005. He later won a
Roy Brooks race at Northampton Fair in
65-year-old jockey. Massachusetts that Sept. 4, a
day before his 70th birthday.
- This January in New York, at 71, he became the
. oldest jockey ever to ride in a race.
Through June 7, Brooks had won 1,412 races
. since 1972, when the American Quarter Horse
Association began keeping records.
. "He is one of the great stories in racing,
k because the guy is 65 and still excelling at a very
tough and dangerous athletic event," said
1 Remington Park general manager Scott Wells, a
1 former trainer who has used Brooks as a rider.
"I've never heard of anyone that rides the
amount of horses he rides and has the success
s he has at his age."
Brooks said he thought seriously about retir-
ing in 2003, but then quarter horse trainer Luis
Villafranco began using him on his top horses.
s As this year's Remington Park meet wound
f down, Brooks acknowledged that he doesn't
e know how much longer he plans to ride,
- although he'd like one more shot at winning
quarter horse racing's biggest event, the All
V American Futurity, in which he's 0-for-6.
"I think it's something to be proud of," Roy
e Brooks said of his longevity in the saddle. "I
i don't gloat about it ... it doesn't bother me for
. (other jockeys) to call me 'old man' or 'grandpa.'
They do that a lot."


Orioles great Robinson still



loving baseball at age of 70


Associated Press

ELLICOTT CITY, Md. -
How convenient that Brooks
Robinson's business office is
located across the street from a
golf course. Nothing like 18
holes after lunch to round out
the day.
Robinson enjoys playing
golf. He loves baseball even
more, which explains why the
Hall of Fame third baseman
will spend his senior years
doing more than just lining up
putts and traveling around the
world.
:Robinson is part owner .of
Opening Day Partners, which
owns and operates minor
league and independent base-
ball teams. Sure, Robinson
serves as an ambassador for
the firm, because almost every-
one in and around Baltimore
remembers his sensational 23-
year career with the Orioles.
But he is not merely a figure-
head. Robinson's responsibili-
ties include interviewing man-
agers and coaches for the three
teams currently owned by
ODP: The Lancaster (Pa.)
Barnstormers, the Camden
(N.J.) Riversharks and the York
(Pa.) Revolution, which is play-
ing its inaugural season this
year
Before becoming a part
owner in April, Robinson spent
four years as a special assistant
to the group. Then he told
Chairman Peter Kirk that it
was time for a change.
"I said, 'Peter, everyplace I
go people think I'm part owner.
When I tell them I'm not, they
look at me funny. So it kind of
makes sense if I had a small
piece of the team,'" Robinson
said.
Robinson recently helped
the group petition the
Maryland legislature for
money to help finance a team


Associated Press
Baseball Hall of Fame third baseman Brooks Robinson, who played
23 years for the Baltimore Orioles, stands near a vintage jersey
June 12 at his office in Ellicott City, Md. Robinson is part owner of
Opening Day Partners, which owns and operates minor league and
independent baseball teams.


in Waldorf, which is scheduled
to launch its season next year
He was also asked to throw out
the first ball June 15 at York's
home opener
But Robinson works when he
wants to - the lone stipulation
he made upon accepting the
responsibility of joining the
ownership group.
"I don't want to do something
that's going to take up all of my
time because I'm doing other
things, too," Robinson said. "I
play in a lot of golf tourna-
ments, I'm making a lot of
speeches, I'm on the go a lot."
So, when it comes to picking
baseball personnel, Robinson
joins the fray. He's there for
news conferences, opening day
ceremonies and fundraisers.
But he has no intention of mak-
ing it a 9-to-5 job.
"I'm happy doing just what I
do. I don't want to do any more.
I'm 70 years old now and I'm
having a ball, just doing the
things I want to do," Robinson
said.
That's just fine with ODP
President Jon Danos, who val-


ues Robinson's guidance and
enthusiasm.
"He appreciates minor
league baseball and what it
represents to these communi-
ties," Danos said. "He loves the
game at this level, loves the
people. He just flat out enjoys
this. And on the non-baseball
side, he has a great influence
on the community."
Robinson has lived in
Baltimore since 1960. While
with the Orioles - the only
team he ever played for - he
won the 1964 MVP award, par-
ticipated in 18 All-Star games
and received 16 Gold Gloves. In
the 1970 World Series, he
earned MVP honors by gloving
virtually every ball hit to third
base by the Cincinnati Reds.
Now, in retirement, Robin-
son is helping provide a setting
that gives young players a
chance to display their talent
for major league scouts.
"It's a good starting point for
a lot of guys," he said. "Every
guy on that field still has that
dream of making it to the big
leagues."


Phillies' former spring


home set for demolition


Associated Press

CLEARWATER - Fans
came to Jack Russell Memorial
Stadium for decades each
spring to see Mike Schmidt and
other Philadelphia Phillies
greats during spring training.
The Rolling Stones played to a
small crowd in the stadium
right before they made it big in
America.
Soon the 52-year-old stadi-
um, which fans counted among
the last old-time Florida spring
training venues, will be noth-
ing but dust and rubble.
A demolition crew hired by
the city of Clearwater is set to
begin tearing down the stadi-
um, which had fallen into dis-
repair even before the Phillies
moved to a new facility in 2004.
A city commissioner broke his
ankle at the stadium in 2001
when a roped off section of
concrete broke away, sending


the politician plummeting 9
feet to the ground.
The field, dugouts and an
office building will remain as
part of a baseball academy.
Jim Felce was 5 when he first
came to the stadium with his
father in 1977.
"Mike Schmidt pulled me
over the right field fence, sat
me on his knee and signed my
baseball," said Felce, who
played minor league baseball
and now coaches at an acade-
my on the stadium property.
"(Larry) Bowa did the same
thing. Can you imagine being 5
years old and that happening?
From that moment on, I knew I
wanted to be a baseball play-
er."
In May 1965, The Rolling
Stones played to an excited
crowd of about 3,000 at the sta-
dium. The show ended with a
scuffle in which 200 fans threw
toilet paper at police. A month


later the Stones' "Satisfaction"
became their first No. 1 hit on
the American charts.
The stadium was named for
Jack Erwin Russell, who
pitched 15 years in the major
leagues before moving to
Clearwater and becoming a
city commissioner. His career
highlights include being
picked for the 1934 American
League All-Star team; pitching
in two World Series; and,
unhappily for him, throwing
the pitch that became Babe
Ruth's 477th home run.
The senior Russell died in
1990 at 85.
"We miss my grandfather
and we're going to miss the sta-
dium as well," said Jack E.
Russell III, 46, a Clearwater
banker and son of Jack E.
Russell Jr., 71. "But we've got to
let it go some time. You hate to
see history go by the wayside,
but that's progress."


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S URTI COUNTY ( ) CHRONICLE




Pete Rose Jr. can't give up dream


Newsday

PJ. Rose couldn't escape his
dad, even if he wanted to. No
matter where he chased his
big- league dream, no matter
what distant baseball
outpost he decided to
call home, there always
would be one well-
lubricated fan, at least
one paying customer,
who wanted only to talk ,-
trash about his father.
He's heard the
chants of "IRS, IRS" PC
when he comes to the Ros
plate. He's heard, "Hey
Petey, here's 10 bucks. Want to
bet on the game?" He's been
repeatedly reminded that he
needs "only 4,254 more hits" to
tie his father's record.
Every day is Father's Day for
Long Island Ducks first base-
man Pete Edward Rose Jr.,
who broke into baseball in
1989, the same year his father
was exiled from the game for
gambling.
After all, how can one measly
day a year be enough for a larg-
er-than-life legend? How can
one Sunday in June be a suffi-
cient tribute for the banned-
for-life hit king? And so Rose Jr.
- or PJ. Rose as he now has
the Ducks public address
announcer call him - has
made a career out of honoring


the man baseball refuses to.
For a good part of the past 19
seasons, Rose Jr. has bused
around the minor leagues,
enduring some of the cruelest
taunts in baseball to doggedly
pursue the big-league
S dream that his father
can't.
"I love him to death,"
Rose said before a
. recent game at Citibank
Park. "He's my idol, my
, inspiration, my every-
thing. He's my dad."
te In pursuit of the
SJr. dream, Rose Jr. has
left his wife, Shannon,
and his two young children
back home in Cincinnati this
summer in order to make
about $2,000 a month playing
i.n the Atlantic League. In
pursuit of the dream, he has
done everything possible to
become a better player -
even using GBL, an illegal
performance-enhancing drug
- which ultimately led to his
serving 30 days in jail in
Boone County, Ky., last year.
In pursuit of the dream, he
has stubbornly refused to
hang up his cleats, even when
players five years younger are
being told that they are too
old to entertain major-league
dreams.
And it is this stick-to-itive-
ness his father clearly admires.


He can play a couple of positions, if some team was smart,
they'd pick him up. I'm surprised the Reds haven't tried to.

Pete Rose Sr.
about son Pete Rose Jr., currently playing in the Atlantic League.


"He's playing tremendous,"
Rose Sr. said in a recent phone
interview. "He loves to play the
game. A lot of people think
when you're 36 or 37, you
shouldn't play. I can't tell him
not to play. I played until I was
45.
"He can play a couple of
positions, if some team was
smart, they'd pick him up. I'm
surprised the Reds haven't
tried to."
Rose Jr. is playing well; he
was batting a team-leading .321
through Thursday for the
Ducks, who play in the inde-
pendent Atlantic League. But
Rose is also 37 and a decade
removed from his one big-
league experience, an 11-game
stint with the Reds at the end of
the 1997 season. The memory
of that brief period as a major-
leaguer - he got only one start
and was 2-for-14 - is one of the
things that keep him coming
back.
The other is the bond the
game gives him with his father.
The two talk several times a


week, mostly about baseball,
with Little Pete often asking
Big Pete's advice. Sometimes
it works. Sometimes it doesn't.
Take the time a few years
back when PJ. was struggling,
when it seemed as if he could-
n't hit a grandma pitching a
grapefruit. He called up Big
Pete, told him about his
slump, and asked what he
should do.
There was a pause on the
other end of the phone, then
Big Pete said: "I don't know.
I've never been in a slump. Just
keep swinging, I guess."
Sometimes, it's not easy to
relate to a father whom his son
describes as being able to "get
a hit off of Jesus." Yet, things
are good between the two these
days. The older Rose divides
his time between his home in
Los Angeles and Las Vegas,
where he has a regular gig sign-
ing autographs at a mall con-
nected to Caesar's Palace.
They see each other about a
half dozen times a year, usually
with little warning.


"I'll look up in the stands one
night, and my dad will be
there," Rose Jr. said.
Whether he is there or not,
Rose often honors his father by
drawing "HK 4,256" in the dirt
behind first base, standing for
hit king and his father's major-
league record. He says he will
continue to do it "as long as
he's out of the game. Just to let
him know what he meant to
me."
Yes, there have been stories
over the years - most notably
one in Sports Illustrated 10
years ago - about their less-
than-perfect relationship, sto-
ries that paint Rose Sr. out to
be a self-absorbed, emotionally
distant father. Rose Jr. said it is
true that it was difficult when
his parents divorced when he
was 10, but he has come to the
conclusion that his father isn't
different from many men of his
generation who were dedicat-
ed to their career.
"Guys used to not run around
hugging each other," Rose Jr.
said. "He was a tough type of


guy because that's how my
grandfather was. My dad is 66
now and he's changed. When
he comes to visit the grandba-
bies, there's hugs and kisses.
He won't admit it, but he's
changed."
What has changed is the pat-
tern, the way one Rose genera-
tion relates to the next.
PJ. Rose will never be the hit
king, but he might be there the
first time his son rides a bike or
his daughter loses a tooth. In
the offseason, Rose Jr. is the
primary caretaker for his 2-
year-old son and infant daugh-
ter, Isabella Marie. Shannon,
who Rose Jr. has been with
since high school, has a good
job in marketing.
"My. dad never changed a
diaper," Rose said. "My wife
works 9 to 5. I change diapers,
feed the kids, take them to
swim lessons, watch Power
Rangers, put them down for
naps."
He also plays ball with his
son, Peter Edward Rose III,
whom they also call PJ. Yes, in
the end Rose Jr. decided to
pass on the name that has
brought him both so much grief
and so much joy over the years.
And his father, of course, was
not surprised.
Said the hit king: "I'm sur-
prised he didn't name his
daughter Pete Rose the IV"


Youth ballplayers get pitch limits


Increasing surgery

rates prompt rule

Associated Press

MONTGOMERY, Ala. - Battling
elbow problems for months, the pitcher
finally put his playing career on hold
and opted for reconstructive surgery.
An overworked major leaguer?
Hardly. Not even a hotshot college
hurler.
"He hurt the ligament when he was
13," said Dr. James Andrews, the noted
sports surgeon, "and at 14 he had sur-
gery."
.Make room on sports medicine's
operating tables. Increasingly, young-
sters with worn-out arms need surgery
to repair elbows and shoulders, derail-
ing or sidetracking careers that haven't
even had a chance to really get started.
It's a problem that has prompted
Little League International to impose a
pitch limit on its players this season.
Other youth leagues are limiting innings
pitched to avoid straining young arms.
An especially common injury for
youngsters appears to be tears in the
ulnar collateral ligament in their
elbows. Correcting the problem
requires the so-called Tommy John sur-
gery, named for the first major leaguer
to have the procedure that typically
involves transplanting ligament taken
from the forearm, wrist or hamstring.
For instance, Andrews, a prominent
Birmingham orthopedist who frequent-
ly operates on high-profile athletes, per-
formed Tommy John surgery 119 times
from 1995-98. Only nine of those were
for high school-aged patients, less than
8 percent, according to Dr. Glenn Fleisig
of Andrews' Alabama Sports Medicine
Institute (ASMI) in Birmingham.
And from 2003-06? The numbers sky-
rocketed to 619 overall and 148 for high
schoolers, or 24 percent.
"We're seeing an epidemic of arm
injuries, both the shoulder and the
elbow, that's appalling," Andrews said.
"We've seen a five- to six-fold increase
in elbow ulnar collateral ligament
injuries since the year 2000. Some of
that's based on increased referrals.
(But) my sports medicine peers around
the country are all experiencing the
same situation."
In an effort to determine the cause,
ASMI tracked 476 youth baseball play-
ers during a spring season, measuring
pitches, how many curve balls they
threw and which players wound up with
elbow or shoulder pain. The study was
commissioned by USA Baseball's
Medical & Safety Advisory Committee.
Fleisig, ASMI's research director,
said the curve ball correlated with a
"slight" risk increase, while pitch count
was "the dominant factor."
The bottom line, he said: "When
someone's tired, take them out That's
pretty much the only rule you need. We
need more rules because not everyone
follows that common-sense rule."
Last year ASMI and USA Baseball
recommended imposing pitch counts on
young pitchers. Only Little League has
taken them up on it so far, after studying
the rule in a pilot program last year.
Little League President Stephen
Keener said the rule change has drawn
mostly positive reviews, and has helped
educate parents and coaches about the
risks of overworking a young player.
"There's only so many throws in an
arm, and we'd like to see those throws
extended over to the life of that player's
career, as opposed to cutting it short at


Associated Press
Sheldon Johnson watches his 10-year-old son Matt warm up on the mound Tuesday
before the start of his team's Dixie Youth Montgomery American League All Start
practice in Montgomery, Ala.


I don't place a whole lot of importance
on winning your league at all costs.

Sheldon Johnson
Little League coach in Montgomery, Ala.


15 or 16 years old," Keener said.
The Little League's pitch limits are:
105 for 17- to 18-year-olds; 95 (13-16), 85
(11-12), and 75 for 10 and under with
mandatory rest periods depending on
how many pitches are thrown.
In Montgomery, Dixie Youth coach
Sheldon Johnson said he keeps a close
eye on his team's pitchers, including 10-
year-old son Matt. The Montgomery
American League limits pitchers to
three innings a game for the first half of
the season, instead of the national orga-
nization's limit of six innings a week.
Dixie Youth also has a mandatory 40-
hour rest period between outings of
three or more innings.
Johnson said he seldom lets a player
pitch more than four innings an outing
during the season. No curve balls
allowed, either.
In youth baseball, he points out, win-
ning isn't supposed to be everything.
"I don't place a whole lot of impor-
tance on winning your league at all
costs," said Johnson, a former college


player. "It's a game for kids."
Dixie Youth Commissioner Wes
Skelton said the league is looking into a
change to the pitch-count system, but
noted it can create staffing issues with
one person needed to keep score and
another to monitor pitches.
"We're going to take a look at it,"
Skelton said. "Our biggest concern is
the administrative burden of keeping
up with it"
Andrews cites other factors that
strain arms besides the number of
pitches, including youth baseball travel
teams and All-Star squads that keep
some kids pitching most of the year, and
young pitchers throwing too hard.
Not surprisingly, Tommy John has
strong opinions on the subject
"Even distance runners do other
things than run all the time," he said.
"We've got to start a program of inform-
ing the parents that year-round baseball
and year-round pitching and all that
stuff is bad. The kids will probably lis-
ten. The parents won't"


Beckham nearly


gets Hollywood


ending in Madrid


Associated Press

MADRID, Spain - David
Beckham was minutes away
from a perfect Hollywood end-
ing.
The 32-year-old soccer star-
pop icon, who likely played his
last professional game in
Europe, was taken off the field
moments before Real Madrid
rallied to win the Spanish
league title for the first time in
Beckham's four years with the
team.
The England midfielder was
replaced in the 66th minute
with what appeared to be a
recurrence of an ankle injury
But he still managed to limp
around the field in celebration
- in front of a huge crowd that
included wife Victoria and
friends Tom Cruise and Katie
Holmes - after his team beat
Mallorca 3-1 to win its 30th
league title.
"I couldn't have dreamt it any
better," Beckham said Sunday.
"It's been about winning the
title for the last six months and
we've deserved it tonight"
It was the culmination of a
season that can easily be called
the most difficult of his life. But
even being shunned by both
Madrid coach Fabio Capello
and England coach Steve
McClaren over the last year
didn't keep Beckham from
proving he still has the skills to
compete at the highest level.
"It's been an incredible
experience but all I remember
now is the great things.
Winning this tonight now puts
to bed everything else," said
Beckham, who was dropped
from the Madrid lineup in
January after signing a five-
year, $27.5 million contract to
play for the Los Angeles
Galaxy of MLS.
But with Madrid again elimi-
nated early from the Champions
League and the team in fourth
place in the league - six points
behind leader FC Barcelona -
Capello begrudgingly recalled
the former England captain.
"A major fault of mine this
season was not recognizing
Beckham's potential," Capello
said Sunday
Beckham, whose good looks


and pop star wife have made
him an international market-
ing magnet, marked his return
to the team by scoring with a
bending free kick in Madrid's
2-1 win at Real Sociedad.
After missing six weeks with
a knee injury, Beckham
returned to set up the winning
goal in a 2-1 win over Valencia.
Madrid rode an eight-game
unbeaten run by scoring 24
goals - more than a third of
the total it had scored in, the
first 30 games of the season.
On Sunday, Beckham nearly
scored with a free kick in the
18th minute, and then watched
as another one went over the
crossbar in the 52nd. Six min-
utes later, Beckham hit the bar
with another.
But Beckham appeared to re-
aggravate his left ankle sprain
and he was replaced by Jose
Antonio Reyes, who scored two
of Madrid's three goals.
After the game, Beckham did
a lap of honor with an England
flag draped across his back,
soaking in the atmosphere at
the famous Santiago Bernabeu
stadium for one last time.
Beckham arrived at Madrid
in 2003 with nine major tro-
phies from his days at
Manchester United. Lining up
alongside Zinedine Zidane,
Ronaldo and Luis Figo,
Beckham was the last "galacti-
co" - sure to fill the club's
pockets with marketing money
while the nine-time Europea'n
champions continued to col-
lect trophies.
But life in Madrid was tough
for Beckham. The club wefit
four years without winning a
trophy - its longest drought in
53 years.
A new language, six different
coaches and three club presi-
dents during his spell led to
incessant criticism that Madrid
was not a team, but a collection
of players.
"I've gone through things
that I never thought were pos-
sible," Beckham said. "Things
have happened here that
never happened at Manchester
United. Not being involved in
matches or in training and hav-
ing things said about me that
were not true was hard."


Associated Press
Real Madrid player David Beckham, center, celebrates Sunday after
a teammate scored during the Spanish League soccer match against
Mallorca In Madrid. Real Madrid won their 30th Spanish League title.


MONDAY, JUNE 18, 20075B


SPO>RHTS


Cri- C tFL f'i wnm, C F


e










6B MONDAY, JUNE 18, 2007


San Antonio gives Spurs parade


For the record-


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
5 p.m. (ESPN2) Champ Car World Series Atlantic Series.
5:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Champ Car World Series Atlantic Series.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
2 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA World Series Game 7 - Teams TBA.
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA World Series Game 8 - Teams TBA.
MLB BASEBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN) Boston Red Sox at Atlanta Braves.
8 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Marlins at Chicago White Sox.
9:30 p.m. (66 PAX) Tampa Bay Devil Rays at Arizona
Diamondbacks.
ARENA FOOTBALL
10 p.m. (ESPN2) Chicago Rush at Colorado Crush.
GOLF
4 p.m. (GOLF) CVS Charity Classic - Day One.


MLB SCOREBOARD


Boston
New York
Toronto
Tampa Bay
Baltimore

Cleveland
Detroit
Minnesota
Chicago
Kansas City

Los Angeles
Oakland
Seattle
Texas


New York
Atlanta
Philadelphia
Florida
Washington

Milwaukee
Chicago
St. Louis
Houston
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati

San Diego
Arizona
Los Angeles
Colorado
San Francisco
z-first game was a win
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Yankees 11, N.Y. Mets 8
San Diego 1, Chicago Cubs 0
Toronto 7, Washington 3
Atlanta 6, Cleveland 2
Boston 1, San Francisco 0
L.A. Angels 3, L.A. Dodgers 0
Houston 9, Seattle 4
Philadelphia 6, Detroit 3
Chicago White Sox 6, Pittsbur
Arizona 8, Baltimore 4
Cincinnati 8, Texas 4
Florida 9, Kansas City 8
Milwaukee 5, Minnesota 2
Colorado 10, Tampa Bay 5
St. Louis 15, Oakland 6
Sunday's Games
Cleveland 5, Atlanta 2
Washington 4, Toronto 2
Texas 11, Cincinnati 4
Detroit 7, Philadelphia 4
Pittsburgh 8, Chicago White S
Arizona 6, Baltimore 4
Houston 10, Seattle 3
Boston 9, San Francisco 5
Kansas City 5, Florida 4
Minnesota 10, Milwaukee 9
San Diego 11, Chicago Cubs
Tampa Bay 7, Colorado 4
St. Louis 10, Oakland 6
LA. Angels 10, L.A. Dodgers
N.Y. Yankees 8, N.Y. Mets 2
Today's Games


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB L10
44 24 .647 - z-7-3
35 32 .522 8% z-9-1
33 35 .485 11 5-5
30 37 .44813% z-5-5
29 40 .42015% z-2-8
Central Division
W L Pct GB L10
40 28 .588 - 4-6
39 29 .574 1 z-6-4
34 33 .507 5Y2 z-6-4
28 37 .431 10% 2-8
28 42 .400 13 6-4
West Division
W L Pct GB L10
44 26 .629 - 6-4
37 31 .544 6 6-4
35 31 .530 7 z-5-5
26 43 .37717% 5-5
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB L10
37 30 .552 - 2-8
37 33 .529 1% 4-6
36 33 .522 2 z-6-4
33 37 .471 5% z-4-6
30 39 .435 8 6-4
Central Division
W L Pct GB L10
38 31 .551 - 5-5
31 37 .456 6% z-5-5
30 36 .455 6% 4-6
30 39 .435 8 z-6-4
30 39 .435 8 z-5-5
27 43 .386 11% z-5-5
West Division
W L Pct GB L10
40 28 .588 - z-5-5
40 30 .571 1 4-6
39 30 .565 12 5-5
35 34 .507 5% z-7-3
30 38 .441 10 z-3-7


Boston (Schilling 6-3) at Atlanta (James
5-6), 7:05 p.m.

BASEBALL
MLB Top Ten
NATIONAL LEAGUE
G AB R H Pct.
Holliday Col 67 278 43 100 .360
DeLee ChC 62 240 35 82 .342
IYoung Was 63 213 29 71 .333
MiCabrera Fla 66 253 45 84 .332
Rowand Phi 68 249 44 81 .325
HeltonCol 65 234 32 76 .325
RenteriaAtI 66 259 45 84 .324
HaRamirez Fla 67 276 58 89 .322
JBReyes NYM 65 270 48 86 .319
TaverasCol 52 206 36 65 .316
Home Runs
Fielder, Milwaukee, 24; Dunn, Cincinnati,
19; Griffey Jr., Cincinnati, 18; Hardy,
Milwaukee, 16; MiCabrera, Florida, 16;
Pujols, St. Louis, 16; Howard,
Philadelphia, 14.
RBI
CaLee, Houston, 55; Utley, Philadelphia,
54; Fielder, Milwaukee, 53; Holliday,
Colorado, 52; MiCabrera, Florida, 51;
Hardy, Milwaukee, 48; AdGonzalez, San
Diego, 47.
Pitching (8 Decisions)
'Peavy, San Diego, 8-1, .869; Penny, Los
Angeles, 8-1, .889; Hamels, Philadelphia,
9-2, .818; Harang, Cincinnati, 7-2, .778;
JSosa, New York, 6-2, .750; Smoltz,
Atlanta, 8-3, .727; BSheets, Milwaukee, 7-
3, .700; Morris, San Francisco, 7-3, .700.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
G AB R H Pct.
MOrdonez Det 65 248 55 91 .367
ISuzukiSea 65 276 50 96 .348
Posada NYY 62 219 39 76 .347
Polanco Det 61 259 45 89 .344
Jeter NYY 65 265 49 91 .343
OCabrera LAA 67 270 47 91 .337
Kotchman LAA 64 207 29 69 .333
Youkilis Bos 63 249 44 82 .329
DOrtiz Bos 62 225 43 74 .329
VGuerrero LAA 66 237 37 78 .329
Home Runs
ARodriguez, New York, 26; Morneau,
Minnesota, 19; Sheffield, Detroit, 17; Rios,
Toronto, 15; CPena, Tampa Bay, 15;
THunter, Minnesota, 14; VMartinez,
Cleveland, 13; MOrdonez, Detroit, 13.
RBI
ARodriguez, New York, 70; MOrdonez,
Detroit, 61; VGuerrero, Los Angeles, 61;
VMartinez, Cleveland, 57; THunter,
Minnesota, 54; Morneau, Minnesota, 51;
Sosa, Texas, 51.


Home
23-12
20-14
20-16
17-19
16-19

Home
22-10
18-14
20-18
14-16
15-24
Home
24-9
19-17
17-13
14-18

Home
17-16
18-16
19-17
14-19
14-19

Home
22-12
15-20
14-16
17-18
15-21
14-23
Home
20-12
20-14
22-14
18-18
16-17


Away Intr
21-12 8-4
15-18 9-3
13-19 6-6
13-18 4-8
13-21 3-9

Away Intr
18-18 6-6
21-15 8-4
14-15 7-5
14-21 3-9
13-18 8-4
Away Intr
20-17 9-3
18-14 8-4
18-18 5-7
12-25 7-5

Away Intr
20-14 4-5
19-17 3-6
17-16 7-5
19-18 6-6
16-20 7-5


Philadelphia (Hamels 9-2) at Cleveland
(Lee 3-4), 7:05 p.m.
Detroit (Maroth 4-2) at Washington
(Chico 3-4), 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Silva 4-7) at N.Y Mets
(Maine 6-4), 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Lowry 6-5) at
Milwaukee (Gallardo 0-0), 8:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Perez 3-7) at St. Louis
(Wainwright 5-5), 8:10 p.m.
Florida (J.Johnson 0-0) at Chicago
White Sox (Contreras 4-7), 8:11 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Jackson 0-8) at Arizona
(L.Hernandez 5-4), 9:40 p.m.
Cincinnati (Lohse 3-8) at Oakland
(Blanton 6-4), 10:05 p.m.
Houston (Sampson 6-5) at L.A. Angels
(Lackey 10-4), 10:05 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Detroit at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Minnesota at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Boston at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m.
San Francisco at Milwaukee, 8:05 p.m.
Kansas City at St. Louis, 8:10 p.m.
Florida at Chicago White Sox, 8:11 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Texas, 8:35 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Colorado, 9:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Baltimore at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Seattle, 10:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Houston at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Pitching (8 Decisions)
Beckett, Boston, 9-1, .900; Sabathia,
Cleveland, 9-2, .818; Carmona, Cleveland,
8-2, .800; Haren, Oakland, 8-2, .800;
Verlander, Detroit, 7-2, .778; Halladay,
Toronto, 7-2, .778; Colon, Los Angeles, 6-
2, .750.

TRANSACTIONS
BASEBALL
Major League Baseball
MLB-Suspended RHP Matt Childers
(Philadelphia) 50 games for violating the
Minor League Drug Prevention and
Treatment Program.
American League
BOSTON RED SOX-Placed RHP
Brendan Donnelly on the 15-day DL,
retroactive to June 11. Recalled RHP
Manny Delcarmen from Pawtucket (IL).
CHICAGO WHITE SOX-Placed RHP
Dewon Day on the 15-day DL. Recalled
RHP David Aardsma from Charlotte (IL).
Agreed to terms with LHP Aaron Poreda.
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Agreed to
terms with LHP Brandon Taylor and OF
Matt Brown.
NEW YORK YANKEES-Optioned RHP
Tyler Clippard to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
(IL). Recalled OF Kevin Thompson from
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS-Purchased the
contract of INF J.J. Furmaniak from
Sacramento (PCL), Designated LHP
Erasmo Ramirez for assignment.
TEXAS RANGERS-Activated RHP
Jamey Wright from the 60-day DL.
Recalled RHP Josh Rupe from Oklahoma
(PCL) and placed him on the 60-day DL.
Optioned RHP Wes Littleton to Oklahoma.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS-Traded
INF Danny Richar to the Chicago White
Sox for OF Aaron Cunningham.
CINCINNATI REDS-Placed LHP Mike
Stanton on the 15-day DL. Purchased the
contract of LHP Michael Gosling.
FLORIDA MARLINS-Assigned RHP
Rick Vanden Hurk outright to Carolina
(SL). Purchased the contract of OF Brett
Carroll from Albuquerque (PCL).
Transferred OF Alejandro De Aza from the
15- to the 60-day DL. Optioned OF Reggie
Abercrombie to Albuquerque.
HOUSTON ASTROS-Activated RHP
Rick White from the 15-day DL. Optioned
LHP Mark McLemore to Round Rock
(PCL).
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS-Placed SS
David Eckstein on the 15-day DL. Recalled
RHP Anthony Reyes and INF Brendan
Ryan from Memphis (PCL). Optioned
Kelvin Jimenez to Memphis.


