Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/00923
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness Fla
Publication Date: June 24, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:00923

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PAGE 4A


JUNE 24, 2007


THE WAR IN IRAQ:


4 Coming
home
Wounded


Wounded troops are returning
to the United States in num-
bers far greater than anticipat-
ed, spurring questions about
care and cost./Page 12A
,IMMIGRATION ARRESTS UP;


Homestead
Officials say rise in immigra-
tion arrests are not linked to
last year's protests. /Page 3A
SMILE!


Blue light special
Local inventor says his tooth-
brush with crazy blue light will
whiten teeth and kill bacte-
ria./Page 1D

HOMECOMING:
Papers pay off
Atlanta acquires important
Martin Luther King Jr.
documents./ Page 6A
LESSON LEARNED:
Hippo helpers
Youth group learns about
responsibility and giving back
by participating in a commu-
nity service project./Page 2A
READY FOR THE BEACH:


Wheelie easy
The Wonder Wheeler beach
,utility cart by Rio Beach
makes it easier to haul
gear./Page 16E

ONLINE POLL,
Share your view
should the local government
amend their comprehensive
plan to require performance-
based septic tanks in areas
that don't have sewer sys-
tems?
1. Yes. It guarantees the long-
term health of our waterways.
2. No. It will cripple the
home-building industry in the
county.
3. Yes. Where local
ecology is con-
cerned, it's pay
now or pay later.
-w 4. No. The govern-
ment already regu-
tes too many things.
To vote, simply access the
chronicle Web site,
www.chronicleonline.com.
Results will appear in the July
1, edition.
Last week's results./Page 2A


Annie's Mailb: . . . . . 20A
iClassified ............ 5D
Crossword ........... 20A
Entertainment ......... 6B
LHoroscope .......... 17A
MLottery Payouts . . . . . ... 6
[Movies ............. 15A
Obituaries ............ 6A
Together ............ 19A
Nine Sections


6 84i578 2007!51 o


After taxes,




$35 richer


Average property owners won't see

much difference in property tax bills


MIKE WRIGHT
wright@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Property taxes are headed
downward thanks to the
Florida Legislature, but don't
plan on vacationing with those
savings just yet
While local governments are
howling that the rollback in


Military


reports


7 killed


in Iraq


Iraqi parliament

hints at oil deal
Los Angeles Times
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Seven
U.S. troops were killed
Saturday in three road-side
bomb attacks, the U.S. military
announced.
The deaths came as Iraq's
Parliament agreed to cut its
summer holiday in half, and
some observers said a deal
had been reached on a law to
share the country's oil wealth.
Both legislative develop-
ments were small signs that
the government of Prime
Minister Nouri al-Maliki was
creeping toward meeting
White House demands to show
political progress and stem
sectarian violence that contin-
ues to claim Iraqi and U.S.
lives.
Before the vote to extend its
session, the Parliament was
scheduled to recess for July
and August. Iraqi lawmakers
denied that the decision to
continue working through the
end of July was due to
American pressure and said
they were trying to make
progress on legislation. But
some U.S. leaders, including
Defense Secretary Robert M.
Gates, have visited Iraq recent-
ly to tell lawmakers they
should not recess while the
U.S. was in the midst of its
troop buildup.
Although the apparent
agreement on oil revenue
sharing is the first sign of tan-
gible progress in months,
Iraqis have announced agree-
ments before, only to see legis-
lation stall. So there were no
guarantees the deals struck
Saturday will result in con-
crete measures.
It was a violent week in Iraq,
with several catastrophic
roadside bomb attacks that
Please see IRAQ/Page 4A


property taxes will cost them
millions of dollars, actual tax-
payers will see little change in
their tax bill.
"It's very minimal," state
Sen. Mike Fasano acknowl-
edged.
How minimal? In Citrus
County, the average tax bill for
a homeowner will drop about

Please see " '- .': : /Page 5A


Single-family home
(based on avg. taxable
value of $97,411)

2006 tax ............ $696
2007 tax ......... $661.32
Savings ........... $34.68


Countywide
Vacant residential
($32,792 taxable value)

2006 tax ........ $234.30
2007 tax ......... $222.62
Savings ......... . $11.68


Commercial
($374,613 taxable value)

2006 tax ....... $2,676.60
2007 tax ........ $2,543.24
Savings ......... $133.36


This chart is based on the following:
1. Property values are 2006 taxable values. All exemptions, such as homestead exemption,
have been removed. Values are averages.
2. Single-family residential is improved property
3. Vacant residential is unimproved
4. Commercial is improved property
5. Taxes listed are those paid ONLY to Citrus County government and, when applicable,
cities of Inverness or Crystal River. Other taxes, such as those to the school board and water
management district, are not included.
6. Tax savings is based on zero change in taxable property value. Increases or decreases
in value will affect that savings.
Source: Citrus County Property Appraiser's Office

* For a more in-depth breakdown of your expected tax savings, see Page 5A


With music, fireworks and a few crazy contests, attendees

at Homosassa's annual festival get their chance to


Donna Bell, left, of Lakeland, and Paul Clark, visiting from
Homosassa River Fireworks Festival at The Shed.


BRIAN LaPETER'Chroncle
Michigan, compete Saturday in the pie-eating contest at the


Numerous activities make for a fun-filled day on the Homosassa River


KERI LYNN MCHALE
kmchale@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Three young boys stood
victorious in front of
Homosassa Riverside resort,
shirts off, drenched in juice.
They used strategies to
win.
"Just like a shark," said 12-
year-old Vladik Lord from
New Hampshire, as he held
up his watermelon. He won
first place. His brother, 10-
year-old Ivan, came in sec-


ond. Ivan imagined the
watermelon was a chocolate
chip cookie, he said.
The brothers came to the
seventh annual Homosassa
River Fireworks Festival and
Poker Run while on vacation,
visiting family. They won
prizes including lunch boxes
filled with T-shirts and candy.
They left their legacy among
the half-eaten remains of
watermelons.
"He (Vladik) inhaled it,"
said 13-year-old Cole
Jackson from Tallahassee,


the third-place winner.
The watermelon-eating
contest was the first of four
contests scheduled to take
place Saturday, followed by
the pie-eating contest, bikini
contest and beer belly con-
test. Locals, visitors, first-
timers and veterans gathered
along the riverbank
"It's awesome. Best water,
best music, best atmos-
phere," said Steve Gaither,
owner of Pit Stop Repair in
Crystal River. "Best bikini
contest," he added.


On the decks, people lis-
tened to music with drinks in
hand and enough food to go
around. The sunshine and
heat only added to the laid-
back, social atmosphere.
There was an abundance of
smiles.
"It's always been a beauti-
ful day. It's just a fun day on
the river," said John Rumer,
Homosassa resident and
four-year festival visitor.
It was all work and no play
for some. The festival attracts
Please see FESTIVAL/Page 7A


Crist drops in on Dean campaign


Governor comes to Citrus to support

Republican candidates in election


CRUSTY LOFTIS
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Welcome to the big leagues.
A small Inverness communi-
ty center housed some of the
biggest names in Florida poli-
tics Saturday as two special
election candidates got some
major campaign support
Gov. Charlie Crist, Senate
* -. . . . "
.' ,; ,


President Ken Pruitt, Sen.
Mike Fasano, Sen. JeffAtwater,
Sen. Paula Dockery, Sen. Mike
Bennett, U.S. Rep. Ginny
Brown-Waite and Chairman of
the Republican Party of
Florida Jim Greer all gathered
for a small event that ultimate-
ly means a valuable spotlight
cast just three days before the
election.
The lucky recipients of the


attention were District 3
Senate candidate Charlie
Dean and District 43 House of
Representatives candidate
Ron Schultz.
"I know we're going to have a
great victory come Tuesday,"
Crist said to Dean and Schultz.
Dean was the focus of much
of the spotlight during the sup-
port rally. Dean is running to
fill former Sen. Nancy
Argenziano's senate seat
against Hernando resident
Suzan Franks.

Please see CAMPAIGN/Page 7A


BRIAN LaPETERI/hronicle
Gov. Charlie Crist stopped Saturday in Inverness at a rally for State
Senate Republican candidate Charlie Dean, who is running against
Democrat Suzan Franks for the District 3 seat.


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2A SUNDAY. JUNE 24. 2007 L~cM Omus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Infrared imaging




helps find woman


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Fifteen members of the Crystal River and Inverness Boys and Girls Clubs of Citrus County vol-
unteered Friday at the Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park. The youth assisted park
rangers by placing 80-pound bags of concrete near the hippo exhibit.


Helping hands for a hippo


Club shoulders responsibility in community service


TAYLOR PROVOST
tprovost@chronicleonline.com
For the Chronicle


Local members of the Boys & Girls Club
learned Friday morning the meaning of com-
munity service when they helped landscape
around the hippopotamus habitat at the
Homosassa Springs State Wildlife Park
"The kids want to learn more about volun-
teering and this project is going to require
hard work - it's the perfect thing,"
Americorps VISTA Volunteer Robert
DeSimone said Thursday.
Around 14 kids in their early teens arrived
bright and early, eager to begin their project,
putting bags of concrete around the trees at
Lucifer the hippo's habitat The bags will pre-
vent the trees from dying when the area is
back-filled to level it with the sidewalk
DeSimone said the park volunteer coordina-
tor seemed grateful because most of the park's
volunteers may be physically incapable of lift-
ing the 80-pound bags, especially in such
warm weather
"This is a project we've been trying to get
done for quite some time," said Maintenance
Supervisor Jim Mitcheson. "If there's one
thing in this world that kids just don't under-
stand, it's the word 'can't'."
DeSimone is a volunteer recruiter for
Americorps. In addition to recruiting volun-
teers for the Boys & Girls Club, he wants the
kids themselves to take an interest in commu-
nity service. "When parents are working and
overwhelmed and don't have enough
resources at home they get to come here


where we get to engage them in different
activities that are positive."
When DeSimone started looking for a good
project to give the kids a feel for volunteering,
his wife Suzanne, who volunteers at the
Wildlife Park mentioned the landscaping proj-
ect
"There was a need there, and that's what
volunteering is," he said. "It's not all hard
work We want them to know there's going to
be some fun involved."
As a reward, the group enjoyed a free tour
of the park and a pizza party when they fin-
ished working. For some, the pizza alone was
worth the effort For others, the satisfaction of
a job well done was a bonus.
"We're giving to the community and we're
getting stronger," said Nicole Biggs, 13, as she
helped lift a bag over a fence to her team-
mates. The best thing she liked about the proj-
ect was knowing she could show her accom-
plishment off during future park visits.
"Ultimately the bags will deteriorate and
we'll have a nice little wall," Mitcheson told
the group.
Although the club members have partici-
pated in group activities like making decora-
tions and costumes for fundraisers, this is
their first volunteer project involving commu-
nity service. They hope to do more.
"We do things that help out the commurnnity"
said Felicitie Gillette, 13. "When I get older I
was thinking I would volunteer for the Boy.s
and Girls Club."
The Boys & Girls Club of Citrus County has
more than 200 members with locations in
Crystal River, Homosassa and Inverness.


KERI LYNN MCHALE
kmchale@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Deputies used new technolo-
gy to find a missing elderly
woman who suffers from
Parkinson's disease and
dementia, according to neigh-
bors and friends.
According to the offense
report, on Tuesday, Kathryn
Weber, 81, wandered from her
home, 1671 N. Dolton Point,
Crystal River. Her neighbor,
Sylvia Hartsfield, told Citrus
County Sheriff's deputies she
saw Weber at 8 p.m. walking
between condominiums across
the street, looking disoriented.


At 9 p.m., Hartsfield said she
went to Weber's condominium
to check on her. The front door
was cracked open and no one
responded to the doorbell.
Hartsfield told deputies Weber
suffers from Parkinson's dis-
ease, is very frail and uses a
cane to walk Deputies
searched Weber's residence
and did not locate her, so they
called canine and aviation
units to the scene.
Code red was used to notify
neighbors of the situation,
while deputies searched for
Weber. Using the sheriff's heli-
copter, equipped with formal
infrared thermal imaging tech-
nology, Weber was found lying
in grass, east of Endicott Point


According to the report,
Weber did not appear to know
where she was or why she was
there. Also, she was unable to'
answer questions such as the
day of the week or morith'6f
the year.
Emergency Medical.
Services transported Weber to
Citrus Memorial Heath
System's hospital for evalua-
tion. Edward Stewart, a friend
of Weber's, told deputies.
Weber also suffers from
dementia. Stewart said he&-
planned to go to Citrust
Memorial to stay with her'
until she was placed in an3
assisted living facility or fami-i
ly members took over heri
care.


County BRIEFS


Fields to close at
recreation park
Due to chemical application, the
Homosassa Area Recreation Park
soccer fields and baseball field will
be closed Monday and Tuesday.
Anyone requiring further infor-
mation may call Citrus County
Parks and Recreation at 527-7677
during normal business hours.
Diabetes
screenings offered
Free diabetes screenings will
be offered from 9:30 a.m. to 5
p.m. July 2 and July 3 at
Walgreens, 4029 S. Suncoast
Blvd., in Homosassa. For more
information, call (800) 713-3301.
An appointment is not necessary.


Food ministry spon-
sors food distribution
EI-Shaddai food ministries will
sponsor a "brown bag of food" dis-
tribution from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
Wednesday, June 27, at the
Crystal River Church God, 2180 W.
12th Ave., behind the Lincoln
Mercury dealership.
This food giveaway is the last
Wednesday of every month. For
information, call 795-3079 or 628-
9087. We deliver to homebound.
The USDA is an equal-opportunity
provider.
Drivers needed
for local program
The Doctor Ride program, pro-
viding rides to and from medical


appointments for people 65 or
older who can't drive and who
have no one to take them, needs
volunteer drivers.
"Since snowbirds make up the
majority of the volunteers, we need
drivers," said program coordinator
Johnltessinger. Currently;1-here- .
are only about 30 volunteer driv-
ers.
Hessinger took over the volun-
teer coordinator position in October"
2006.
Appointments for rides must be
made three to five days in
advance; only one ride per week
per person is available. For infor-
mation about volunteering or to
make a reservation for a ride, call
746-3796.
- From wire reports
d


SO YOU KNOW
8 News notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an event.
* During the busy season, expect notes to run no more than twice.
* Submit information at least two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but multiple publications cannot be
guaranteed.
* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 563-3280; or by
e-mail to newsdesk@ chronicleonline.com.



A. , . -.A


Tri county Hearing Aid
ww, tri.counry-heeang com Beverly Hills 746-1 133 Dunnellon 489-6565


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www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around

THE STATE

Floral City

Bike riders
injured in collision
Two bicyclists were hospital-
ized after colliding Saturday
morning. According to Gail
Tierney, Citrus County Sheriff's
Office spokeswoman, two men
crashed into each other while
riding on Istachatta Road in
Floral City. The cause of the
collision is unknown.
One of the men was airlifted
to Tampa General Hospital and
the other was transported to
Citrus Memorial. No other
information was available
Saturday.

Ocala

Police need help
finding armed robber
A man entered a law office
Thursday in Ocala and robbed
a woman, 64, at gunpoint,
according to the Ocala Police
Department.
The robber entered the busi-
ness, the law firm of John C.
Trentelman, 207 N. Magnolia
Ave., at about 8;30 a.m.
Thursday.
He held the firm's secretary,
Victoria McCue, at gunpoint,
tied her hands behind her
back, gagged and taped her
mouth shut, then covered her
eyes with a blindfold, McCue
said. According to the police
department, the robber
searched the office, stole
McCue's purse and personal
car. The car was later found
abandoned at a gas station.
McCue described the robber
as a clean cut, well-dressed
black man, 5'8" tall, in his 20s
or 30s. He was last seen wear-
ing a button-down, white dress
shirt and dark-colored slacks.
Images of the man were cap-
tured on a gas station's cam-
eras. - -.
' Call the Ocala Police
Department with information at
(352) 369-7000.

Tallahassee

City out of running for
Piper Aircraft plant
Piper Aircraft Inc. has elimi-
nated Tallahassee from consid-
eration for its light jet manufac-
turing center.
The company said Friday it
had narrowed its list from five
cities to three, leaving Vero
Beach, Albuquerque and
Oklahoma Mides .
Tallahassee Columbia, S.C.,
was also eliminated.
"Despiteftheir strengths,
Columbia and Tallahassee did
not compare as favorably as
competing cities when we con-
sidered some of our key loca-
tion criteria, such as a more
established aviation sector and
a ready work force," the com-
pany said in.a prepared state-
ment. "P.
The Tallahassee/Leon
County Economic
Development Council had
approved an estimated $100
million incentives package in
hopes of luring a plant to build
the new single-engine
PiperJet. ... : .
The plant is expected to
employ 1,500 people.

--From staff and wire reports


Clarification
H A story in Saturday's edition
contained some misleading infor-
mration. Kelly's Gym Incorporated
v'as officially recognized as a
nonprofit organization on May 27.
Ilowever, Kelly's Gym is not yet
considered a nonprofit facility. The
paperwork is being processed,
Blut may take several months to a
9ear. The gym currently is a profit-
Iased business and was one at
tie time of the fire.
* Because of a production
error, a letter to the editor in


tbday's edition regarding the 40th
Anniversary of the Israeli attack on
on American Navy ship, the USS
liberty, is lacking a reference. It is:
www.whatreallyhappened.com/us
4liberty.html.
The Chronicle regrets the
errors.


ACLU challenges panhandling laws


Associated Press
MIAMI BEACH - The
American Civil Liberties
Union is challenging two ordi-
nances here aimed at curbing
panhandling.
The ACLU's Greater Miami
chapter filed a lawsuit Friday,
claiming the two sections of
city code, "when viewed
together, effectively prohibit
panhandlers, street perform-
ers, artists and others from
freely expressing themselves."


In April, the Miami Beach
City Commission approved
regulations on street perform-
ers and vendors on Lincoln
Road. The city established 12
rotating zones along Lincoln
Road where performers and
vendors can operate during
certain hours: 8 a.m. to mid-
night Mondays through
Friday, 8 a.m. to 2 a.m. on
weekends.
The law was drafted after
the ACLU successfully chal-
lenged a 2005 law that


required performers and art
vendors to have a permit.
"The city's ordinances cre-
ate a scheme that is so broad
that it would limit not just
street performers, but any
political, artistic or religious
free speech activity including
Girl Scouts selling cookies,
Salvation Army volunteers
asking for donations during
the holidays, as well as reli-
gious and charitable solicita-
tions," read an ACLU state-
ment announcing the lawsuit.


Miami Beach City Attorney
Jose Smith said the lawsuit
would be vigorously chal-
lenged.
'"All of the attacks on the
ordinances are not factually
or legally correct," he said.
"These ordinances apply only
to people that are actually
conducting business.
Legitimate street performers
and art vendors who do have
First Amendment rights do
not fall within those ordi-
nances."


V J |
Associated Press
Lucia de la Cruz, of Guatemala, center, wipes her forehead as she talks to a reporter with her children Martina, center bottom,,
4 months old, Andres, right, 5, and Angelica, left, 4, Tuesday in Homestead. In the weeks leading up to the massive immigrant
rallies in April and May of last year, rumors swirled across the country about large-scale immigration sweeps. In Florida and else-
where, thousands of workers stayed home from their jobs for days. Although Lucia feared the raids, her husband continued to
work in order to support the family.


Immigration arrests not tied to protests


Associated Press


HOMESTEAD - Afraid to step onto
the streets of this rural town, friends of
Herman Martinez asked him to bring
them milk for their children. Neighbors
of Elvira Carvajal sought refuge in her
house so immigration agents wouldn't
arrest them.
In the weeks leading up to massive
pro-immigrant rallies in the spring of
'2006, rumors swirled that authorities
were on the streets rounding up immi-
grants across the country. Fear of being
caught and deported kept many illegal
immigrants, and some legal ones, in
their homes.
Homeland Security data released to
The Associated Press shows non-work-
site arrests jumped in the first half of
2006, up 75 percent over the previous
year. Immigration and Customs
Enforcement maintains the increase
did not come from random sweeps, but
from its standing policy of targeted
arrests.
In both years, more than two-thirds of
those detained already had deportation
orders.
"We've said over and over that we
don't do random sweeps. We do targeted
enforcement," agency spokeswoman
Jamie Zuieback said.
ICE maintains that it targets people it
considers "fugitives," those who remain
in the United States despite a deporta-
tion order. To ICE agents, a fugitive
could be either a known drug smuggler
or a retired grandmother with no crimi-
nal record. During a search for fugi-
tives, agents can also detain individuals
they suspect of being in the country ille-
gally in so-called "collateral arrests."
Since the department was created in
2003, it has steadily arrested more peo-
ple as its budget and resources have
grown, Zuieback said of the spike in
detentions. "It's not in the least bit polit-
ical."
In the first three months of 2006, ICE's
fugitive operations program arrested
3,222 people nationwide, according to
information released last month, 10
months after the AP filed a Freedom of
Information Act request. That com-
pared to the 2,174 people arrested in the
same period of 2005.
During the height of the 2006 immi-
gration debate, from April through
June, the number of arrests jumped to
4,516. That was more than double the
2,234 arrests for the same period of
2005.


Immigrant arrests
U.S. Immigration and Customs
Enforcement (ICE) non-worksite
arrests jumped in the first half of
2006, up at least 75 percent in
the previous year. ICE maintains
the increase did not come from
random sweeps.
;1,500
Non-fugitives
0 Fugitives
1.000


50:111111lill



JFMAMJ J FMAMJ
2005 2006
SOURCE: Dept. of
Homeland Security AP

Still, the percentages of collateral
arrests rose only slightly, from 28 per-
cent to 33 percent
ICE's numbers don't include worksite


arrests, which
jumped more than
threefold between
fiscal year 2005
and fscal year
2006, from 1,292 to
4,383. The agency
refused to break
down those num-
bers by quarter.
Zuieback reject-
ed the notion that


We arE
but now we
used to that


Lu
Florida resident


the arrests were a timed show of force.
"There's not a lot we can say to some-
body who is here illegally that is going
to appease them," she said.
"I think we've been very clear that
our mandate is to enforce the law, and
that's what we intend to do."
Professor Alex Stepick, who heads
Florida International University's
Immigration & Ethnicity Institute, dis-
agreed. He believes the Bush adminis-
tration both stepped up arrests and
allowed the rumors to build to assuage
his conservative base as Congress con-
sidered whether to give illegal immi-
grants a path to citizenship.
"The residual concern on the part of
immigrants is part of the Bush adminis-


tration's policy," he said. "They want to
show they are doing something to con-
trol immigration."
Last year's protests began in response
to what many immigrants viewed as
draconian legislation that would have
redefined illegal immigrants as crimi-
nals.
In late March 2006, tens of thousands
students walked out of classes. More
than 500,000 people took to the streets
in Los Angeles alone. On April 1, thou-
sands formed a mile-long line across the
Brooklyn Bridge. And despite the
rumors of arrests, on May 1, more than a
million people demonstrated nation-
wide.
Yet even if the random sweeps
weren't real, the fear they generated
was, said Martinez, a community organ-
izer in the town of Homestead.
The rural town about 30 miles south
of Miami is dominated by Mexican,
Central American and Haitian immi-
grants who come to work in South
Florida's farm fields and stay for jobs in
plant nurseries and construction.
Last year, Martinez repeatedly was
called to check out areas where raids
reportedly had occurred, only to find
nothing. "But I was buying gallons of
milk for people afraid to go to the gro-
cery store," he said.
Carvajal, an
advocate with the
e still afraid, farmworker's asso-
till afraid, ciation in
are more Homestead, added
that many parents
fear. kept their children
home from school.
Natalia Coletti,
cia de la Cruz who works at the
nt who fled Guatemala. Healthy Start
Coalition of Miami-
Dade County, said attendance in prena-
tal classes fell during the week before
the May 1 protests. Mothers with high-
risk pregnancies refused to come to the
clinic despite their complaints of
cramps and bleeding.
Homestead resident Lucia de la Cruz,
who fled civil violence in Guatemala
more than a decade ago, said her hus-
band still headed to his construction job
each morning because the couple had
no other way to feed their four young
children. But de la Cruz, who is here
illegally, spent her days in a constant
state of terror, waiting for her husband
to return each night.
"We are still afraid," she said, "but
now we are more used to that fear."


to pray ... You just pray for jus-
tice - for myself and the rest
of them."


*( I....)


t15I L

Cb'~L ~>


Smith said the new ordi-
nance is aimed at people who
sell goods like CDs or cigars
and are not exercising free
speech.
The ACLU has spoken out
against similar ordinances
across the country, including
those in New York, Georgia,
Virginia and Pennsylvania.
The group has filed lawsuits
against such laws in
Albuquerque, N.M., and
Cincinnati, among other
places.


Girl's


abduction


sparked


by sexual


fantasy

Associated Press
PORTAGE, Wis. - A mem-
ber of a band of drifters
accused of killing one of their
own and torturing an 11-year-
old boy said the violence was
sparked when the murdered
woman admitted she had sex-
ual fantasies about another
member of the group.
Candace Clark told the
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
on Saturday that tensions
among group members rose
after Easter, when Tammie
Garlin admitted to having sex-
ual fantasies about Clark.
"It all went downhill," Clark
said at the Columbia County
Jail. "All the violence started."
Clark said her boyfriend,
Michael Sisk, was angry and
felt betrayed, as was Michaela
Clerc, a 20-year-old woman
who was having an affair with
Garlin, 36.
Clark, 23, Clerc, Sisk, 25 and
Garlin's 15-year-old daughter
Felicia, have all been charged
with Tammie Garlin's murder
and the repeated abuse of
Garlin's 11-year-old son.
On June 14, police went to a
house the group had rented in
Portage, acting on a tip from
Florida detectives searching
for Clark's 2-year-old daugh-
ter, whom they believed Clark
had abducted from her
Florida foster parents.
The group had begun living
together in Florida last year
and went around the country
before renting a home in
Portage in February.
Clark said that Sisk had
always been extremely con-
trolling and referred to their
group as a "cult" She said he
refused even to allow her to
take a bath unless he sat in
the bathroom with her. Clark
said violence toward Garlin
and Garlin's son peaked after
Garlin "blurted out" her fan-
tasy about Clark.
On Friday, Clark told
reporters from the Portage
Daily Register and the
Journal Sentinel, "I am not a
monster."
She denied involvement in
the murder. As for the other
charges she and the others
face, she said, "No one's inno-
cent in this."
She said that included the
boy whose bloody and burned
body are described in the
criminal complaint.
"Everybody's making him
out to be perfect. He's not,"
she said.
Clark told the Daily Register
that Tammie Garlin "was my
best friend in the whole
world." But her children did
not like their mother, she said.
"She wasn't a good mom.
Her kids hated her," Clark
said.
Clark said social workers
have told her her three chil-
dren, including the 2-year-old
girl, "are fine." She said her
family members were heading
to Portage.
She said she has been pray-
ing for justice while in jail.
"We have a lot of time to
think about things in here,"
she said. "I have a lot of time