Associated Press

SAN ANTONIO - The San
Antonio Spurs' black and silver
was joined by another color
Sunday - the gold of the
team's fourth championship
trophy in nine seasons.
Lining the banks of San
Antonio's famed River Walk,
tens of thousands of fans
decked out in the Spurs' colors
waited in the oppressive heat
to catch a glimpse of their
favorite players and congratu-
late the team.
"You guys continue to come
out and support us," Spurs star
Tim Duncan said. "Hopefully


EDWARDS
Continued from Page 1B

"Is it really over?" Edwards
excitedly asked his crew as he
closed in on the finish line.
Edwards celebrated his fifth
career Nextel Cup win with his
trademark backflip off the win-
dow ledge of his car. He then
shared an emotional hug with
crew chief Bob Osborne, who
was with him in 2005 but was
moved off the crew for most of
2006. The two were reunited at
the end of last season.
"It's been a long time, for
both of us," Osborne said. "I
know he's been dying to get
back in the winner's circle.
He's extremely competitive,
awesome race car driver. So,
you know, Carl Edwards, I
would go to battle for him any
day"
Edwards then gleefully took
a pair of scissors to team mem-
ber Tom Giacchi's shaggy
beard, clipping off a chunk of
hair that had been growing
since the two vowed in late
2005 that Giacchi wouldn't
shave until Edwards' next win.
"When they made that silly


we can ge
Spurs
Parker wa
to-be, act:
"I'm so
blessed a
play with
Parker,
finals M'
on one o
the river
that he'd
phy for
nights.
"I put I
said.
Famed
Domingo
vored ve;

wager, I h
this long
Roush sa:
four race
even surf
to get it g
The viP
second v
first since
Feb. 25
temporal
Hendrick
long do:
cars hav
races this
Roush,
headqua;
Livonia,
Michigan
drivers
twice thi
Kvapil a
Series ra,
Edwar(
the second
and it sn
ning stre
other ma
race this
"Ford
technical
money th
help us p
be compi
manufact
teams,"I


DAHLBER green wit
G his way t
"To be
Continued from Page 1B bit nervous
that's nor
on greens so slick they looked ed. "I enj
oily were having trouble com- If he di
prehending just how tough. its mission
"It is unbelievable," Ian making p
Poulter said. "It's frightening." they can
Frightening might not be a and then
word most people would asso- it. Then a
ciate with a Sunday afternoon exactly s
round of golf. jokes as
Frightened was the perfect through
description, though, for how unraveled
Aaron Baddeley looked as he hit his fir
stood on the first tee with a He wa
two-shot lead and thousands of were fall
people screaming for Woods to hot and
make some magic. Woods Ames wa
obliged by hitting a cannon when he
shot 350 yards down the mid- No. 7, wh
dle, which Baddeley followed a share o
by hitting a lazy flare of a 3- promptly
wood into the right rough. in a row o
Fourteen minutes later, The sca
Baddeley walked off the first have beet



ANGEL
Continued from Page 1B

the final round, he only needed one birdie
over his final three holes to force a playoff.
Woods hit 3-wood off the 17th tee into a
deep bunker, but he couldn't keep it on the
green and had to make a 7-footer for par.
His tee shot on the 18th looked good
when it left his club, but hopped along the
line of first cut and deep rough, and his
approach ran some 30 feet by the flag. His
birdie putt was just long and right, and
Woods again was the last man to leave the
18th green at a major, no trophy in hand.
Cabrera might not have been the winner
anyone expected, especially at Oakmont,
which has produced U.S. Open champions
of the highest caliber. But he earned his
victory against the best.
Cabrera delivered a 1-2-3 knockout dur-
ing a difficult week. A birdie on his final
hole Friday caused second-ranked Phil
Mickelson to miss the cut in a major for
the first time in eight years, and he was
even stronger down the stretch with
Woods and Furyk, No. 1 and No. 3 in the
world, both poised to catch him.
He blew a chance to win the esteemed
BMW Championship in Europe last month
by topping a tee shot on the back nine, and
Cabrera showed signs of a struggle late in
the afternoon when he three-putted for
bogey on the 16th and missed the 17th
green with a wedge from the fairway to
drop into a tie for the lead with Furyk.
"He just kept himself calm," caddie
Eddie Gardino said. "He might go and win
the British Open, because he knows he
can do it."
Furyk went 70-70 on the weekend, and
still had to settle for another silver medal
for finishing tied for second. A year ago, he
missed a 6-foot par putt on the final hole at
Winged Foot and finished one shot behind
Geoff Ogilvy.
"I had a lot of opportunities," Furyk
said. "It just didn't work out"
Aaron Baddeley, who had a two-shot
lead over Woods going into the final round,
three-putted from 8 feet for triple bogey on
the opening hole and wound up with an 80.
It was the third straight year no one
broke par at the U.S. Open, the longest


et another one."
point guard Tony
as joined by his bride-
ress Eva Longoria.
D happy - I feel very
and it's a privilege to
a great team," said
who carried his
VP trophy with him
f the early barges of
r parade. He joked
I slept with the tro-
the last couple of

Eva on the couch," he

tenor Placido
sang a mariachi-fla-
rsion of the national

ad no idea it would be
g," car owner Jack
id. "Carl and Bob won
s the first year. I was
raisedd it took this long
going this year."
ctory gave Roush his
uin of the season -
e Matt Kenseth won
at California - and
rily sidetracked
k Motorsports' season-
mination. Hendrick
e won 10 of the 15
season.
who has company
rters in nearby
makes winning at
a priority for all his
and he celebrated
s weekend - Travis
also won the Truck
ce Saturday
ds' victory was only
d of the year for Ford,
apped a 13-race win-
ak for Chevrolet No
nufacturer has won a
season.
has given us every
1 support, all the
.at we've asked for to
put in equipment and
etitive with the other
urers, with the other
Roush said. "They


th a triple bogey 7 on
o a big fat 80.
honest, I was a little
us on the first tee. But
mal," Baddeley insist-
oyed myself."
d, the USGA failed in
on, which seems to be
players squirm until
't squirm any more,
having a laugh about
gain, Baddeley wasn't
miling and cracking
he hacked his way
a final round that
d from the minute he
st tee shot.
isn't alone. Players
ing everywhere on a
sticky day. Stephen
is tied for the lead
made a triple bogey on
ile Steve Stricker had
f it at the turn before
making two doubles
on Nos. 10 and 11.
ary thing is, it could
n a lot worse.


anthem and led the crowd in
chants of "Go Spurs Go."
Spurs owner Peter Holt,
joined by the team's mascot, a
coyote, told the crowd he wants
a repeat next year.
"Never gets old," he said.
Michael Finley and Jacque
Vaughn, two of the Spurs play-
ers who won their, first champi-
onship rings this year, were
joined on a boat by Robert
Horry, who has now won seven
rings. They said another title
run is a definite possibility.
"I could get used to this,"
Finley said.
"I say, Why not back-to-
back?" Vaughn added.

deserve more, and I'm just
embarrassed that it took us this
long to really celebrate it with
Carl and the guys."
Truex, who had his first vic-
tory two weeks ago at Dover,
finished second after overcom-
ing a spin on the backstretch
100 laps into the race. Truex,
who led 54 laps before the
early spin and has climbed to
10th in the series standings,
heaped praise on his Dale
Earnhardt Inc. team.
"It was a great day for us," he
said. "The team did another
awesome job. I think it was the
best pit stops we've ever had on
pit road. Awesome race car,
and probably the best engine
I've ever had. Guys are doing
great, man, and I'm loving life
right now."
Two-time series champion
Tony Stewart, winless this sea-
son, was third. Stewart had a
strong car in practice Saturday,
but an accident with David
Gilliland caused heavy damage
and he wasn't sure how good his
car would be during the race.
He was supposed to start
41st, but deliberately hung
back at the green flag to fall
into 43rd place at the start.
"With what happened (in


After a second round on
Friday where conditions were
so brutal players were in near
revolt, the USGA tried to tame
the monster it created by
watering greens over and over
on the weekend and giving
players at least a few pins they
could shoot at.
Cabrera took advantage with
two iron shots on the back side
for kick-in birdies, then fought
back nerves to stumble his way
in. He then sat smiling in the
scorer's area, happy as heck to
be done and secure in the
knowledge that whatever
course remained would beat
up whoever was left standing.
The Argentine ended up
with the lowest score of the
week, though the debate will
always be whether he was the
better player for four days or
simply the player who con-
tained his mistakes the most
That's always the fate of an
Open winner, especially those


streak in 46 years.
That was no surprise at Oakmont, espe-
cially on Sunday.
Under steamy sunshine, with final-
round pressure on a course reputed to be
the toughest in America, every mistake
was magnified.
Baddeley might have made the biggest
blunder, and it set the tone for his day. He
was in the short cut of rough to the right of
the first green when he chipped toward
the flag instead of the middle of the green,
and it zipped by the hole and off the green.
He chipped weakly to 8 feet and ran his
bogey putt about 4 feet past Two putts
later,; he had a triple bogey
Six players had at least a share of the
lead at some point, but not for long.
Stephen Ames opened with a 12-foot
birdie and looked strong until he hooked a
tee shot into the ditch on the seventh, tried
to play out, finally chopped it to the right
rough short of the green and walked off
with a triple bogey.
Steve Stricker poured in birdie putts on
the fifth and sixth holes to join the lead
and closed out his front nine with two good
pars for a 34. But he pulled his tee shot
into a bunker on No. 10, had to play out
sideways, then three-putted for double
bogey.
Paul Casey was in such bad shape in a
bunker on the par-3 sixth that he played
backward, away from the green, chipped
short of the green and took triple bogey on
his way to a 43 on the front nine.
About the only players who didn't make
any ugly errors - or many errors - were
the players who ultimately contended for
this title.
Cabrera traded birdies and bogeys
along the front nine, most notably a birdie
on the par-3 eighth hole that played 300
yards with the back tee and back pin. He
looked as though he might pull away on
the back, using his power for short birdies
on the 11th and 15th.
Furyk finally stumbled with careless
shots on the 11th and 12th, only to run off
three straight birdies to get back in the
game.
Woods, the best closer in golf, was a mys-
tery
He couldn't make a timely putt at the
Masters. He couldn't find his swing at
Oakmont.


Spurs coach Gregg Popovich
introduced members of his
coaching staff and thanked the
fans.
"You all supported them all
year long, we appreciate that,"
he said. "We're going to contin-
ue to try to do it the right way."
Fans said they came several
hours ahead of the river
parade to claim a spot. Many
fans could be seen dunking
their feet in the brown waters
of the San Antonio River in an
attempt to cool off. Others
were dining at restaurants
along the river to get their
own comfortable front-row
seat.

practice) and where we quali-
fied, it was two strikes against
us," Stewart said. "I made sure
I went across the start-finish
line in 43rd, so wherever we
ended up I could say we went
from dead last. From 43rd to
third is a pretty good day."
Casey Mears, on a roll since
his first career win on May 27,
was fourth and the highest fin-
ishing Hendrick driver.
Dale Earnhardt Jr. was fifth
to give DEI two cars in the top
five, and the showing moved
him into Chase for the champi-
onship contention. He's 12th in
the standings - where he was
before a 100-point penalty last
month knocked him down to
14th - and is trying to end his
time at DEI on top.
Earnhardt, who agreed to a
five-year deal this week to
drive for Hendrick Motorsports
starting next season, congratu-
lated Truex, his teammate.
"Martin did good, he did such
a good job today. That team has
found something - I might
sneak over there and find out
what it is," Earnhardt said. "We
had a good car. We were as good
as anybody at the end of the
race, just ran out of laps."


who come from seemingly
nowhere to win like Geoff
Ogilvy did last year and
Cabrera did to a certain extent
this week.
Those hoping to join Cabrera
in the elite club of major cham-
pionship winners,don't have a
whole lot to look forward to.
Players head for Scotland next
month for the British Open at
Carnoustie, where Jean Van de
Velde's meltdown eclipsed any-
thing seen here this week.
Oakmont might have been
brutal, but Carnoustie is widely
regarded to have been the
toughest major championship
test ever when the British was
last played there in 1999.
The wind will blow, rough
will be even deeper, and the
greens will be just as slick.
About the only thing missing
will be the bear.
He escaped, which on this
day made him one of the lucky
ones.


U.S. Open Par Scores
Oakmont Country Club
Oakmont, Pa.
Purse: $7 million
Final Round
Angel Cabrera, $1,260,00069-71-76-69 - 285
Jim Furyk, $611,33671-75-70-70 - 286
Tiger Woods, $611,33671-74-69-72 - 286
Niclas Fasth, $325,92371-71-75-70 - 287
David Toms, $248,94872-72-73-72 - 289
Bubba Watson, $248,94870-71-74-74 - 289
Nick Dougherty, $194,24568-77-74-71 - 290
Scott Verplank, $194,24573-71-74-72 - 290
Jerry Kelly, $194,24574-71-73-72 - 290
Justin Rose, $154,09371-71-73-76 - 291
Stephen Ames, $154,09373-69-73-76 - 291
Paul Casey, $154,09377-66-72-76 - 291
Lee Janzen, $124,70673-73-73-73 - 292
Hunter Mahan, $124,70673-74-72-73 - 292
Steve Stricker, $124,70675-73-68-76 - 292
Aaron Baddeley, $124,70672-70-70-80 - 292
Carl Pettersson, $102,53672-72-75-74 - 293
Tim Clark, $102,53672-76-71-74 - 293
Jeff Brehaut, $102,53673-75-70-75 - 293
Anthony Kim, $86,20074-73-80-67 - 294
Mike Weir, $86,20074-72-73-75 - 294
Vijay Singh, $86,20071-77-70-76 - 294
Ken Duke, $71,90574-75-73-73 - 295
Brandt Snedeker, $71,90571-73-77-74 - 295
Nick O'Hern, $71,90576-74-71-74 - 295
Camilo Villegas, $57,02673-77-75-71 - 296
Boo Weekley, $57,02672-75-77-72 - 296
J.J. Henry, $57,02671-78-75-72 - 296
Stuart Appleby, $57,02674-72-71-79 - 296
Pablo Martin, $45,31371-76-77-73 - 297
Peter Hanson, $45,31371-74-78-74 - 297
Fred Funk, $45,31371-78-74-74 - 297
D.J. Brigman, $45,31374-74-74-75 - 297
Chari Schwartzel, $45,31375-73-73-76 - 297
Graeme McDowell, $45,31373-72-75-77 - 297
Lee Westwood, $37,15972-75-79-72 - 298
Shingo Katayama, $37,15972-74-79-73 - 298
Mathew Goggin, $37,15977-73-74-74 - 298
J.M. Singh, $37,15975-75-73-75 - 298
lan Poulter, $37,15972-77-72-77 - 298
Tom Pernice Jr, $37,15972-72-75-79 - 298
Kenneth Ferrie, $31,08474-76-77-72 - 299
Geoff Ogilvy, $31,08471-75-78-75 - 299
John Rollins, $31,08475-74-74-76 - 299
Marcus Fraser, $25,01672-78-77-73 - 300
Olin Browne, $25,01671-75-80-74 - 300
Ben Curtis, $25,01671-77-78-74 - 300
J.M. Olazabal, $25,01670-78-78-74 - 300
Zach Johnson, $25,01676-74-76-74 - 300
Chris Dimarco, $25,01676-73-73-78 - 300
Rory Sabbatini, $20,28273-77-78-73 - 301
C. Howell III, $20,28276-73-77-75 - 301
Dean Wilson, $20,28276-74-76-75 - 301
Ernie Els, $20,28273-76-74-78 - 301
Anders Hansen, $18,82971-79-79-73 - 302
Michael Putnam, $18,82973-74-72-83 - 302
Chad Campbell, $18,18473-72-77-81 - 303
K. Sutherland, $17,37174-76-79-75 - 304
Bob Estes, $17,37175-75-77-77 - 304
M. Campbell, $17,37173-77-75-79 - 304
Harrison Frazar, $17,37174-74-74-82 - 304
Jason Dufner, $16,64771-75-79-80 - 305
George McNeill, $16,36372-76-77-81 - 306


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TRsPnreT













MONDAY
JUNE 1 8, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


7B


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Martin Sheen
wants drug courts
WASHINGTON - Martin
Sheen says a drug court saved
the life of a friend of his who
was self-destructing from
drug and alcohol abuse.
The actor
was in
Washington
this past
� J week to urge
" Congress to
p - provide fund-
ing for drug
courts, which
provide
Martin addicts with
Sheen lifesaving
alternatives
to prison
Sheen told George
Stephanopoulos in an inter-
view that aired Sunday on
ABC's "This Weelk" that he
used his friend, whom he did
not name, as an example as
someone whose addiction
could have led to death.
'At a critical point, I had to
decide who would speak at
the funeral, who should carry
the casket," he said. "You
have to be prepared to say 'I
did everything that I possibly
could.'
"Well, I had not yet I had
one more option, and that
was drug court That's what
saved his life, and mine,"
Sheen said.
He said a large percentage
of prison inmates are incar-
cerated for committing crime
under the influence of drugs
and alcohol.

Gibson stresses
honesty, fairness
SCHENECTADY, N.Y. -
ABC News anchor Charles
Gibson urged Union College
graduates to practice honesty
and fairness Sunday and
established a scholarship in
his father's name.
"It sounds
old-fashioned,
but I will tell
you there are
ethical imper-
atives in this
life," said
Gibson, who
received an
honorary
Charles Doctor of
Gibson Humane
Letters dur-
ing the ceremony.
"Compassion. Honesty.
Fairness. Trustworthiness.
Respect for others. If those
things are not the bedrocks of
your life, you will suffer for
their absence in time. And I
would wager you won't much
like yourself."
Gibson's father, Burdett,
grew up in Schenectady and
graduated from Union in
1923. The anchor of the top-
rated network evening news
show contributed $75,000 to
help create the Burdett
Gibson Class of 1923
Scholarship, which will be
awarded each year to a stu-
dent in need.
College President Stephen
Ainlay presented Gibson with
a copy of the 1923 yearbook,
along with a framed photo-
graph of his father's yearbook
entry.

Jackson gives than
for financial advice
NEW YORK-- Michael
Jackson says in a court depo-
sition that the Rev. Jesse
Jackson and billionaire Ron
Burkie gave him advice to
help save him from financial

he was fight-
ing child
molestation
charges.
The Daily
News said in
Sunday edi-
tions it
reviewed
IMichael seven hours
Jackson of transcripts,
finding that
the singer believed disloyal
advisers took advantage of
him financially before a Santa
Maria, Calif., jury acquitted
him of child molestation in


June 2005.
Michael Jackson said in a
deposition taken last summer
that the entertainment indus-
try was "full of sharks, charla-
tans and impostors."

- From wire reports


'Fantastic Four' debuts at top LOERIES


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES - Hollywood's super-
hero foursome is still fantastic at the box
office.
The 20th Century Fox sequel "Fantastic
Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer" debuted
as the No. 1 weekend flick with $57.4 mil-
lion in sales, slightly surpassing the $56.1
million opening of "Fantastic Four" two
years ago, according to studio estimates
Sunday.
Among other new wide releases, a
favorite teen detective had trouble finding
an audience as the Warner Bros. mystery
"Nancy Drew" premiered with a so-so $7.1
million to finish at No. 7.
Opening in narrower release was the
Weinstein Co. thriller "DOA: Dead or
Alive," an adaptation of the martial-arts
video game that pulled in just $232,000.
Playing in 505 theaters, "DOA' averaged a
paltry $460 a cinema, compared to $14,499
in 3,959 theaters for "Fantastic Four" and
$2,732 in 2,612 locations for "Nancy Drew."
The previous weekend's No. 1 movie,
George Clooney and Brad Pitt's "Ocean's
Thirteen," fell to No. 2 with $19.1 million.
The Warner Bros. casino caper raised its
10-day total to $69.8 million, putting it on
track to become the franchise's third $100
million hit


TOP MOVIES
1. "Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver
Surfer," $57.4 million.
2. "Ocean's Thirteen," $19.1 million.
3. "Knocked Up," $14.5 million.
4. "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's
End," $12 million.
5. "Surf's Up," $9.3 million.
6. "Shrek the Third," $9 million.
7. "Nancy Drew," $7.1 million.
8. "Hostel: Part II," $3 million.
9. "Mr. Brooks," $2.8 million.
10. "Spider-Man 3," $2.5 million..

Despite the big opening for "Fantastic
Four," Hollywood revenues slipped for the
third straight weekend. The top 12 movies
took in $138.8 million, down 4 percent
from the same weekend last year, when
"Cars," "Nacho Libre" and "The Fast and
the Furious: Tokyo Drift" led with a com-
bined $86 million.
The industry had a blockbuster May
with "Spider-Man," "Shrek" and "Pirates
of the Caribbean" sequels, but big films
are not holding their audiences after huge
opening weekends.
After a surge early this year, attendance


has slipped to just a fraction ahead of
2006, diminishing prospects of a record
summer that many analysts had predicted.
"We've seen our advantage over last
year slowly being chipped away," said
Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-
office tracker Exhibitor Relations. "A lot of
films are doing what these big summer
movies do, open big and drop off fast."
The new "Fantastic Four" reunites the
quartet of astronauts-turned-mutant-
superheroes, played by loan Gruffudd,
Jessica Alba, Michael Chiklis and Chris
Evans. This time, the comic-book heroes
join forces with archenemy Dr. Doom
(Julian McMahon) to take down the Silver
Surfer, an emissary leading a planet-
destroying entity to Earth.
The studio and filmmakers toned down
the action so the sequel could earn a PG
rating to broaden the audience to family
viewers. The first "Fantastic Four" was
rated PG-13.
"A lot of the superhero comic-book
movies are sort of geared toward being
darker and edgier. We think 'Fantastic
Four' is a more family friendly group of
superheroes," said Chris Aronson, senior
vice president for distribution at 20th
Century Fox. "We wanted to make sure to
cast a wide net and go after the family
audience, and it worked."


Here are the
winning numbers
selected Sunday in
the Florida
Lottery:


CASH 3
8-2-2
PLAY 4
2-6-7-9
FANTASY 5
9- 11-21-23-33
SATURDAY, JUNE 16
Cash 3:2 -7 -6
Play 4:7 - 1 - 6 - 7
Lotto: 7 - 10 - 13 - 16 - 22 - 24
6-of-6 No winners
5-of-6 236 $2,075.50
4-of-6 8,775 . $45
3-of-6 150,079 $3.50
Fantasy 5: 9 - 19 - 20 - 29 - 30
5-of-5 3 winners $90,732.97
4-of-5 353 $124
3-of-5 11,592 $10.50
FRIDAY, JUNE 15
Cash 3:0 - 2 - 5
Play 4: 6- 3 - 8 -4
Mega Money: 4 - 15 - 12 - 32
Mega Ball: 20
4-of-4 MB No winners
4-of-4 6 $1,567
3-of-4 MB 66 $312
3-of-4 1,418 $43
2-of-4 MB 1,651 $25.50
2-of-4 40,934 $2
1-of-4 MB 13,461 $3
Fantasy 5:4- 6 - 11 -19-34
5-of-5 1 winners $250,221
4-of-5 405 $99.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially posted
by the Florida Lottery. On the
Web, go to www.flalottery
.cor; by telephone, call (850)
487.7777.


Today in
---

HISTORY

Today is Monday, June 18, the
169th day of 2007. There are 196
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On June 18, 1940, during World
War II, British Prime Minister
Winston Churchill urged his coun-
trymen to conduct themselves in a
manner that would prompt future
generations to say, "This was their
finest hour."
On this date:
In 1586, English colonists sailed
from Roanoke Island, N.C., after
failing to establish England's first
permanent settlement in America.
In 1778, American forces
entered Philadelphia as the British
withdrew during the Revolutionary
War.
In 1812, the United States
declared war against Britain:
In 1928, Amelia Earhart became
the first woman to fly across the
Atlantic Ocean as she completed a
journey with pilots Wilmer Stultz
and Louis Gordon from
Newfoundland to Wales in about
21 hours.
In 1979, President Carter and
Soviet President Leonid I.
Brezhnev signed the SALT II
strategic arms limitation treaty in
Vienna.
In 1983, astronaut Sally K. Ride
became America's first woman in
space as she and four colleagues
blasted off aboard the space shut-
tle Challenger.
Ten years ago: The Southern
Baptist Convention called for a
boycott of the Walt Disney Co.,
protesting what the convention
called its "gay-friendly" policies.
Five years ago: A Palestinian'
detonated a nail-studded bomb in
a Jerusalem bus, killing 19 pas-
sengers and himself.
One year ago: Bishop
Katharine Jefferts Schori was
elected the first female presiding
bishop for the Episcopal Church,
the U.S. arm of the global Anglican
Communion.
Today's Birthdays: Actor lan
Carmichael is 87. Columnist Tom
Wicker is 81. Rock singer-compos-
er-musician Sir Paul McCartney is
65. Movie critic Roger Ebert is 65.
Actress Linda Thorson is 60.
Actress Isabella Rossellini is 55.
Actress Carol Kane is 55. Country
singer-musician Tim Hunt is 40.
Rock singer-musician Sice (The
Boo Radleys) is 38. Rhythm-and-
blues singer Nathan Morris (Boyz
II Men) is 36. Actress Mara Hobel
is 36. Actress Alana de la Garza is
31. Country singer Blake Shelton
is 31.
Thought for Today: "Frailty, thy
name is no longer woman. -
Victor Riesel, American labor jour-
nalist (1913-1995).


BY MATT SLAGLE
Associated Press

"Shadowrun" is the first title
from Microsoft Corp. that lets
gamers on both sides of the
systems fence battle each
other online.
But there are some serious
technological tradeoffs in let-
ting Xbox 360 console owners
square off against their
Windows Vista-toting brethren.
Perhaps my geek credentials
should be revoked, but I'd
never even heard of
"Shadowrun" until this M-
rated, $59.99 title was
announced.
It's based on an older pen-
and-paper role playing game, a
la "Dungeons and Dragons,"
that's set in a future where
magic is real and tech savvy
humans aren't the only ones
roaming the planet. Sly elves,
hulking trolls and pugnacious
dwarfs now vie for power, too.
Yet this potentially interest-
ing premise feels barely
fleshed out as the game is
essentially a stripped-down,
bare-bones first person shoot-
er with some genuinely
intriguing, but ultimately frus-
trating, role-playing aspects.
You can go through some
practice levels to get a sense
for the varying abilities of the
different races and then play
online against real human
opponents on Xbox Live or
against computer-controlled
foes called "bots."
There's no real story, no lin-


Associate d ress
This undated screen shot courtesy of Microsoft Corp. shows a standoff between a human and a dwarf
in the new video game "Shadowrun."


ear progression, just some
straight-up online fighting
with "Shadowrun" on a rather
measly selection of nine differ-
ent maps and just two online
modes.
Some of the most successful
games, such as "Counter-
Strike," have been online-only.
But they offered far more
diverse and complex game-
play.
"Shadowrun" is sometimes
fun, especially once you grasp
the magical and technological
abilities at your disposal. For
example, I was able to teleport
through walls and ceilings, fly
long distances with the glider
ability, and even summon a
magical tree to regenerate


health.
The visuals are generally
solid aside from a very bizarre
graphical oversight where
characters appear to be climb-
ing ladders while standing
straight up. .
The characters themselves
pack some interesting detail
but you can't customize their
appearance at all, so many
games I played were filled
with a bunch of identical elves
and humans.
As I mentioned, the lure of
pitting Xbox 360 players
against Vista PC gamers was
enticing and one of the main
reasons I wanted to test this
title.
However, in order to keep


things "fair," we get dumbed-
down controls that aren't very
precise or satisfying. Gun bat-
tles are supposed to be the
adrenaline-fueled highlight of
a shooting game; the guns here
are very weak and insanely
inaccurate.
This blending of two genres
- role playing and first person
shooter - was an ambitious
undertaking for the develop-
ers at FASA Studio.
"Shadowrun," however,
ends up diluting these two dis-
tinct game styles too much,
leaving players with an experi-
ence that feels forced and
incomplete.
Two and a half stars out four.