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4ASU~NJVAAV tUir j~24. 2007


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic battery
arrests
* Steven Torres, 39, Lecanto, at
5:10 p.m. Friday on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery. No
bond.
* Hector Torres, 65, Lecanto, at
5:10 p.m. Friday on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery. No
bond.
DUI arrests
* Robert Douglas Roland, 40,
2308 S.E. Fourth St., Boynton
Beach, at 8:16 p.m. Friday on a
charge of driving under the influ-
ence. According to the arrest report,
Roland's blood alcohol level was
0.176; the legal limit in Florida is
0.08. Bond $500.
Other arrests
* Mike O'Brien Kelly, 30, 525
Jacob Circle, Douglas, Ga., at 4:30
p.m. Thursday on a felony charge of


IRAQ
Continued from Page 1A

have caused multiple U.S.
troop casualties.
The attacks continued
Saturday, with the deaths of
four soldiers in one roadside
bombing northwest of
Baghdad.
Two other soldiers died in a
roadside bombing followed by
small-arms fire Saturday in
eastern Baghdad, and an air-
man died when an explosive
device detonated Saturday
near his vehicle in Tikrit, the
military said.
One other soldier was
reported killed Saturday in a
noncombat incident.
The British military also
reported the death of a sol-
dier.


violation of probation on an active
Citrus County warrant for an original
charge of sexual assault. No bond.
* Cheryl Ann Nelsonpiedra, 48,
5172 S. Rocky Point, Homosassa,
at 9:50 a.m. Friday on a charge of
drug. paraphernalia/possession.
Bond $500.
* Johanna Moore Beck, 34, 720
S. Fairlane Terrace, Lecanto, at
12:18 p.m. Friday on a felony charge
of violation of probation on an active
Citrus County warrant for an original
charge of possession of cocaine. No
bond.
* Jennifer M. Selvester, 19, W.
Blueflax Court, at 2:17 p.m. Friday
on a charge of petit theft. Bond
$500.
* Mary Beth Pipin, 19, 107
Commerce, Crystal River, at 2:17
p.m. Friday on a charge of petit theft.
Bond $500.
* Brandy Lea Cave, 24, 640
N.E. 10th St., Crystal River, at 2:50
p.m. Friday on a charge of drug


The attacks brought the
death toll since the March
2003 invasion to 3,555, accord-
ing to icasualties.org, ah inde-
pendent Web site that tracks
military deaths in the Iraq
theater.
In Baghdad, police reported
finding the bodies of 15 peo-
ple, all presumed victims of
sectarian violence.
In Hilla, police said a car
bomb killed four people and
injured 18 more.
Hospital officials in
Samarra reported clashes
between police and militants
left five Iraqi civilians dead.
Residents also reported
that after the clash, police
dragged the body of one of the
militants through the streets
and then hung it from a tele-
phone pole.
The U.S. military
announced early Saturday


paraphernalia on an active Citrus
County warrant. Bond $250.
* Heather Leann Parker, 24,
6605 Van Buren St., Homosassa, at
3:09 p.m. Friday on a felony charge
of violation of probation on an active
Levy County warrant for original
charges of possession of a con-
trolled substance and paraphernalia.
Bond $7,500.
* Katherine Jindra Staab, 45,
908 W. Hampshire Blvd., Citrus
Springs, at 4:10 p.m. Friday on a
charge of assault or battery of law
enforcement officer, firefighters.
Bond $5,000.
N Arlando J. Madison, 21, 521
S. Adams St., Beverly Hills, at 5:08
p.m. Friday on a felony charge of
violation of probation on an active
Citrus County warrant for an original
charge of possession of cocaine. No
bond.
* Karen Rae Ali, 42, 2290 S.
Hunt Point, Crystal River, at 7:52
p.m. Friday on a felony charge of


that they had killed at least 17
al-Qaida militants on the
fourth day of combat opera-
tions in Diyala province.
Since the beginning of the
operation at least 55 suspect-
ed al-Qaida fighters have
been killed and 23 detained,
the military said.
The military also
announced Saturday that
seven other suspected mili-
tants were killed around Iraq
in the last two days as part of
operations targeting al-Qaida
leaders.
In hopes of easing violence,
U.S. officials had been push-
ing for the Iraqi Parliament to
pass an oil revenue-sharing
law, set a date for new provin-
cial elections, agree on consti-
tutional reforms and approve
legislation easing govern-
ment-employment and bene-
fits restrictions on members


ON THE NET
* For more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org and
click on the link to Daily
Reports, then Arrest
Reports.

violation of probation on an active
Alachua County warrant for an origi-
nal charge of grand vehicular theft,
third degree. No bond.
* Roger Byron Ellis, 32, 3430
S. Suncoast Blvd., 15, Homosassa,
at 10:30 p.m. Friday on a felony
charge of violation of probation on
an active Citrus County warrant for
an original charge of possession of
controlled substance without per-
cription. No bond.
M Andrew Hartenstein, 23, 885
Duck Cove Path, Inverness, at 4:19


of the ousted Baath regime.
The oil law is the only goal
that has appeared achievable,
although it has yet to be intro-
duced in Parliament.
Some Kurdish and Shiite
Muslim members of
Parliament said Saturday
they had reached agreement
over how to divide the oil rev-
enue.
"The (Shiite) United Iraqi
Alliance together with the
Kurds have agreed to this
law," said Wail Abdul Lateef, a
Cabinet member who is part
of the secular political coali-
tion headed by former interim
Prime Minister Ayad Allawi.
"This law is very important
for Iraq, which is living under
enormous poverty even
though its citizens are living
over a gold lake."
The Kurdish and Shiite
blocs control about 80 percent


a.m. Saturday on felony charge of
violation of probation on an active
Hillsborough County warrant for an
original charge of possession of con-
trolled substances. No bond.
* Erich Lee Taylor, 34, 4533 E.
Larch Lane, Hemando at 8:12 a.m.
on a felony charge of battery and a
misdemeanor charge of battery on
an active Citrus County warrant.
Bond $3,000.
* Clinton Ross Cahill, 33, 6040
W. Last Chance Lane, Dunnellon, at
1:27 a.m. on a felony charge of con-
trolled substance possession, a
criminal.charge of knowingly driving
while license suspended/revoked
and a charge of drug paraphernalia.
Bond $6,500.
* Maxwell James Lamb, 21,
3111 N. Portico Terrace,
Hernando, at 2:06 a.m. Saturday
on a charge of resisting/obstruct-
ing officer without violence. Bond
$500.
* Daniel Lee Montanez, 20,


of Parliament.
Mahmoud Othman, a
Kurdish member of
Parliament, said there are
several outstanding issues
that are still being debated in
the oil legislation, including
the power of a state-run oil
company.
But he has said that the
Kurdistan regional govern-
ment had agreed to take 17
percent of the county's oil
wealth.
U.S. officials remain cau-
tiously optimistic that the oil
law will pass this summer.
Approving the country's oil
law would show that the cen-
tral government is capable of
functioning and would pro-
vide an important first agree-
ment for the country's sects
and regions to divide and
share the country's oil wealth,
a U.S. embassy official said
this week.


10024 Oana St., New Port Richey,
at 3:12 a.m. Saturday on a felony
charge of unarmed burlary of
unoccupied structure. Bond
$3,000.
Juanitia Gale Robertson, 21,
4812 E. Dartmouth Lane,
Hernando at 4:00 a.m. Saturday
on a charge of disorderly intoxica-
tion. Bond $150.
* Joseph Andrew Capo II, 47,
904 Poplar St., Inverness at 4:24
a.m. Saturday on a charge of
resusting officer with violence.
Bond $5,000.

Crystal River Police
Department
Arrests
* Justin Steven Arrington, 21,
7206 W. Greenwood Lane, Crystal
River, at 12:56 p.m. Friday on a
felony charge of violation of proba-
tion on an active Citrus County war-
rant for an original charge of burgla-
ry. No bond.


WEEKLY LINEUP :.
* Nearly a dozen medical
professionals contribute
their expertise to
columns in Health &
Life. ,'Tuesdays
* Read up on all things
school-related in the
Chronicle's Education sec-
tion../Wednesdays
* Plan menus for the week r
from the tempting recipes
in the Flair for Food sec-
tion.,'Thursdays "
* Get a jump on weekend -,
entertainment with the '
stories in Scene. /Fridays
* See what local houses of
worship plan to do for the
week in the Religion sec-
tion.,/Saturdays
* Read about area business-
es in the Business sec
tion./Sundays


CITRUS COUNTY WEATHER


-.*:'>tLOUDA TEMPERATURE. < K


y^ c 1 T R U S.


S C U N T Y


THREE DAY OUTLOOK
I f - TODAY Exclusive daily forecast by:
High: 91 Low: 72
Partly cloudy with isolated PM
thunderstorms possible.


High: 92 Low: 73
Partly cloudy with isolated PM showers and
thunderstorms.
TUESDAY
High: 90 Low: 72
Partly cloudy with isolated PM showers and
thunderstorms.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year


91/69
100/60
71/90
80
-1

0.00 in.
3.32 in.
11.74 in.
22.20 in.


"As of 6 p.m.from Hernando'County Airport
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder-
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE


Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.96 in.
DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 63
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 41%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees and grasses were light and
weeds were absent.
"Light - only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
1Qafuru... ... A .u.WI 11.,+ilu-


Saturday was good wi
ants mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES


DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING)
6/24 SUNDAY 1:27 7:37
6/25 MONDAY 2:04 8:14


MINOR
(AFTEF
1:47
2:25


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
3 e SUNSET TONIGHT......
I SUNRISE TOMORROW
SMOONRISE TODAY.....
mY7 JY14 .JMY22 MOONSET TODAY......


ih pollut-



MAJOR
NOON)
7:57
8:36


.......... 8:32 P.M.
...........6:33 A.M.
........... 3:29 P.M.
...........2:09 A.M.


S.. . ': BURN CONDITIONS

Today's Fire Danger Rating Is: HIGH. There Is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi
.""-'WATERING RULES '
[!" -b, , .. . . . . .. ... . ': .
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending In 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending In 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending In 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending In 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres In size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.


Tide times are for the mouths of the rivers.
Sunday
High/Low High/Low High/Low
1:44 a/8:54 a 1:26 p/10:28 p 3:08 a/9:52
12:05 a/6:16 a 11:47 a/7:50 p 1:29 a/7:14
9:34 a/4:04 a 11:16 p/5:38 p 10:22 a/5:02
12:54 a/7:53 a 12:36 p/9:27 p 2:18 a/8:51


Monday
High/Low
a 2:14 p/11:30 p
a 12:35 p/8:52 p
2 a -----/6:40 p
a 1:24 p/10:29 p


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


Southwest winds from 5 to 10 knots. Seas
1 to 2. Bay and inland waters will have a
light chop. Partly cloudy skies today with


F'cast
ptcldy
tstrm
tstrm
ptcldy
tstrm
ptcldy
ptcldy
ptcldy
ptcldy


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
tstrm
ptcldy
ptcldy
ptcldy
ptcldy
ptcldy
ptcldy
ptcldy
tstrm


Gulf water
temperature


an isolated afternoon or evening thunder- 0
storms possible.

Taken at Egmont Key
-. LAKE LEVELS .* .
- -... . -. ...... .....- .. ....... -" - . "
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.01 27.99 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.38 34.33 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 34.17 34.16 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 35.99 35.88 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Gdological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

S, :,. .-THE.NATION. . * ,,


Saturday
H L Pcp.
71 48
95 68
87 58
95 72
78 51
86 69 .01
82 50
90 62
97 71
86 58
72 56
72 50
70 53
94 68
81 57
89 69
67 62 .05
79 59
70 50
93 70
77 54
69 51
92 74
93 51
72 64 .02
74 53
10171
88 68 .28
78 51
73 54
88 72 .18
74 63 .03
95 66
10782
90 75 .06
73 63
83 64 .03
95 76
75 58
81 62
92 68
97 68
93 69


Sunday
Fcst H L
cldy 75 58
ptcldy 99 67
ptcldy 86 62
cldy 94 73
sunny 82 64
tstrm 84 72
sunny 86 64
tstrm 88 59
ptcldy. 95 70
sunny 82 48
ptcldy 78 59
ptcldy 79 60
cldy 75 53
ptcldy 91 73
ptcldy 86 63
ptcldy 90 67
ptcldy 85 71
tstrm 88 67
ptcldy 84 65
ptcldy 95 71
ptcldy 88 67
ptcldy 73 51
tstrm 89 71
sunny 97 64
sunny 89 72
ptcldy 84 68
ptcldy 99 71
tstrm 89 70
sunny 85 64
ptcldy 79 56
tstrm 89 74
tstrm 88 69
tstrm 90 68
sunny 10477
tstrm 88 71
ptcldy 69 59
tstrm 91 74
tstrm 91 74
ptcldy 81 68
sunny 91 71
ptcldy 90 70
ptcldy 96 70
tstrm 93 71


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f.fair; h.hazy pc.partly cloudy r-raini
r.ra-ain/now mix a.-unny; ah-showral,
n.snowl ta-thunderatonas; w.wlndy.
02007 Weather Central, Madison, Wl.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY
Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 90 75 tstrm 89 76
New York City 74 56 sunny 83 68
Norfolk 80 70 ptcldy 87 69
Oklahoma City 90 71 .16 ptcldy 88 69
Omaha 79 67 sunny 92 74
Palm Springs 10578 sunny 10870
Philadelphia 77 58 sunny 85 68
Phoenix 10985 sunny 10881
Pittsburgh 71 49 sunny 84 62
Portland, ME 69 51 sunny 70 52
Portland, Ore 71 52 .01 shwrs 63 50
Providence, R.I. 73 54 ptcldy 79 60
Raleigh 85 66 .12 ptcldy 91 68
Rapid City 10256 sunny 10165
Reno 93 58 sunny 84 52
Rochester, NY 71 46 cIdy 79 59
Sacramento 88 57 sunny 81 55
St. Louis 88 71 .34 tstrm 89 72
St. Ste. Marie 77 54 sunny 76 60
Salt Lake City 94 69 sunny 91 60
San Antonio 84 71 tstrm 85 73
San Diego 69 60 ptcldy 69 60
San Francisco 68 53 sunny 64 51
Savannah 89 68 ptcidy 95 72
Seattle 70 52 shwrs 60 51
Spokane 70 46 ptcldy 66 47
Syracuse 66 47 cldy 79 59
Topeka 86 65 .29 sunny 91 69
Washington 80 59 sunny 87 69
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 110 Needles, Calif. LOW 31 Fraser, Colo.


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 89/79/ts
Amsterdam 69/54/sh
Athens 100/65/s
Beijing 96/73/pc
Berlin 68/56/c
Bermuda ' 86/68/pc
Cairo 102/72/s
Calgary 70/46/pc
Havana 89/77/pc
Hong Kong 92/82/pc
Jerusalem 106/82/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


89/61/pc
60/46/sh
96/59/pc
75/55/ts
72/63/s
70/54/ts
70/49/sh
77/65/s
84/63/pc
61/51/pc
74/64/ts
82/63/s
67/57/sh


JHRONICLL


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MARINE OUTLOOK


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SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 5A


CITRus COUNTY (FL)


) CHRONICLE


Rollback Penalties
* The tax rollback penalty
imposed on counties and
cities is based on the percent-
age of per capital tax growth
from 2001-06.
County
"Tax Growth % Penalty %
0 to 7 3
7to9 5 (a)
9 toll 7
11 " 9
' (a) Citrus County
City
Tax Growth % Penalty %
0 to 6 none
6 to 7.5 3 (b)
7.5 to10.5 5
10.5 to 12.4 7 (c)
1:12.5 9
(bl Inverness; (c) Crystal River
Source: Florida Legislature


AVERAGE
Continued from Page 1A
$35 - and that's only if property
values don't change. With the
taxable value on most home-
steaded properties expected to
rise 2.5 percent to conform to the
Save Our Homes law, the actual
savings might be less than $20.
The tax cut, signed into law
Thursday by Gov Charlie Crist,
freezes millage rates at their cur-
rent level and then rolls them
back a certain percentage based
on the five previous years' tax
increases.
For example, the Citrus
County Commission must roll
back the tax rate by 5 percent
from the current rate. In
Inverness, it's 3 percent; Crystal
River, 7 percent
Crystal River property owners
will see a bigger tax break than
their counterparts in Inverness.
That's because, according to the
state formula, Inverness kept tax
rates closer in line from 2001-06
than Crystal River did.
' Fasano, R-New Port Richey,
said he had hoped the
Legislature would have rolled
back property taxes to rates
prior to 2004 when local gov-
ernments began reaping tax
revenues due to increasing
property values.
| "It wasn't far enough," he said.
"Counties and cities did such an
excellent job in lobbying, con-
vincing many that they would
have to cut all kinds of services,
close libraries, cut to one day a
week some staff, that it was
decided to roll back taxes to
.here it wouldn't have too much
impact on counties and cities."
S asano said the true tax break
gould come after Jan. 29. Voters
on that day will be asked
whether to approve a change in
the state constitution that
moves the $25,000 homestead
exemption in favor of one that
exempts 75 percent of the first
$200,000 of value on homes and
5 percent from the next
300,000.
Tax savings from the property
1�ax cut are a direct relation
between millage rate and tax-
able value. Property Appraiser
Melanie Hensley said her office
loes not yet know whether
property values are rising, stay-
ing steady or dropping.
Generally, she said, home-
stead properties will rise 2.5




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Single-family home
($129,784 taxable value)
2006 tax ............ $927.30
2007 tax ......... . .$881.10
Savings ..............$46.20


Single-family home
($79,386 taxable value)
2006 tax.............$567.61
2007 tax............ $538.95
Savings ............$28.66.


Single-family home
($50,719 taxable value)
2006 tax ......... . . . $364.40
2007 tax ......... . . . $346.24
Savings .............. $18.16


Single-family home
($164,587 taxable value)
2006 tax ........ . . .$1,175.97
2007 tax ........ . . $1,117.38
Savings .............. $58.59


Single-family home
($164,869 taxable value)
2006 city tax ......... $923.26
2007 city tax ......... $858.63
City savings ..........$64.63
2006 county tax ....... $1,178
2007 county tax ..... $1,119.29
County savings .....$. 58.71

Single-family residential
($58,197 taxable value)
2006 city tax ......... $283.71
2007 city tax ......... $275.15
City savings ........... .$8.56
2006 county tax ...... $415.81
2007 county tax ...... $395.10
County savings ....... $20.71


Crystal River
($3,976,264 taxable value)
2006 city tax ........ $22,267
2007 city tax .........$20,708
City savings ..... .....$1,559


Sugarmill Woods
Vacant residential
($46,656 taxable value)
2006 tax ............$333.35
2007 tax ............$316.75
Savings . .. .. ...... $16.60

Citrus Springs
Vacant residential
($25,893 taxable value)
2006 tax ............. $185
2007 tax.......... $175.78
Savings ...............$9.22

Beverly Hills
Vacant residential
($25,075 taxable value)
2006 tax ......... . . . $178.62
2007 tax .......... . . . .169.72
Savings ............... $8.90

Homosassa
Vacant residential
($36,030 taxable value)
2006 tax ......... . . . .$257.61
2007 tax ...... . . .... .$244.60
Savings .......... . . . .$13.01

Crystal River
Vacant residential
($53,067 taxable value)
2006 city tax ........ .$297.17
2007 city tax ........ .$276.38
City savings .......... $20.79
2006 county tax ..... .$379.16
2007 county tax ..... .$360.27
County savings ...... 18.89
Inverness
Vacant residential
($18,346 taxable value)
2006 city tax ......... .$89.43
2007 city tax ......... .$86.74
City savings ......... . .$2.69
2006 county tax ...... $131.08
2007 county tax ..... .$124.55
County savings ....... $6.53

Progress Energy
Inverness
($7,787,585 taxable value)
2006 city tax ........ .$37,964
2007 city tax ......... $36,819
City savings .......... $1,145


Commercial
($1,599,420 taxable value)
2006 tax .......... $11,427.85
2007 tax ......... .$10,858.46
Savings......... ....$569.39


Commercial
($571,894 taxable value)
2006 tax ....... ....$4,086.18
2007 tax ...........$3,882.58
Savings ............ $203.60


Commercial
($250,105 taxable value)
2006 tax ........ . . .$1,786.25
2007 tax ........ . . .$1697.25
Savings ................ $89


Commercial
($551,841 taxable value)
2006 tax ......... . .$3,942.90
2007 tax ........... $3,746.44
Savings ......... . . . $196.46


Commercial
($503,012 taxable value)
2006 city tax ....... $2,816.86
2007 city tax ....... $2,619.68
City savings ......... $197.18
2006 county tax .. . $3,594.02
2007 county tax .... $3,414.94
County savings ...... $179.08

Commercial
($389,387 taxable value)
2006 city tax ....... $1,898.26
2007 city tax ...... $1,841.02
City savings .......... $57.24
2006 county tax . . . .$2,846.47
2007 county tax . . . .$2,643.54
County savings ...... $202.93


Citrus County taxable
($452,866,728 taxable value)
2006 tax ......... .$3,235,732
2007 tax ......... .$3.074,512
Savings ....... .... $161,220


These charts are based on the following:
1. Property values are 2006 taxable values. All exemptions, such as homestead exemption,
have been removed. Values are averages.
2 Single-family residential is improved property
3. Vacant residential is unimproved
4. Commercial is improved property
5. Taxes listed are those paid ONLY to Citrus County government and, when applicable,
cities of Inverness or Crystal River. Other taxes, such as those to the school board and water
management district, are not included.
6. Tax savings is based on zero change in taxable property value. Increases or decreases in
value will affect that savings.
Source: Citrus County Property Appraiser's Office


percent in taxable value. And
she also expected that vacant
lots in Citrus Springs would
drop in value.
She also noted that the prop-
erty tax rollback affects all
property owners, including

CELEBRATING
5OYEARS7

"good feelings"
-Patricia Streicher
Patricia was
impressed with the
"good feelings"
she sensed at CMIH,
and she went to work
there as an ICU/CCU
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Patricia Streicher is a
retired nurse.

CITRUS MEMORIAL


^^^^^^ ^^^^


Vericls- auxWodBins-Shter Cluar Sade doWa
90 AY-NOPYET-NOITRS


Progress Energy.
The company pays 99 sepa-
rate tax bills for its properties
in Citrus County, including one
each in Crystal River and


Inverness. All told, it will save
about $163,000 with the millage
rollbacks if current taxable val-
ues stay in place. It will pay
$3,132,042 in property taxes.


. ., -mnnatee-olookshe "R" thatt i Vthed by the
- The seven 14 karat gold ropes signify the
'rivers of clear cool water in Citrus County
SNowi available at
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(352) 795-5900


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLb


King papers pay off for Atlanta


Associated Press

ATLANTA - It's been a year
since Atlanta did what many
thought was impossible: The
city bought the Martin Luther
King Jr. Collection in an
eleventh-hour deal, avoiding an
auction and returning more
than 10,000 of the civil rights
icon's personal papers and
books to his hometown.
But the papers could have
just as easily ended up another
city's treasure. Andrew Young,
King's friend and lieutenant in
the civil rights movement, said
he almost panicked when he
heard days before the auction
that officials in Washington and
New York were looking to buy
the collection.
"This was our birthright," he
said. "And we needed to claim
it"
Young went to Atlanta Mayor
Shirley Franklin, his friend and
former protege, and argued
that the papers were too valu-
able to Atlanta's history and
that they shouldn't leave the
South.
Within hours, Franklin had
convinced a network of busi-
ness and civic leaders to back
up the $32 million loan.
"The community rallied to
reclaim its own history,"
Franklin said.
The collection is already
beginning to pay off for King's
hometown and alma mater,
Morehouse College.
The city already has raised
most of the money needed to
pay off the loan - a deal that
was closed on June 23, 2006, a
week before a public sale of the
documents was to take place at
New York auction house
Sotheby's.
About $24 million was
pledged, and more than $15
million has been collected, said
John Ahmann, executive direc-
tor of the Atlanta Committee for
Progress, a group of business
and university leaders support-
ing the King Papers project
Much of the support has been
corporate, but more than 130
individuals have also con-
tributed, pledging more than
$260,000.
"I think people recognize its
historical significance and its


significance for Atlanta,"
Ahmann said. "The responsive-
ness of people to the mayor's
call has been amazing."
The group still needs to raise
about $10 million to pay the
loan's interest and cover legal
costs, Ahmann said.
The loan is due in June 2008,
but organizers hopes to have
the bill paid by October - long
before Franklin leaves office in
2009.
They also want to capitalize
on the papers' momentum as
Atlanta focuses on funding a
proposed civil and human
rights center. The papers are
expected to be the centerpiece
of the downtown museum,
which could be located not far
from King's birthplace.
In October, the Coca-Cola Co.
donated 2 1/2 acres near the
popular Georgia Aquarium and
the new World of Coca-Cola to.
develop the museum. Civic
leaders have supported that
location, though other sites -
including a location closer to
King's birthplace - are also
being considered.
Franklin said the museum is
still in the planning stages, and
a committee is working to
determine the museum's focus.
She said she hoped a financial
plan would be in place by the
end of the year, and expects the
project to cost about $100 mil-
lion.
"I think Atlanta is one of the
places that, through its religion,
its education, its effective use
of democracy and free enter-
prise by all of our citizens, we
can look back," said Young.
"And we can say that this is how
we have begun to overcome.
This is why this city is what it
is."
The collection's appeal was
proven in the first months of
2007, when hundreds of books
and documents debuted in an
exhibit at the Atlanta History
Center
The exhibit was the muse-
um's most popular ever, and
more than 65,000 people
viewed it between January and
May, poring over an essay dat-
ing back to King's elementary
school years, his sermons cata-
logued on index cards and
selections from his personal


tA


I -
-U

..1;


1*


Associated Pressi
Bridget Levette, processing archivist at the Woodruff Library at Atlanta University Center in Atlanta, Ga., processes King papers Junem
13. It's been a year since Atlanta did what many thought was impossible: The city bought the Martin Luther King Jr. Collection in aui
eleventh-hour deal, avoiding an auction and returning more than 10,000 of the civil rights icon's personal papers and books to his home-
town. [


library.
Scholars might soon get a
more extensive look at the
papers.
Archivists at the Robert
Woodruff Library at the Atlanta
University Center are now tak-
ing inventory of the documents,
which sat for years in the base-
ment of the Kings' northwest
Atlanta home - where King
lived until his death in 1968 and
where Coretta Scott King lived
for several decades afterward.
"We've been busy," said


Library CEO Loretta Parham,
who hopes the full collection
will be archived by next spring.
"It's been a King year The goal
is to open this collection as
soon as we possibly can."
Meanwhile, Morehouse
College is figuring out how it
will incorporate the papers into
its curriculum with help from a
national advisory board that
includes scholars Clayborne
Carson of Stanford University,
Henry Louiis Gates of Harvard
University. and the Rev. Otis


Moss. This month, financial
institution Goldman Sachs
donated $2 million to endow a
leadership chair in civil and
human rights, a person who
will also be the director for the
King collection.
The papers hold a special sig-
nificance for the Atlanta school.
King graduated from
Morehouse in 1948 and he's
touted as the college's most
famous alum. The school owns
the title to the papers, though
hI- f i l-- tillr ti tina th int-l-


Obituaries


Elvira Abbott, 79
INVERNESS
Elvira Mae Abbott, 79,
Inverness, died Friday, June 22,
2007, at her home under the
care of Hospice of Citrus
County.
A native of Brookville, Pa.,
she was born July 29, 1927, to
James and Christene
(McMaindle) Whiteman. She
moved to this area in 1970 from
Erie, Pa.
She was a homemaker.
She worked for the Tampa
Library District as a library
assistant
She was Protestant
She was preceded in death
by her son, Howard Geer, who
died in March; brothers, Banks
and Milton Whiteman; and sis-
ters, Ann Carruba and Helen
Siar.
She is survived by her hus-
band of 38 years, Donald R.
Abbot, Inverness; two daugh-
ters, Joy Brosius, Erie, Pa., and
Shellie Harden, Dallas, Texas;
one stepson, Douglas R. Abbot
and his wife Paula, Fort Valley,
Ga.; one stepdaughter, Lindan
Deming and her husband
Richard, Erie, Pa.; three sis-
ters, Ethel Hedrick, Brookville,
Pa., Jane Tharp and her hus-
band Frank, Union City, Pa.,
and Margie McCool, Brookville,
Pa.; 13 grandchildren; and sev-
eral great-grandchildren.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness.