Dan Rather hopes to rejuvenate news


Associated Press

NEW YORK - Dan Rather
was walking down 41st Street
recently when a woman
stopped him, grabbed his right
hand and began pumping it.
"Mr. Rather," she said, "I just
want you to know. We miss
you.")
It would have been the per-
fect plant to impress an accom-
panying reporter, if it wasn't for
one detail: Rather isn't gone. It
just seems that way.
He proved the point last
week, when his criticism of
"CBS Evening News" under
Katie Couric instantly drew
more attention than anything
he's done in seven months on
his new HDNet news program.
The angry exchange between
old colleagues began when
Rather said CBS made a mis-
take with his old newscast by
trying to "dumb it down, tart it
up in hopes of attracting a
younger audience." The CBS
Corp. boss, Leslie Moonves,
suggested that was a sexist
remark aimed at Couric.
An unapologetic Rather said
his remark had nothing to do
with gender and was consistent
with his hard-news nature.
Besides, CBS itself has leveled
essentially the same criticism
of Couric's first weeks on the
job.
"They seized on this to try to
take the discussion away from


Associated Press
Former CBS news anchor Dan Rather poses on the roof of an office
building overlooking New York's Times Square, on Nov. 6, 2006.
His weekly magazine program, now in operation for seven months,
is available to the six million satellite and cable homes reached by
HDNET, the high-definition channel owned by media mogul Mark
Cuban. With his weekly hour-long "Dan Rather Reports," the news-
man aims to recreate a CBS News he idealizes, rather than what
he suggests it has become


what I was saying," he said.
Besides feeling kicked when
they're down in the ratings,
CBS News found the criticism
particularly galling to take
from Rather. Many there blame
Rather, who was forced out
after a discredited story over
President Bush's military serv-
ice, for leaving CBS a distant
third in the ratings.
"Dan must be having some


kind of crisis," said Rick
Kaplan, current "CBS Evening
News" executive producer. "I
don't understand what would
make him strike out at his old
colleagues, especially when
they supported him through
thin and thinner."
With his weekly "Dan Rather
Reports," the newsman aims to
recreate a CBS News he ideal-
izes, rather than what he sug-


gests it has become.
Seven months in operation,
"Dan Rather Reports" is a
meaty news show that has done
stories on dangerous chemi-
cals in trailers given to
Hurricane Katrina victims,
drug cartels that have ren-
dered large swaths of Mexico
lawless and civil rights
enforcement within the cur-
rent U.S. Justice Department
With home video provided by
truck drivers, Rather focused
on the often unseen dangers
faced by wartime contractors
in Iraq.
It's a demanding regimen for
a 76 year old. Rather com-
mands a 21-person staff, but is
the only on-air reporter. With a
full hour to fill and no commer-
cial breaks, the stories some-
time look like they need edit-
ing. A piece with a Kent State
University professor recalling
that school's violent 1970 anti-
war demonstration felt like
filler Rather has also done
hour-long pieces, like one on
Afghanistan's poppy crop.
Two former CBS News pro-
ducers run the "Dan Rather
Reports" staff with their boss.
Their office a few steps away
from Times Square - Rather
critics will love this - is locat-
ed in the Bush Building.
"I love doing it," he told The
Associated Press. "I love the
liberating quality of it. It's been
an absolute joy for me."


- -- ..--- . ...... Video Game REVIEW


'Shadowrun' doesn't hit its mark


1: E turta







Cri-imis Coumn'rl('FL,) CHRONICL.E


ENTERTAINMENT


SB MONDAY, JUNi. 18, 2007


MONDAY EVENING JUNE 18, 2007 c: Comcast,Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast,Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis
C B D T I 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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MONDAY EVENING JUNE 18, 2007 C: Comcast,Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast,Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis
cBD I 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

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he PlusCode number printed next to each pro- PlusCode number, cable channels with the guide channel numbers using
gram is for use with the Gemstar VCR Plus+ sys- If you have cable service, please make sure that the convenient chart printed in the Viewfinder. This
tem. If you have a VCR with the VCR Plus+ fea- your cable channel numbers are the same as the procedure is described in your VCR user's manual.
ture (identified by the VCR Plus+ logo on your VCR), channel numbers in this guide. If not, you will need to Should you have questions about your VCR Plus+ sys-
all you need to do to record a program is enter its perform a simple one-time procedure to match up the tern, please contact your VCR manufacturer.
The channel lineup for KLiP Interactive cable customers is in the Sunday Viewfinder on page 70.



Wife's insecurity borders paranoia


Dear Annie: "Susan" and I
have been married for three
years, and while we love each
other, the end may be near. Susan
was cheated on in a previous rela-
tionship, but has made no
effort to get past it, and she
is entirely convinced I '
have been having affairs. (I
have always been 100 per-
cent faithful.) .
In her obsessive witch
hunt, Susan has opened my
mail, checked my cell
phone and computer histo-
ry and followed me when I
run errands. She sees "evi-
dence" of my unfaithful-
ness everywhere. If I balk
at shopping with her, it's so ANN
I can stay home and chat MAIL
online with anonymous
women. If my nightly walk with the
dog lasts 10 minutes too long, it's
because of a tryst at the dog park.
I am a nurse and wear gloves all
day, but Susan believes the odor of
latex means I was handling a con-
dom. I soiled a shirt once and came
home wearing a scrub top. She
assumed it was to hide lipstick
stains. If I leave work late because of
a patient crisis, she thinks I've met
someone. If I'm too exhausted for
sex after a 12-hour shift, it means
I've been fooling around in the linen
closet at work. There are other


absurd examples, but you get the
idea. Yet she doesn't think she's
obsessive.
We've tried couples and individual
counseling, to no avail. Susan is see-
ing a psychiatrist, but the
- antidepressants haven't
helped. I have been
extremely tolerant up to this
'r V point, but it's bordering on
psychological abuse, and I
can't put up with it any
longer. Any suggestions? -
Unjustly Accused, Tried and
. - Convicted
-- Dear Accused: Susan's
insecurity borders on para-
noia. If her psychiatrist is
unaware of her obsessive
iE'S behavior, you should inform
.BOX the doctor and ask that it be
addressed at their next ses-
sion, and also explain how close you
are to walking out. If Susan refuses to
work on her problems, you may need to
distance yourself for the sake of your
own mental health.
Dear Annie: My sister is getting mar-
ried in July, and they are deciding
whether or not to open the wedding
gifts at the reception. She says "no,"
and her fiance says "yes." All of us have
a different opinion. Can you help? -
Confused Bridesmaid in Kansas
Dear Kansas: It is not a good idea to
open the gifts at the reception. It may
embarrass some of the guests, and it


becomes much more difficult to keep
track of things when boxes are opened,
ribbons are scattered and cards fall
out. Gifts that are brought to the recep-
tion should be placed on a table set up
for that purpose and opened later, at
home.
Dear Annie: Upon reading the letter
from "Bozo's Husband," I felt com-
pelled to write. Bozo's wife, "Penny,"
thinks it is hilarious to slap the behind
of whoever happens to be bending over,
but it is seen as assault.
One of these days, Penny is going to
slap someone who will not find this
behavior amusing, and she will end up
in court. If convicted, she will have a
police record.
As the director of a domestic vio-
lence shelter, I can assure you that if
Penny did that to one of our clients, I
would encourage that person to
press charges immediately. No one
has the right to slap another individ-
ual - whether in "fun" or in anger.
Penny is looking for trouble, and if
she keeps up this behavior, she is
sure to find it. - Sandra C. Becker,
Executive Director, Help and
Emergency Response Inc.,
Portsmouth, Va.
Dear Sandra Becker: Many read-
ers wrote and expressed similar sen-
timents about Penny. Thanks for
making it clear that there could be
legal repercussions , as well as social
ones.


Local �"'


WJUF-FM 90.1
WHGN-FM 91.9
WXCV-FM 95.3
WXOF-FM 96.3
WRGO-FM 102.7


National Public Radio
Religious
Adult Contemporary
Adult Mix
Oldies


WIFL-FM 104.3
WJQB-FM 106.3
WFJV-FM 103.3
WRZN-AM 720


Adult Mix
Oldies
'50s, '60s, '70s
Adult Standards


RYidap_______


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
When we are bidding, we
always try to reach at least a game
contract. Assuming we will do
that, if we have a major-suit fit, we
charge into four hearts or four
spades. If we do not have a major-
suit fit, we steer toward three no-
trump. We bid five of a minor only
when we are confident that three
no-trump, four hearts and four
spades are unmakable. But some-
times, once we have established a
minor-suit fit, we might be uncer-
tain about three no-trump. How
do we investigate three no-
trump's viability?
Look at the South hand. You
open one club and partner
responds three clubs, a limit raise
showing five-plus clubs, some 10-
12 points (eight losers), and no
four-card or longer major. What
would you do next?
You are thinking about three
no-trump, but can the opponents
cash too many heart tricks? Since
you do not know, rebid three dia-
monds, which shows a stopper in
that suit. And when North returns
the compliment with three hearts,
highlighting his strength there,
you convert to three no-trump.
(Note that with best defense South
must guess the trumps to make
five clubs.)


ACROSS
1 Competed for
5 Home
furnishing
8 Barge
12 He directed
Marion
13 Ms. Merkel
14 Painted
tinware
15 Gull's cousin
16 Loots
18 Confidential
20 - - sorry!
21 Road
hazard
22 Game
official
23 Pat's cohost
26 Cold snaps
29 Shake - -!
30 Wave
makers
31 Gasp
of delight
33 Dactyl
34 Tackle-box item
35 Muslim mystic


36 Swirled around
38 Herring
39 Oola's guy
40 What,
in Oaxaca
41 Talk online
43 Pint
fractions
46 Good mixer
(2 wds.)
48 Division word
50 Passageway
51 Dispose of
52 Insatiable
53 Run in
neutral
54 USN officer
55 Homer's
instrument
DOWN
1 Zoo staffer
2 Cousteau's
islands
3 Ireland
4 Nightclub
activity
5 Delhi coin


North 06-18-07
4 4 2
SAK 7
+ 8 5 3
A K 10 6 5 2
West East
A A 10 8 7 5 A J 9 6
S9 8 6 4 Q J10 3
* Q 762 * 1094
4 - Q 7 3
South
AK Q 3
V 5 2
* AK J
4 A J 9 8 4
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither

South West North East
1 4 Pass 3 4 Pass


Opening lead: A 7

West leads the spade seven: two,
jack, king. You have seven top
tricks: one spade (trick one), two
hearts, two diamonds and two
clubs. You can get the extra tricks
from clubs, but must make sure
that East cannot gain the lead;
otherwise, he will push a spade
straight through your queen. Play
a club to dummy's king. Here, you
end with 10 tricks. But even if East
were void in clubs, your contract
would still be safe.


Answer to Previous Puzzle
K NG ALUM ODD
ALOE RAREMBRO
LION F I DSOU T
EASIEST IEMS
A I
DEARTA R


WAD KE
SK E B A AS Y



HOUSE B
W ---K B 0E|BA|Y
IR 1 B pj W -WA G E
A ~~ B Up|BE lmR|A|N
HOUSEFUL HI 7NAD T lM

ARN RODSNERAT
BEG Soso EI


6 College credit
7 Guy's date
8 Collectors'
items
9 Gear teeth
10 Dairy-case buy


GET MORE in the new "Just Right Crossword Puzzles"
series from Quill Driver. Call 800-605-7176.


11 Unseld of the
NBA
17 Stars' cars
19 VCR maker
22 Siberian river
23 Dye container
24 Shampoo
additive
25 Call for
26 Alfalfa or oats
27 Go
sightseeing
28 Davenport
30 Trickle
32 Gold record
34 Brawls
35 Not ordinary
37 Feasible
38 Grab some
rays
40 Thigh
muscles, in
the gym
41 Attired
42 Popcorn
nuisance
43 Valhalla host
44 Greed's
cousin
45 Cook in a wok
46 T'ai - ch'uan
47 Mineral
deposit
49 Poem by
Keats


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Henri Arnold and Mike Argirion


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I MUPIO I


PRYTAN


www.jumble.com
TUNESA
< ^ --^
1 _ ^ _ s


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer:
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: SCARY LIMBO BELLOW LEDGER
Answer: What happened when he came home
stewed - HE WAS "GRILLED"


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: G equals C


"UFDDFDB MVN VRUVAN YPVDX YIGM
XW YP, SIX U FDDFDB TZFPDEN MVN
YPVDX XMP YWNX." - BWRTPZ SVSP
EFEZFLNWD JVMVZFVN

PREVIOUS SOLUTION - "My father gave me the greatest gift anyone could
give another person; he believed in me." - Coach Jim Valvano
(c) 2007 by NEA, Inc. 6-18


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C' t~~AfTC MONDAY. JUNE 18, 2007 9B


CITRUS COUT vn(FL) CHROIoCLE


Peanuts


Cathy


Garfield


Sally Forth
rAUSHI IT'S THE LAST\i AUG m THIS IS DOESN'T SHE USUALLY FIRST YEAR SHE'S
WEEK OF SCHOOL! THE WORST | HAVE A FFERENT FINAL EXAMS/
� WEEK F .......... ,


LI(.l
Dilbert


For Better or For Worse
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Beetle Bailey


The " -*


The :".; Loser


LOOK NT TIAE. WM't TRF-5UN6Wg
PEOPLE Ot �C! .TREREZ5 NO
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Kit 'N ' -'. _______ Rubes


"No street vendor license, eh? My, that's
quite a serious offense. Gosh, if only there
was some way for you to avoid a nasty fine ..."


*PON7T PML 5A7 RUFF YOU CAN'T CMMB IW75
OUT CAT'S CAN'r SCARG AWAY 114EFNWL.MAN-1"


"Wake up, Dolly, or you'll be late
for summer vacation!"


Doonesbury


Frank & Ernest


P- I ) ,'aay ., . �. :I.'


,. and Janis


Today's HOROSCOPE


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness
Box Office 637-3377
"Fantastic Four: Silver Surfer"
(PG) Noon, 2:30 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:50
p.m., 10:25 p.m. Digital. No passes
or super savers.
"Ocean's 13" (PG-13) 12:45
p.m., 4 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Surf's Up" (PG) 12:15 p.m.,
2:45 p.m., 5:05 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Knocked Up" (R) 12:40 p.m.,
3:50 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Pirates of the Caribbean:
World's End" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m.,
4:05 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Shrek the Third" (PG) 12:10
p.m., 2:40 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:40
p.m., 10:05 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Nancy Drew" (PG) 12:10 p.m.,
2:30 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10


p.m. Digital.
"Fantastic Four: Silver Surfer"
(PG) 12:20 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 5:10
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:10 p.m. Digital.
No passes or super savers.
"Hostel 2" (R) 12:15 p.m., 2:35
p.m., 4:55 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Ocean's 13" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
Digital.
"Surf's Up" (PG) 12:40 p.m.,
2:50 p.m., 5:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
9:45 p.m. Digital.
"Mr. Brooks" (R) 12:50 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"Knocked Up" (R) 12:45 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:20 p.m. Digital.
"Pirates of the Caribbean:
World's End" (PG-13) Noon, 3:40
p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:40 p.m.
"Shrek the Third" (PG) 12:30
p.m., 2:45 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
9:55 p.m. Digital.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


Your Birthday: There may be a number of wonderful
things happening in your life that could be more reward-
ing than you've experienced for some time. The months
ahead will definitely not be the usual run of the mill.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) --This is an excellent day
to discuss your bright ideas with confidants whose judg-
ment you admire. An exchange of ideas could define
what you want to do and how to make good things hap-
pen.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - Don't sit on any inspi-
ration that you get pertaining to ways and means to
increase your eamings or provide you with greater mate-
rial security. Your thinking will be right on the money.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Someone you happen
across socially could turn out to be of considerable help
in furthering a self-interest you've been harboring. It
could be your lucky day.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - It behooves you to main-
tain a positive picture concerning the outcome of an
event that is quite important to you.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Promoting a personal
interest of yours looks far more favorable than it has for
a long time, so don't waste this propitious day. Add some
twists of your own and dare to be different.


Scorpio (Oct 24-Nov. 22) - There is no reason to
be intimidated by situations that are measured in large
figures.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - Have faith in your-
self and your ability to succeed. You are capable of
achieving exceptionally large gains in enterprises or ven-
tures that you originate, manage or direct.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)- Where you're likely to
be at your best is in the handling of situations or con-
cems that affect others, as well as yourself.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Your upbeat and out-
going attitude tends to have an exhilarating effect upon
all those with whom you associate at this time.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - If you are not already
so inclined, set your sights as high as possible, especial-
ly where your work or career is concerned.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - Your personality is far
more magnetic than it usually is, so don't be surprised if
friends, co-workers and family members start to cluster
about in all types of settings.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - Although the methods
you use to achieve your ends appear to be no different
than usual, your ability to achieve success in big ways is
far beyond the norm. Results could be phenomenal.


Circus


Big Nate


MONDAY. JUNE 18, 2007 9B


fcomiCS























Classifieds

Mil7B1tR'm


[7 ax (32 56-651Tl re"88)8224 mii:casfescrnceoln o es :ww-hoiloln~o


Gay White Female,
5'10", 180 Ibs,
Auburn Hair, blue eyes,
looking for same for
friendship, movies,
conversation.
N/S preferred.
(352) 795-0309
Looking For
Companion
to Share Cost,
Traveling to Michigan,
End of June
(352) 476-6192
SWM, Semi-retired,
Italian, 5'8" 155lbs.
seeks female friend
or companion.
Age, color, race
unimportant.
(352) 746-6159
WWM in Search WF, 65,
to enjoy country music,
flea markets, traveling
USA, in Class A Motor
Home. Send Response
To: Blind Box 1329P
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River Fl.
34429




r MENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com



$$CASH WE BUY TODAY
Cars, Trucks, Vans - rf
FREE Removal Metal,
Junk Vehicles, No title
OK 352-476-4392 Andy
Tax Deductible Recelot
$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144


Your world fffst



Need a job

or a

qualified

employee?



This area's

#1

employment

source!



CHI aNsidE


$$ CASH PAID $$
Having Code
Enforcement problems
w/ Junk vehicles in your
yard? (352) 860-2545
$ CASH $ PAID FOR
Unwanted Vehicles
CALL (352) 220-0687
Abandoned Kitten
Recue, Save her from
the pound
(352) 628-5868
American English
Bulldog
Free to good home,
good w/ kids,
needs room to run
(352) 795-0747
COMMUNITY SERVICE
The Path Shelter is
available for people
who need to serve
their community
service.
(352) 560-6163 or
(352) 746-9084
Leave Message
FREE KITTEN
Orange tabby, litter
box trained flea'd &
wormed. Also
I YEAR OLD BLK. MALE
(352) 563-0493
Free KITTENS
& PARENTS, litter trained.
Farm raised.
(352) 586-2590
FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowersjacuzzi's, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
FREE REMOVAL OF
BOATS/RVS
(352) 628-6605
FREE REMOVAL
Of unwanted househid
& Garage Sale Items.
Call (352) 726-9500
ORGAN WURLITZER
OMNI 6000
Perfect for church or
community center.
(352) 560-7383
The Path Shelter
will pick up your
unwanted vehicle
Tax deductible
receipt given
(352) 746-9084

WE PAY CASH
FOR
JUNK CARS
Top $$ paid $$
Toll Free
(888) 480-1170
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645



FRESH SWEET CORN
@ BELLAMY GROVES
1.5 miles E. on Eden Dr.
In INVERNESS
Lima Beans, Purple Hull
& Buffer Beans
(352) 726-6378



S DIVORCES I
BANKRUPTCY
- Name Change |
*Child Support
*Wills
SWe Come To You
S 637-4022795-5999
=I II II


Diana's Flower &
Wedding Shop-Offering
"Bosic Floral Design"
classes (352) 400-4912
DRUM LESSONS
Prof, drummer, Music
field 50+ yrs. 794-0265
Glory Recording Studios


Sudoku ***-A- 4puz.com


7

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9 2


1 9


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2




2


3


1


1 9
8.


8 1






3 5


6


'4


6,


5 1


5


8s


91 3

'9,7


2


8


Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
I rentalfinder.com
SSOD * SOD * SOD-
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY




., ,:- ../ .


ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
BUYERS AGENT
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
A n iUS OCfM


and read

1,000's of Items sold
everyday using the
Chronicle classified.
Call today and we'll
help you get rid of
your unwanted stuff.


(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-1441



Fountains Mem Park,
Homosassa, Lots 1,2,3
& 4 in Peace 114
Garden $6995 for all
four. (352) 799-2970-
Brooksville






S Your Website
Chronicle Website
Directory in print
H and online.
Our search engine
will link customers
directly to your site.
In Print
+ Online
I = One Price
$51.95
(3 lines of copy
for 30 days)
Header and
Website Address
Call Today:
(352) 563-5966

CA- SALES
www.naturecoast
wheels.cam
Get The Value of Your
Home
www.naturecoastliving.n
et
Hurricane Info
www.chronicleonllnel

NEWSPAPERS
www.chronicle
online.com
Political News
www.chronicleonline

Real Estate Information
www.FreeCltrusCounty
Homelnfo.com

www.chroniclehome
finder.com

www.naturecoast
homefront.com

www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com



COOK FT/PT
Experience Required
Tadpoles Early Learning
Center (352) 560-4222



CITRUS COUNTY
Clerk of Courts
Is accepting
applications at this
time. For the
positions of
*SYSTEMS
ANALYST
*SWITCH BOARD
OPERATOR
For additional
information please
view our website at
www.clerk. citrus.fl.us
or contact
Human Resources at
(352) 341-6483


BILINGUAL
RECEPTIONIST
Needed part time for edu-
cational foundation. Must
be fluent in Spanish. Fax
resume to 352/795-1970.

















n -2Babrn




NightsE
I]Jul. 30 i i'smet ,l I


CMI
Oamn ,ICeNOSPOtOn MaEem

LPN & RN
(3:45pm-12:l5am)
Second Shift
(1 1:45pm-8:15am)
Third Shift
(Full Time)
GREAT BENEFITS&!!
Paid Vacation;,
Holidays, Health
Insurance & 401K


Ready for a change?
The best kept secret
in nursing is in
Correctional Nursing.
Current FL LPN or RN
license & valid Drivers
license is required
To apply for a new
challenging career
visit our facility
M-F 8:30am - 4:30pm
2604 W. Woodland
Ridge Drive
Lecanto, Fl 34461
To apply via Internet
www.corrections
carp.com
M/F/VET/HP
.EO.E.. Drug Free
Workplace


ARNP
Exp'd, F/T for Busy
Doctors office and
Nursing Home.
Send Resume To:
(352)795-7898

BILLING/
RECEPTIONIST
Medical billing and/or
reception exp.
Fax: (352) 746-2236

BRENTWOOD
Retirement/
Assisted Living
Has the following
Openings
* LPN's for PRN
*FTCNA's3-11
& 11-7
All positions -
Insurance after
60 days. Vacation
After 90 days.

Sign on bonus &
paid by exp.
Apply in Person:
Brentwood Retirement
Community
Commons Build.
1900 W. Alpha Ct.
Lecanto 352-746-6611
DFWP/EOE








We offer h Ie Io]t




dental bene�fits


r CNA'S NEEDED
F/T 3-11 I
Shift differential
Cypress Cove
Care Center
(352) 795-8832









EARN AS YOU LEARN
CNA Test Prep/CPR
Continuing Education
341-2311/Cell 422-3656
Evening
Receptionist
Monday-Friday,
4:30pm-7:30pm
Come join a fun
team Multi-phone
system and data
entry skills preferred,
Dependability a must.
Apply In person
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, FL
EOE

EXPERIENCED
PHLEBOTOMIST
W/ Front Office
experience.
FT for busy Dr's office
$$ Good benefits $$
Fax resume to
352-746-6333

HOUSEKEEPER
We have a position
available as
housekeeper in our
skilled nursing facility.
We offer a good
salary and benefit
package including
liberal paid time off,
health & dental
insurance.
Please apply
in person:
Citrus Health and
Rehabilitation Center
701 Medical Ct East,
INVERNESS EOE/ DFW
Not-for-Profit

LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers
DONOR
RECRUITER
This is a full-time
position working with
media, planning
special events, and
recruiting whole
blood and apheresis
donors. Must have
strong written and
verbal communica-
tion skills and possess
excellent customer
service skills. Must also
be enthusiastic and
energetic. Sales or
retail experience a
plus. Background
check required,
Please submit resume
to: 1241 S. Lecanto
Hwy, Lecanto, FL
34461
EOE/DFWP


Services


$172.68


FRONI UtDESK
MEDICAL OFFICE
One F/T, One P/T.
Please fax
resumes to:
352-628-1120








LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers Seeks
Energetic
DONOR
SPECIALIST
Responsibilities
include registration of
donors, performing
interviews and
physical to
determine eligibility of
donors as well as
phlebotomy. Must
have excellent
customer service skills.
Will provide on the
job training. Flexible
hours required.
Background check
required.
Please submit resume
to: 1241 S. Lecanto
Hwy, Lecanto, FL
34461
EOE/DFWP

NURSE7P/T
11-7
JOIN OUR TEAM!
CYPRESS COVE
CARE CENTER
700 SE 8th Ave.
Crystal River
(352) 795-8832
AAAAATkA A
NOW HIRING
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
Flexible schedules
offered. $10.00/hr.
CALL LOVING CARE



RN/LPN
3-11
$2,500 Sign-on
Bonus

Also seeking
CNA 11-7

Looking for that
individual with
exceptional
Clinical Skills and
work ethics.
Fax resume to
Geri Murphy at
352-746-0866
Health Center at
Brentwood
"We are a
drug free facility"
EOE D/V/M/F


RN
w/BSN or MSN
OB/Peds Exp.
Adjuncent, flexible
schedule.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 245-0276 or
Call (352) 245-4119

RN, LPN, CNA,
CMA NEEDED
A ALL STAR A
Professional
Staffing Services
352-560-6210

RN/LPN
CNA/HHA'S
New competitive pay
rates. Call
Interim Health Care
(352) 637-3111

SOCIAL SERVICES
DIRECTOR
Avante at Inverness
seeks a qualified
professional to act as
liaison and
representative for
residents' social
interests. Will plan,
organize and direct
overall operation of
Social Services Dept.
to ensure that
medically related
social and emotional
needs of residents are
met. Must be a
licensed social worker
with BSW or Masters
degree. Must possess
excellent comm. and
org. skills.
Please apply in
person at:
304 S. Citrus Ave.,
Inverness or
fax resume to
352-637-0333
or email to


-S
avantearouo.com








CORRECTIONAL
OFFICER
(Full Time)

GREAT BENEFITS!!
Paid Vacations,
Holidays, Health
Insurance & 401 K
Qual: H.S./GED, A
valid Florida Drivers
license is required.
Must be at least 19yrs.
of age.
Applications are
available at
2604 W. Woodland
Ridge Drive
Lecanto, Fl 34461
www.corrections
coro.com
M/F/VET/HP
E.O.E. Drug Free
Workplace


-Ul

EXECUTIVE
HOUSEKEEPER
For 114 Room Resort
Hotel in Crystal River.
3 years prior
experience in position
required. Health
Insurance, 401,
Vacation & Holidays
Fax resume with
salary requirements
to 352-795-3179
EXPERIENCED
/ Software
Developers
/ Graphic
Designers
/ Marketing Mngr
/ Software Tester
www.mobiform.com
Send Resume To:
info@mobiform.com
FRONT DESK &
BOOKKEEPER
F/T, Apply in person
Port Hotel & Marina
Crystal River, FL.
Substance
Abuse/Mental
Health Technician
Under direction of a
mental health or
substance abuse
professional,
manages the general
conduct and
behavior of juvenile
residents, assists
therapists with the
provision of
behavioral health
overlay services,
maintains discipline,
participates In
training residents in
life and social skills
training, leads
recreational
activities, and; does
related work as
required.
Education:
Graduation from an
accredited college
with a Bachelor's
degree in Behavioral
Science or related
field
Apply in person at:
Cypress Creek
Juvenile Offenders
Correctional Center
2855 W Woodland
Ridge Dr.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Or fax resume to
352-527-2235
Drug Free Workplace
/ EEO


Your World





C IcRmNiac

ww chranicleonlrre.ccvm


Transportation Real Estate


$77.95


$97.95


Callfor details



(352) 563-5966


Classifieds Working For You


SUBSTANCE
ABUSE
COUNSELOR
Provides in-home sub-
stance abuse assess-
ment and counseling
svcs. to at-risk families
in Hernando County;
possesses knowledge
of chemical depend-
ency, AA/NA 12-step
philosophy, community
CD resources and
Marchman Act; 2 yrs.
relevant substance
abuse treatment exp.
req. MA in Human
Svcs. req. and licensed
in mental health and/or
CAP preferred.
DFWP/EOE

Youth and Family
Ministry P/T
Must have a heart for
reaching out to youth
and upper elem. age
kids. Fairly new Christian
Church in Citrus County
Respond to Box 1328P
c/o Citrus Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FI
34429




.COOKS
*SERVERS
Exp. preferred. High
volume environment.
COACH'S Pub&Eatery
114W. Main St., lnv.
11582 N. Williams St.,
Dunnellon EOE

SCHIANO'S
NOW HIRING
Exp. waitstaff. Inverness
(352) 344-0024

*SOUS CHEF
*SERVERS
*DISHWASHER/
PREP
We will train.
Please Apply before
11am or after 2pm
Cafe on the Ave.
631 N. Citrus Ave.
(352) 795-3656





$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
WRITE YOUR OWN
PAYCHECK
Exp. phone Sales
Reps Needed.
Call 352-628-0187

CASHIERS
Travel Store, Hiring for
all shifts. Full benefits
& 401K. Contact:
Dave Short
(352)748-2501 ext. 119
or Apply in person
TRAVEL CENTER OF
AMERICA
556 St. Rd. 44
Wildwood
Exit 329 off 1-75


Cirs ont hrncl SmerCunyTie



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ONE CALL,



ONE PRICE


Reach 82,000


Homes & Businesses



Examples:


CLASSIFIEDS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



To place an ad, call 563-5966


b Classifieds



In Print


and


STOnline


All


The Time


I











CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Exp. Appt. Setter
& Installer

Top Pay 352-726-1002
352-597-4002


LOCAL PLUMBING
WHOLESALER

Seeking Inside
Salesperson, Must have
knowledge of
plumbing & office
procedures. Insurance,
401 K, (352)795-2999


Realtors Wanted

Small productive
non franchise office.
Pleasant working
cond., Good comm.
split. Interviews
confidential.
(352) 795-9123


SALES PERSON
Needed, $350 wkly,
Citrus County District,
$350 wkly, monthly
commissions on
produce sales. $450
mo. on monthly
car use allowance.
Call APM Produce.
(352) 732-1191
7am-Noon


I M"4�lh
C= Sales Help


I-rL I


9-


STATE FARM
INSURANCE

Sales Posillon.
Customer Service or
Sales exp. req,
Call (352) 489-8900





A/C INSTALLER/
SERVICE TECH
Expereinced.
TopPay & Benefits
Call 352-628-5700
CUSTODIAN/
FACILITY MONITOR

Apply in person:
Spruce Creek
Preserve. St. Rd. 200
Dunnellon, see Steve,
Julie or Diane,
DRILLER'S ASST.

Needed. Long hours.
Clean Class D license &
driving record. Paid
holidays & vacations
352-400-0398 before 9p

DSI SECURITY FT

D lic. req. Uniforms,
Health benefits
1-888-221-0040
EEO M/F/V D/F/W/P


MONDAY, JUNE 18, 2007 11B


FACILITATOR
Shared Service
Alliance of Citrus Co.
Is seeking a
Professional Facilitator
that provides,
administrative
support and reports
to the SSA Board. This
is a Part time annual
contract position,
min. AA degree req.,
Bachelors preferred
Salary $15,000-$20,000
based on exp,/
education. No Bene-
fits, Send Resumes
for consideration to:
Brad Thorpe
3600 W. Sovereign
Path suite 202
Lecanto Fl. 34461


MOTORCYCLE &
PWC TECH
WANTED
Citrus Kawasaki is
seeking an
experienced &
responsible person to
join our team. Top
pay and benefits in
the business if you are
looking for a career
position call Paul @
352-527-0129 or
Email your
confidential resume
to:suby@adelphia.net


ELECTRICIAN
Must have exp, in
commercial, residen-
tial, and service, Must
be a team player
Insurance Benefits
Call Mon-Thurs.
(352) 341-2004



PROPERTY
MANAGER
NEEDED
59 Unit property.
Tax credit exp.
required. Brooksvllle
area. 352-396-0295.
9am- 4 pm. Mon. - Fri.
or resume to
352-787-1912
Benefits offered.
EOE DFWP




QUALIFIED
SERVICE TECH

S Must have
* experience and
current FL
Driver's License
Apply in person:
Daniel's Heating &
Air
4581 S. Florida Ave.
Inverness
Li--i --J


GREENBRIAR
ENTERPRISES
LOOKING FOR
LAWN &
MAINTENANCE

Clean Driver's lic, req.
(352) 302-7509
Masons & Mason
Laborers
(352) 302-7566
ROOFING
LABORER

Commercial roofing
company looking for
hard-working &
dependable laborers.
Exc. Pay w/pd. time
for travel. We cover
the entire state of FL.
Must have a valid D.L.
DFWP (352) 564-8319
Ask for Michelle

SCI

Looking for
Experienced
ASPHALT PLANT
OPERATOR &
WELDER
FABRICATOR
APPRENTICE
No Phone Calls
Apply in Person:
3601 SW 38th Ave.
Ocala


POOL TECHS
WANTED
In Wildwood. Exp.
preferred. Will train.
(352) 748-3987







CHTpoNE


DELIVERY ROUTES
AVAILABLE IN
CRYSTAL RIVER.

Earn $200 a weekI 2-3
early morning hours,
7 days a week.
There are currently
several newspaper
delivery routes
available in the
Crystal River area.
Call 563-3201
and leave your name,
telephone number
and the best time to
call. Back-up vehicle
required.

CHR* 'LE


$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
WRITE YOUR OWN
PAYCHECK!
Exp. phone Sales
Reps Needed.
Call 352-628-0187



COOK, FT/PT
Experience Required
Tadpoles Early Learning
Center (352) 560-4222


LANDFILL
OPERATOR &
.GENERAL
LABORERS
Send Resume To:
Sumter Recycling
352-568-0110


LAWN &
LANDSCAPE
TECHNICIAN

Exp. pref'd. 25-30 hrs.
per wk. (352)726-9481


LAWN SERVICE
HELP
352-425-8703


A/C Tune up w/ Free
permanent filter +
Termite/Pest Control
Insp. Lic & Boned Only
$44.95 for both.
(352) 628-5700
caco36870
r--- - -- q
I I!l


I ADVERTISE YOUR
BUSINESS IN THE
I SERVICE
DIRECTORY
TODAY!
$$$$$$$S$$$$$$$$s$
Its Less than
I Pennies per day
per household

IF WE DON'T HAVE
| YOUR BUSINESS
S CATEGORY.
JUST ASK.
1 WE CAN GET
IT FOR YOUI!

CALL TODAY
S(352) 563-5966

MARY'S
PRECIOUS PETS
Pet Sitting Service
(352) 503-5414


-E










AFFORDABLE
1 HAULING CLEANUP, I
PROMPT SERVICE |
Trash, Trees, Brush,
I Apple. Furn, Const, I
I Debris & Garages |
352-697-1126 1

;"All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
:' Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
COLEMAN TREE SERVICE
Removal & trim, Lic. Ins.
FREE EST. Lowest rates
Guaranteed! 726-8010
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
HaulingCleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Stump Grinding
'& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272

HAULING, TREE
SERVICES,
DEMOLITION &
MISC CLEANUP, ETC.
352.447-3713/232-2898

R WRIGHT TREE SERVICE,
* tree removal, stump
grind, trim, lns.& Lic
#0256879 352-341-6827







A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd friendly
serve, Lowest rates Free
estimates,352-860-1452


For more Info. on Aerating
mwww.eino.com
SAcreage Aerating,
s Fertilizing & Seeding


All Compurer Kepaurs
We come to your home
or office. 21 yrs. exp.
7 days (352) 212-1165




CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch,clean, repair
Vinyl, Tile, Wood, (352)
341-0909 Shop at home
REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch - Installation
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 5861J728





We Install YOUR Floorl
Carpet, vinyl, & tile
All jobs welcome! We


r #1 A+ Mr Fix Iti
Prof. painting, Pres- I
I sure washing, Home n
repairs, Gutter cing
I & Screen repair. I
1 220-9326/382-3647 I
Uc#99990255609

VChris Satchell Painting
& Walicovering.AII work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Lic#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533
CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Uc. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
CHEAP/CHEAP/CHEAP
DP Pressure Cleaning
& Painting. Licensed &
Insured. 637-3765
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any job. lic
# 99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
George Swedlige
Painting- Int./Ext.
Pressure Cleaning- Free
est. 794-0400 /628-2245
Henry's Painting Press.
wash, roof clean. Ins.
Accept Cr. cards. Lic#
30555 (352) 302-4928
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic,/Ins,
(352) 726-9998
* RUDY'S PAINTING A*
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Cleaning
FREE EST. (352) 476-9013




Affordable Boat Maint.
& Repair, Mechanical,
Electrical, Custom Rig.
John (352) 746-4521
DOCKS, SEAWALLS,
Boat Lifts, Boat Houses,
New, Re decks, Repair
& Styrofoam Replace.
Lic.CBC060275. Ins.
(352) 302-1236
MORRILL MARINE
Outboard Repairs,
Dockside Service. Elec.
installed (352) 628-3331




AT YOUR HOME Res.
mower & small engine
repair. ULc#99990001273
Bob, 352-220-4244


Levy (352) 447-4017
Citrus (352) 287-9207


iEl
Family Enterprises
Free Estimates
Lawn Aerating, Lawn
Dethaching, Leaf Clean-Up &
Removal, Bush Hogging, Haul
Away Service


BATHTUB REGLAZING
Old tubs & ugly
ceramic tile is restored
to new cond. All colors
avail. 697-TUBS (8827)


CUSTOM UPHOLSTERY
Modern & antique.
Denny, 628-5595
or 464-2738



*PRIVATE.
Adult Family Care
Home. Licensed.
Get one on one care.
Semi-private & private
rooms available
Come see us at Floral
City. (352) 637-3253




vChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Lic#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533




Clean Breeze Cleaning
Service INC.
Owners DO the work!
Lic/Ins.(352)476-8979
HOMES & WINDOWS
Serving Citrus County
over 18 years. Kathy
(352) 465-7334
PARTNERS IN GRIME
Commer/Res. 20 yrs
exp., Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
Call (352) 628-4898
Paula's Independent
Cleaning Service
29 yrs. exp. Excel. Ref.
Resid./Comm. 793-6599
PHYLLIS' CLEANING SVC
Homes/Offices/Condos
20+ yrs exp.* ref's avail
352-795-1443
Touch of Class Cleaning
Service, 15 Yrs. Exp.
Also If you Need Help?
With Errands, Things
Around the House. Ret.
Nancy (352) 628-2774




Spiffy Window Cleaners
Superb service at
a reasonable Rate
lic. & Ins. (352) 503-3558
* The Window Man *
Beats any Est. by 10%
Com./resid., Lic. & Ins,
* (352) 228-7295 *


AFFORDABLE
CABINETS &
COUNTERTOPS
(352) 586-8415




Additions-Kitchens
Bathrooms - Decks,
Woodfloors - Ceramic
DJM Constructors Inc.
Lic. & Ins. CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620


DOTSON Construction
25 yrs. In Central FL. Our
own crews! Specializing
in additions, framing,
trim. & decks.
Lic. #CRC1326910
(352) 726-1708
HOME or COMM.
Renovations. We sell &
install ICF's (Insulated
Concrete Wall Forms)
30 yrs. exp.
Lic#CBC1250751 Ins,
No job too small
Affordable rates. Ron
Whitehead Bldr. Major
C.C. Acc. 352-628-4211
ROGERS Construction
New Homes,Additions
Florida Rooms.
637-4373 CRC 1326872




FL RESCREEN
352-563-0104/257-1011
1 panel or comp cage
Family owned &
operated. Also avail.
suier screen w/10vr
manufacturer warr.
Screen rms,Carports,
vinyl & acrylic windows,
roof overs & storm
panels, garage screen
doors, siding,
soffit fascia, Lic#2708
(352) 628-0562
SOFFITS, SCREEN RMS,
REPAIRS- Free Est.
Montalto Alum. Lic.
#2807 (352)503-4924




CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
AUGIE'S PRESSURE
Cleaning - Quality
Work, Low Prices. FREE
Estimates: 220-2913
Henry's Painting Press.
wash, roof clean. Ins.
Accept Cr. cards. Lic#
30555 (352) 302-4928
PICARD'S PRESSURE
CLEANING & PAINTING
Roofs w/no pressure,
houses,driveways, 25 yrs
exp. Lc./Ins, 341-3300





r #1 A+ MrFi- It -
I Prof, painting, Pres- I
sure washing, Home I
repairs. Gutter cing
& Screen repair.
220-9326/382-3647
Lic#99990255609
--- --- E
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash & Gutters
Lic.5863 (352) 746-0141
#1 IN HOME REPAIRS,
paint, press.wash, clean
roof&gutters, Reliable,
#0169757 344-4409
1 Call does it All No iob
toosm.l Remod., Home
Repairs, Press. Clean.,
etc. CRC1326431
(352) 746-9613
Andrew Joehl
Handyman. General
Maintenance/Repairs
Ftessure & cleaning.
Lawns, gutters. No job
too small Reliable. Ins
0256271 352-465-9201


3 J's HOME
IMPROVEMENT, INC.
General maint. Painting
Int & Ext, landscaping
Free est Lic2951
352-527-3341/302-5994
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any job. lic
# 99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
-r�--n-U
AFFORDABLE
HAULING CLEANUP, I
| PROMPT SERVICE |
Trash, Trees, Brush,
Appl. Furn, Const, I
I Debris & Garages I
352-697-1126
ARTISAN HOME
IMPROVEMENTS
General Maintenance
& Repairs. Lic # 34064
(352) 228-7823
FAST AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs.
Free Est. Llc # 0256374
(352) 257-9508
Handyman Wayne
Lic 34151, 352-795-9708
Cell 352-257-3514
Handyman.
If its broke Jerry can
fix it. Lic#189620
(352) 726-0762
HOME REPAIR, You
need it done, we'll do
it. 30 yrs. exp. Lic., Ins.
#73490256935,489-9051
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Tile Work,
Framing. 30 yrs. exp.
344-1952 CBC058263




STAYLER AC & HEATING,
Inc. FREE Service call
w/repair this mo. Ins.
628-6300. CACO 58704




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's Installed.
Pressure wash & Gutters
Lic.5863 (352) 746-0141
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC INC.
Elec. Serv./Repairs. New
const. Remodel Free Est
726-2907 EC13002699
FULL ELECTRIC SERVICE
Remodeling, Lighting,
New Install! Lic. & Insur.
#2767 (352)257-2276


-0-- ----

AFFORDABLE
I HAULING CLEANUP, I
I PROMPT SERVICE |
STrash, Trees, Brush,
Appl, Furn, Const. I
I Debris & Garages |
352-697-1126 N









All of Citrus Hauling/
Moving items delivered,
clean ups. Everything
from A to Z 628-6790
C.J.'S TRUCK/TRAILERS
Furn., apple, trash, brush,
Low $$$/Professional
Prompt 7 day service
726-2264 /201-1422


Furn. Moving / Hauling
Dependable & Exp.
CALL LARRY
352-270-3589, 726-7022
Got Trash-Brush? You/
We load 20-40yard
dumpsters Mulch, fill
topsoil Pick up/delivery
352-726-1875 302-8382
HAULING, TREE
SERVICES,
DEMOLITION &
MISC CLEANUP, ETC.
352.447-3713/232-2898
Nature Coast Contain-
ers, Comm./ Res. 12 yd.
dumpsters, mulch deliv-
ery & hauling. 302-7100
WE MOVE SHEDS
352-637-6607


-SH-
CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch,clean, repair
Vinyl, Tile, Wood, (352)
341-0909 Shop at home
FRANK TILE, INC.
Tile, Marble, Pavers,
Remodel/Repair-spec.
20+ yrs. Ins. Lic#2665
352-634-0761/598-3901




Viglione Asphalt Paving
Driveways, Sidewalks,
Patios, Etc., Free Est.,


All Kinds o fTences
JAMES LYNCH FENCE
Free estimates.
(352) 527-3431
ROCKY'S FENCING
Working In
Citrus County for 25 yrs.
Free Estimate, Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279
25 Years In County
Free Est., Res./Comm.
FENCES BY DALLAS
Lic./Ins (352) 795-1110
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any job. lic
# 99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing.
All types.Free estimates
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BARNYARD II FENCING
Serving Citrus Co. Since
1973. Free Estimates
(352) 726-9260
BEACH FENCE
Free est., Lic. #0258336
(352) 628-1190
813-763-3856 Cell


SI in service
Hise Roofing
New const. reroofs &
repairs. 25 yrs. exp. leak
spec. #CCC 1327059
(352) 344-2442


L 2776 - Licensed & Insurd
Lv� #2776 Licensed & 1 cloxnd


HOME REPAIR & MAINTENANCE, INC.
"Caring for Your Home is Our Business"
- Offering A Full Range of Services -
�. Residential
Commercial ....
s 628-4282 Chamber
8-4282 Member


J. Vauahn Roofing. Inc.
New Roofs, Re-Roofs &
Repairs; CC.C accepted
Ins/Lic CCC 1327365
(352) 795-6659
John Gordon Roofing
Reas. Rates. Free est.
Proud to Serve You.
ccc 1325492.
795-7003/800-233-5358




All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. FREE EST.
Llc#2579 /Ins. 746-1004
Concrete Slabs, Pavers
Remove & Haul Debris
Demolit. 352-746-9613
Lic# CRC 1326431
CONCRETE WORK.
Sdewaks, Driveways Patios,
Free est, Lic. 2000. Ins.
795-4798
Decorative concrete,
River rock, curbing &
concrete, Fuston's River
Rock (352) 344-4209
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
driveways & tear outs
Lic.1476 726-6554




A+ QUALITY WORK
SPAFFORD's CONST.
Specializing in room
additions, remodeling,
bathrooms, windows,
garages. Lic. RR0066831
352-726-7855
Additions-Kitchens
Bathrooms - Decks,
Woodfloors - Ceramic
DJM Constructors Inc.
Lic. & Ins. CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620
DOTSON Construction
25 yrs. In Central FL. Our
own crews! Specializing
in additions, framing,
trim, & decks.
Lic. #CRC1326910
(352) 726-1708
HOME or COMM.
Renovations. We sell &
Install ICF's (Insulated
Concrete Wall Forms)
30 yrs. exp.
Llc#CBC1250751 Ins.
No job too smallil
Affordable rates. Ran
Whitehead Bldr. Major
C.C. Acc. 352-628-4211







W. F. GILLESPIE
Room Additions, New
Home Construction,
Baths & Kitchens
St. Lic. CRC 1327902
(352) 465-2177
www.wfgillespie.com
We do it ALLI Big or Sm.!
Additions, BA & Kitch.,
DrywallCrown molding,
Demo. CRC1326431
(352) 746-9613




CERAMIC TILE INSTALLER
Bathroom remodeling,
handicap bathrooms.
Uc/Ins. #2441 795-7241


CUTTING EDGE Ceramic
Tile. Uc. #2713, Insured.
Showers, Firs, Counters
Etc. (352) 422-2019
FREE ESTIMATES
Honest & Dependable
Bath Remodeling.
LIC.#2551 352-266-1600



ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cert. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs,
Texture, Additions,
Homeowners, Builders
Free est. (352) 220-9016
Lic.#SCC 131149747
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Tile Work,
Framing. 30 yrs. exp.
344-1952 CBC058263



FILL, ROCK, CLAY, ETC.
All typoes of Dirt Service
Call Mike 352-564-1411
Mobile 239-470-0572
AFFORDABLE Top soil,
fill, mulch,rock. Tractor
work. No job too small.
352-302-7325 341-2019
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
FLIPS TRUCK & TRACTOR,
Landclearing, Truck &
Tractor work. House
Pads, Rock, Sand, Clay,
Mulch & Topsoil.
(352) 382-2253
LARRY'S TRACTOR
SERVICE Finish grading
& bush hogging
352-302-3523/628-3924




All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
DONALD KERNZ'S
M.H. demolition, red
tag cleanup, land
clearing (352) 634-0329
TREE REMOVAL,
Landclearing, Fill Dirt,
Bush hogging,
(352) 563-1873
TURTLE ACRES
BUSHHOG SERVICE
Boxblade, Front Loader
& Stump Grinding


BILL'S LANDSCAPING
& Lawn Service, Flower
Beds, Mulch, Plants,
Sod, Trees, Clean-ups,
FREE Est. (352) 628-4258
Cell 352-453-6292
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272
Lawncare-N-More LLC
Bushes, Beds, Leaves,
Pres. Washing, Debris
Removal. 726-9570
RAM Landscaping &
Lawn care, Specializing
In Pruning. Call Me
(352) 637-6588


Roof Cleaning Specialist
The Only Company that can Keep Mold & Mildew Off
Siding - Stucco- Vinyl - Concrete Tile & Asphalt Roofs

GUARANTEED!
Restore * Protect * Beautify - Residential & Commercial


Suncoast
- Exterior
Restoration Service Inc.

1 877-601-5050 * 352-489-5265


# SOD * SOD * SOD*
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032




"El Cheapo" cuts $10 up
Beat any Price. We do
it All. Call 352-563-9824
Or 352-228-7320
# Yard Dogz Lawncare
quality cuts starting $10.
Reliable & dependable
Free Est. (352) 382-1504
A TROPICAL LAWN
Family owned & oper.
Satisfaction Guaran.
352-257-9132/257-1930
Advanced LAWN CARE
& More pressure wash,
beds, hedges, Uc. Ins.
Res./Comm. Ref. avail.
352-220-6325/220-9533
All Seasons Lawncare
Residential/ Commerc.
Complete lawn care,
Second to none.
Guaranteed best rates.
LIC. INS. (352) 302-0420
BARKER'S LAWN
SERVICE & MORE
(352) 228-2231
Bob's Pro Lawn Care
Reliable, Quality work
Residential / Comm.
Llc./Ins. 352-613-4250
Frankenfield Lawncare
& Pressure Washing
Res./Comm. No Job
too Big or Small, Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-8533
J & S LAWN CARE
Landscape & Design
Reasonable Rates!! Res-
idential & Commercial.
25 Years Experience.
(352)465-0818
LAWN SERVICE
We do re-sodding
and patching.
Free Estimate 795-4798.
Lawncare-N-More LLC
Bushes, Beds, Leaves,
Pres. Washing, Debris
Removal. 726-9570
RITTER LAWN CARE
Lawn Maint., Press.
Clean., Sm Tree Remov.
Free Est.(352) 257-6001
Steve's Lawn Service
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lice. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166




AQUA AZURE
Total Pool System Care
Personalized Service &
Great Prices 344-4796
DANIAL COLE POOL
CLEANING SERVICES
Reliable, Wkly Cleaning
Lic. Ins. 352-465-3985
EVERCLEAR POOL SERV.
10 yrs exp., We offer
Reliable and Quality
Service (352) 344-5122
George Fisher Pools
PleaseCleanMvPool.
com WEEKLY POOL
SERVICE 422-6123
NEED POOL REPAIRS?
Filters, Pumps, Heaters,
Remodeling, & Leak
detection, lic. 2819
503-3778/352-302-9963
POOL BOY SERVICES
Aqua guard, Epoxy,
Coatings, Acrylic
Decking. Lic./Ins.
i 352-464-3967 m
POOL DOCTOR
Wkly. & Monthly Maint.
Repairs & Acrylic
Decking. 352-212-7272


R.C. (GATOR) EDSON
Pump Service-All Types
Ins'd, Uc. 17110191517
352-637-2519/302-6217
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs on all makes
& models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard




Bill's Mobile Welding
Nights & Weekends
Visa & Master Card Acc
352-257-2240/726-6122




HAULING, TREE
'SERVICES,
DEMOLITION &
MISC CLEANUP, ETC.
352.447-3713/232-2898
Here Come The Stormsl
Plywood Cut & Install
To fit windows/doors
Lic./ Ins.(352)634-0171
Nature Coast Contain-
ers, Comm./ Res. 12 yd.
dumpsters, mulch deliv-
ery & hauling. 302-7100
* PROFILE T SHIRTS *
Custom Screen Printina
Hats, Shirts, Jackets &
more! 352-344-1978
MR CITRUS









ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
BUYERS AGENT
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM


BOOKKEEPING SERV.
Out source your
AP, AR, Invoicing. PR,
Lynn 352-560-3437




S0 RAINDANCER O
6" Seamless Gutter
Best Job Availablell
Lic. & Ins. 352-860-0714
r ----- U.�
ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
Quality Price!
6" Seamless Gutters
Uc & Ins 621-0881



- I
PRO EXTERIOR SYSTEMS
Safe & Effective Low
Pressure Roof Cleaning
5yr. warr 352-400-5028






STONE DRIVEWAYS
Professionally done at
an Affordable price.
Call Mike 352-564-1411
Mobile 239-470-0572 or
Chuck 352-220-9559


CLASSIFIED


AM Aink
Lp
�Ad 7






74114 1-:--m


Are Drought Conditions
Destroying Your Lawn?


New & Re-Roofs * Flat & Low Pitch
*Roof Repairs * Commercial * Residential
Shingle - Metal - Built Up Roof
Torchdown - Shakes






Ins tam ll aS atii ons' a s

(352) 628-2557
Lucksroof.com
Roof Inspections Available Drug Free Workplace
S___ _ Slate Certified LIe. #CCC1327643


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C."-a General
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12B MONAY, JUNE 18, 2007




LAWN WE MOVE SHEDS
TECHNICIAN 352-637-6607

FULL TIME clean
Dri. Lic., Lawn experi- 1 i
ence preferred. ,
Will train, benefits "LIVE AUCTIONS"
Apply In person www.charliefudge.com
CITRUS PEST MGT. For Upcoming Auctions
5 N, Melbourne 1-800-542-3877
Beverly Hills, Fl 34465 LIBRARY TABLE
Must have at least 5 Victorian, mahogany
Yrs. Recent Experience 534"red $65033
In Florida Lawncare (352) 860-1536


Desire to work & valid
Dri. Lic. Good starting
Pay and Pd, Vacations
(352) 228-7472
* FIREWORKS STAND*
OPERATORS

M/F, no experience
necessary. Exc. Pay.
*June 20-Jul 5*
(813) 677-1874
TIRE INSTALLER
For busy repair shop;
Must be able to
hustle, have good
D.L. & exp. needed.
Hard work good pay
& benefits
Apply in person @
LKQ Auto Service
4950 W. Hwy 486.
Crystal River
See John Wood





CLERICAL
Provides clerical sup-
port to a Crisis Re-
sponse Team program
in Hernando County;
answers phones, files,
screens visitors, gener-
ates reports; requisi-
tions supplies, faxes,
photocopies and exe-
cutes word processing;
knowledge of Microsoft
Office essential; min. of
1 yr. in an administra-
tive support capacity
and a High School Di-
ploma or GED req. Ap-
ply LifeStream Behav-
ioral Ctr. 515 W. Main
St. Leesburg or online
at www.lsbc.net
DFWP/EOE


Ci pNiLE

DELIVERY ROUTES
AVAILABLE IN
CRYSTAL RIVER.

Earn $200 a weekly 2-3
early morning hours,
7 days a week.
There are currently
several newspaper
delivery routes
available in the
Crystal River area.
Call 563-3201
and leave your
name, telephone
number and the best
time to call. Back-up
vehicle required.


Ci-I pNiCLE

Youth and Family
Ministry
Must have a heart for
reaching out to youth
and upper elem. age
kids. Fairly new Christian
Church in Citrus County
Respond to Box 1328P
c/o Citrus Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, Fl
34429

































Home Health Agency
Exclusive Territory
Jun. s























Crystal River
SEstablished 23 yrs.
No Competition
Store front, turn key,
Net $100,000.
great husband/wife
operation Sell $200,000.
(352) 601-5396
Restaurant For Sale
B &L Fo 12 yrs In good
location, steady



clientele $125,000.
Call (352) 527-1945


Lg. cust. base Growth
oppor for Hands-on
Owner. e$1OFTABLEI000.

Miner at C-21 JWMotfon


OF .U.-I51I/ 79A-6668


ALL SILtL BUILDINGS



25x25x7 (2:12 Pitch)
1- 9x7 garage door,
2 vents,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED-$15.995
25x30x9 (3:12 Pitch)
Roof Overhang
2-9x7 garage doors,
2 vents, entry door,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED- $16.495
Many Sizes Avail,
We Custom Build
We Are The Factory
Fl. Engineered Plans
Meets or Exceeds
Florida Wind Code
METAL STRUCTURES
LLC.COM
1-866-624-9100
metalstructuresllc.com


A+SPAS.COM
Authorized Hydro
SPA DEALER
5 Person, 15 Jets $1,850
6 Person, 40 jets $3,650
(352) 572-7940
.FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers,jacuzzi's, We


A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
-, 2 Ton $780.00
-* 2-/2 ton $814.00
3 Ton $882.00
*Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
.Pool Heat Pumps
Also Available
Free Delivery!
Call 746-4394
ABC Briscoe Appliance
Refrigerators, washers,
stoves. Service & Parts
(352) 344-2928
AC SYSTEMS
Heat Pumps, MH Units
All sizes, New 13 SEER
352-400-4945
GE REFRIGERATOR
27 CuFT. Side by Side
Filtered Ice/Water In dr.
Energy Saver. Designer
white. Exc. Cond. $500
(352) 563-0648
Hotpoint Range
white, self cleaning
Oven $50.
(352) 228-0000
KENMORE
Gas range double
oven self cleaning
Never Installedl
Great value $375
(352) 860-1308
Kenmore Refrig.
21 cu.ft. almond,
w/Icemaker, $75.
Maytag Dryer, Lrg.
capacity, white, good
cond., $75. 344-9141
Washer & Dryer
works good
$125 for both
* (352) 628-4994
Washer & Dryer, like
new, $295/set Satisf.
guar. Free Del. & set up
(352) 293-2529
economyappl.com
Whirlpool dryer,
works & looks
good. $75.
(352) 344-1521
Whirlpool Washer
6 cycle. 3 spd., H/D $75.
Kenmore Dryer,
propane gas, 3 temps.,
HD, $75. Both $125.
(352) 795-4596



SOLID MAHOGANY
OFFICE FURNITURE
Exc. Cond. 2 mahog-
any office sets, 9 Phone
systems w/phones, 6
Confer. Chairs, 65 Gal.
Fish Tank, running
w/fish,352-02-




4 HARDWARE CABINETS
(4 drawers each) Nuts,
bolts, screws of all types
included. USA made
$500/set
(352) 527-1789
10" TABLE SAW
W/Stand. $125;
ELECTRIC TILE CUTTER
$25
(352) 257-3261
10" BAND SAW
$75.
3/4 hp. Air Compressor
40 PSI $75
(352) 257-3261
Automatic Saw Filing
equipment for hand
saws and up to 30"
circular saws, $350.
(352) 344-1939
Chain Saw
14" 2 yrs old
$40.
(352) 212-7806
Drill Press
1/2 inch,
$100.
(352) 533-3331
TRUCK TOOL BOX
Diamond plate tool
box 63 Inches, almost
new $100.00 firm call
560 7802, Inverness.