Frances
Glerum, 82
OCALA
Frances R. Glerum, 82, Ocala,
died Thursday, June 21, 2007,
after a brief illness.
She was the daughter of A
Clyde and Florence Root of
Ashville, N.Y.
She was a graduate of the
University of Rochester and


HEINZ
FUNERAL HOME
& Cremation


Chatauqa High School.
Her hobbies included gar-
dening, cooking, walking, shop-
ping and crossword puzzles.
She loved to sing and enjoyed
music. She will be remembered
for her gentle and loving per-
sonality.
She was a nurse for more
than 43 years and retired from
the oncology floor of Ocala
Regional Hospital.
She was preceded in death
by her parents, brother,
Edward Root, and sister, Ruth
Palacio.
She is survived by her hus-
band of 60 years, Richard Z.
Glerum; daughter, Marge Green
of Nichols, N.Y; son, David
Glerum of Daytona Beach; son-
in-law, Carl Green; daughter-in-
law, Margaret Glerum; five
grandchildren, Derek Green,
Christopher Green, Andrea
Green, David Glerum and
Daniel Glerum; sisters,
Elizabeth Park of Ashville, N.Y.,
Cecile Nuerschback of
Tonawanda, N.Y, and Lucille
Small of Broadalbin, N.Y; and
many nieces, nephews and
cousins.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to Hospice of
Marion County Legacy House,
9505 S.W 110 St., Ocala, FL
34481.
At the request of the deceased
there will be no funeral servic-
es.
Roberts Funeral Home,
Dunnellon.

Laurence
'Larry' ULillvik, 63
BEVERLY HILLS
Laurence Vernon "Larry"
Lillvik, 63, Beverly Hills, died
Monday, June 4, 2007, in
Lecanto.
Born Oct 17, 1943, he was the
son of the late Laurence V
Lillvik Sr and Lillian Ferris in
Fort Monmouth, N.J.


He was a retired U.S. Army
major serving 20 years and
working in military intelligence.
He moved
here in 1992
from Fairfax,
Va.
He was a
member of the
First Lutheran
Church of Inverness.
Survivors include his wife,
Janet Lillvik of Beverly Hills;
daughters, Chetylynn A.
Bradeen of Portsmouth, R.I.,
and Pamela Gail Lillvik of
Beverly Hills; sister, Paula G.
Ferris of Orlando; and five
grandchildren.
Hooper Funeral Home &
Crematory, Beverly Hills
chapel.

Harry
Rolfes Jr., 55
DUNNELLON
Harry F Rolfes Jr, 55,
Dunnellon, died Friday, June 22,
2007, at Munroe Regional
Medical Center TimberRidge
Emergency Center
He was a native of Lake Wales
and moved to Dunnellon in 1991
from Orlando.
He was the owner of H & D
Aircraft Maintenance Company
of Williston.
He was Roman Catholic.
He was a licensed mechanic
and pilot in the aviation indus-
try.
He is survived by his wife,
Carol M. Rolfes of Dunnellon;
son, Harry E Rolfes, III; and
daughter, Carolina Rolfes, both
of Dunnellon; father, Dr Harry F
Rolfes Sr of Sarasota; brothers,
Thomas Rolfes of Tallahassee;
and James Rolfes of Osprey; sis-
ters, Carol Tyrell of Los Angeles,
Calif, and Ann Rolfes of St
Petersburg; and by many nieces
and nephews.
Roberts Funeral Home of
Dunnellon.


Michael
Thyssen, 46
ROME, ITALY
Michael W Thyssen, 46,
Rome, died in a motorcycle acci-
dent June 9, 2007, in Piasano,
Italy.
He was born
in Elizabeth,
N.J., and gradu-
ated with a
bachelor of sci-
ence degree in
mechanical engineering from
Lafayette College in Easton, Pa.,
in 1982. After that, he joined the
U.S. Air Force. While on active
duty, he earned his master of
arts degree in National Security
Affairs and was assigned as an
agent to the Air Force's Office of
Special Investigations with serv-
ice in Izmir, Turkey, Brindisi,
Italy and Scott Air Force Base in
Illinois. As OSI vice commander
at Scott Air Force Base, he exer-
cised command over field units
at U.S. installations worldwide
and provided investigative,
counterintelligence, antiterror-
ism and counter drug support to
35 bases.
He retired with the rank of
lieutenant colonel in 2002, but
continued to work as an agent in
Naples, and finally as special
agent in charge for Italy attached
to the U.S. Embassy in Rome. He
was fluent in three languages.
He is survived by his wife of 21
years, Nannette; 14-year-old son,
Matteo; and 8-year-old daughter
Sonja; brother, Christopher
Thyssen; sister, Susan Johnson;
his parents, Dorothy and
Bernard of Pine Ridge; and
other relatives here and abroad.




Funeral Home
With Crematory

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Fune
NOTICE


Laurence Ver
Lillvik. The
remembrance f
V Lillvik, 63, B
will be held 10
June 26, at
National Cemet(
with military hor
by the Florid
Guard. Those w
send memorial
the Southeast
Alliance, 6241 N
Suite 400, Gaii
32653 or the
Cancer Society, (
Unit, PO.
Inverness, FL 34
Michael W.
funeral mass was
ebrated in Rome
W. Thyssen, 46.


lectual property rights. I
"There's a tremendous feel-s
ing of completion, to be able to
have Dr King's papers back at1
Morehouse, and to now be the&
stewards of the collection," said
Philip Howard, the school'st
vice president of institutionaD
advancement "To play a vitale
role in that nexus is something
that's very exciting for us." 'a
The momentum and excite-
ment surrounding the papers)
has only just begun, FrankliniP
as CI


all II 11e eile- s aIU



yral mass will be celebrated 1I
a.m. June 27, 2007, at th 4
CES church of St. Elizabeth A
Seton, 1401 W Country Clul
Blvd., Citrus Springs. He wil
non "Larry" be buried in Arlingtor
service of National Cemetery today.
or Laurence Ming-Chang Tsai. A memo
3everly Hills, rial service for Ming-Chan.
a.m. Tuesday, Tsai, 72, of Homosassa, wil
the Florida be conducted 2 p.m. Saturday
ery, Bushnell, June 30, 2007, from the Firs
nors afforded Presbyterian Church o
la National Crystal River with Dr. Rand
ho wish may Moody presiding. The family
donations to suggests those who wish in
ern Tissue lieu of flowers make a memo2
q.W 23rd St., rial contribution to Dr
nesville, FL George Simon research fun
American at H. Lee Moffitt Cance
Citrus County Center, 12902 Magnoli
Box 1902, Drive, Tampa, FL 33612
1451-1902. Strickland Funeral Home
Thyssen. A Crystal River.
s June 15 cel- Click on www.chronicleon-
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tbfflk SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007


4


e am y s re







SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 7A


FESTIVAL
Continued from Page 1A
many residents, so local busi-
nesses use it as an opportunity
0 advertise. Representatives
the law firm of
Abrahamson, Uiterwyk and
Barnes passed out cold water,
and promotional materials,
such as pocketknives. Even
private sellers pitched tents
And displayed their work.
"I come down here every
ear," said William Dickerson
of Homosassa. He handmakes
signs, every single letter, he
aid and always profits well
rom the festival.
Festivalgoers can shop,
socialize, dance, play sports,
�oat down the river, resort
ilop, compete for prizes or
enjoy a day under the sun, by
e water.
For Lecanto resident Mary
ree, it's all about the people
watchingg and boat watching.
k "I like the fact that I can
pok at the boats, the smallest
and biggest .... everyone hav-
$ng a great time," she said.
While the adults lounged
around, the children geared
up for the pie-eating contest.
Danielle Ronza, a 10-year-
Id Lecanto resident, planned
o enter the contest. She said


CAMPAIGN
Continued from Page 1A
S"He is one of us and he will
fight for us," Crist said of Dean.
? Crist is not a newcomer to
Citrus County. When Crist was
growing up, his dad owned
some land in Citrus.
. Before coming to meet
Republicans at the Inverness
Community Center, Crist and
Dean were in Marion County at
a veterans' coalition meeting.
, When Dean got up to speak,
he spent time talking about
Schultz being the right person
to fill his place in the House.
With Schultz being a former
Citrus County Property
Appraiser and Dean a former
sheriff, the two will be a pai to
contend with, Dean said.
"We'll be the toughest tw
old birds who sit in
Tallahassee," Dean said.


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Cheyenne Casada, 11, had her face painted like the flag Saturday at the Homosassa River Fireworks
Festival.


she was going to win and her
sister came in second last
year.
"I guess we're going to have
to wait and see (who wins), but
I guess it's going to be Danny,"
said Ronza's friend, Tucker
Henderson, a 9-year-old

As the event wound down
and people went outside, they
were greeted with signs and
supporters of Schultz's
Democratic opponent Sophia
Diaz-Fonseca.
Diaz-Fonseca said she and
her team mobilized on short
notice to show up at the event
- about 15 minutes. She said
she wasn't overly concerned
that the governor was support-
ing her opponent
"He wouldn't be here if there
wasn't a reason," Diaz-Fonseca
said.
No-party-affiliation House
candidate David "Dave" Gregory
said the governor supporting
Schultz certainly doesn't help his
campaign. Gregory works full-
time and said he is pretty much
running his campaign on his own
and with few funds.
"I'm running as someone
outside the system, and I really
hope people realize that,"
Gregory said. "I represent the


Lecanto resident.
While the children worked
on packing on the pounds in
the food competitions, the
adults who already sported a
worthy gut had a contest of
their own.
For those participating in

common man and woman."
Senate Democratic candi-
date Suzan Franks said she's
not surprised the governor
supported her opponent
"Charlie Dean has been
spending all his time cozying
up to the special interests in
Tallahassee this entire cam-
paign," Franks said.
She is spending the next few
days crisscrossing the senate
district meeting people and
knocking on doors.
Regardless of who is sup-
porting whom, it's not every
day a governor makes a special
appearance in Citrus County.
"It's a wonderful thing for a
community," Citrus GOP
spokesman Chris Gangler said,
who helped organize the Dean
event "It speaks a lot of how
much more prominent our
county is becoming in our state."
Voters can take to the polls
Tuesday to decide who will win
in the special election.


the beer belly contest, Jason
English, an employee at
MacRae's, offered advice.
English has been a festival
participant since it started,
and he said the beer belly con-
test is a must-have.
"It's whoever has the


Everyone
is friendly,
having a good
time. Just
floating,
drinking and
talking.

Kurt Clayton
Homosassa resident and
festival regular.

biggest belly and the biggest
personality .... that helps,"
English said.
Just like any other recog-
nized pageant, personality
wins points.
From the beach volleyball
courts, to resorts and restau-
rants, children and adults
have their fair share of enter-
tainment.
"Everyone is friendly, hav-
ing a good time. Just floating,
drinking and talking," said
Kurt Clayton, a Homosassa
resident who is a festival reg-
ular.
For those who partook in
the celebration, the party was-
n't over until the fireworks hit
the sky.