36" JDC TV
4 yrs. old, w/stand,
$400/obo
(352) 220-6347
46" Sony Large screen
TV, looks & works,
perfect cond., with
receiver & surround
sound,$450
(352) 344-1521
52" Panasonic
Cinema vision, plays
great, $625;
(352) 628-1722
61" RCA
Rear Projection TV,
PIP, works excellent
$600. obo
Call (352) 601-3237
SONY 30" WEGA
HD ready. $450
(352) 634-1860
TV, 35" RCA,
Home Theatre, color
console, walnut finish
PIP, sound retrieval sys.
excel. cond.$350. obo
(352) 746-6632




Your World

%y 9wa9 iu


CHTIONICLE
Classifie ds


ww.chrorscleonllne corn


16' Pine Fence Board,
$5,50@; Cherry lumber,
$2.00/ft. Rough sawn,
air dried, 352-212-4122




2 COMPUTER TOWERS
$160/each Take your
pick! Windows XP
operating system.
(352) 382-3895
Citrus County
Computer Doctors
Prof. Repairs-In Home
Fast & affordable.
Free Quote. 344-4839
DELL DIMENSION
2006 Model.
DVD/CDRW,
2.8G/160G, extras! $325.
352-628-4741.
DIESTLER COMPUTERS
Internet service, New &
Used systems, parts &
upgrades. Visa/
MCard 637-5469
http://www.rdeeli.com
PANASONIC
Electronic typewriter
new in box never used
$200 firm
(352) 341-1714




Inside Patio set, alum.,
brown, 6 chairs, oblong
glass top table,
excellent, $175
(352) 637-2032.
PATIO SWING
W/CANOPY $95
2 concrete columns,
$100 ea
R oMAM r AAA


2 leather recliners
Ashley, like new,
$150 each
(352) 560-3048
PRE OWNED FURNITURE
Unbeatable Prices
NU 2 U FURNITURE
Homosassa 621-7788
ANTIQUE GOLD
DAYBED
Mattress, coverlet &
skirt, used twice. $400
(352) 527-3863
BARSTOOLS
blonde wood (2)
$25/both.
352- 489-3770
Bed
King sz., w/ headboard
plus matching lamps,
excel, cond. $150.
(352) 533-3331
BEDS -. BEDS *- BEDS
The factory outlet store!
For TOP National Brands
Fr.50%/70% off Retail
Twin $119 .- Full $159
Queen $199/King $249
Please call 795-6006
Broyhill Liv. Room Set
Leather sofa, lounge
chair, ottomans, & ta-
bles, $800. Like New
Will Separate
352-726-0040,212-3571
CITRUS HOME DECOR @
Homosassa Sprgs. Plaza
Consignment, like new
furniture (352) 621-3326
Country Style Dining
Table w/ 6 ladder back
chairs & 2 leaves
$175.
Matching Sideboard
$100. (352) 341-0935
CURIO / BABY BED
Lighted Curio Cabinet
$500. Jenny Lind style
baby bed, no mattress
$25. 352-382-7992
Daybed
no mattress, black
w/gold trim,
$25;
.352-489-3770
DINING / BEDROOM
9 piece dining set $700.
5 piece queen
bedroom set $700.
352-382-7992
Dining Room Table
64" ext. to 88", beige 6
upholst. chairs. $125.
SET-GLASS TOP COFFEE
Table Beige/gold, &
2 matching end tables,
Two -3 way lamps $95.
(352) 382-0091
DINING TABLE,
6 CHAIRS, 1 leaf, new
solid wood. Creme,
Was $1500, Sell $375.
Call (352) 382-7223,
after 11am
Dresser w/ Mirror
$40.
King Sz. Bed Plllowtop
$110.
(352) 637-5103
DROP LEAF TABLE
w/2 chairs, brand new,
$200.
(352) 726-3716
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Solid Oak, Glass Doors,
Storage, Lighted, TV
opening 35W X 37.5D.
Exc. Cond. $600
(352) 527-0239
FLOOR LAMP,
Wrought Iron, white
shade.
$20.
(352) 726-8912, call af-
ter 10 a.m.
FLORAL SOFA 80" L
$199.
MARBLE TOP COFFEE
TABLE, $99.
(352) 726-8912, call
after 10 a.m.
FURNITURE SET
Sofa, Loveseat, off
white w/gold leaves,
Queen & full pillowtop
beds, w/box & frames,
all newer & great
shape. $1400/obo
(352) 422-5927
LAMPS, DESIGNER PAIR
New - $800,
Sell -$100
Call (352) 382-7223,
after 11am
LEATHER COUCH &
LOVESEAT, exc. cond.
both items recline,
$500; GLASS TOP KIT.
TABLE w/ 4 castor chairs
$150. (352) 489-4934
LIVING ROOM SET
Sofa, Chair, Ottoman,
Dk. Teal Leather
$500/set; ARMLESS
Upholstered Chair $50
(352) 527-4161
LONG DRESSER W/TWO
MIRRORS & NIGHTSTAND
$80, (2) 19" COLOR TV'S
W/ REMOTE $50/EA
(352) 795-5444
NEW SLEEP SOFA QUEEN
SIZE/LITE BEIGE
$395, 860-0444
PINE CUPBOARD
Hutch, Quebec, old,
$250.
Call (352) 382-7223,
after 11am
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40
Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808


IFIEDS


Queen Sz. Bed $75.
Twin Bed $40.
(352) 637-5103

RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com

Single Bed w/
bookcase headboard,
$75.
Overstuffed recliner
$50.
(352) 341-0935
SLEEPER SOFA &
LOVESEAT
Wicker, white wash,
floral. Good Cond. $275
(352) 628-5011
SOFA & LOVESEAT
Floral Print, Pastel
Perfect Condition!
includes 3 Tables
& Lamps $550.
(352) 746-1447
Sofa Sleeper & two
Rocker Recliners,
Matching, $450.
(352) 795-4771
The Path's Graduates,
Single Mothers,
Needs your furniture.
Dining tables, dressers &
beds are needed.
Call (352) 746-9084
TRUNDLE BED
Custom made! With
matresses and linens
excellent condition
$225 OBO
(352) 527-9448


-'C. M


52" HUSTLER MOWER &
60" HUSTLER MOWER
700 hrs. $3,500 obo/ea.
(352) 621-4777
BUSH HOG
4ft, $350 abo
(352) 628-0824
Chipper/Shredder
Craftsman, 6.5 HP
$250.
(352) 533-3331
Craftsman 42" cut,
rider, mower, w/17HP
Kohler, ready to cut,
$450 (352) 628-2769
FIELD & BRUSH CUTTER
11.5HP. Newl Never
used similar to a DR
brand. $1200
(352) 746-3988
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers,jacuzzl's, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
JOHN DEERE
LAWNMOWER
LX176 w/bagger, Plus
gas powered edger &
trimmer, $750/obo
(352) 746-1440
OUTDOOR
BBQ GRILL
Exc. Cond.
Seldom used. $50
(352) 746-3971
SPRING MOWER REPAIR
Hernando, Pick up &
Delivery, Quick Service,
Don Mead 400-1483




Trading Card Collection
Wanted to Buy
"Magic, The Gathering"
Call (352) 560-7064




CHILDREN' CLOTHES
Size 12 mo. to 6 2.00
each also a comp.
crib set 15.00


2007

SPECIALS
6 lines - 10 days
Items totalling
$1-$150...........$7.95
$151-$400......$12.95
$401-$800.......$17.95
$801-$1,500....$22.95
CALL CHRONICLE
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
726-1441 OR
563-5966
Two general
merchandise Items
per ad,
private party only.
(Non-Refundable)
Some Restrictions
May Apply

ARTIST SUPPLIES
Lots of paints, brushes,
canvases, frames,
& BOB ROSS paints.
(352) 560-7383
BOY'S CLOTHING
Size 8/10.60 shirts, 17 pr
pnts/jeans & 29 pr
shorts Includes designer
brands-$100 all.
637-3055
* BURN BARRELS *
$10 Each
Call Mon-Fri 8-5
860-2545
Dining Rm. Chandelier,
maple leaf, 5 frosted
glass domes, neutral
textured finish,, new
cond. $85, abo
Dinette area Chande-
lier, maple finish, single
frosted glass dome.
Neutral texture finish
new cond. $50. obo
(352) 746-6632
For Sale
Large Wall Mirror
Appx. 7ft. x 31/2 ft.
$50. obo
(352) 746-2946
GENERATOR, New
6300 Watts, 9100 Start-
ing Watts, 11HP B&S,
OHV Eng., elec. start,
12V battery included,
(4) 120 V, (20 amp)
standard hshid. outlets
and one 120/240V
(30amp) locking plug
outlet, all w/ protective
rubber covers.
$850. (352) 489-3440
HEAVY DUTY
SINGER
Sewing machine in
small cabinet. $50
(352) 527-0424
HI-PHONICS AMP
2 X 300 watts, 12" sq..
kicker sub invented
box, 2 mos. old $200firm
BOW FLEX Extreme,
camp. set. Barely Used.
$400 obo 352-613-3095
HURRICANE PKG.
Propane stove w/2
tanks, AC/DC TV, all
new, $100; 9" AC/DC
TV/VCR Combo, $100
(352) 382-3895

--IRRIGATION--
New Systems &
Repairs. Ins. Lic.3000
$QQ- ALL VARIETIES
Cut outs & New
Homes. Installed &
Rolled. A.L. EVANS
(352) 637-5825


JANITORIAL/
RESTAURANT
CLEANING
Immediate openings
FT, professional
sub-contractors. Night
work. Inverness area.
Call M-F 9-4pm
1-800-577-1318
KENMORE 18000BTU
Window Unit Air Cond.
Remote, exc. cond.
$175.
(352) 637-2838
Keyboard,
Kawai FS610, $100.
Women's Bike
24" 3 spd, manual,
Huffy $30.
(352) 527-8884
LARGE COLLECTION OF
BOYD BEARS &
accessoires., $200;
15' Diam. Pool, new
pump, $50.
(352) 628-1722
Microwave, Kenmore,
very good cond, $25.
(352) 382-0091
MUST SELL
Large Trampoline full
enclosure $125.00
Window AC unit $75.00
OBO 352-560-3480
OLD JACUZZI
$100;
New Whirlpool Tub
Never Usedl
New $4,900/Sell $700
(352) 621-3135
Refrigerator, 20 cu.ft.
Icemaker, exc. cond.,
$150. Queen BR set,
chest of drawers,
dresser & desk, $100.
(352) 341-7757
Sears Elec. Blade
Edger, $30;
Rattan Queen
Headboard, $40;
Gaming Table, $75.
(352) 860-0158
Sliding Glass Door
8' H, x 12' W, 3 panel
like new
$300. obo
(352) 527-3086
SOD. ALL VARIETIES
Bahia, $80 pallet,
St Augustine, $150
pallet. Install & Del.
Avail. 352-302-3363
The Spot Family Center
Needs Donations
For Community
Family/Youth Events
Land, Storage Racks,
Containers, Folding
Tables, Event Tents, Bus,
Box Truck. Please call:
Brian (352) 220-0576
WEDDING DRESS
Sz. 5-6, Floor Length for
5'9", Long Train, Off
Shoulder, Wht. w/pale
pink flowers. Must Seell
$350 (352) 382-4734
Wheel Barrel
rubber tires good
shape, $15.
(352) 382-5657
Wood Chipper,
Shredder, Mulcher,
like new $250.
Amigo Scooter
$50.
(352) 621-5328




10" tile saw model
60010,2 hp on stand,
$250.00; Robo Lazer
with remote $150.00.
Call 352-445-1488.
TOOLS
Delta 10" contractors
grade table saw
$225.00; Craftsman 4"
joiner with table $50.00
352-445-1488
TOOLS
Tapco Aluminum
break, 10'6", like new
$800.00 352-445-1488


AMIGO SCOOTER
3 WHEEL $200.00/OBO
RASCAL SCOOTER,
3 WHEEL, $200/00B
(352) 628-9625
For Sale
Celebrity Electric
Scooter
Used 3 times
Asking $600.
(352) 746-4627
JAZZY TYPE
ELECTRIC CART
4 mos. old. $3,500 new/
Asking $500 OBO
(352) 628-7381
Lift Chair
cranberry
new condition
$450.
(352) 527-8884
PRIDE Z CHAIR
8mos, old. Used once.
Portable, fits In trunk.
Asking $500
(352) 503-3885
Wheel Chair, power.
Jazzy 1100, Like new,
$300.
(352) 382-0091




BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676




Kustom Mixer &
2 Speakers Behringer
Amp, Fender Tele Tex
Mex, Tenor Banjo
Call Jim 352-422-2187
PIANO
Piano for sale $150
(352) 382-7992
TURNKEY
PROFESSIONAL
DJ SET UP
$1200.00 OBO
Reasonable Offers only
352-220-3452




2 elec. treadmills,
I exercise bike, all in
good working cond.
$75 obo for all 3
Call eves, 6pm-9pm
(352) 344-1310
WEIGHT BENCH W/BAR
& WEIGHTS
& Sep. Slant Board
$150
(352) 621-0848



COLT 22 Caliber
Revolver Official
police, $575:
COLT 38
Caliber Revolver
Police Positive $495
(352) 344-9502
GOLF CLUBS $75 Firm &
SCHWINN BIKE Good
Condition $35 firm
(352) 341-1714


GOLF CLUBS
Tommy Armour, 845 Sil-
ver Scofftt, like new Irons
3-PW $275. Taylor Made
Irons 3-PW, Driver, bag
& putter, bubble shaft
grafite $195.
352-860-0288, 634-4592
Tree Stand,
Excellent condition,
$50 (352) 527-6709
WE BUY GUNS
On site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238
Welder Home Gym
& Treadmill
Uke new! $250 obo
(352) 560-7848
Weight Machine
WelderPro, Power Stack
Up to 5501b press
$50.obo
(352) 628-5011




16' BIG TEX
Open trir, tandem axel,
lightly used. Electric
brakes. $1,700
(352) 212-0882
5X8 w/gate, w/ad $650
5X10 w/gate w/ad $699
EZ PULL TRAILERS 6532 W
Gulf to Lake Hwy. CR
Homemade Enclosed
4 x 8, Trailer w/ roof
rack 16" tires, $400.
See on Hwy 19
By Dallas Fence
Call (352) 464-0779
TANDEM AXEL TRLR
2005, 8 x 16 Enclosed.
Fold down gate &
swing out door. $3,500
352-465-7635/228-0751













ACCOUSTIC
& ELECTRIC GUITARS
Bass, Banjo, Ulke,
Mandolin, Amps,
Effects. Any
age/cond. We get
you top dollar. Do not
sell anywhere else.
M-F 10-6 563-1779.
BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676
Trading Card Collection
Wanted to Buy
"Magic, The Gathering"
Call (3521 560-7064


NOTICE
Pets for Sale
In the State of Florida
per stature 828.29 all
dogs or cats offered
for sale are required
to be at least 8 weeks
of age with a health
certificate per
Florida Statute.

20 gal. aquarium,
fully stocked &
decorated
$75. (352) 560-3048
AKC REG. SEAL & WHITE
Italian Greyhound
Male. 1 12 yrs. old. 12Lbs.
Sweet & loving, must
sell. $475/obo.
(352) 212-9125
BLOODHOUND PUPPIES
Purebred, 2 Females.
1 Red, 1 Black & Tan
$350
352-628-5432/302-8726
Bull Mastiff, Female,
sweet, lovable,
showmanship
bloodline, $1500.
(352) 586-2590
CHOCOLATE LAB
PUPPIES
Showmanship
bloodline, 3 males,
$500, (352) 586-2590
CHOW CHOW PUPS
BIk. Female & Blk. Male
1st shots, AKC Reg.
Health Cert Ready for
new home $600. - Up
(352) 527-8165
DOG OBEDIENCE
HUMAN TRAINER
SMW area.
(352) 382-1273
Humane Society
of Inverness
offers Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Service
In our Mobile Clinic.
Appointments avail.
Cat Male $40,
CatFemale $50,
Dog Male $60,
Dog Female $70.
Prices including spay
or Neuter, 3 Yr. Rabies
shot Annual Vaccines
Nail Clipping, Micro
chipping & Micro
chip reg.
Appt. avail Wed,Thurs,
Sat. Inverness &
Crystal River. Call for
appt. 352-726-8801

Humanitarians
of Florida
Low Cost Spay &
Neuter by Appt.
Cat Neutered $20
Cat Soaved $25
Dog Neutered &
Spaved start at $35
Low cost shot clinic
Tues, Weds & Thurs
1st & 3rd Saturdays
10am-4pm
(352) 563-2370
Umbrella, Molluscan,
Cockatoos, Sun con-
jure, Nanday, Quaker,
2 cockatiels, w/cages
$1,300. for all Will Sepa-
rate (352) 746-4590
Yorkie, Male 7 mos.
AKC $800. oab
Two Lhasa Apso 5 yrs.
$100 ea.o ab
352-746-9536, 613-2422




2 Thoroughbred Horses
1 is an exc. rider, other
needs TLC. Exc. Cond.
$1,000/both
(352) 795-9633
2 Yr. Old Bay Filly
QH, Sweet & gentle.
Ready to Train.
$300 OBO
(352) 628-4144 day
(352) 697-0127 eve
3 Horse S/L w/12'
Uving quarters, AC,
furnace, stove, oven,
refrig. bath, $25,000.
Call (352) 637-4943
for more info.
ARABIAN STRAIGHT
EGYTIAN COLTS
For sale, starting at $500
(352) 472-7462


IBR unfurn $400; 1BR RV
Park Model, furn., $325;
1BR, scr.rm, crprt $525
NoPets/Smoke628-4441
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5, $500/mo.
ist/lst/sec.352-302-1466
HERNANDO
1/1, like new, no smok-
ing/ pets, $550./mo.,1st.
Ist. sec. (352) 746-6477
HERNANDO
4/2, fenced, quiet
area, 1st, lost sec. $600
mo. (352) 344-2335
HOMOSASSA
2/11/2 $450/mo. Quiet
area. 352-795-6862
HOMOSASSA 3/2
2 mi. S. of Home Depot,
No pets, $750. mo. .
352-637-1142 220-1341
INGLIS
1,2,3 BR from $350 Nice
park W pool, Play area.
pets O.K. Northwood
Estates. 447-2759
INVERNESS 2/1
Furn., crnr lot. $550/mo.
352-201-1222
INVERNESS
3 Vacancies. Starting @
$450,/mo. 1st/last/sec.
352-302-8210


14 X 70 Ply Floors,
Copp. pipes, REDUCEDI
Must Selli $3.000 OBO
352-344-4899/637-0817
2/1, Partially Furn.
carport, scrn. porch,
laundry mat on Prem-
ises Adult Park on Lake
Rousseau, low park
rent, (352) 447-0676
Affordable Mobile
Great 1.25 Acre
$91,500
352-726-7533
www.Rellance-RE.com
Reliance Realty
HOME ON 1/2 ACRE
Must sell 3/2, 28x52
on end of road,
quite, home has
deck. Sacrifice
$3,000 down,
$745/mo.
Call 352-621-9182
INVERNESS
55+ Lakefront park
Exciting opportunity! 1
or 2BR Mobiles for sale.
Scr. porches, appl.,
water Incl. Fishing piers,
Community center.
Leeson's 352-476-4964
NEW 3BR /2BA
Nicely treed,private
It+ AWith drivewa/l/


carport, shed and
covered deck with
sun room. Located in
55+ park just walking
distance from pool
and clubhouse.
SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
(352) 794-7308
Singlewide mobile
home, like new & road
worthy. New carpets,
counter tops, paint,
A/C, 12'x35' $5,500 aobo
(352) 628-2769
Small Park 55+, 2/1,
completely furnished
Leaving Country
Just Bring Your Tooth-
brush & clothes
(352) 228-2239
WHOLESALE TO
THE PUBLIC

Repo's, Trade-Ins,
All Makes Models and
Sizes, Prices Starting
at $14,000. Call
SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
(352) 794-7308


--- --nE
RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfindercom




14 X 52 Mobile 2/1.5
6301 W Beaumont
Off Rosedale
Sm. Lot $39,900
352-382-0722/423-9221
3/2 DW on 7.6 acres
joins Sweetwater Pt. on
the western boundary
then south to the
waters of Lake Tsala
Apopka.4300 S. Owens
Trail, (352) 637-3207
3/2 MH on 1/4 Ac.
Handyman Special.
$55K OBO
(352) 746-4596
3/2 Huge DW 27 X 52
Garden Tub, Sky Light, 2
Decks, Citrus Trees, New
Roof & AC Maint. free.
$78,900 Neg.
352-563-6591
4/2 Palm Harbor Triple
Wide. Loaded w/tile &
all appll's. Huge cvr'd
porch. New In-ground
pool. Lg. site built block
3 car grg. Fenced 2.45
ac. lot w/solar pwr'd
gate. Many extras.
Asking $189,900. Poss.
Owner fin. Call
Crawford 352-212-7613
60x27 DW 1600 sq.ft.
3/2, built in 2001 on 3.86
acres, paved roads
80x80 fenced back
yard, 16x12 workshop
2-car carport, fieplace.
Asking $169,900
(352) 726-2286
BEST OF BEST
5 yrs. In a row
TAYLOR MADE HOMES
Clearance sale- all
models on sale
2008 models are
arriving. All 2007's
must go]al Come by and
save, homes starting
@ $32,900.
Used-New- Repo's
Call 352-621-9181
CRYSTAL RIVER SAC.
3/2 1600sqft. w/office
Very private, paved Rd.
Deck, shed, workshop
Call for email pictures
352-795-3026 $169K
HARD TO GET
FINANCED?
2007 FACTORY CLOSE
OUTI
Give us a try
5 new homes 2,3 & 4
bedrooms.

All sizes All prices
SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
352-794-7308
HERNANDO-$39,90011
Nice 2/2 on 1/3 Ac.,
Won't Lastl Great Rental
Oportuniltvl Beautiful
Areal 352- 400-5367


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



WORDY GURDY CKY RICKYKANE
1. Employment for a male swan (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT

11101 1 and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Authentic ear or cart part (1) they will fit in the letter
Squares. The number after the
I I- I I 1 definition tells you how many
3. Provide suprt for golfs Nicklaus (1) syllables in each word. To win
|_ --tf forgolf's Ni$10, send your original rhymes
with your definitions to this
4. Evangelist Roberts's ethical standards (2) newspaper. All entries become

l- -l l t1 0l l- - �@ 2007 United Feature Syndicate, inc
5. Random mixing of camper bags (2)
Thanks and $10 to
I II Rosemary Rhea of
6. Less hefty actor Yul (2)S Roxana, IL for #1
I I I I I I II l J I this newspaper.

7. Ones who con cattle thieves (2)


SHTIUSISiH S'LSH n'L HaNM1Af HaNNIHL '9 IAIdflHS T'I2afl(I
S'IVHO S'IVW O T' xovrOMIva 's T3aHA 'air ' aor oo
6-18-07 S)aMSNV


'10208


NEW HOME
3/2 1550 sq. ft. on 1/2
acre. Garage, fenced
yard, nice trees,
grassed yard. Don't
miss out! $119,900,
financing available.
Call 352-621-3807
HOMOSASSA 3/2.5
On Gorgeous lac.
Seller will provide yr
Home Warr.$136,500
Sharon Levins. Rhema
Realty (352) 228-1301
INVERNESS 2/1
10 x 50 w/shed on
Canal. Priced for quick
sale $29K Owner
Finance 352-344-8138
INVERNESS
Newly Renovated.
Ready for Occupancy!
2/1 on 1/2 Ac. 0% Down
1415/mo. 352-746-5912
LECANTO 2/1
Wonderful wooded
area in Cinnamon
Ridge. $45,000 Sharon
Levins. Rhema Realty
(352) 228-1301
LECANTO 2/2 SW
$56,000. 2 porches,
Fenced yard. (352)
564-0856/ 628-3090
MOVE IN NOW!
Beautiful homes
ready for you now.
$500 down or no
closing cost or
as low as
5.75% Interest rates.
Call for a free credit
approval and come
see your new home.
352-621-9183

= f0 ,
14 x6, 2li/


14 x 56, 2/1I V
w/ 10x 17 addition,
Carport, roofover, cor-
ner lot, senior park,
C/H/A $21,500.
352-302-2824
Lecanto FL. 14' x 70' MH
Patio & Shed,
Remodeled, 55+
$25,000. (352) 628-1171
NEW & USED DW's & SW's
Starting at $15,000
Quiet 55+ Homosassa
Park. 352-628-5977
NEW HOMES
ARRIVING IN JUNE
$79K- $128K
Resales Available
$30K-$115K
Excellent Amenities!
5 * , 55+
Gated Community
Phone 352-795-7161
OPEN SUNDAY 2-4
$$$32,900.$$$
LOVELY 2/1, Open Fl.
plan, master walk in,
AC, apple's, new rf. 55+
gated comm. w/ pool
clubhouse & activities
5405 S. Stonerldge Dr.
Inverness 352-344-5805


S SalI Ee
RENTAL FINDER
www.chronlcle
rentalfindercom_




Property

Management &
Investment
Group, Inc.
Licensed R.E. Broker
> Property & Comm.
Assoc. Mgmt. is our
only Business
> Res.& Vac.
Rental Specialists
> Condo & Home
owner Assoc. Mgmt.
Robble Anderson
LCAM, Realtor
352-628-5600
Info@orooeffv
managmentgrouo.
cIam

RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfindercom



1-4
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 $600/month
(352) 228-7328
CRYSTAL RIVER
Newly Renovated
1 bedrm efficiencies w/
fully equip kitchens.
No contracts
necessary. Next to
park/ Kings Bay
Starting @ $40
a day for a week or
more.(includes all
utilities & Full Service
Housekeeping)
(352) 586-1813
FLORAL CITY
Lakefront 1BR, Wkly/Mo
No Pets. (352) 344-1025




CANDLEWOOD

COURT
APARTMENTS I
2 BR Apartments
now available. I
Starting @ $530/mo. I
Please call
(352) 344-1010
S307 Washington Ave.
Wed., & Fri.
8am to 5pm
Equal Housing
Opportunity



I- a
(A2 3
OPP75mmm7!T� '7'
L- - J


3/2/2 BRAND NEW
Rent-to-Own Homel
Low Down, $1,095/mo.
$$1st MONTH FREEII $$
Call 1352) 875-5645
Crystal Palms Apts.
1 & 2 Bdrm Easy Terms.
Crystal River. 634-0595

CRYSTAL RIVER
& INVERNESS E
I ONE MONTH FREE I
1, 2 & 3 Bdrm/Studio
* (352) 795-2626 _
L .--- ---
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2.5, $650 mo.
(352) 563-1588

CRYSTAL RIVER
Seven Rivers Apts.
1 & 2 bedrooms,
clean, quiet. Close to
mall & hospital.
Complete laundry
facilities.
No application fees.
(352) 795-1588
Equal Housing
Opportunity

HERNANDO
2/1 Very clean,
$550/mo. Sec. dep.
352-527-0033
INVERNESS
2/1, $650. Moves You In.
(352) 860-0464
(352) 302-3911 cell

K NOLLWOOD
TOWNHOUSES
Corner of Druid Rd.
&581. 1 & 2BR
available starting
@ $485. For more
information call
(352) 344-1010
S Or apply @
307 Washington Ave.
Wed. & Fri. 8 to 5
Equal Housing
Opportunity



HE - 6--


LECANTO
1 Bedroom Apartment
352-613-2989/746-5238

RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS
Accepting
\applications for 1
Bedroom Wheelchair
accessible units
Rental Assistance
Available.
to those who qualify
Laundry facility and
on-site management.
(352) 795-8024
TDD 1-800-955-8771





Ventura Village
Apartments
1 & 2 bedrooms
Elderly,
Handicapped or
disabled.
Rent starting at
$381mo.
(800) 342-3552
(352) 637-6349










Crystal Palms Apts.
1 & 2 Bdrm Easy Terms.
Crystal River. 634-0595
CRYSTAL RIVER
2BR & 1 BR, all Util. + HBO
incl. $800./$700. No dogs
(352) 422-3261


-^Bi


LANDMARK
REALTY

We have rentals
ranging from $500 a
month and up.
All types available.
In all areas.
Call for more
Information.

Ask for Kathy
or Janet
352-726-9136
311 W Main St.
Inverness


2700+ sq ft Bldg.


2700+ sq ft Bldg.
Can divide into
Med/Prof/Retail Pine
Ridge. Your floor plan.
(352) 527-9013
CRYSTAL RIVER
Zoned Comm.-
Approx. 400 sq ft.
$600.moContact Lisa
(Broker/Owner) @
(352) 422-7925
HERNANDO
ALESCI'S CORNER
Office 1,500 Sq. Ft.
1-800-557-4044
INVERNESS
1,000 st. Office/Retail.
Rent negotiable, ample
parking. Busy corners,
Appt. (352) 726-6640
INVERNESS
Plaza West Stores,
Busy corners, 1,000 sf.
suitable for pizzeria
Appt. (352) 726-6640


BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1, heated pool,
$850. mo. 1st & last,
$100 sec. (352) 527-0160
CITRUS HILLS
Wonderful Mead-
owview Villa 2br/2ba
with Pool. $1,000 per
mo neg. 302-423-0541
CRYS. RIVER 2/2/2
Wtrfmt, turn. htd pool
Jacuzzi, dock, prlv pat.
FP, beau. decor. Bike tri,
tennis, all amenities.
$1,600. mo.
loannirwln@msn.com
(352) 875-4427



"Better Than Rent" Or
"Rent To Own" 352-
484-0866 No Cred Chk
visit jademission.com


$$ SUMMER RATE $$
2/2/1 pl WF, dock From
$850 River Links Realty
628-1616/800-488-5184
2/2, Villa, Inverness
$750. mo. unfurnished
(352) 746-4611
CITRUS HILLS 2/2
Furn. Short/Long Term
352-527-8002/476-4242
CITRUS HILLS 2/2.5
W/D, CHA, Pool, Quiet
$880/mo. 1st/last/sec.
(352) 697-1883
CRYS. RIVER 2/2/2
Wtrfrnt, furn. htd pool
Jacuzzi, dock, priv pat.
FP, beau. decor. Bike trl,
tennis, all amenities.
$1,600. mo.
joannirwln@msn.com
(352) 875-4427
INVERNESS
3/2, exc. location.
Comm. pool, $750, 1st,
$800 sec. 352-220-4082
SUGARMILL WOODS
Villa, near golf course.
2/2/1 No pets. $800 mo.
1st & last, sec., Lawn
Maint. Included
(352) 382-0741




CITRUS SPRINGS
New, 2/2, all appl.,
W/D $650.-$700.
(954) 557-6211
Cry Rvr/Homosassa
2/1 Nice, W/D h.up,
CHA, water/garb incl.
$200 refund @ move-in
$550/mo. 352-464-0897
CRYSTAL RIVER
S& INVERNESS
I ONE MONTH FREE I
* 1, 2 & 3 Bdrm/Studio
* (352) 795-2626 I

CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, util. included
$600. mo.
Broker/Owner:
352-634-0129

CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Beach Ln. $650/mo.
(352) 634-4336 .
HOMOSASSA
New, 2/2, Rent or w/
opt. to buy, fans, blinds,
refr., stove, microwave,
tile carpet. $750. mo.
(352) 592-0893
INVERNESS 2/1
Carport, C/H/A, W&D
hk-ups. Ig. scrn prch,
$600/mo, $500. sec
404-226-2940
INVERNESS
Canal Front 1/1,
W/D, Carport $490. mo.
(301) 785-9996




CRYSTAL RIVER
Mini MH $425 rent incl's
ele, cable, quiet 55+
park, bingo, card night,
pot luck dinners, walk
to bank, church &
stores. 352-795-9049

CRYSTALRIVER
LANDINGS.COM
8 - IBR Suites, 795-1795
VALUE INN HERNANDO
Renovated Efficiencies,
Phone, Pool, fish pond
AC, $50. daily, $300. wk
Trailers $225 wk.
(352) 726-4744




2/2/1 $650/mo. + last &
sec. No pets/smoking.
1960 Spivey Ter,
Inverness.
(352) 220-4355
County Wide
View ALL at:
www.choosegar.com
*Luxury homes &
Townhomes For Rent
-*Citus HillsJ 3 bdrm
-Beveryiv Hills: 3Bdrm
*Inverness 2&3 Bdrm
*Inverness 2/2 Apts
Great American
Realty (352) 422-6129

INVERNESS
2/1, Gospel Isl. $650, 1st,
last, sec. (352) 726-5338

RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com

NEW PAINT/CARPET
2/1, BLK hm. Lg. Uv. Lg.
tam. Scrn prch. 1oc.
fenced. Sm. pet ok.
$600. 352-634-1764


11











QCrius COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C" Ren: Huse
= Unurise


3/2/2 BRAND NEW
Rent-to-Own Homel
Low Down, $1,095/mo.
$S 1ST MONTH FREEII $$
(352) 875-5645
BEV/ HILLS 1/1/1
Faon. Rm.2 E. Golden St.
$600/mo 1ST/LAST/SEC.
(352) 795-8888
BEVERLY HILLS 1/1
Furn/Unfrun., W/D $650.
mo. (239) 776-6800
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 & crpt. $700/mo.
(352) 746-0639
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 Scrn rm. $675/mo.
& 1/1 Carport, FIRm.
$575 mo. Both, No pets
352-527-3236
BEVERLY HILLS 2/2
2 to choose, From $700
mo. (352) 201-0658
BEVERLY HILLS 3/2
Laurel Ridge, oversized
garage, pool & spa
$1.300mo.352-527-1051
Beverly Hills
3/2/Carport new
everything $800./mo
Hernando
3/2/Carport big yard
remodeled $750./mo
Inverness
2/2/Carport fenced
yard $750./mo
352-637-2973



4--


Brentwood
2/2/2 w/den
$950.00
Please Call:
(352) 341-3330
For more info. or
visit the web at:
citrusvillages

CITRUS HILLS
Unfurnished Homes &
Furnished Condos
www.areenbrlar
Greenbriar Rentals, Inc.
(352) 746-5921
CITRUS HILLS 2/2/2
Caged Pool, 1 ac, Mintl
$975/mo. Option or sale
352-564-1436/586-1255
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/2, 1571 W Datura,
$650/mo. 352-697-1907
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 Brand new, dogs
ok 2000 sqft under air.
$1000/mo. lease option
to buy. (352) 522-0247
CITRUS SPRINGS
Lovely 3/2/1 w/large
screen porch, terrazzo
floors, large closets.
$850 rent. 1st, last and
security to move in.
Avail now. Call
352-489-1411.

County Wide
View ALL at:
www.choosegar.com
3Luxury Homes &
Townhomes For Rent
*Citrus Hills: 3 bdrm
-Beverly Hills: 3Bdrm
* Inverness 2&3 Bdrm
*Inverness: 2/2 Apts
Great American
Realty (352) 422-6129
CR/Hom 3/2/I$695;
2/2, V2-AC, $550; 2/1
$475 CH/A 212-8273
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/11/2. 2ac. w/barn,
15 min. to Inglis. $850/
mo. 352-563-1033
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 + Bonus Rm., CHA,
new kit., carpet, paint.
Fncd. yrd. Pets negot.
$825/mo. (240)994-8765
CRYSTAL RIVER 3/2
Nice, clean, $800 mo
352-795-6299/697-1240
Dunn./Goldie Pt.
River Garden Subdv. 2/1
could be a 3/1 Conc.
Block Home, Lg. Yrd,
Red. to $599/mo.
(352)669-2253
OTHER HOMES AVAIL
DUNNELLON
3/2, Blue Cove Division
(352) 489-3161
FLORAL CITY 1/1
Lakefront Beautiful.
wooded acre, scrn.
patio, No smoking. Util.
Inc. $675,1st/last/sec.
(813) 241-7117 Kristl
FLORAL CITY 3/1
Remodeled. All util. incl
City water. $850/mo
352-422-3670/860-0899
HOMOSASSA 3/2
Rent to Own. $950/mo.
The Meadows Subd.
(813) 956-3563
HOMOSASSA
MEADOWS 3/2/2 From
$750 River Links Realty
628-1616/800-488-5184
INGLIS
2/1 CANAL TO GULF
28 Canterbury $795
407-963-6554
INVERNESS
2/1-'/s, newly reno-
vated, new CH/A, $750
+ sec. (352) 637-0704
407-427-4800 anytime
before 11pm
INVERNESS
2/1/1, w/large yard,
S. Apopka $700.1st,&
last, (352) 726-9593
INVERNESS 2/1'/2
Canal front W, LR, DR.
office. C/H/A, W &D H.U.
quiet area, very nice,
$600/mo, 1st. last Sec.
Ref. (352) 212-2022
INVERNESS
3/1, $550, 1st, last,
sec. No Pets
(352) 287-9268
INVERNESS 3/2
Dwntn, No Pets. $750 +
sec. (727)514-8358
INVERNESS
GOSPEL ISLAND
2/2 w/wsh dryer
$750 + Security
352-447-5593

LANDMARK
REALTY


We have rentals
ranging from $500 a
month and up.
All types available.
In all areas.
Call for more
information.

Ask for Kathy
or Janet
352-726-9136
311 W Main St.
Inverness


- B. g
- *1


INVERNESS POOL
Lovely 3/2/2, 3,000 sf.
Golf crs. loc. $875./mo.
No pets 908-322-6529
* CITRUS SPRGS "
Why Rent?l? Lease
w/optlon to buy. New
3/2/2 DREAM HOUSE
on Elkcam Blvd.
Move in w/$2,150.
2nd & Last Mo.
are FREE with a
2 yr. lease.
Dave Kaiser, C2/
Naturecoast Realty
* (352) 220-8967 *
PINE RIDGE 2/2/2
Newly remod., brand
new apple. $900/mo. 1st,
lost, sec.(352) 302-1466
PRITCHARD ISLAND
3/2.5 $180K, $950/mo.
2/2 $165K, $800/mo.
Dock, Comun. Pool, all
Appl's., scrn prch. more
352-237-7436/812-3213
RAINBOW SPRGS.
County Club Est. 3/2,
garage, yard. $875/mo.
For info: (352) 489-5928
(425) 773-6306



SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2 OR 4/3, Poss. Ls.
Opt. Gorgeous; Brand
New!(352) 613-6943
SUGARMILL WOODS
New 2,665 sqft 4/2/2+
3/4ac-3 min Sncst Pkwy.
$1195/mo. lst+sec, incls
lawn svc. 813-748-5206


-s

CRYS. RIVER 2/2/2
Wtrfrnt, furn. htd pool
Jacuzzi, dock, prlv pat.
FP, beau. decor. Bike trl,
tennis, all amenities.
$1,600. mo.
joannlrwin@msn.com
(352) 875-4427
CRYSTAL RIVER
Ozello Key single wide
2 bdrm 1 bath mobile
home on water,
Covered boat ramp.
Comp. turn, PERFECT for
a fish camp $500.00
per month + utilities.
(813)972-1562 or
(678)485-6638.
HOMOSASSA
2/2 Stilt, CHA, D/W,
treed secl. w/wrap
around scm. porch &
prvt. dock. $850/mo.
(407) 908-1553
HOMOSASSA Canal
1BR w/boat dock, scrn.
porch, until, Incl. $700/
mo.+ sec.(352)628-6537
INVERNESS 1/1
NICE & QUIET Util. Incl.
$495/mo. $200 refund @
move-In 352-464-0897
INVERNESS 2/1/2
LKFRNT, $750/Mo+
(612) 392-7520
PRITCHARD ISLAND
3/2.5 $180K, $950/mo.
2/2 $165K. $800/mo.
Dock, Comun. Pool, all
Appl's., scrn prch. more
352-237-7436/812-3213




MEADOWCREST
3/2/2 Fairmont Village,
fully furn., (all new
furniture) $1,500/mo.
+ elec., phone, water.
Poss. partial owner finan.
(352) 746-1792




BEVERLY HILLS
House Privi. $100/wk.
John (352) 601-3212
CRYSTAL RIVER IBR,
Furn., cable tv, phone,
priv. bath, use of Kit,
$375. 352-795-7412
INVERNESS
Near Super Walmart,
w/priv. bath. Nice
$100/wk. 352-464-4641




RENTAL FINDER
| www.chroni

VALUE INN HERNANDO
Renovated Efficiencies,
Phone, Pool, fish pond
AC, $50. daily,'$300. wk
Trailers $225wk.
(352) 726-4744




BEVERLY HILLS
Diplomat 2 bedroom, 1
and 1/2 bath , Florida
room, eat In kitchen,
must see. $139,500
neg. 352-527-1259
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes It Illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention, to make
such preference, limi-
tation or discrimina-
tion." Familial status
includes children un-
der the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings
advertised In this


newspaper are avail-
able on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing Impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



fir


or-


20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission

Re A lect

(352) 795-1555
Equestrian Trail Home
New, 2004,3/2/3 Pool
home w/fenced yard.
on Equestrian Trail,
4577 W PINTO LOOP
$279,000/ OBO
(352) 746-9813

FIXER
UPPER
These homes
need work.
Free Computerized
list of properties
Free Recorded
Message
1-800-597-5259
www.freecitruscoun-
tvhomelnfo.com
ID# 1048

ERA American
Realty &
Investments


PINE RIDGE
1 /2 story. 4BR/3BA
pool home on
landscaped 1.25 ac.
corner lot. $299,900
(352) 634-2373
PINERIDGE 3/2/2
Pool Hm. w/ FP
$247K Obo. Must Sell!
MLS #314040
352-302-7045
407-566-8637


v


MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
BUYERS AGENT
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM




OPEN SUNDAY 2-4
$$$32,900.$$$
LOVELY 2/1, Open Fl.
plan, master walk in,
AC, appl's, new rf. 55+
gated comm. w/ pool
clubhouse & activities
5405 S. Stoneridge Dr.
Inverness 352-344-5805




HOM./ Would make
perfect office Near
town, zoned GNC, 1.3
Ac. Poss. ownr fin.
$189,900 Ron McEvoy,
EXIT (352) 586-2663
LECANTO
Office Space, Retail &
Warehouse for rent.
(352) 795-0800




Builder
Liquidation Sale!
Must sell nowl All new
homes, only $995
down. 352-694-2900
INVESTORS PROPERTIES
for Sale, MH, Duplexes,
Quadplexes, Sin. Fam.
Vac. Lots, 352-795-0367




2005 4/2/2 $156K
New on marketll
For info go to:
www.mvfsbo.com/
2349n or call
352-601-2585 btwn 8-8
3/2/2 BRAND NEW
Rent-to-Own Homel
Low Down, $1,095/mo.
$$ Ist MONTH FREEII $$
(352) 875-5645
4/2/2, New, Split Plan,
Fam. Rm., Cathedral
Ceilings 1800 sq. ft. liv.
$142,900. 352-489-8415
BEAUTIFUL NEW 4/2/2
2235 SFLA, Spit plan, CT,
Ig. Lanai, must sell
$197.000. 407-468-2179
BY OWNER
2/2/3 All appl., 1400 sf.
$134,900. Extra
RV lot available.
www.9572travis.com
352-489-0386/208-0714



3+- BEAUTIFUL ACRES
Close to equestrian
center, tall oaks & pine.
$157K FSBO 527-8739
Adj. to Golf Course
FSBO 3/2.5/2, Corner
Lot, Pool, Gas FP, Well,
Granite, Huge Shed,
Undated Evervthlngl
myhome4sale.net
$299K (352) 746-1175
BEAUTIFUL POOL HOME
3/2/2 On 1 acre
Sell/lease opt.
$249,900. Must see!
352-302-5535
Best Priced 4/3 Pool
Home on 1.11 Acresl
10' Ceil., Corlan, S.S.
Appl., Home Sec., 2,740
sf. under AC. $399,900
(352) 746-6161
BETTY MORTON I


CITRUS HILLS ON
GOLF COURSE
Beautiful 3-way split
w/2642 living sq ft
3BR/3bath/Den. New
A/C+ Roof Gourmet
Kitchen w/granite
wood & tile upgrades
galore & Standby
power Generator.
Large caged pool
overlooks 13th water
hole green of
Meadow golf course.
$424K. 352-560-6130

CUSTOM 2002
3/2/3 Pool, Over 5000
sq ft / roof. Huge
outdoor living,
granite/maple
+ $370K +
352-527-2749/212-7534







*� .*-. U*


NEW LISTING
Tastefully furnished
Meadowvlew Villa with
Country Club Mem.
2BR/2BA, Lanai and
Pool In perfect cond.
$179,000.
Tom @ 302-423-0541
TERRA VISTA 2/2/2+Den
40K In upgrdsl Wooded
view! With Expanded
lanai, master bdrm &
garorge. $257,900
(352) 746-1673
TERRA VISTA/HILLSIDE
SOUTH - 1800sq ft. 3/2/2
10,000sf lot. Brand new.
$289,900. 617-816-1230




CHARMING COTTAGE
1 BR Cottage w/Water
views. '1 AC. $62K
(631)334-8444




100% Finan. Reduced,
must relocate 2100
sq.ff. 3/2 2 car garage
new roof, firepl., corner
lot, Buyowner 61665
352-586-7685
Affordable Mobile
Great 1.25 Acre
$91,500
352-726-7533
www.Rellance-RE.com
Reliance Realty
BEAUTIFUL 3/2/2 Gospel
Island home. Block
Stucco, immaculate
cond. $149K. Open
House Saturday's &
Sunday's 1-4637-6105


2/2/1 OWNER FINANCE
6006 E. Wingate $130K
New roof, AC & carpet
(352) 746-3932
BETTY MORTON


"Better Than Rent" Or
"Rent To Own" 352-
484-0866 No Cred Chk
visit lademission.com




LEASE OPTION
Sale $108,00 Rent $700.
mo. 2/1, New carpet,
ceramic tile, corner lot,
67 Beverly Hills Blvd.
(352) 613-4050
Oakwood Village
2/2, split, too many
improvements to list.
$159,900.
(352) 527-6866
Oakwood Village 3/2/2
Florida living, near golf,
$25K below appraslall
$149,900 Greg Younger
Coldwell Banker 1st
Choice. (352) 220-9188


UPDATED 2/1
Updated Kit., Bath,
Roof, and more. CHA
,Dishwasher and
upgraded
Elec. $103,500.
352-270-3075





PINE RIDGE
4BR/2BA
2802 W. Goldenrod
Dr, 1.18 acre corner
lot, beaut landscape,
LR/DR/BR/FR, ofc in
mstr. Many custom
features! 2700 SF of
A/C space. Open
house Sunday 2-5.
MUST SEEII $295,000.
Call 527-9769


Lic. Real Estate Agent
20 Years Experience
2.8%
Commission

ReaiO lect

(352) 795-1555


3/2 ON 10.8 ACRESII
Detached 14 X 28
office, pool, fncd.
$295K (352)621-3135


LiC. KealI tsate Agent
20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission

R ea-bi iect

(352) 795-1555
CHARMING 2BR/2BATH
HIGHLANDS, corner lot,
circular driveway,
prequallified only
Must See. $124,900
(352) 201-1663
CUSTOM BUILT 2/2/2
Energy efficient, new
roof & appli's. Open fir.
plan, close to shopping
& hospital, $129,000.
Must seel 352-344-8519




FSBO Riverfront home
with panoramic view
directly on
Withlacoochee 1,850
sq.ff. on 1.25 acres with
boat house & separate
dock. Best view on River
and fishing's greatly
$399,000 For virtual tour
visit ByownerCltrus.com
or call Don at
(352) 344-1613
Furnished Villa, 2/2, ca-
thedral ceiling in LR
Newly tiled Including
screen rm., $130,000
elkurz@yahoo.de
(352) 613-6496
HOME FOR SALE
On Your Lot, $110,900.
3/2/1 w/ Laundry
Atkinson Construction
352-637-4138
Uc.# CBC059685

How to Sell
Your House
By Yourself
Free Report Reveal.
10 inside tips to
Selling Your House
By Yourself.
Free Recorded
Message
1-800-597-5259
www.freecltruscoun-
tvhominfo.com
ID# 1017
ERA American
Realty &
Investments
INVERNESS LOT
80 x 120, surveyed,
house plans, 1,.500 sq ft
LA, Total 2,750 sq ft.
3/2/2 Bldg. cost
$123,000. Lot cost
$30,000. 352-382-7888
Move Right In
Foxwood Estates
Immaculate 3/2/2,
fenced overszd Lot Lg.
lanai, everything new,
$152,000 firm
417-273-0020
352-400-5906 "
SELL YOUR HOME!
Place a Chronicle
Classified ad
6 lines, 30 days
$51.95*
Call
726-1441
563-5966
Non-Refundable
Private Party Only
55 per addiltonal line
(Some Rest-rctions
May oppikI

WINDERMERE!!
2/2, Immaculate!
Ceiling Fans, Screen
Lanai, W/D, Plant
shelves, Vaulted
Ceilings, Blinds,
Remarkable
Community Amenities!
$180K,(352)726-4763
or 344-3567
WW I 1100% Disabled
Veteran, Must Sell
House and furniture
because of Health.
3/2/2, Upgraded,
many extras., water,
sewer, lawncare &
garb. pickup Included
for small fee. Ideal for
Retired Couple,
RV Free Storage, Serious
Buyers Only, Call
(352) 637-0321 for appt.




3/2 with Florida Room
on 3/4 acre,
Fenced Yard
On Spanish Trail
$119,000.
(352) 400-0847
GREAT HOME ON 1 AC.1
2/2/2, new roof, renov.
In 2004. Open floor,
w/split plan $179,900
Terri Hartman Crossland
Realty (352)726-6644




3/1 CRACKER, 1/2 ac.
Crnr lot. Completely
Rnnvatedl Must See!
$109Kobo 352-209-2118
$50K BELOW
APPRAISAL Like new
3500 sf. Country Ranch
Near Hospital. 2.4 acre
corner lot, w/attached
2 story garage apt.
Reduced to $360K.
Contact owner
352-220-8310
I BETTY MORTON I


eot Cul , n1111 ui tily.
3/2/2 Many Upgrades!
Fenced yard. $184,900
Harley Hough, EXIT
Realty 352-400-0051




KEY WEST Style Cottage
3BR, Fully Upgraded.
Cony. Locat. Must Seel
352-621-9227 or
hotlocalproperties.com




3/2/2 Cul-de-sac
Sweetwater Elegance
Open Plan $199,000
Charlene & Peggy,
EXIT REALTY
(352) 464-4179


*Home Finder* *Home Finder* *Home Finder*




Citrus Ridge Realty 3521 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, FL 34465
707420 1-888-789-7100


SPRING RUN
10080 Pamondeho Cir
3/2 split floor plan, triple
carport, sunroom,
completely. renovated
In last 21/V2 yrs. New ap-
pliances, tile, carpet,
lights, fans, counter-
tops, sinks, nicely land-
scaped 1/2 acre lot.
12X16 workshop with air
cond. & attic. Com-
pare with other homes
in neighborhood get a
bigger and better
house for $20,000 -
$30,000 less. Quick sale.
$140,000. 352-220-6663




2/1 on /2 Ac. Fenced
Great Loci W/Alum.
Crprt, Wood Frame Hm.
Fam. Rm, Eat-In KItch.
New AC & drainfield.
102300 (352)628-1669
A MUST SEEI 2/2/2
Split floor plan.
Beautifully maintained.
$124,900 Ron Egnot 1st
Choice Coldwell
Banker. 352-287-9219
BY OWNER
3/2 singlewide On 2 half
acre lots $46K firm 1592
S Lookout Pt 2 blocks off
US19 352-503-4142



----q

DISTRESS SALE
I 3/2/2 NEW Block I
I Home Deed Rest.,
S$115,500. Own. Fin.
| For Sale By Owner
L (727)271-0196

HOMOSASSA 3/2.5/2
Must see home on 5
AcresiPlenty of Land &
Privacy. $279K Alex
Choto, Fl. Realty &


Realtor
My Goal is Satisfied
Customers

REALTY ONE -
Outslamling Agents
OuWsandilng Reslts
(352) 637-6200

MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY




1 0 . .



ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
BUYERS AGENT
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956









wash rack. Sep. 12X12
Shed/Tack Rm. 2/2 MH
w/ranch style porch &
gorgeous hill-top vlewsl
$229,900
Well < mkt. value
352-239-7788/465-2427











3 BR/2BA Old Town
w/double garage, All
Cypress on 1 acre w/
canopy of hardwoods,
1 ml. to boat ramp
$165,000. (352)542-1182



-U-


CRYSTAL
RIVER
3/3/2, 2600 sq.
ft. Loaded with
upgrades. Just
off Kings Bay. 2
fresh water spgs,
10k boat lift.
$479,000
(302-6924)

Dianna McNally
REALTOR
Exit Realty
352-302-6924 710967


CRYSTAL RIVER 5/2.5/2.5
BEAUTIFUL New Cape
Cod on V2 Ac. Over
2,800 SF. MUST SEEI
$249K or $1,600/mo.
352-746-5912




FSBO Riverfront home
with panoramic view
directly on
Withlacoochee 1,850
sq.ft. on 1.25 acres with
boat house & separate
dock. Best view on River
and fishing's great!
$399,000 For virtual tour
visit ByownerCitrus.com
or call Don at
(352) 344-1613
HOME FOR SALE
On Your Lot, $110,900.
3/2/1 w/ Laundry
Atkinson Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685
INVERNESS 3/2
1300sq ft split plan.
Remodeled block
home. CHA. New roof,
windows & floors. Poss.
Owner Finance. $108K
(727) 399-9533


Michele Rose
REALTOR
"Simply Put-
1'1 Work Harder"
352-212-5097
thorn@atlantlc.net
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515
MUST SELL
QUICKLY
3/2mh on 5 acres., land
Is cleared and fenced
for horses has two
barns. asking $120,000.
lets make a deal.
352-422-4536
NEED TO SEE!!!
Cinnamon Ridge $89K
2/2 MH. Lg. treed lot
5408 W. Cinnamon Rda
Dr. View most any time.
352-249-1130/201-1670
NEWI 2 Story Cape Cod
5/3, 2,850 SF. w/8' X 32'
Covered Porch, Opt.
Garage. Come see us
@ Impressive Home
Builders (352)746-5912
Over 3,000
Homes and
Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com

SELL YOUR HOME
Place a Chronicle
Classified ad
6 lines, 30 days
$51.95*
Call
726-1441
563-5966
Non-Refundable
Private Party Only
. p? r .i5aidt'Ticr, l IIlrn
,'-,. me P.-'-ticir ,
.1, .aDpr I)

Vic McDonald
(352) 637-6200


.i; . - . ?" :


IT'S OUR SPECIALTY

www.crossland

Crossland
Realty Inc.
(352) 726-6644




3 Lots Rainbow Est.
75x140, Must sell
352-601-4582

BEST
LOCATIONS


High Profile 1+
Acre Corner Lots
Email
cr.bankson@era.com
for details
Or call Direct
352-464-1136
ERA American Realty
795-3144
BRING YOU'RE
HORSES -LIVE THE
COUNTRY LIFE
1.9 ACRES OFFERED AT
45,000.312-218-4408
CRYSTAL RIVER
Derosa Estates. Lot 15
BIk B. Aprrox 1/2 acre.
No Reasoffer refused
8743 N. Buscetta Loop.
(561) 762-8467
INVERNESS HIGHLANDS
Maxwell P1. & Savory
Ave. 8 parcels for
$44,900. (727) 457-6595


MONDAY, JUNE 18, 2007 13B

co --L [..
S andIc=Boats
Lf'BfH I nmH


4/3.5/2 In YANKEETOWN
3,514 sf. Formal areas,
French Drs. gazebo &
guesthouse.$1,285,000
Nancy Lewis, EXIT
REALTY(352) 302-6082
BETTY MORTON









Lic. Real Estate Agent
20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission

Reityect

(352) 795-1555

BUY NOW
Bargains
Everywhere!








Deb Infantine
EXIT REALTY LEADERS
(352) 302-8046
FSBO Riverfront home
with panoramic view
directly on
Withlacoochee 1,850
sq.ft. on 1.25 acres with
boat house & separate
dock. Best view on River
and fishing's greatly
$399,000 For virtual tour
visit ByownerCitrus.com
or call Don at
(352) 344-1613
HOMOSASSA 3/2/2
Home has Upgrades
Galore! Peaceful &
Serene. $349K
John Maisel III Exit
(352)794-0888
INVERNESS 3000 sf.
Beautiful Country Home
4/3, FP, fish pond,
1 /2 Ac. Adj. 3/4 Ac.
Lot avail. Prvt. Nature
Preserve. $339K
631-334-8444
INVERNESS
Pritchard Island 2/2
condo, 2 story end unit.
Open water by dock
$185,000 352-400-0053
LET OUR OFFICE
GUIDE YOU!