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U.S. makes improbable
ally in Diyala
BAQOUBA, Iraq - Two months
ago, a dozen Sunni insurgents -
haggard, hungry and in handcuffs
-r- stepped tentatively into a U.S.-
l1'aqi combat outpost near Baqouba
Ond asked to speak to the command-
er 'We're out of ammunition, but we
want to help you fight al-Qaida."
i Now hundreds of fighters from
the 1920s Revolution Brigades, an
Erstwhile Sunni insurgent group,
,ork as scouts and gather intelli-
gence for the 10,000-strong
American force in the fifth day of its
mission to remove al-Qaida gun-
men and bomb makers from the
)iyala provincial capital.
Little so well illustrates the
Middle Eastern dictum: "The
enemy of my enemy is my friend."
i And as it struggles in the raging
teat and violence of central Iraq,
the U.S. military appears to have
bought into the tactic in its struggle
to pull what victory it can from the
increasingly troubled American
inission in Iraq, under congression-
l1 pressure for a troop pullout and
0 presidential election campaign
already in the minds of voters.
Each U.S. Army company in
Baqouba, an hour's drive northeast
4f Baghdad, has a scout from the
Brigades, others have become a
ragtag intelligence network and still
others fight, said Capt. Ricardo
Crtega, a 34-year-old Puerto Rico
iiative of the 2nd Infantry Division.
The Army has given some of the
(ne-time insurgents special cloth-
ing - football-style jerseys with
numbers on the chest - to mark
them as American allies.
; States struggle to
recruit game wardens
PITTSBURGH - Fish and
wildlife departments around the
country are on the hunt - for
More wardens. -
i From California to Pennsylvania
to Florida, states are struggling to
recruit officers and other projects
are being delayed. Those enforc-
ipg wildlife laws have a full work-
. Ipad, and officials-suspect poach-
igg is increasing, though hard
numbers are difficult to come by.
i "I think the nefarious people
realize there's a good chance
they're not going to get caught and
are taking more opportunities," said
Nancy Foley, chief of the law
enforcement division of California's
Department of Fish and Game.
, Besides enforcing hunting and
fishing laws, wildlife wardens
ilespond to calls about injured or
nuisance wildlife and provide envi-
ronmental education. In states
such as Texas, they are among the
f^rst responders to hurricanes and
other natural disasters, said Col.
Pete Flores, director of the law
enforcement division for the Texas
Parks and Wildlife Department.
The danger of the job and
decliningg interest in outdoor activi-
tes may also be to blame for short-
Iges, officials say. But mostly, it's


the pay, often thousands less than
traditional police officers make.
DURHAM, N.C.- The official
assessment of Mike Nifong's han-
dling of the Duke lacrosse case -
"intentional prosecutorial miscon-
duct" - could not have been more
harsh.
Duke case could
lead to appeals
DURHAM, N.C. - What's not
yet clear: Will Nifong's misdeeds in
his last case as a prosecutor give
defense attorneys an easy path to
overturn convictions from his near-
ly three decades in the Durham
County district attorney's office?
"I don't think the fact that he was
shown to be so unethical in the
Duke lacrosse case will mean that
other cases he's prosecuted will
automatically be reversed or
appealed," said Steve Cron, a
defense lawyer from Santa Monica,
Calif., who has practiced for 33 years.
"But his behavior in this case
was so outrageous and so beyond
what's required of an ethical prose-
cutor that everyone's going to start
going back and looking."
Nifong handed in his resignation
last week after a disciplinary com-
mittee of the North Carolina State
Bar determined he should be
stripped of his law license. The
panel found that Nifong broke
more than two dozen rules of pro-
fessional conduct while investigat-
ing a woman's allegations she was
raped at a March 2006 lacrosse
team party where she was hired to
perform as a stripper.
Putin considers
third term in 2012
MOSCOW - President Vladimir
Putin seems to quietly delight in
stoking the fevered speculation
about who will succeed him when
he steps down, as he has prom-
ised to do, following presidential
elections in March.
Now Moscow is suddenly chat-
tering about a new, unnamed
prospect - the loyal place-holder.
Under that scenario, which Putin
recently toyed with publicly, a new
leader would keep his seat warm
until 2012 - or even sooner, as
some have suggested, if Russia's
next president were suddenly
afflicted with nervous exhaustion or
some other condition that forced
him - or her - to resign. The
Russian constitution only prevents
Putin from serving more than two
consecutive terms.
"Theoretically it's possible," Putin
said when asked at the recent
Group of Eight summit in Germany
if he might run in 2012. 'The con-
stitution does not forbid it."
Just before the summit, in a
meeting with foreign reporters,
Putin said he was open to the idea
of extending the term of the presi-
dent from four to five or even
seven years - a constitutional
change that could also be used to
trigger a new round of presidential
elections after 2008.
-From wire reports


Young pilot close to records


Associated Press
HOUSTON - Two stops
before completing a journey
that would make him the
youngest person to fly solo
around the Earth, Barrington
Irving glided into Houston on
Saturday with a message for
the roughly 50 students who
cheered his arrival.
"I think this shows it doesn't
matter where you come from,
what you have or what you
don't have," Irving said after
climbing out of his single-
engine Columbia 400.
The 23-year-old aerospace
student, who built his plane
from more than $300,000 in
donated parts, took off from
Florida on March 23 in his bid
to become the youngest person
and first black pilot to fly solo
around the globe.
After one more stop, in
Alabama, Irving plans to return
to Opa-locka Executive Airport
outside Miami on Wednesday to
complete his journey.
From Florida, he flew to
Cleveland and New York
before continuing into Canada,
then flying across the Atlanta to
Europe, the Middle East and
Asia. From Asia, he flew to


Associated Press
Pilot Barrington Irving waves after he touches down Saturday in
Houston, Texas. Irving is on his second-to-last leg of an around-the-
world journey, flying solo, which will give him the record for the
youngest and also the first black pilot to accomplish the voyage


Juneau, Alaska, then Seattle
and Denver before arriving in
Houston. His plane is dotted
with stickers of flags of several
of the countries he visited.
He said the most difficult
part of the trip was weather,
which delayed some legs, and
keeping his mind occupied.
"There were times I was very
frustrated," he said.
Irving was born in Jamaica
and grew up in Miami. He said
he saw little chance for success
until he met a Jamaican-
American pilot at his parents'
bookstore who took him to see


a Boeing 777. The 15-year-old
was mesmerized and turned
down college football scholar-
ships to become a pilot.
Irving is now -studying at
Florida Memorial University
and has private and commer-
cial pilot licenses. He also
founded Experience Aviation, a
Miami-based organization that
encourages minority youths to
pursue aviation careers.
He said a book and docu-
mentary are likely, as well as
other projects.
"I have a lot of great ideas,"
Irving said.


Nation/World BRIEFS


I am for V TE


and guaranteeing the Ifj "
safety of our citizens.


VICE MAYOR, p K
Jim Farley says:


"Mike Gudis stands tall
in his support of our
brave police officers
and firefighters, and he
understands that this
election will decide
whether we keep our
police and fire services.
I look forward to
working together with
Mike to reduce taxes in
a responsible manner."


CHRONICLE QUOTE:
"Working familiarity with work
confronting the city."
"Background as an accountant
and local civic involvement reflect
a resume of someone who would
serve the city well."


Mike Gudis will make
cleaning up our
waterways a priority.
I-


CITY! COUNCIL #3..
CERTIFIED ).GOVWT FIJNIANCIAILi MANAGER
F - portation to the Polls, Call " 6
oneymike@mindspring.co


Fiscal expertise &
accountability to the people.


10 OF MY
ENDORSEMENT
* Police Union
* Ed & KayTolle
(One of the largest
Taxpayers in the city)
* Ernie Woods
* Dr.K.C. Nayfield
* Lee Cooper
* Willie & Raye Joyner
* Roger Proffer
* Sharon Weaver
* Dr. Leonard Calodney
* Frank Yetner


hk


Mike Gudis understands
the importance
of economic development
for the city.


By Mike Gudis, Candidate for City Council, Non


I.


an, for Crystal River City Council, Seat #3


SHARE YOUR
THOUGHTS
* Follow the instructions on
today's Opinion page to
send a letter to the editor.
* Letters must be no
longer than 350 words,
and writers will be limited
to three letters per month.



50 YEARS

"like family"

-Janet Gonter
Janet is particularly
pleased with the
current CEO "who
is bringing back the
feeling we all had in
the early days."
In 1978, Ms. Gonter
became food
service director.

CITRUS MEMORIAL
At lrfht', 4 Cmo Cw,,silf
vy~lis~'i ~ 9^~i


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SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 9A


NATIONMORD


'14








IOA SUNDAY, .LJNIi 24, 2007 _ CIrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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SUNDAY. TUNE 24. 2007 11A


In Netherlands, attitudes changing with times


The Washington Post
AMSTERDAM, Netherlands
-- For years, WB. Kranendonk
was a lone ranger in Dutch pol-
itics - the editor of an orthodox
Christian newspaper in a
nation that has legalized prosti-
tuition, euthanasia, abortion and
same-sex marriage and allows
the personal use of marijuana..
! Today, with an orthodox
Christian political party in the
government for the first time,
and with immigration anxi-
eties fueling a national search
for identity, the country that
has been the world's most
socially liberal political labora-
tpry is rethinking its anything-
goes policies.
!And suddenly, Kranendonk
no longer seems so all alone.
t "People in high political cir-
cles are saying it can't be good to
lave a society so liberal that
everything is allowed," said
Itranendonk, editor of
Reformist Daily and an increas-
itigly influential voice that res-
onates in the shifting main-
stream of Dutch public opinion.
"People are saying we should
have values; people are asking for
more and more rules in society."
i In cities across the
Netherlands, mayors and town
councils are. .cL..sjng.. down.
shops where marijuana is sold,
rolled and . smoked.
~Iunicipalities are shuttering
the brothels where prostitutes
have been allowed to ply their
tjade legally. Parliament is
considering a ban on the sale of
hallucinogenic "magic mush-
rooms." Orthodox Christian
ipembers of parliament have
introduced a bill that would
allow civil officials with moral
objections to refuse to perform
ay marriages. And Dutch
thorities are trying to curtail
e activities of an abortion
rights group that assists women.
ih neighboring countries
where abortions are illegal.


The effort to rein in the
Netherlands' famed social lib-
erties is not limited to the
small, newly empowered
Christian Union party, which
holds two of the 16 ministries
in the coalition government
formed this year. Increasingly,
politicians from the more cen-
ter-left Labor Party are among
the most outspoken propo-
nents of closing some brothels
and marijuana shops - known
here as "coffee shops."
"Has the Netherlands
changed? Yes," said Frank de
Wolf, a Labor Party member of
the Amsterdam City Council.
"There is not only a different
mood among our people and
politicians, but there are dif-
ferent problems now."
The Netherlands is going
through the same racial, ethnic
and religious metamorphosis
as the rest of Western Europe:
Large influxes of black, Arab
and Muslim immigrants are
changing the social complexion
of an overwhelmingly white,
Christian nation struggling
with its loss of homogeneity.
But here those anxieties are
exacerbated by alarm over the
international crime organiza-
tions that have infiltrated the
country's prostitution and drug
trades, the. increasing preva--
lence of trafficking in women
and children across its borders,
and dismay over the
Netherlands' image as an inter-
national tourist destination for
drugs and sexual debauchery.
"There is an uneasiness
about globalization that the
Dutch don't have control over
their own country anymore,"
said James Kennedy, professor
of contemporary history at the
Free University of Amsterdam.
"There is a more conservative
mood in the country that is
interested in setting limits and
making sure things don't get


I " ' . ' ' ,'. 'l".,

Amsterdam's long-tolerated red-liI
a city councilman says. Officials
sex and drug use that have given
out of hand."
De Wolf, the Amsterdam
councilman, is part of that
movement.
"In the past, we looked at
legal prostitution as a women's
liberation issue; now it's
looked at as exploitation of
women and should be-
stopped," said de Wolf, sitting
in the offices of the medical -
complex where he works as an
HIV-AIDS researcher.
He said Amsterdam's police
force is overwhelmed and ill-
equipped to fight the sophisti-
cated foreign organized crime
networks operating in the city.
Laws designed to regulate pros-
titution and brothel operators
have instead opened the trade
to criminal gangs, according to
de Wolf and other city officials.
And de Wolf said he is fed up
with the planeloads of British
thrill-seekers who take cheap


SWthe rise of the .orthodox
. r Christian Union party, many
n h r J members of which shun televi-
' t u s ion as part of their religious
. code, has coincided with the
- t - changing public attitude.
i e i Defense Minister Eimert
van Middelkoop is a member
of the Christian Union. He
ho'.-- " in refuses to work Sundays and
recentlyny dewlined-an invitation
to participate in the U.S.
Embassy's Memorial Day com-
memoration because it was
held on the Sabbath, officials
said.
Leaders of the Christian
Union say they are not pushing
to banish legalized prostitu-
tion or soft drugs. And no offi-
cials are discussing rollbacks
on same-sex marriage,
euthanasia or abortion, even
though the party opposes all
The Washington Post three.
ght district is "not the way I want people to look at" the Dutch city, Instead, the party and other
in the Netherlands are taking another look at laws and policies on leaders who agree with some
the country a reputation as a socially liberal political laboratory. of its stances are "copying
from the United States,"
flights to Amsterdam each gers of cannabis, mimicking according to Rebecca
Friday evening for weekend the warning labels on tobacco Gomperts, founder of Women
binges of sex, drugs and alco- and alcohol products. on Waves, an organization that
hol in his city's red-light dis- Ivo Opstelten, the mayor of provides Internet counseling
trict, where scantily clad pros- Rotterdam, the second-largest on abortions.
titutes stand behind plate-glass Dutch city, announced this "They are chopping away at
windows beckoning to poten- month that he will close all the edges so that people don't
tial customers. marijuana shops within 250 notice," Gomperts said, "reset-
'Amsterdam- has--a- reputa- .yards-ofschoota i-=Ia-ly-h lfiThin-the norm of whaT isac-ept-
tion that you can do everything of the city's 62 shops .... .. ed practice."
here,"? de Wolf said. "That's not Michael Velinig, 52, propri- Editor Kranendonk said ht:is
the way I want people to look at etor of an Amsterdam coffee Christian Union party is realis-
Amsterdam." shop where a marijuana joint tic: "When you're a small party,
Those same concerns have sells for $5.50, said politicians you can't change everything in
prompted some cities to bar increasingly are looking for four years.
tourists from their marijuana any excuse to scale back the "If you had said to me in 1995
and hashish shops. Some local- sale of soft drugs. that one of the main orthodox
ities now require patrons of "This toleration policy goes Christian parties would be in
the shops to show Dutch iden- back 35 years," said Veling, the government today, I would-
tity cards to gain entry, and a snapping the lids off plastic n't- .have ..believed it,"
new nationwide law forbids boxes of pungent marijuana Kranendonk said. "The num-
the sale of alcohol in shops blends. "Now the word. 'coffee ber of Christians is diminish-
that sell pot and hash. Some shop' has become a symbol of ing, churches are closing."
lawmakers have proposed something we don't like about He paused and smiled, "But
requiring the shops to warn society." there are other ways of believ-
their customers about the dan- But historian Kennedy said ing."














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12A
SUNDAY
JUNE 24, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Strange, yes


Search ends; body found


Associated Press
Members of the Australian
performance company
Strange Fruit perform high
above the ground Friday in
front of the Burton Tower in
Ann Arbor, Mich., during the
Ann Arbor Summer Festival.
The foursome performed vari-
ous dance and mime routines
on 15-foot bendable fiber-
glass poles. The Strange Fruit
members are, from left,
Kathryn Jamison, ,George
Filev, Paul Bourk and Amelia
McQueen.

Legislation may
ease passport pains
WASHINGTON - Travelers
could find relief from a three-
month wait for their passports if
Congress passes a bill that
would allow the State Depart-
ment to hire retired personnel.
The bill, introduced by Sen.
Charles Schumer, D-N.Y, would
allow retired foreign service
employees who process pass-
ports to return to work without
forfeiting their retirement bene-
fits. It would also eliminate a cap
on the number of employees the
department can hire.
Schumer.said the depart-
ment's need of foreign service
personnel is the biggest problem
it faces right now because those
employees "have the experience
working with foreign countries."
The bill is expected to go
before the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee on
Wednesday.

World BRIEFS

Proud


Associated Press
A couple embraces during a
Gay Pride parade Saturday in
Guadalajara, Mexico.

Yemeni guard kills
one, wounds five
SAN'A, Yemen -A Yemeni
guard opened fire Saturday on a
group of foreign oil workers
shortly after they landed at a
company airstrip, killing one and
wounding five - including an
American, officials said.
The shooting took place at
the Occidental Petroleum Corp.
in the southern Shabwa
province, some 300 miles south
of the capital, San'a. The provin-
cial governor, Ali al-Maqqdishi,
said the guard was mentally ill.
The U.S. Embassy in San'a
confirmed the attack in a mes-
sage posted on its Web site and
said the American was "critically
injured."
No constitution
for European Union
PARIS -A squabbling
European Union has given up
hope for a constitution, agreeing
instead Saturday to peddle a
watered-down treaty to its 27
capitals in hopes of ending a two-
year stalemate that has hobbled
one of the world's most potent
economic and diplomatic blocs.
The details of the treaty must
still be negotiated and the final
document ratified by all 27 E.U.
members to become effective.
E.U. leaders set a goal of 2009
for winning approval of the treaty.
The lack of a constitution has
been a legal hurdle, as well as a
psychological impediment to
E.U. efforts to move forward
with a unified voice.
- From wire reports


Thought to be

missing mother

Associated Press

CANTON, Ohio - A massive
search ended in sadness
Saturday when authorities
announced they found a body
believed to be a pregnant
woman who vanished from her
home a week earlier. A police
officer believed to be the father
of the unborn child was arrest-


ed on two counts of murder.
Jessie Davis, 26, who was due
to deliver a baby girl on July 3,
was reported missing after her
mother found Davis' 2-year-old
son home alone, bedroom fur-
niture toppled and bleach
spilled on the floor.
The boy gave investigators
their first clues. "Mommy was
crying. Mommy broke the table.
Mommy's in rug," the boy said.
Thousands of volunteers had
searched for Davis over several
days, while investigators ques-
tioned Bobby Cutts Jr., 30, who
is the father of Davis' son but is


married to another woman.
Investigators were mum on
many details of their work until
they announced Cutts was
taken into custody Saturday
and was to be arraigned on
charges of murder in the deaths
of Davis and her unborn child.
The Stark County Sheriff's
Department also said a
woman's body was recovered in
Summit County at 3:30 p.m.
Authorities did not give a loca-
tion but said they believed it to
be Davis.
Television news footage
taken from helicopters above


Cuyahoga Valley National Park
showed investigators riding off-
road vehicles to reach an area
that is heavily covered with
trees and brush. It also show
authorities carrying a body bag
on a stretcher and loading it
into a white van.
Roger Riggins, an investiga-
tor with the Summit County
medical examiner's office, con-
firmed a body was found at the
southeast edge of the park,
about 25 miles from Davis'
home in Lake Township.
During the investigation, a
newborn baby girl was left on


Coming home wounded


Associated Press
Eva Briseno comforts her son, Joseph Briseno Jr., on March 21 as he lies In bed at the James A. Haley Veterans Hopital in Tampa.
Briseno was injured in Iraq.

Number of seriously injured soldiers strains families, care facilities


Associated Press

More than 800 of them have
lost an arm, a leg, fingers or
toes. More than 100 are blind.
Dozens need tubes and
machines to keep them alive.
Hundreds are disfigured by
burns, and thousands have
brain injuries or mangled minds.
These are America's war
wounded, a toll that has
received less attention than
the 3,500 troops killed in Iraq.
Depending on how you count
them, they number between
35,000 and 53,000.
More of them are coming
home, with injuries of a scope
and magnitude the govern-
ment did not predict and is
now struggling to treat
"If we left Iraq tomorrow,
we would have the legacy of
all these people for many
years to come," said Dr Jeffrey
Drazen, editor-in-chief of the
New England Journal of
Medicine and an adviser to
the U.S. Department of
Veterans Affairs. 'The mili-
tary simply wasn't prepared
for its own success" at keeping
severely wounded soldiers
alive, he said.
Survival rates today are
even higher than the record
levels set early in the war,
thanks to body armor and bet-
ter care. For every American
soldier or Marine killed in
Iraq, 15 others have survived
illness or injury there.
Unlike previous wars, few of
them have been shot The sig-
nature weapon of this war -
the improvised explosive
device, or IED - has left a sig-
nature wound: traumatic
brain injury.
Soldiers hit in the head or
knocked out by blasts some-
times have no visible wounds
but a fog of war in their minds.
They can be addled, irritable,
depressed and unaware they
are impaired.
Only an estimated 2,000
cases of brain injury have
been treated, but doctors think
many less obvious cases have
gone undetected.
Some of those on active duty


Nearly 53,000 wounded in Iraq
As of early June, 25,830 U.S. troops have been wounded in action.
Another 27,103 non-battle-related air transports occurred for those
with illness or injury.
U.S. soldiers wounded in action in Iraq
By military branch, as of June 2
Army 65.7% (16,975) ..... Navy 2.2 (561) ...

Marines 31.0 (8,003) Air Force 1.1 (291)


By cause of injury, as of May 19


Weaponry 87.3% (22,300)
By state, as of June 2


Transportation .5%(134) ...

Other 12.2% (3,115)


10 1- -0 5 -
20-100 101 - 300 301 - 500 501 -900 901 -1,500 1,501 -2,723


SOURCE: Department of Defense
may have subtle brain damage
that was missed when they
were treated for more visible
wounds. Half of those wound-
ed in action returned to duty
within 72 hours - before
some brain injuries may have
been apparent
Back home, concerns grow
about care. The Walter Reed
hospital scandal and prob-
lems with VA nursing homes
have led Republicans and
Democrats to call for better
care for this crop of veterans.
A lucky few get Cadillac
care at one of the VAs four
polytrauma centers, where
the most complex wounds are
treated with state-of-the-art
techniques and devices like
"power knee" or "smart
ankle." Others battle bureau-
cracy to see doctors or get
basic benefits.


Mental health problems
loom large. More than a third of
troops received psychological
counseling shortly after return-
ing, and a third of those were
diagnosed with a problem, a
recent Pentagon study found.
No one knows what the ulti-
mate cost will be. Harvard
University economist Linda
Bilmes estimates the lifetime
tab for these troops will be
$250 billion to $650 billion - a
wide range but a huge sum no
matter how you slice it
Counting the wounded can
be contentious. Earlier this
year, the Department of
Defense changed how it tallies
war-related injuries, dropping
those not needing air trans-
port to a military hospital from
the bottom-line total.
As of June 2, 25,830 troops
had been wounded in action.


Of these, 7,675 needed airlifts
to military hospitals and the
rest were treated and
remained in Iraq.
There were another 27,103
non-battle-related air trans-
ports. Of those, 7,188 had
injuries. Most occurred from
vehicle accidents, training or
work-related accidents, said
Dr. Michael Kilpatrick, who
tracks this information for the
Defense Department
Of the half-million troops
who have left active duty and
are eligible for VA health care,
about one-third have sought it
The most complicated cases
end up at one of the four poly-
trauma centers, in Tampa,
Fla.; Richmond, Va.; Palo Alto,
Calif.; and Minneapolis.
These were formed after
doctors realized they were
missing problems - amputees
who were confused and
unable to put on prosthetics
because of undiagnosed brain
injuries, and guys who could
remember their therapy dog's
name but not their doctor's, or
who could carry on a conversa-
tion but not recall what they
had for breakfast,
Troops at these hospitals
have an average of six major
impairments and 10 special-
ists treating them.
In prior wars, one of every
five to seven troops surviving a
war-related wound had a trau-
matic brain injury, the mili-
tary estimates. It's much high-
er in this war
A pilot project at Walter
Reed in 2003 to screen 155
patients returning from Iraq
found that 62 percent had a
brain injury.
Much needs to be learned
about how to treat these
injuries, Kilpatrick said, but he
credited the military medical
staff for the chance.
"It's just amazing to me
every day when I look at these
numbers. The good news is
that the majority of these peo-
ple who become ill or injured
... are going to survive and are
going to be able to return
either to the military orto civil-
ian life and be productive."


Wounded at war There have been nearly 2 million U.S. soldiers wounded at war since the inception of the United States.
671,846
U.S. soldiers wounded 281,881 204,002 103,284 153,303 54,225
6,188 4,505 4,152 10 1,662 467
War of 1812 Civil War World War I Korean War Persian Gulf
1812-1815 1861-1865 1917-1918 I 1950-1953 1990-1991
HIllMIll l|II III MIIII I II II1l1 IIII IlIIHIll II 1111111
Revolutionary War Mexican War Spanish-American War World War II Vietnam Iraq/Afghanistan
1775-1783 1846-1848 1898 1941-1946' 1964-1973 2001-2007
* Data from Dec. 1, 1941 through Dec. 31, 1946, when hostilities were officially terminated by Presidential Proclamation
SOURCE: Department of Defense AP


the doorstep of a home in a
nearby county, raising ques,
tions about whether it belonged
to Davis. DNA tests were being
conducted when another
woman confessed to leaving the
child at the home.
An attorney for Davis' mother
said the family had a rolleri
coaster ride of emotions and
had no comment
"I've seen them laugh, cry, be
angry - everything you can,
imagine," Rick Pitinii said.!
"They need to be together, and
they need to be alone, and they
need to grieve."



North


Korea


may shut


down


reactor

Associated Press
TOKYO - North Korea
could shut down its nuclear
reactor within three weeks'
and return to disarmament
talks, a U.S. envoy said!
Saturday. Russia, meanwhile,'
said disputed funds have:
reached a North Korean
account at a Russian bank,,
clearing a key hurdle in nego-
tiations. I
The Yongbyon plutonium-
producing reactor will be shut
after the U.N.'s nuclear watch-
dog and North Korea agree onr
how to monitor the process,'
Assistant Secretary of State'
Christopher Hill said after
returning from a rare trip to
the reclusive country.,
"We do expect this to be
soon, probably within three
weeks ... though I don't want to
be pinned down on precisely
the date," Hill told reporters
after briefing his Japanese
counterpart, Kenichiro Sasae,
on the outcome of his two-day
surprise trip to Pyongyang.
The next round of nuclear
negotiations could begin in1
early July, though the exact
timing depended on schedule,
ing by the host nation, China,
he added.
"I would expect it to happen
soon after shutdown begins,'
Hill said. i
Hill's visit - the first to
North Korea by a high-ranking
U.S. official since October 2002,
- came amid growing opti-
mism that the government in
Pyongyang may finally b'
ready to take concrete steps
toward fulfilling a promise td
dismantle its nuclear pro4
grams.
Last week, North Koreii
invited inspectors from the
International Atomic Energy
Agency to discuss procedures
for shutting down its reactor
five years after expelling
them. The U.N. inspectors are
due to arrive in the North
Korean capital Tuesday.
In another sign of progress,
Russia's Foreign Ministry said
a bank in far eastern Russia
had received North Korean
funds frozen at a Macau bank
that had been blacklisted by
the U.S. over allegations of
money-laundering and other
financial crimes.
Because of the dispute over
the $25 million, North Korea
missed an April deadline for
shutting down its nuclear reac-
tor under a February agree-
ment The funds were freed
earlier this year, but only last
week started to be transferred
to the Russian bank
North Korea's official
Korean Central News Agency
struck an upbeat tone about
the talks with Hill, describing
them Saturday as "compre-
hensive and productive."
"Both sides shared the views
that they would start imple-
menting the (February) agree-
ment on the premise that the
issue of the remittance of the
funds is finally settled," the
agency said.