New Boat Trailers
GALV. & ALUM.
All at Far Below
Dealers Pricing
SUMMER CLEARANCE
* MONROE SALES *

352-527-3555

2005 KW 2020CC
150 Yam4Strk 180 hrs
T-Top Custom Dodger
Tandem Trailer
Asking $33,500
352-586-6717

PONTOON '87
All fiberglass.
Good Cond. Runs
Good. $2,500 obo
(352) 793-7996
PROLINE
'06, 19ft., '06 Mercury
Optdmax, 115 H out-
board, T-Top, color
electronics, still under
fact. warranty, many,
many options w/boat &
trailer, asking $22,500.
(352) 628-4668


LAKEFRONT
Crystal River $45K
www.JohnsFlorldo
Lots. coam 352-228-7523
Agent Owned
WITHLACOOCHEE
2'/4 AC. 230' on main
river/ very priv. beautiful
bldg. site w/ez access.
Below Market. $275,000
(352) 422-0199




RENTAL FINDER
mwww.chronicle
rentalfinder.com




Yamaha
2000, 25HP High thrust,
4 stroke, 66 hrs., $2,200.
(352) 249-0860
Cell (352) 476-1113




Jet Ski
06, Yamaha, GP 1300R,
w. trailer, exc cond,
$7800. OBO.
(352) 464-4868
SEA DOO Ltd/Set
'03 & '03 GTX 3 Seaters
Low hrs Grg kept & serv.
Dual galv, trlr. Mintl
$12,900 (352) 382-1623




2 SUNFISH
w/trailer. Garage Kept.
Very Good Cond.
$1,500/all
(352) 201-0142
14'-28'
Let us sell your
clean used boat.
THREE RIVERS
MARINE



(352) 563-5510
17ft. PATHFINDER
'99, Tunnel Hull,
Yamaha 50HP, trim
tabs, power pole. 85 Ib
trolling mtr, much more
$8,500. (352) 628-5418
AEROCRAFT 19.7'
Boat w/trlr. 4.3 Ltr., V-6
Merc, OD, Trim Tabs,
Runs Good. $1,750
352-628-3969/205-0291
ALUM. BOAT 17'
19 hp Go Devil, Trir.,
Spare tire, Floral City
$3,000 abo
(352)341-0292


AREAS LARGEST
SELECTION
OF PONTOONS
& DECK BOATS
Crystal River
Marine
(352) 795-2597
BAYLINER TROPHY
Clean, '96, 17FT, 90HP
motor, center console,
VHF, fish/depth finder,
trailer, $6,900 637-4319
CAROLINA SKIFF
'01 17DLX, '04 Yamaha
60HP 2 strk. I yr. warr.
GPS, DF, LOADED
$11.495. (352) 422-1412
CAROLINA SKIFF 21'
'00, frnt/rear casting
decks, CC, 115HP Yam,
jack pit. Many extras.
$11,500. (352) 726-0939
F16 SEARAYDER
'96, 1-owner, bimini top,
radio, 92 hrs., exc. cond
garage kept, $5,000
abo (352) 465-5796
FIBERGLASS 14'
9HP Evinrude w/traller
life jackets, trolling mtr.
Etc. $700, runs great.
(352) 277-4528
GALAXY 1987 21'
w/165 Merc. I/O. Trailer
Inc. Runs Good;
Needs TLC. $2,500 obo
795-7118 or 212-0379
GODFREY 22'
HURRICANE Deck Boat
'91, 115 hp Merc, many
new parts w/Trlr. $8,000
(352) 726-2408
GRADY WHITE 22.6'
W/A Cuddy, 200 hp
Mariner, O/B, Alum. Top
W/Top Gun Outriggers.
Garmin Chart plotter.
$12K abo 352-302-8266
HEWES 18'
Flats boat w/ 115
Yamaha 4 stroke.
Great cond. $17K OBO
(352) 634-3800
HURRICANE
23ft. Deck Boat, 150
Mariner, new rebuilt
'03, trailer. $6,500.
(352) 212-7500
JON BOAT
10 ft., w/trolling motor,
& accessories $225.
Deep cycle Battery $45.
(352) 746-7992
Lowes 22' Pontoon
2001, Bimlnl top, A.M.
cover. Toilet, depth/FF.F.
4 fish seats & tandem
trlr. 90 HP $13,945; 70hrs.
502-345-0285 (IN FL)
* MUST SELL! *
25' Aqua Sport
Walk Arnd Cuddy
$4,200 obo
* (352) 795-9621 *


'03 Skamper 190,25ft,
AC, heat, full Bath, 2
showers, like new,
many extras, all manu-
als, clean, $8,000. obo
503-5487, 313-477-3125
LAYTON 26' 1993
Micro, AC, Fr/bk drs. 23'
awning, new tires, refrig.
Exc. cond. w/'98 Dodge
Durango. 4X4, V-8, tow
pkg. 6 pass, Rr AC,
both/$12,900
Call (352) 628-3376
POP UP CAMPER
'00 Hunter Coachman,
good cond, sleeps 6,
cold AC, easy setup,
$2500 (352) 697-0243
PROWLER
'98 27.5FT, 5th wheel,
Queen bed, 13FT slide
out, full kitchen, clean,
$7,000 (352) 860-1568


CLASSIFIED


Plantation Realty. Inc.
1352) 795-0784
Cell 422-7925
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner
See all of the listings In
Citrus County at
www.olantatlon
realtvync.com
PRITCHARD ISLAND
3/2.5 $180K, $950/mo.
2/2 $165K, $800/mo.
Dock, Comun. Pool, all
Appl's., scrn prch. more
352-237-7436/812-3213
Spacious HER-
NANDO
3/2/2, 3100 sq ft under
roof. Appt only.
$279,900 (352) 341-5611




1-15 HOUSES WANTED
Cash or Terms
John (352) 228-7523
www.FastFloridaHouse
Buyer.com
* ******
I BUY HOUSES
ANY CONDITION
(352) 503-3245

WE BUY HOUSES
Ca$h........Fast I
352-637-2973
1 homesold.com
WE BUY HOUSES
CaSh.......Fast I
352-637-2973
Ihomesold.com



10 AC. MOL S.E. Citrus
660 X 660 Fncd, Paved
Rd.,May split $189K/
QffMe (813) 620-1188
GOOD LAND
IS HARD TO FINDI


BONNIE PETERSON
Realtor, GRI

Your SATISFACTION
Is Mv Future!l
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC
BY OWNER 3/2/2, .5 Ac.
Over 1,600 sf. l.a., fncd.,
w/work shed w/elec.
Built 2000, quiet
cul-de-sac off 486.
Great family home
w/playroomsi $165K
(352) 422-3137


a m ll
Ll ~m rI Q II ^M


PROLINE 17'
'85, T-Top, 88 hp
Johnson P/T, w/trlr.
$3,995
352-795-9229/400-1251
PROLINE 18'
'95, Flats, 150 Mariner,
electronics, trir., Exc.
Must Sell! $9K obo
352-341-0336/586-8946

RENTAL FINDER
Swww.chronicle
rentalflnder.com

REPOWER SALE
NEW MOTORS
70-4S Suzuki $5,295
60-4s Mercury $5,430
50 Evinrude E-TEC
$4,900
Other Brands and HP
available
Nature Coast Marine
352-794-0094

AAA
BOAT DONATIONS
Tax Deductible @
appraised value
when donated to a
43 year old
non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Maritime Ministries
A (352) 795-9621 A
SABRE
16FT center console,
70HP Johnson, bimini
top, Performance trailer
$2,000 (352) 726-5329
SEA ARK 16',Tunnel
'06 Evinrude E-Tech 40
hp. console, jack plate,
54 lb. trying mtr. $8,200
Reduced 628-3331
SKIPPER CRAFT
20FT. Pontoon Boat &
motor $2,000. Boat,
motor & trailer $2,850
(352) 447-8024
SLIPPER SAILBOAT
17' in exc. cond. w/2
sets of sails, $2,500
Call (352) 795-7777
STAMAS 1982 24'
Cuddy cabin, new eng.
new outdrive in 1996.
Low hrs. Fly bridge,
outriggers, fishing ma-
chine. See at Aqua
Power In Inglis. $9000.
STUMPKNOCKER 14'
Fiberglass, Boat, Mtr,
&Trir.
Exc. Cond. 1,800obo
(352) 302-6082
Wanted: Boats in Need
of Repair, also motors
and trailers, Cash Paid
(352) 212-6497





A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
.2 weeks In the
*2 weeks Online!
* Featured in Tues.
"Wheels" Section!
Cal Today
(352) 726-1441
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
*$5 per additional line
* Some Restrictions
May Apply
GEORGIA BOY
1979. 27FT., Perfect
cond. $4,200
(352) 637-4938,
GULFSTREAM 32'
'94, 62K, Sleeps 6, new
AC, flooring, tires. Exc.
Cond. $10,000
352-270-3162/257-2387
JAMBOREE 29'
2005, V-10 Class C
13K, Loadedl Perfect
Condltonl Ready to gol
$48,500 (352)465-2138
MONACO
'00, Monarch, 34', Class
A w/sllde, 30K, V-10,
spotless. Just serviced.
$47,000 (352)746-9457
ROADTREK 190
'95, Camper van,
queen bed, refrig.
microwave, TV, VCR,
toilet, shower, perfect
in and out, all books
& manuals, $13,900
(727) 430-2379
RV FOR RENT
31', Sleeps up to 7.
Loaded! Just bring your
clothes & food $800wk
(352) 422-7794
WE NEED RVSII
We will buy or consign
your clean RV @ NO
FEEl Bobby Clark RV
(352) 726-5999




T RV DONATIONS T?.
Tax Deductible for-
Appraised Value -'.
Maritime Ministries'
T (352) 795-9621 T1
4 Tires 255-70R-15 or
ICW alum 15x7 5 lug,
Chevy truck $525
(352) 422-3821
Mon-Thurs. 7am-7pm
5TH WHEEL 30'
Super slide 2000
Meadowbrook. Exc.
cond. $18,200
(352) 746-0348
AIRSTREAM 31'
1979, Great Shapel
New AC, carpet, tires,
uphol., $8,900 obo
(352) 257-4260
CASITA 17' TT
'99, All optionsnew tires
& bearings, equal.htch.
Garaged! Exc. Cond.
$9,950 (352)465-2142
COLEMAN POPUP
'89, Air, refrig, stereo,
exc. cond. $3200/obo
(352) 489-9736 or
(352) 422-2874
I BUY RV'S
Travel Trailers, 5th
wheels ect.Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
JAYCO 36', '04
Toy Hauler, 4,000 watt
Gen., 15,000 AC, 16"
Wheels, Fuel Station
$26,950 (502) 345-0285
Kodiac












14B MONDAY, JUNE I


-.ffi8t3Brt
c4AessresH


3 Tires
255-70-16
$7. ea.
(352) 212-7806
4 NEW TIRES W/WHEELS
245X45/R17 '99 Cobra
wheels, $700:
JACK ROUSH WHEELS
w/4 Goodrich Tires
245X45/R17 some tread
$300, (352) 382-7001
CHEVY SUBURBAN
'79, NEW ENGINE
350 4 BOLT MAIN w/
800 miles on it,. Vehicle
needs work. $1,000/obo
(352)489-3770
Corsa Exhaust System-
has 4 chrome tail pipe
tips, For 06/07Chevy
Silverado or GMC Sierra
with 5.3L V-8, paid
$1,100, sell for $400
Paul, hm.(352) 560-3210
cell 813-323-7813
One Tire, 195-75-14, on
4 lug mustang Rim $15.
Four other Tires
255-65-17, Michelin,
like new $15. ea.
(352) 212-7806
SET OF 4 WHEELS
Dodge Ram Hemi Sport
Wheels, high polished
aluminum. Like New
$400 (352) 613-3095
Two Tires, 215-70-14
$5. ea.
One Tire, 225-75-15,
like new $15.
(352) 212-7806


-UH

$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
CASH BUYER-No Junk
for Trucks, Vans & Cars
Larry's Auto Sales
Hwy 19S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowersjacuzzi's, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084

WE PAY CASH
FOR
JUNK CARS
Top $$ paid $$
Toll Free
(888) 480-1170

$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645




tt t
We wish to give @
least 30 Cars to
BATTERED
WOMEN'S SHELTER
S this year.
Tax Deduct. Avail.
PLEASE HELP US.
MARITIME MINISTRIES
9 (352) 795-9621 "
r -- 6=
'00 Nissan Altlma
SGXE, #H09676B, I
SAwesome Shape
On ly 59K mi. Must I
| See $6,998. or $138 |
@ mo. 866-838-4376

'02 OLDS AURORA
| #H10247A Loaded |
-� with Leather, CD �
I and More $8,677.
Sor $162. mo.
866-838-4376

02 Chevy Impala
| LS,#H10088A, Big I
SCar For Less, Need
More Space Call
n $8,944. or $167.@, |

r - -- 2H� mi
mo. 866-838-4376
r '02 Ho ra CivIc,
| #Hm01025B, Here Is I
How You Buy A
Honda $10,470. or I
S$182.9@ mo.
866-838-4376










S--- - -- Eu
S'04, Ford FocusSE,
| H09689A, Want Low |
I Payments and Save
| Gas, $9,988 or $179
S@ mo. 866-838-4376
L .-- m u
r 05, Ford Mustang



-866-838-4376



Summertime Is Here,
Let the Top Down
I $17,988 or $297 @
mo.866-838-4376
I
'07, Mitsublishi,
SEclipse GSL#HI0144B
SAlmost New Only 3K
Smi., Save Lots, Call I
m 866-838-4376 =


For sale! Cars from
$500 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374


70T , X-Clas, Losd ...$4,995







" '97 Saturn SLI Sedan =
I Auto, A/C, great I
" Student Car $2,997. |


_ '98,Buick Lesaobre, _
*" Less, Wonderful Ride .
, 11 $4,988. |
� 866-838-4376 -

A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
.2 weeks In the

*2 weeks Onlinel


*Featured in Tues.
"Wheels" SectionI
Call Today
(352) 726-1441
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
*$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
ACURA RSX-S '04
6sp man., mnrf, 54K,
leather, 6cd pampered
$14,900/obo
352-344-4505
BUICK
1988 Station wagon,
4 cyl., good
transportation $400
(352) 795-8863
BUICK
1995, For sale $1,500
- Call 352-795-8634


-Pr-


CADILLAC DEVILLE
1989 White 4 dr, Blue
Leather, non smoker
great condition.
(352 ) 447-4425
$1 OO,500 Inglis
CADILLAC DEVILLE
'99 73,800 ml. Air Cond.
Leather, Mother of Pearl
w/ bilk convertible top
Dual Power Seats,
Premium Sound, AM/FMI
Stereo, Cassette,
Premium Wheels,
$10,500. (352) 860-0444
CHRYSLER Crossfire
2005, 18K Miles,
YOU GOTTA SEE IT!
#6149823B Citrus Kia
(352) 564-8668
CHRYSLER SEBRING
CONVERTIBLE
2001, 28,889, $12,500.
Limited; White Conv.,
cream & blue interior,
blue cloth top
(352) 382-7063





DODGE INTREPID
'99. 2.7L, 30MPG HWY,
48K mi. All power, CD,
tinted windows, non
smoker, women driven,
garaged, exc. cond.
$5200. (352) 795-6151
FORD
1985 Station wagon,
$500 (352) 795-8863
FORD
'95. Cougar, burgundy,
clean, full pwr., cold
AC, auto, asking $1,895.
(352) 726-4267
FORD FOCUS
2002
Clean & Economical
#7056199B Citrus Kia
(352) 564-8668
FORD MUSTANG GT
'89, 347 Stroker, 5 spd.
Munci trans., SVT rims,
Fast Car. Needs wk.
$4,500 352-257-6001
HYUNDAI
2006, Azera, 25k mi.,
excel. cond., Asking
$19,000. (352) 382-0148
(352) 422-7884
KIA OPTIMA EX
2004, V-6, 18K ml.
Like NEWI
*7060610A Citrus Kio
(352) 564-8668
KIA SPECTRA
2003, 22,600 mi.,
Blue Book Is $7,900.
Asking $7,000.
(352) 533-3069
LINCOLN
2000, Signature Series,
Exc. cond. 72k ml.
hardly driven.
$10,000 Negotiable
(352) 489-0122
LINCOLN
'99, Towncar Signature
series, 107k mi., excel
cond. non smoker,
$6,500. SMW, 382-1905
LINCOLN TownCar
2003, Signature Series,
Showroom Cond.
Carriage Roof. $17,500
OBO (352) 489-1639
LINCOLN Towncar
'93, Sig. Series, leather,
123K ml., Great Shapel
Everything works! Cold
AC. $2,500 341-0718
MERCEDES 230SLK
'98, Hard-top/convert.,
auto, Immaculate, all
options, Ice cold AC,
(240) 994.8765
MITSUBISHI
'97, Eclipse, silver, new
motor, transm. & tires
$4,000 ab o (352)
637-3659 or 302-0119
PLYMOUTH
ACCLAIM
1991,6 cyl, auto,
Runs Great! $950 obo
(352) 564-8014





TOYOTA
'94, Camry Sedan,
clean inside/out, excel.
running cond.. auto
137k mi $3,200 obo
352-465-4801
TOYOTA CAMRY LE '96
Exc. Cond/AII pwr.
Mntc. Recds. Grgd
$3,500 352-422-5685
TOYOTA CELICA
'93, GT, 150K, Gooa
Cond. $1,600
(352) 634-5301
Your Donation of
A Vehicle
Supports Single,
Homeless Mothers
& Is Tax
Deductible
Donate your vehicle
TO THE PATH
(Rescue Mission for
Men Women &
Children)
at (352) 527-6500




1972 BUICK
ELECTRA 2DR
$1200 OBO Mechani-
cally Sound. Some rust,
352-212-8951
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale Cars from
$500! For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374
'82 CADILLAC Biarritz
Pristine, classic,
collectible. 9,137 orig.
miles. Black w/red
leather int. S.S. roof,
custom made spoke
wheels, new Redline
tires, All rec. incl. orig,.
invoice. $15,000 firm
352-586-9663/795-8634
BARACUDA 1969
Restorable $2,500 Firm
(727) 919-2022 cell
Lv. Message
CAMARO
'72, Real Z28, orig. eng.
auto w/ console, cortez
silver, w/ blk, stripes,
$20k (352) 422-7233
EL CAMINO '85


Needs mnr body work.
$4,500 OBO Proceeds
to charity 352-795-9621
FORD 1940
New paint, Chevy
350 motor & trans. drive
It home. Very clean.
(352) 212-7500
FORD
1956 T-Bird, Red, new
restoration, rebuilt eng.,,
new paint, both tops,
Pwr. Steer. $29,500.
(352) 628-1734
FORD
1965 Thunderbird
landau, goodcond.,
all orig. $2,500
(352) 637-3333
FORD THUNDERBIRD
'89 Super Coupe. 5 spd.
Super Charged Eng.
$1800/obo
(352) 382-7001


i


JEEP
1994 Black YJ Wrangler
w/Soft Top, 6 Cyl., Auto-
matic, A/C, CD AM/FM
Player, 4" Lift Kit, Pacer
Chrome Wheels, 33"
Tires, 78K miles, Mint
Condition, $12K O.B.O.
Call after 6pm 795-0841
JEEP WRANGLER
1994, 4x4. Fair cond,
Great for the woods.
Runs good $4,000 OBO
352-527-2822




$5001 Police Impounds
For salel Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374
CHEVY 1997
Conversion Van. All
pwr, leather, sofa bed,
V8, tow pkg. Runs
Great $3,700 586-2664


MERCEDES
1987, 560 SL, 125K,
White, Both tops, New
Mich, tires. $10,500
(352) 586-6805
MGB
1977, good shape, new
tires, new roof. $4,000
obo. Moving
(352) 400-1068




$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$500! For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374

A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the
Chronlclel
*2 weeks Onlinel
*Featured in Tues.
"Wheels" Sectionl
Call Today
(352) 726-1441
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
*$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
CHEVY
'99, Sllverado, 36k mil,
long bed, V6, auto,
rhino liner, new tires,
tool box, $8,500. obo
352-382-1073, 422-1834
CHEVY P/U '00
71k ml, 2 8ft toolboxes
/roof rack. 1 owner,
Well main. 5495.00
OBO (352) 613-5869
CHEVY S- 10
'02, Exc. Cond. Bed liner
& Tonneau Cover,
Tint, 69K, $6,300
(352) 344-2331





DODGE DAKOTA
'90 V-6, 3.9, all new un-
der hood. New motor &
brakes. Rebuilt Tranny
$2,900 352-353-5116
DODGE RAM
2004
READY TO
GO TO WORKII
#7051944A Citrus Kia
(352) 564-8668
FORD
Ranger Edge, 6cd,
UWS diamond plate
tool box, 38,600 ml,
13,900 OBO 795-7381
FORD F-150
1986, 6 cyl, $500
Needs Workl
(352) 533-3049
GMC
1993 Pickup step side.
V8, AUTO Runs great,
looks great $2,990 OBO
(352) 726-2894
INTERNATIONAL
2000 Semi w/Sleeper
9200 Model series,
60 Detroit, 10 spd. trans.
air ride, tandem rear
end 273, w/ wetline, PC
set up, $20,500. obo
(352) 726-1373
ISUZU
'06, 14ft Box Truck w/lift
gate, PW, PL, AC, 17k
ml., excel cond,, asking
$26,000. (352) 613-4891
NISSAN
'99 Frontier XE oo001, ml,
r,- . inr.e rur,: i.iio
Asking $.. 600
(352) 527-8706









$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$500! For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374
ISUZU AXIUM
2002,
Sharp Looking SUVI
#7042529A Citrus Kia
(352) 564-8668
JEEP
'04, Grande Cherokee
Laredo, white w/ grey
Int., 6 cyl, 40k mi. 2W/D
$14,900. (352) 249-1196
JEEP CHEROKEE
'96 4x4, gd. tires, mint
engine, cold air, runs
great, 140K mi. $2500.
(352) 382-4142
KIA SORENO
2006, 4 X 4, Low miles
2 to Choose From
Citrus Kla
(352) 564-8668
SATURN V6 AWD
VUE 2003 60k ml, Blue,
Loaded, Moon Roof,
Cargo Racks, etc., 28
MPG Hwy, graphics re-
movable $10,500 OBO
352 628 5957
SUBURBAN 4x4 '88
Navy/grey, front & rear
air, tow pkg. Clean &
solid machine.$2,200.
obo (352) 795-3970




$5001 Police Impounds
For sale Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374
A WHEEL OF

A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks In the
*2 weeks Onllne!
*Featured In Tues.
"Wheels" Section]
Call Today
(352) 726-1441
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
"$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply


'00, NInja, 250 motor,
runs good, needs
windshield, $1,000. obo
(352) 795-1411
SUZUKI 2002 GSX
R600. Telefonica
Edition 12651 miles.
Garage kept. $4500/
obo (352) 527-2822
SUZUKI SV650S
2004, 5800 miles, Great
Condition, Very Fastill
Asking $4,500 obo.
Call 464-4183,
Ask for Donny.






598-0618 MCRN
Notice to Creditors
(Summary Administration)


CHEVY
'94, Conversion Van, TV,
tape player, new tires,
completely tuned,
(352) 228-2239
CHEVY CARGO
VAN 2002, 8600LB. 5.7L,
bin pkg, tow pkg.
Roof racks, $7800.
(352) 628-6300
CHEVY LUMINA
'95, Looks good, runs
good. New tires,
battery & brake pads.
$2,500 (352) 726-7262
CHEVY VENTURE
2001, pristine condition
mobility express lift on
bumper, 94K mi, $4,500
(352) 613-0078
DODGE
'89 Conversion Van, V8,
auto, TV, runs great,
$1,900. cash
(352) 637-1257
DODGE RAM 350
'91, 15 passenger van,
dual AC, PS,PB, AM/FM
Stereo Radio/CD, tow
pkg. $2,900 341-0292
FORD AEROSTAR
'92, 150k, $999.
352-527-6500
FORD WINDSTAR
LX
2000, Cruise, P/S, P/B,
Cold AC. Well kept!
Non-Smoker. 100K
$3,500 (352) 465-3539
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY






Ft


ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
BUYERS AGENT
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.CQM




*FREE REMOVAL OF*
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowersjacuzzi's, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
HONDA TRX 250 EX
2005, Exc. Cond.
Inc. 2 extra tires.
$2,500 obo
(352) 527-9020
POLARIS ATV
'05, Kid's 50cc, bought
new In summer, 2006.
Mint Cond.I $950
(352) 527-4529





A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the
.2 weeks Onlneli
*Featured In Tues.
"WThees" SectionI
Call Today
(352) 726-1441
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
*$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
BIG DOG
'98, Chromed Out,
board & stroked,
12k mi. Sacrifice. Please
Call. (352) 228-2239
BIKE TRAILER
Open, factory built for
2 Harleys. 3200 lb.
capacity. Ramp.
Exc. Cond, $900
(352) 382-5296
*FREE REMOVAL OF *
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers,jacuzzl's, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'01, Ultra Classic,
Voyager kit, (like trike)
reverse kit, cust. paint,
10,300 mi. $19,000.
(352) 302-6200
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'05, 1200 Sportster Cus-
tom, many extras, well
maintained, $7,895.
(352) 637-6284
HARLEY DAVIDSON
1997 Sportster, 1200cc,
21K mi., Great
running bikel $4,950
(352) 746-3789
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000 Elec. Glide Classic
1450 cc, Vance N Heins
pipes, sport windshield,
lots of chrome, only
15,800 mi. Like new
$11,995 (352) 467-0872
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2006, Street Glide.
1450CC, Like Newl 2,200
ml, blk, $13,500 OBO
(352) 400-0360
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'93, Softall, customized,
1340, lots of chrome,
$6,000 (352) 341-2019
Harley Davidson
'95, Dyno NA, 34K ml,,
$8,500 (352) 422-5255
HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA2005
6200ml, $12,500 wind-
shield, bags, 4000 miles
of warr. (352) 697-0243
HONDA
'03, CR250R, like new,
never riden, $800. of ex-
tra new parts incl.
$2,500. (352) 572-6023
HONDA '07
Aero 750, Mint Cond,,
Showroom new, Less
than 1,500 ml. $6,600.,
Includes Windshield
and 2 Helmets. New
house forces sale.
352-400-2277
HONDA 2003 VTX
1300, well maintained,
garage kept, lots of
xtras, Exc. cond. $6500.
(352) 527-6639
Kawasaki


Estate Of Kenneth Bogon
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2007-CP-531
IN RE: ESTATE OF
KENNETH BOGAN, JR.
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE:
You are hereby noti-
fied that an Order of Sum-
mary Administration has
been entered in the Es-
tate of Kenneth Bogan,
Jr., deceased. File Num-
ber 2007-CP-531, by the
Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of
which Is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, Florida 34450; that
the decedent's date of
death was December 13,
2006; that the total value
of the estate Is $500.00
and that the names and
addresses of those to
whom it has been as-
signed by such order are:
Name Address
Sharon Miller
100 Sycamore Circle
Homosassa, Florida 34446
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the es-
tate of the decedent and
persons having claims or
demands against the es-
tate of the decedent
other than those for
whom provision for full
payment was made in
the Order of Summary
Administration must file
their claims with this court
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DE-
MANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING
ANY OTHER APPLICABLE
TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publi-
cation of this notice is
June 11, 2007.
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ SHARON MILLER

Attorney for
Person Giving Notice:
HAAG, HAAG
& FRIEDRICH, P.A.
452 Pleasant Grove Road
Inverness, Florida 34452
(352) 726-0901
(352) 726-3345 (Facsimile)
Florida Bar Number:
0196529
/s/ JEANNETTE M. HAAG
JEANNETTE M. HAAG
Attorney for Estate
Published two (2) times In
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, June 11 and 18.
2007.
599-0618 MCRN
Notice to Creditors
(Summary Administration)
Estate of Betty Lou Patton
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2007CP505
Division: Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BETTY LOU PATTON
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE:
You are hereby noti-
fied that an Order of Sum-
mary Administration has
been entered In the es-
tate of BETTY LOU PATTON,
deceased, File Number
2007CP505, by the Circuit
Court for Citrus County,
Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is
110 North Apopka Ave-
nue, Inverness. Florida
34450; that the
decedent's date of death


506-0618 MCRN
Notice of Action
Ernestine Cookson Revocable Trust vs.
Robert A. Keough, et al.,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY
Case No.: 09-2007-CA-001256

ERNESTINE COOKSON REVOCABLE TRUST
DATED AUGUST 14. 1993
PLAINTIFF,
-vs-

ROBERT A. KEOUGH, TAMMY R. KEOUGH
and CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA,
DEFENDANTS.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
ROBERT KEOUGH
Last Known Address: 5307 Tangerine Drive,
New Port RIchey, FL 34652
and
9871 Lakevlew Drive. New Port Richey, FL 34654
Current Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of
Mortgage on the following described property:
COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE
NORTHWEST ONE QUARTER (1/4) OF SECTION 25, TOWN-
SHIP 20 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA; GO THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES, 09'35" WEST
ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTHWEST ONE
QUARTER (1/4) A DISTANCE OF 896.48 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; CONTINUE THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES
09'35" WEST 94,35 FEET: THENCE NORTH 21 DEGREES
41'29" WEST, 173.04; THENCE NORTH 68 DEGREES 20'30"
EAST. 105.05 FEET: THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 06'08";
EAST 207.22 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on
Jonathan W. Mesker, Esq., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose
address Is 4919 VENUS AVENUE, NEW PORT RICHEY, FL
34652 on or before July 11, 2007, a date which as
within (30) days after the first publication of this Notice
in the (Please publish in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONI-
CLE) and file the original with the Clerk of this Court ei-
ther before service on Plaintiff's attorney or Immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded In the complaint.
In accordance with the American with Disabilities
Act of 1990 (ADA), disabled persons who, because of
their disabilities, need special accommodations to par-
ticipate In this proceeding should contact the ADA Co-
ordinator at 110 NORTH APOPKA AVENUE; INVERNESS,
FLORIDA 34450 or Telephone Volce/TDD (904) 521-4274
ext. 8110 not later than five business days prior to pro-
ceeding.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 5th
day of June, 2007.
Betty Strlfier
As Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ M. A. Michel
As Deputy Clerk


was January 22. 2007;
that the total value of the
estate is $19,556.13 and
that the names and ad-
dresses to whom It has
been assigned by such or-
der are:

Name
Paul Patton
Address
12 Heuchera Court West
Homosassa, FL 34446

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the es-
tate of the decedent and
persons having claims or
demands against the es-
tate of the decedent
other than those for
whom provision for full
payment was made In
the Order of Summary
Administration must file
their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DE-
MANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING
ANY OTHER APPLICABLE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first
publication of this Notice
Is June 11, 2007.
Persons Giving Notice:
/s/ Paul Patton
12 Heuchera Court West
Homosassa, Florida 34446
Attorney for Persons
Giving Notice:
/s/ Thomas E.
Slaymaker. Esquire
Florida Bar No. 398535
Slaymaker
and Nelson, P.A,
6027 South Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, Florida 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-1204
Published two (2) times In
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, June 11 and 18,
2007.
512-0709 MCRN
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2007-CA-2308
IN RE: THE FORFEITURE OF
TWO THOUSAND TWO
HUNDRED AND FORTY FIVE
DOLLARS and NO/CENTS
($2,245.00) IN U.S. CUR-
RENCY. BY THE CITRUS
COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE,
Plaintiff
vs.
JESUS MEZA and TAMIKA
GARCIA,
Claimants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JESUS MEZA and
TAMIKA GARCIA 5905
S. MASON CREEK
ROAD HOMOSASSA,
FLORIDA 34446
You are notified that
an action seeking forfei-
ture of Two Thousand Two
Hundred and Forty Five
Dollars In U.S. Currency
($2,245.00) has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, If
any, to it on Richard Wm.
Wesch. Esquire, Plaintiff's
Attorney, whose address
Is 1 Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr. Avenue, Inverness, Flor-
ida 34450 on or before
July 18, 2007 and file the
original with the Clerk of
Court either before serv-
ice on Plaintiff's Attorney
or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for
the relief demanded In
the Complaint or Petition
dated this 12 day of June,
2007.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of
Courts
Clerk of Court
/s/ M.G. Michel
Deputy Clerk

Published two (4) times In
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, June 18 and 25, July 2
and 9, 2007


ANITA SCHREUDER-WEBBINK: IF ALIVE: AND
IF DEAD, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES OR OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THEM, OR ANY OF THEM, AND
ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS, IF ALIVE, AND IF
DEAD, OR NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
AUVE. THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES OR OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE UNKNOWN PERSONS
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF ACTION TO QUIET TITLE
To: ALL PARTIES claiming Interests
by through, under or against:
EVERT WEBBINK, deceased,
MONIQUE M. WEBBINK-
SCHELLENBERG, JOYCE
WEBBINK and ANITA
SCHREUDER-WEBBINK:


Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle
on June 11 and 18, 2007.

503-0618 MCRN
Notice of Action
Foreclosure Proceedings - Property
HSBC Bank USA, NA., vs. VIoleta Castro, et al.,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 5th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY
Case *: 09-2007-CA-1721
Division #
UNC:

HSBC Bank USA, N.A., as Trustee on behalf
of ACE Securities Corp. Home Equity Loan
Trust and for the registered holders of ACE
Securities Corp. Home Equity Loan Trust
Series 2005-HE6, Asset Backed Pass-Through
Certificates,

Plaintiff,
-vs.-
VIoleta Castro; Mortgage Electric
Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for
Novastar Mortgage, Inc,; HSBC Bank USA,
N.A,, as trustee on behalf of ACE Securities
Corp. Home Equity Loan Trust and for the
registered holders of ACE Securities Corp.
Home Equity Loan Trust. Series 2005-HE6.
Asset Backed Pass-Through Certificates;
Unknown Parties In Possession #1; Unknown
Parties In Posesslon #2; If living, and all
Unknown Parties Claiming by, through, under
and against the above named Defendant(s)
Who Are Not Known To Be Dead Or Alive,
Whether Said Unknown Parties May Claim An
Interest As Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees,
Or Other Claimants
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE
PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY
TO:
Vloleta Castro, WHOSE LAST KNOWN RESIDENCE IS:
12833 South Betty Point, Floral City, FL 34436
Residence unknown, If living, including any unknown
spouse of the said Defendants, If either has remarried
and If either or both of said Defendants are dead, their
respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assign-
ees, creditors, Ilenors, and trustees, and all other per-
sons claiming by, through, under or against the named
Defendantss; and the aforementioned named
Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned un-
known Defendants and such of the aforementioned
unknown Defendants as maybe Infants, incompetents
or otherwise not sul juris.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been
commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the following
real property, lying and being and situated In Citrus
County, Florida, more particularly described as follows:

LOT 15, BLOCK G OF WHISPERING OAKS, ACCORIDNG
TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7,
PAGE(S) 20 THROUGH 24, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
more commonly known as 12833 South Betty Point, Flo-
ral City, FL 34436 .
This action has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written defense, if
any, upon SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, Attorneys for Plaintiff,
whose address Is 10004 N. Dale Mabry Highway, Suite
112, Tampa, FL 33618 within thirty (30) days after the
first publication of this notice and file the original with
the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or Immediately there after; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded In the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 5th
day of June, 2007.
BETTY STRIFLER
Circuit and County Courts
By: /s/ M. A. Michel
Deputy Clerk
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 11 and 18,2007.


501-0618 MCRN
Notice of Action
Chase Home Finance vs. Bremner et al.,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 2007-CA-1979
DIVISION:

CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, OR AGAINST, JANE K BREMNER
A/K/A JANE KATHERINE BREMNER,
DECEASED, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, JANE K
BREMNER A/K/A JANE KATHERINE BREMNER, DECEASED
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED IN-
DIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following property In CITRUS County.
Florida:
LOT 18, BLOCK 182, CITRUS SPRINGS, UNIT NO. 2, AC-
CORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 108 THROUGH 115, INCLUSIVE,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days af-
ter the first publication. If any, on Echevarria Codills &
Stawlarskl, Plaintiff's attorney, whose address Is 9119
Corporate Lake Drive, Suite 300, Tampa, Florida 33634,
and file the original with this Court either before service
on Plaintiff's attorney or Immediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered against you for the relief
demanded In the Complaint or petition,.
This notice shall be published once each week for
two consecutive weeks In the
Citrus County Chronicle.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this
4th day of May. 2007,

Betty Strlfler
Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ M. A, Michel
As Deputy Clerk
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 11 and 18, 2007. F07012498


502-0702 MCRN
Notice of Action to Quiet Title
AlbertJe Hoen vs. Evert Webbink, et al..,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No. 2006 CA 4740

ALBERTJE HOEN,
Plaintiff,
vs.
EVERT WEBBINK, DECEASED; MONIQUE M.
WEBBINK-SCHELLENBERG; JOYCE WEBBINK;


has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, If any, to It on
Plaintiff's attorney, DONALD F. PERRIN, Esq., Donald F.
Perrin, P.A., Post Office Box 250, Inverness, FL
34451-0250 on or before the 11th day of July, 2007,
and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs' attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In the Complaint.
DATED this 5th day of June, 2007.
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ M. A. Michel
As Deputy Clerk
Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 11 and 18, 2007.


505-0702 MCRN
Notice of Action
Robert Alley vs. Sky Development Group, LLC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 06CA5608

ROBERT ALLEY and MONA ALLEY,


CiTus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





and ALL PARTIES having or
claiming to have any right, title
or interest In the property herein
described.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a complaint for quiet ti-
tle has been filed against you regarding real property
that Is more specifically described as:

Lot 10 Block 82 of Pine Ridge Unit ONE a Subdivision ac-
cording to the Plot thereof, recorded In Plot Book 8,
Page 25-36, of the Public Records of Citrus County, Flor-
Ida
You are required to file written defenses, If any, with
the clerk of the above-styled court and serve a copy
on Ronnie Van Gent, Esq., of The Van Gent Law Firm, a
Professional Association, Attorneys for Plaintiff, Albertje
Hoen, whose address Is 2881 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Ste.
212. Fort Lauderdale, FL 33306. on or before July 20.
2007. otherwise a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once a week for four
consecutive weeks In the Citrus County Chronicle.
Witness my hand and the seal of said court at Inver-
ness, Florida on this 5th day of June, 2007.
BETTY STRIFLER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Citrus County, Florida

By: /s/ M. A. Michel
RONNIE VAN GENT, ESQ.
Florida Bar number: 0063126
THE VAN GENT LAW FIRM,
a Professional Association
2881 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Suite 21
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33306
Telephone: 954-315-1777
Fax: 954-315-1778
Attorneys for PLAINTIFF Albertje Hoen
Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle
on June 11, 18, 25 and July 2, 2007.

509-0618 MCRN
Notice of Action
Bohatka Realty Investments, LLC vs. Horn, et al.
PUBLIC NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 2007-CA-2080

BOHATKA REALTY INVESTMENTS LLC
Plaintiff,
Vs.
HANS HORN, et al.
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: HANS HORN, HANNA HORN, UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF HANNA HORN, AND, IF A NAMED DEFENDANT IS DE-
CEASED, THE SURVIVING SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, CREDITORS, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THAT DEFEND-
ANT, AND THE SEVERAL AND RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN AS-
SIGNS, SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST, TRUSTEES OR OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST
ANY CORPORATION OR OTHER LEGAL ENTITY NAMED AS
A DEFENDANT, AND ALL CLAIMANTS. PERSONS OR PAR-
TIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE OR WHOSE EXACT LE-
GAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF
THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS
LAST KNOWN RESIDENCE IS:
HANS HORN
15 Box Elder Court,
Sugarmlll Woods
Homosassa Springs, FL 34447
HANNA HORN
3010 N. Deer Haven Pt.
Cyrstal River, FL 34428
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HANNA HORN
3010 N. Deer Haven Pt.
Crystal River, FL 34428
PRESENT RESIDENCE IS: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following property In CITRUS County,
Florida:
Lot 5 of a subdivision of Lot 10, HOLIDAY ACRES
UNIT 1, more particularly described as follows:
Commence at the NE corner of Lot 10, Holiday Acres
Unit I, as recorded In Plat Book 5, Page 65 and 66,
Public Records of Citrus County, Florida, thence S89
degrees, 35 minutes 16seconds West, along the North
line of said Lot 10, a distance of 165.48 feet, thence
South 00 degrees, 32 minutes, 15 seconds East, 496.24
feet to the Point of Beginning, thence continue South
00 degrees, 32 minutes, 15 seconds East, 138 feet to
a point on the South line of said Lot 10, thence South
89 degrees 36 minutes 52 seconds West, along said
South line a distance of 165.23 feet to the SW corner
of said Lot 10, thence North 00 degrees, 33 minutes,
32 seconds West, along the West line of said Lot O0, a
distance of 138 feet, thence North 89 degrees. 36
minutes, 52 seconds East, parallel to said South line a
distance of 165.28 feet to the Point of Beginning.

Together with an easement along the West 15 feet of
the EI/2 and along the East 15 feet to the W1/2 of
Lot 10, Holiday Acres Unit No. 1, as recorded In Plat
Book 5, Pages 65-66, of the Public Records of Citrus
County, Florida, for road right-of-way, less the South
138 feet thereof.
Together with that certain mobile home situated
thereon.
has been filed against you. You are required to file writ-
ten defenses with the clerk of the court and to serve a
copy within thirty (30) days after the first publication, on
or before July 11, 2007 of this notice on Plaintiff's attor-
ney, Golson Law Firm, 1230 South Myrtle Avenue, Suite
105. Clearwater. FL 33756-3445, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.

WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this
1st day of June. 2007.
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Court
by /s/ M. A. Michel
As Deputy Clerk
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 11 and 18, 2007.


504-0618 MCRN
Notice of Action
George S. Renshaw vs. Thomas L. KIncade, Jr., et al.,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2007-CA-1644

GEORGE S. RENSHAW and RUTHANN
RENSHAW, Co-Trustees of the RR
REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST,
Plaintiff,

v.
THOMAS L KINCADE, JR.
Defendant.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: THOMAS L. KINCADE, JR.
4935 W. Gigl Court
Lecanto, FL 34461
and
Post Office Box 794
Leconto, FL 34460
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
Mortgage and Note on the following described prop-
erty In Citrus County, Florida
S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 Less
E 200 feet and W 250 feet as described In Official
Records Book 893, page 1824, as recorded In the
public records of Citrus County, Florida. TOGETHER
WITH one 1974 Nobility mobile home, I.D. No. N5403
located thereon.








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Plaintiffs,
-vs-
SKY DEVELOPMENT GROUP, LLC
Defendant.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: SKY DEVELOPMENT. LLC
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to
real property on the following described property In
Citrus County. Florida has been filed against you:
Lot 26 Block 356 Citrus Springs Unit 4, according to
the map or plat thereof as recorded In Plat Book 5.
Page(s) 133 Public Records of Citrus County, Florida
and you are required to serve a copy of your written
defenses. if any, to it on ERIC T. SALPETER. ESQ..
Plaintiff's Attorney. Zebersky & Payne, LLP. 4000 Holly-
wood Blvd., Suite 675 S, Hollywood, FL 33021 and file
the original with the Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's attorneys or Immediately thereafter
on or before July 11 2007: otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the
- Complaint."
DATED on June 5. 2007.

BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of Courts
CLERK OF COURT
Clerk of the Court
/s/ M. A. Michel
By: As Deputy Clerk
Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle
on June 11, 18.,25 and July 2, 2007.

500-0702 MCRN
Notice of Action for Dissolution of Marriage
Deborah L Smith ako Deborah Ochoa
vs. Richard Ellzondo
PUBLIC NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 2007-CA-2448
Division:
DEBORAH L. SMITH AKA DEBORAH OCHOA,
Petitioner
and
RICHARD EUZONDO,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: RICHARD ELIZONDO
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed
against you and that you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, If any, to It on Deborah L.
Smith/ aka Ochoo, whose address Is 7749 E. Pinto Ct.
Floral City, FL 34436 on or before 7-11-07, and file the
original with the clerk of this Court at The Citrus County
Courthouse 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness. FL 34450,
before service on Petitioner or Immediately thereafter.
If you fall to do so, a default may be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents In this case, Includ-
ing orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit
Court's office. You may review these documents upon
request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office
notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of
Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved


Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers In this lawsuit
will be mailed to the address on record at the clerk's
office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of
documents and Information. Failure to comply can re-
sult in sanctions, Including dismissal or striking of plead-
ings.
Betty Strifler. Clerk of Court
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ M.A. Michel
Deputy Clerk
Published four (4) times in the Citrus County Chronicle
on June 11, 18. 25 and July 2. 2007.

508-0702 MCRN
Notice of Action
Woodrow Wilson Tozer vs. Sidney M. Olsen, et al.,,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY.
FLORIDA
.. .FIFH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT . ...
. . CIRCUITCIVIL NO. 2007-CA-1970

WOODROW WILSON TOZER and
DOROTHY MAE TOZER, his wife.
Plaintiffs,
v.
SIDNEY M. OLSEN, deceased,
LILLIAN K. POSNASKY a/k/a LILLIAN POSNASKY, de-
ceased, DIANE E. KANE a/k/a DIANE KANE, deceased,
HEATHER KANE, ROBERT KANE, KARAN DINEEN, VALERIE
BAREK, JANET MARIE WEINTZ, CHRISTINE PAOLICELLI, JO-
SEPH COCCIA, DON COCCIA, et al.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
SIDNEY M. OLSEN, deceased, residence unknown
ULLIAN K. POSNASKY a/k/a LILLIAN POSNASKY,
deceased, residence unknown
DIANE E. KANE a/k/a DIANE KANE, deceased,
residence unknown
HEATHER KANE, residence unknown
VALERIE BAREK, residence unknown
JANET MARIE WEINTZ, residence unknown
JOSEPH COCCIA, residence unknown
DON COCCIA, residence unknown
and all other unknown parties claiming by, through,
under and against the above named defendant who
are not known to be dead or alive, whether said un-
known parties may claim an Interest as spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees, or other claimants whomsoever
having or claiming to have any right, title or interest In
and to the following described personal property lo-
cated In Citrus County, Florida, to-wit:
1971 MERC SINGLEWIDE MOBILE HOME
VIN: MF2201E
TITLE NO: 4215166
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to
the above personal property located In Citrus County,
Florida, has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defenses, If any,
on the Plaintiff's attorney, whose name and address Is:
H. Michael Evans, Esquire at 20702 W Pennsylvania Av-
enue, Dunnellon, FL 34431, and tile the original with the
clerk of this court on or before July 11. 2007 otherwise,
a judgment may be entered against you for the relief
demanded In the Complaint.
Witness my hand and seal of this Court on this 4 day of
June, 2007.
BETTY STRIFLER
As Clerk of the Court


110 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
By: /s/ M.A. Michel
As Deputy Clerk
Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle
on June 11, 18, 25 and July 2, 2007.

507-0702 MCRN
Notice of Action
John Faulk vs. David Borstein, et al..,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No: 2007 CA 2570
JOHN KENNETH FAULK,
Plaintiffs,
Vs.
DAVID E. BORSTEIN, and all
unknown heirs and devisees of
.DAVID.E.-BORSTEIN. and all-- --.-. -. - --- .-. -
uknown grantees and other
parties claiming any Interest under the
said DAVID E. BORSTEIN,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DAVID E. BORSTEIN
440 3rd AVENUE
MONTGOMERY, WV 25136
AND TO: ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF DAVID
E. BORSTEIN AND ALL OTHER UNKNOWN GRANTEES AND
OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING ANY INTEREST UNDER THE SAID
DAVID E. BORSTEIN.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to quiet tax ti-
tle on the following property In Citrus County, Florida:
Lot B: The South 152.69 feet of the North 305.38 feet
of the West 1h of the Southwest 1A of the Northwest '/4 of
the Northwest 1/V4 Section 11, Township 18 South, Range
17 East. Subject to an easement across the West 25 feet
thereof.
Parcel ID # 17E 18S 11 IA370 00B0
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses. If any, to It HAR-
OLD B. STEPHENS, the Plaintiff's attorney, whose address
Is 3591 West Gulf To Lake Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461
on or before July 11. 2007, and file the original with the
clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or Immediately thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
Dated on June 5, 2007.
BETTY STRIFLER
CLERK OF THE COURT
By: /s/ M.A. Michel
Deputy Clerk
Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle
on June 11. 18, 25, and July 2. 2007.

583-0618 MCRN
Notice of Action
In the Matter of the Adoption
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2007-DR-1918
IN RE: In the Matter of the Adoption of:


SETH WAYNE GUNN
A Minor Child.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: KENNETH WAYNE HOOKS
5195 E. Tangelo Lane
Inverness, FL 34452
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition for Step-Parent
Adoption has been filed regarding the above refer-
enced adoptee. You are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to It on PATRICIA M. MOR-
ING, Florida Bar # 712809, Moring & Moting, P.A., 7655
W. Gulf to Lake Highway, Ste. 12, Crystal River, FL
34429, the attorney for the Petitioners on or before
June 27, 2007, and tile the original with the clerk of this
Court before service on the Petitioner or immediately
thereafter. If you fall to do so, a default may be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded In the peti-
tion.
Copies of all court documents in this case, Includ-
ing orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit
Court's office. You may review these documents upon
request.
6P.us*r atheflet.oJhe-CircuBl Court's office-
notified of your current address. Future papers In this
lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the
clerk' office.
This Is an action for adoption of the minor child by a
step-parent. This case Is being filed In the Circuit Court
of the Fifth Judicial Circuit, in and for Citrus County, lo-
cated at 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida. The
telephone number of the division of the Circuit Court
where this petition Is filed Is 352-341-6700. The minor
children subject to this petition S.W.G, male, 11-24-01,
Citrus County, Florida.
Dated May 21, 2007.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of Courts
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Marcia A. Michel
Deputy Clerk
Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 28, June 4, 11, and 18, 2007.

585-0618 MCRN
Notice of Action: Constructive Service - Property
Rio Enterprises vs. Farouk At Hamod et a.,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 2007 CA 1541
RIO ENTERPRISES, LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
FAROUK AL HAMOD,
Defendant.
Notice of Action: Constructive Service - Promerty
TO: FAROUK AL HAMOD, INCLUDING ALL PARTIES
CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST SAID DEFENDANT, AND ALL PARTIES
HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE
OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to
the following property In Citrus County, Florida:
Leaal Descriptioni:
THE NORTH 1/2 OF LOT 20, HOLIDAY ACRES UNIT #
1, AS RECORDED IN PLAT 5, AT PAGE 65, OF THE


PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Parcel # 14-18S-17E-0010-0203
Alternate Key#: 2239603
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, If any, to it on
Terrence F, Dytrych, Esq.. the Plaintiffs attorney, whose
address Is: Terrence F. Dytrych, P.A., 712 U.S. Highway
One, Suite 301-32, North Palm Beach, FL 33408.
(Telephone: 561/841-2232; Telecopier: 561/841-2533),
on or before June 27, 2007 and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either before service on the
plaintiffs attorney or Immediately thereafter; otherwise
a default will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition.
Dated on May 21, 2007.
BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK
Citrus County Courthouse
110 N.Apopka Avenue
Inverness. FL 34450
(SEAL) "
BY: /s/ Marcia A. Michel
DEPUTY CLERK
-Pubilshed foljr s-(4ifrtiilh-The"Citrus County-Chrontcle....
on May 28, June 4, 11, and 18, 2007.

588-0625 MCRN
Notice of Action
Troy R. Austin and Ruthann Austin vs. Michael Getz
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY
DOMESTIC RELATIONS DIVISION
CASE NO. 2007-DR-863 and
CASE NO. 2007-DR-2096
IN THE MATTER OF THE INTEREST OF:
N. R. H. (W/F; d/o/b 01/27/2007),
A Minor Child.
TROY R. AUSTIN and
RUTHANN AUSTIN, his wife,
Petitioners,
v.
MICHAEL GETZ.
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MICHAEL GETZ
1029 Ferry Street
Easton, Pennsylvania 18042
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Verified Petition for Tem-
porary Custody of Minor Child By Extended Family
Member and a Petition for Termination of Parental
Rights Pending Adoption have been filed regarding
the above referenced matter. You are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, If any, to it on
JACK A. MORING, Florida Bar # 499160, Moring & Mor-
Ing. P.A., 7655 W. Gulf to Lake Highway. Ste. 12. Crystal
River, FL 34429, the attorney for the Petitioners, on or
before July 5, 2007, and file the original with the clerk
of this Court before service on the Petitioners or imme-
diately thereafter. If you fall to do so a default may be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the pe-
etilon.
Copies of all court documents In this case, Includ-
ing orders, are available .at the Clerk of the Circuit
Court's office, You may review these documents upon
request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office


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16B MONDAY, JUNE 18, 2007



notified of your current address Future papers In this
lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the
clerk's' office.
This is an action for temporary custody of a minor child
by an extended family member and for termination of
parental rights pending adoption. These cases are be-
Ing filed In the Circuit Court of the Fifth Judicial Circuit,
in and for Citrus County, located a 110 N. Apopka Ave-
nue. Inverness, Florida. The telephone number of the
division of the Circuit Court where this petition Is filed is
352-341-6700. The minor child subject to these petitions
Is N.R.H., female, 01/27/07, Easton, Pennsylvania BETTY
STRIFLER, Clerk Of Courts
Dated May 25, 2007.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of Courts
Clerk of the Circuit Circuit
By: /s/ Marcia A. Michel
Deputy Clerk
Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle
on June 4, 11., 18 and 25, 2007.

513-0625 MCRN
495 SELF STORAGE
PUBLIC NOTICE
495 SELF-STORAGE, LL.C,
4055 N. Citrus Avenue
Mailing address:
(P.O. Box #395)
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL. 34428
PHONE (352) 563-5050 FAX (352) 563-5054
www.495selfstorage.com
E-Mail: 495storage@earthllnk.net
495 Self Storage LLC
Notice of Public Sale
Notice Is given: 495 Self Storage, LLC, located at
4055 N. Citrus Avenue, Crystal River Florida, will sell to
the highest bidder, contents now stored In Unit # D-6,
described as household items, stored by: Michael
Lowerv, for the purpose of satisfying an Owners' Lien
provided In Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part III. sec-
tions 83.806 and 83.807.
Proceeds will be applied first to past due rents, col-
lection and advertising cost, and any other charges
accrued. Lien sale to be held on the premise address
above on: June 29th, 2007 at 10 A.M. Viewing at time
of sale only.
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
on June 18th and June 25th 2007.

589-0702 MCRN
Notice of Action for Dissolution of Marriage
Hazel Sircar and Archibald Clement Bailey
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN
AND FOR CITRU COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No,: 2007DR2498
Division:
HAZEL SIRCAR.
Petitioner
and
ARCHIBALD CLEMENT BAILEY.
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: ARCHIBALD CLEMENT BAILEY
(Respondent's last known address) 12 T.T. PLACE.
NEW DELHI, INDIA
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed
against you and that you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, If any, to it on HAZEL SIRCAR,


whose address Is 320 N. FRESNO AVE., HERNANDO, FL.
34442 on or before (date/ July 11, 2007, and file the
orglnal with the clerk of this Court at 110 N. APOKA
AVE., INVERNESS, FL 34450, before service on Petitioner
or Immediately thereafter. If you fall to do so, a default
may be entered against you for the relief demanded In
the peltion.
Copies of all court documents In this case, Including
orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office. You may review these documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit's office noti-
fied of your current address. (You may file Notice of
Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers In this lawsuit
will be mailed to the address on record at the clerk's
office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of
documents and Information. Failure to comply can re-
sult In sanctions, Including dismissal or striking of plead-
Ings.
Dated: May 25, 2007.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of Courts
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ L. Johnson
Deputy Clerk
Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle
on June 11, 18. 25 and July 2, 2007,

594-0702 MCRN
Notice of Action for Dissolution of Marriage
Steven Lynn and Shella Jane Webb
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 2007 DR 2619
Division:
Steven Lynn Webb,
Petitioner
and
Shella Jane Webb,
Respondent,
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: I name of Respondent/ Shella Jane Webb
{Respondent's last known address) unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed
against you and that you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, If any, to It on (name of Peti-
tioner) Steven Lynn Webb, whose address Is 10681 E.
Turtle LN. Floral City, FL 34436 on or before (date) July
11, 2007, and file the original with the clerk of this
Court at (clerk's address) 110 N. Apopka Ave. Inverness,
FL 34450 before service on Petitioner or Immediately
thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded In the peti-
tion.
Copies of all court documents In this case, Including
orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office. You may review these documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office no-
tifted of your current address. (You may file Notice of
Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit
will be mailed to the address on record at the clerk's
office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Pro-
cedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of docu-
ments and Information. Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, Including dismissal or striking of pleadings.
Dated June 1, 2007.


BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF COURTS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Kelly Carpenter
Deputy Clerk
Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle
on June 11, 18, 25 and July 2, 2007.

511-0702 MCRN
Department of Business and Professional Regulation
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION
BEFORE THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY
LICENSING BOARD
IN RE: The practice of construction
Natalia Wolf
d/b/a Sky Construction Group, LLC
10260 North Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL 34434
CASE NO.: 2007-004042, 2007-001181CG
LICENSE NO.: FR02347
The Department of Business and Professional Regula-
tion has filed an Administrative Complaint against you,
a copy of which may be obtained by contacting, Ja-
mie Duran, Office of General Counsel, Department of
Business and Professional Regulation. 1940 North Mon-
roe Street, Suite 33, Tallahassee, FL 32399-2202, (850)
487-9651.
If no contact has been made by you concerning the
above by July 23, 2007 the matter of the Administrative
Complaint will be presented at a hearing pursuant to
120.57(2), FS. before the Construction Industry Ucens-
Ing Board,
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act,
persons needing a special accommodation to partici-
pate In this proceeding should contact the Individual
or agency sending notice not later than seven days
prior to the proceeding at the address given on notice,
Telephone: (850) 257-6097; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or
1-800-955-8770 (v), via Florida Relay Service.
Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle
on June 11. 18,25 and July 2, 2007.

595-0702 MCRN
Notice of Action
Charles E. Home, Jr vs. Jeronimo Perez Valle, et al.,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR CITRUS COUNTY FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION NO: 2007 CA 2550
CHARLES R HORNE, JR. AND
JAMI H DAVIS JTWROS,
Plaintiffs
v.
JERONIMO PEREZ VALLE,
ROSA P PEREZ VALLE A/K/A
ROSA PAMIAS DE PEREZ A/K/A
ROSA PAMIAS DE PEREZ VALLE,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO DEFENDANTS: JERONIMO PEREZ VALLE, ROSA P PEREZ
VALLE A/K/A ROSA PAMIAS DE PEREZ A/K/A ROSA
PAMIAS DE PEREZ VALLE, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT, IF REMARRIED AND IF DE-
CEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUS-


-,0 41- -
TEES, PARENT COMPANIES, SUBSIDIARIES AND, ALL
OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTS.
TO: JERONIMO PEREZ VALLE
TO: ROSA P PEREZ VALLE A/K/A ROSA PAMIAS DE PEREZ
A/K/A ROSA PAMIAS DE PEREZ VALLE
and all others claiming by, through or under them and
to all others whom It may concern:
YOU ARE NOTIFIED of an action to quiet and confirm ti-
tle on the following property In Citrus County, Florida:
SEVEN RIVERS HTS 2ND ADD UNREC SUB LOT 12 DESC IN
OR BK 517 PG 730 & OR BK 519 PG 757, public records
of Citrus County, Florida
Said action has been filed against you, and you are re-
quired to file a copy of your written defenses, If any, to
CLAY W. SCHACHT ESQUIRE, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address Is 606 CASA PARK CIRCLE CT. UNIT M,
WINTER SPRINGS, FL 32708 on or before July 11, 2007,
and the original with the Clerk of this Court either be-
fore service on CLAY W. SCHACHT ESQUIRE, attorney
for Plaintiff or Immediately thereafter: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or motion.
Witness my hand and seal of this Court on this 1st dayof
June, 2007.
BETTY STRIFLER
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ M. A. Michel
Deputy Clerk
Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle
on June 11, 18, 25 and July 2, 2007.

596-0702 MCRN
Notice of Action
Robert C. Lupo, Jr, vs. May Wang., et al.,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR CITRUS COUNTY FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION NO: 2007 CA 2551
ROBERT C LUPO, JR.
PLAINTIFF
VS
MAY WANG
J C HERMAN
RUTH M HERMAN
MARINA KRIEGER LEITLOFF A/K/A MARINA KRIEGER
DEFENDANTS
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO DEFENDANTS: MAY WANG, J C HERMAN, RUTH M
HERMAN AND MARINA KRIEGER LEITLOFF A/K/A MA-
RINA KRIEGER, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SAID DEFENDANTS, IF REMARRIED AND IF DECEASED, THE
RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, AS-
SIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, PARENT
COMPANIES, SUBSIDIARIES AND, ALL OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE
NAMED DEFENDANTS.
TO: MAY WANG
and all others claiming by, through or under them and
to all others whom it may concern:
YOU ARE NOTIFIED of an action to quiet and confirm ti-
tle on the following property in Citrus County, Florida:
CITRUS SPRINGS UNIT 26 PB 9 PG 7 LOT 4 BLK 1650, pub-
lic records of Citrus County. Florida.
TO: J C HERMAN
TO: RUTH M HERMAN
and all others claiming by, through or under them and
to all others whom It may concern:
YOU ARE NOTIFIED of an action to quiet and confirm ti-
tle on the following property In Citrus County Florida:
TOWNSITE OF CRYSTAL PARK LOT 235 DESC IN OR BK 219
PG 154, public record of Citrus County, Florida.


TO: MARINA KRIEGER LEITLOFF A/K/A MARINA KRIEGER
and all others claiming by, through or under them and
to all others whom It may concern:
YOU ARE NOTIFIED of an action to quiet and confirm ti-
tle on the following property in Citrus County Florida:
CITRUS SPRINGS UNIT 16 LOT 16 BLK 973 DESC IN OR BK
549 PG 63, public record of Citrus County, Florida.
Said action has been filed against you, and you are re-
quired to file a copy of your written defenses, if any, to
CLAY W. SCHACHT ESQUIRE, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address Is 606 CASA PARK CIRCLE CT. UNIT M,
WINTER SPRINGS, FL, 32708 on or before July 11, 2007,
and the original with the Clerk of this Court either be-
fore service on CLAY W, SCHACHT ESQUIRE, attorney
for Plaintiff or Immediately thereafter: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or motion.
Witness my hand and seal of this Court on this 1st dayof
June. 2007.
BETTY STRIFLER
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ M. A. Michel
Deputy Clerk
Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle
on June 11, 18, 25 and July 2, 2007.

597-0702 MCRN
Notice of Action
Marcano vs. Haag, et ao.,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2007-CA-2574
HIRAM MARCANO and
REBECCA MARCANO,
Plaintiff,
vs.
HOMER E.W. HAAG and MARTHA J. HAAG
and ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THIS ACTION AS HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS BY,
THROUGH OR UNDER HOMER E. W. HAAG
and MARTHA J. HAAG,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: HOMER E. W. HAAG and MARTHA J. HAAG,
5705 Lee Farm Rd., Ste. C, Suffolk, VA 23435
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the
following property In CITRUS County, Florida
LOT 10, BLOCK 157, SUGARMILL WOODS OAK VILLAGE,
as per plat thereof as recorded In Plat Book 10. Page
10, of the public records of CITRUS County, Florida. Key
No. 1249493
Parcel Identification No. 18E20S T30020 01570 0100
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your defenses, If any, to It on DAVID
ALLEN BUCK, Plaintiffs' attorney, whose address Is 13127
Spring Hill Drive. Spring Hill, Florida 34609, on or before
June 11, 2007, and file the original with the clerk of this
court either before service on Plaintiffs' attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded In the com-
plaint.
DATED on June 11, 2007
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Marcia A. Michel
Published four (4) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 11, 18, 25 and July 2, 2007.


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