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


A2
SUNDAY
JUNE 24, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


Travel BRIEFS

TV ads to boost
Bronx's image
NEW YORK - The time to
start planning your vacation to
the Bronx is now - at least that
is the hope of a series of new
television commercials touting
the borough's image.
The 30-second spots promot-
ing the borough of 1.3 million as
a tourist destination are part of a
marketing campaign called
"We're Talking the Bronx."
The ads were unveiled June
12 by Bronx Borough President
Adolfo Carrion Jr., who spoke of
the Bronx's journey from blight
to a new frontier of residential
and commercial development.
Take in an opera
in the Ozarks
EUREKA SPRINGS, Ark. -
The arias from Puccini's
"Madama Butterfly" and
Mozart's "The Marriage of
Figaro" will be sung from an out-
door stage in Eureka Springs for
the next few weeks as the 57th
annual "Opera in the Ozarks"
summer festival gets underway
at Inspiration Point Fine Arts
Colony.
Three major operas are pro-
duced each season. The 2007
Season runs June 22 to July 20
and will also feature
"Susannah," an American opera
by Carlisle Floyd.
"Madama Butterfly" will be
performed June 30, and July 3,
.12, 16 and 20. "Figaro" will be
staged June 29, and July 1, 5,
10, 14 and 18. "Susannah,"
which tells the poignant story of
a beautiful young mountain girl
in Tennessee, will be performed
July 2, 6, 9, 13 and 19.
Also part of the season will be
a children's opera on July 8, and
a chamber orchestra concert on
July 17.
All evening performances are
at 8 p.m. and take place on a
sheltered outdoor stage with an
outdoor seating capacity of 300.
Details at 479-253-8595 or
www.opera.org.
-Ski visits were up
in Utah, Colorado
DENVER - Last winter was
a good season for ski areas in
Utah and Colorado, but nation-
wide, ski visits were down, due
to warm weather and below-
average snowfall in many
places.
The National Ski Areas
Association said ski visits were
down overall about 7 percent
from last season, to a total of
54.8 million visits for the season.
The previous winter, ski visits hit
a record nationwide of 58.9 mil-
lion.
The Rocky Mountain region,
however, set a new record for
the winter of 2006-07, of 21 mil-
lion visits. The Rocky Mountain
region includes Colorado, Idaho,
Montana, New Mexico, Utah
and Wyoming.
- From wire reports


Western tourists try Eastern skills


NEIL SAWYER
Special to the Chronicle
"Stop! Stop! Stop!"
Everyone in our group of 12 suddenly
came to life, jerking to an upright posi-
tion, looking like a family of groundhogs
that had just spotted a fox.
Our tour guide's command was
directed to the bus driver just as we
came around a sharp turn on a :rural
road in northern Thailand. What could
have been so important that our guide
would risk scaring the driver off the
road, and awakening us from a well-
earned nap? After all we were on a
pleasure trip and had been lulled into
our afternoon slumber after a delicious


Spontaneous

meal of curried chicken with avocad(
at a roadside stop.
A row of Thai rice cutters caused thi
excitement, working in unison like
piece of automated machinery, cutting
the ripened crop of rice. And a beauti
ful sight it was! Of course, the reason fo
the exclamation was for us to join then
and exhibit our Western skills of cutting
rice.
One by one we, except those whi
seemed to have known it would be suc]
an easy task that they would not bE
intimidated into doing such a simple
thing, timidly handed our scythes (per


product She only had about a dozen
TOUR GUIDE --- and I believe we cleared her of invento-
ry for the day This was near the time of
o haps it was a sickle) back to our gra- the local lantern festival in late
cious hosts. I am constantly astounded November.
e at the finesse and grace with which a That evening, after dark in our hotel
a talented hand can make a tough job so parking lot, our group had its own
g easy. lantern festival - or competition, you
- It is reported that history repeats might say. The lanterns were made of
r itself. You might now guess that a simi- very lightweight paper, and when
a lar challenge presented itself the next unfolded, we found that there was a
g day, and in the same rural area of the wax candle suspended inside.
country. We were cruising along when, Nothing to it - light the candle and
o again, we heard "Stop! Stop! Stop!" the heated air will cause this contrap-
h Apparently this command is only mean- tion to soar like an elegant hot air bal-
e ingful when done in triplicate, loon.


Beside the road was a Thai merchant,
specializing in lantern kites, her only


Please see TOUR/Page 18A


Hitting the road?


Chronicle


Tell us about it! The
Chronicle will run your reports
about recent day trips to other
parts of the state. Follow these
guidelines when submitting
your photos and information,
and you'll be credited when
the story runs in our Sunday
edition.
1. Write about a day trip to a
town or attraction within three
hours' drive of Citrus County.
2. Include your name, home-
town and phone number (the
phone number will not be pub-
lished - it's for our reference).
3. Submit a photo or photos
of the place you visit. Drop off
copies at the Chronicle offices
in Inverness or Crystal River,


or e-mail the images as sepa-
rate, high-resolution jpeg (.jpg)
attachments to community@
chronicleonline.com. Include.
information about what's in
the pictures. Photos cannot be
returned without a stamped,
self-addressed envelope.
4. Include the name of the
area, the county it's in, the
major roads leading to it and
its main attractions. You can
include a list of favorite restau-
rants, or upcoming events
planned in that area.
5. Limit reports to 350 words.
The Chronicle will edit any
reports chosen for publication.
6. Pay attention to the day
trips reported by other readers
- duplicate reports will be
eliminated.


Museum has

bedtime history to tell


The Washington Post
WASHINGTON - In 18th-
century America, mattresses
were stuffed with straw, moss,
feathers, dried corn husks or
wheat chaff. Quick, name the
softest. Feathers, of course.
(Avoid the chaff; it feels like
acorns.)


See for yourself at the mod-
est-but-charming free exhibit
"And So to Bed: The American
Bedroom, 1750-1920" at the
Daughters. of the American
Revolution Museum, near the
White House.
The showstopper is a heavily
Please see BED/Page 18A


Cities marking anniversary of Summer of Love


Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - Hippie
counter-culture blossomed as
the "Summer of Love" unfold-
ed 40 years ago in San
Francisco's Golden Gate Park
and Haight-Ashbury neighbor-
hood.
Teenagers, college students
and other young people
flocked to the area, which was
a hotbed of psychedelic styles,
rock music, free love and drug
use. Social change and politi-


cal unrest - including
activism against the Vietnam
War and for civil rights -
formed a backdrop.
This year, several tours and
museum exhibits are marking
the 40th anniversary of the
Summer of Love, both in San
Francisco and elsewhere.
New York's Whitney
Museum of American Art is
showing "Summer of Love: Art
of the Psychedelic Era," now
through Sept. 16. The show
looks at the impact that the


1960s and early 1970s had on
art, music, film and other
fields.
The Rock and Roll Hall of
Fame in Cleveland has six
exhibits that touch on
"Summer of Love" themes,
including shows about The
Doors, the Beach Boys, the
"San Francisco City Scene,"
Otis Redding, Jimi Hendrix
and the Monterey Pop music
festival, which in 1967
launched Janis Joplin's career
and also featured Jimi


Hendrix. All of the shows have
already opened except fore
Monterey Pop, opening July 25.
Details at www.rockhall.com.
Those who care to retrace
the footsteps of the hippies of
yesteryear can take San
Francisco's "Haight Ashbury
Flower Power Walking Tour."
The tour is offered Tuesdays
and Saturdays at 9:30 a.m. and
Friday at 11 a.m., at $20 a per-
son (children 9 and younger
free). Details at www.haigh
tashburytour.com or (800) 979-


3370.
Other "Summer of Love"
events in San Francisco
include a lecture sponsored by
the San Francisco History
Association at the Mission
Dolores School Auditorium,
16th and Church streets, 7 p.m.
Tuesday; a daylong 40th
anniversary concert Sept. 2 at
Speedway Meadows in Golden
Gate Park, 2blrecords.com/
summeroflove40th, and a
Please see LOVE/Page 18A


- Community NEWS


C.R. tour CAA to have Student Night FBC to offer VBS


brochure


free

Special to the Chronicle
The Crystal River Heritage
Council is pleased to
announce that the new
"Historic Tour of Crystal
River" brochure is now avail-
able. The brochure is a self-
guided walking/driving tour,
with map, photos and a brief
history of 26 historic struc-
tures in the city of Crystal
River.
Start your tour at the Coastal
Heritage Museum at 532 Citrus
Ave. in Crystal River; there
you can pick up your free copy
of the brochure and visit the
museum.
Museum admission is free.
Museum hours are 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Tuesday through Friday
and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.
The museum is closed Sunday
and Monday.
For more information, call
the Coastal Heritage Museum
at 795-1755.


Event is free,
Special to the Chronicle


If you want to learn how to
fly, flew in the service or are an
inactive pilot, come see us.
Citrus Aviation Association's
third annual Student Night


'en to the public
will begin at 6:30 p.m.
Thursday, June 28, at the
Crystal River Airport This is
an event for anyone who is
interested in aviation, from
students to seniors. There will
be a variety of planes to see


and pilots with experience,
from sport-rating to airline
captain and retired military
will be available to answer
questions. There will be light
refreshments and door prizes.
The event is free and the pub-
lic is welcome. E-mail secre
tary@citrusaviation.org for
more information.


Call to register
Special to the Chronicle
First Baptist Church of
Inverness, 550 Pleasant Grove
Road, will have Bible school
featuring Lifeway's Game Day
Central theme from 5:30 to 8


p.m. during the week of July 8
through July 13.
All children from ages 3
years through fifth grade are
welcome.
Nursery is provided for birth
through 2 years.
Call the church at 726-1252
for early registration.


CITRUS COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL PET PROFILES


The Citrus County Animal Control
Shelter has online listings of
impounded animals. Go to the Web
page http://animalcontrol.citrus.fl.us/
and click on "Impounrded Animals"
to begin a search.


NAME: (none)
AGE: YA
SEX: F'
ID #: 82321


NAME: Zoose
AGE: Adult
SEX: M ID #:
82282


To enquire about the animals list--
ed here, refer to the type (cat or
dog), age group and gender in a
search.
The shelter can help you save an
innocent pet. The shelter is in


NAME: COCO
AGE: Adult
SEX: M
ID #: 82283


NAME: (none)
AGE: Adult
SEX: (?)
ID #: 82248


NAME: (none)
AGE: Infant
SEX: M
ID #: 82251


Inverness near the airport. It is
open for adoptions from 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. Monday through Friday and
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.
Call 726-7660 for more informa-
tion.


NAME: Lila
AGE: YA
SEX: SF
ID #: 23247


NAME: (none)
AGE: YA
SEX: M
ID #: 82372


Financial assistance for spaying
and neutering of your adopted pet
is available through the Humani-
tarians of Florida, 563-2370, or from
the Humane Society of Citrus
County, 341-2222.


NAME: Bear
AGE: YA
SEX: M
ID #: 56947


NAME: (none)
AGE: (?)
SEX: M ID
#: 82249


L W
NAME:.(none)
AGE: Senior
SEX: M
ID #: 82243


Seabird rookery


DREAM
S,/CATONS
',oto Cont-est.


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo contest
for readers of the newspaper.
Readers are invited to send
a photograph from their
Dream Vacation with a brief
description of the trip.
If it's selected as a winner,
it will be published in the Sun-
day Chronicle.
At the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select thet
best photo during the year
and that photographer will win
a prize.
Please avoid photos with
computerized dates on the
print.
Please make sure photo-
graphs are in sharp focus.
Photos should be sent to
the Chronicle at 1624 N Special to the chronicle
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal Speca to the Chronicle
River, FL 34429 or dropped Nell and Karyn Sawyer visited Alaska during early May. They
off at any Chronicle office or ..saw this waterfall, the focal point of a seabird rookery on
any Accent Travel office. Prince William Sound being visited by a local tour boat, when
arriving in Whittier, Alaska, from Valdez and Cordova, on a
high-speed ferry. The white specks on the rocks are birds.


�t


pi 'e� A-IsNom


e
- .


A L
L









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-2.4 Ac -- ?"n-7


Mj. SUNDAY, JUNiE 24,200 u N AA


Veterans NOTES


* The Citrus County Veterans
Coalition will meet at 6 p.m.
Thursday at the Citrus County
Resource Center, West Marc
Knighton Court, just off County
Road 491 in Lecanto. This is an
open business meeting and all
members, veterans' organizations
and interested veterans who are
eager to assist veterans in need
are encouraged to come and get
involved. Annual dues are now $10
per year or three years for $25 as
of April 1.
The CCVC has projects that
need your help in getting accom-
plished and this can be done
through a cooperative effort of all
28,000 veterans in Citrus County.
The CCVC's philosophy is
"Veterans Helping Veterans."
For more information about the
Citrus County Veterans Coalition,
go to www.citruscountyveterans
coalition.org or www.ccvcfl.org.
* Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary, 906 E.
State Road 44, Inverness; tele-
phone 344-3495; fax 344-3514,
announce daily activities schedule
for the week of June 24 to 30.
Sunday: Pool tourney at 2 p.m.;
karaoke Wild Willy from 5 to 9 p.m.
Monday: Bar bingo at 3 p.m.
Tuesday: Chicken wings - four
for $1, nine flavors, from 4:30 to 7
p.m.; Mark B. karaoke from 6 to 9.
Wednesday: Ladies auxiliary bar
bingo at 6 p.m.
Thursday: Bar bingo at 3 p.m.
Friday: Fish fry (southern fried
chicken available) $6.50, from 4:30
to 7 p.m.; Wild Willy Karaoke at 6.
Saturday: no dinner, no enter-
tainment.
* VFW Post 4252 and the
Ladies Auxiliary in Hernando on
State Road 200 will serve dinner
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday for a
$6.50 donation. This week we will
have barbecue ribs or fish. Music
from 6:30 to 10:30 by Carriers.
Post has bar bingo at 2 p.m.
Sunday. Ladies Auxiliary hosts
bingo at 10:30 a.m. Saturday.
Food available. Ladies also have
bar bingo at 2 p.m. Tuesday.
Profits go to local charities. This
month is for PAC.
There will be no Fourth of July
picnic, but the post will have chick-
en wings, four for $1, 2 to 6 p.m.
A flea market is planned for Oct.
21. Inside tables $10, outside
tables $5. Donations accepted.
Send e-mail to VFW4252@tam
pabay.rr.com.
Ladies Auxiliary goes to nursing
homes four times a month to play
bingo with the residents. Everyone
is welcome.
Post honor guard is available for
funerals, flag raising and nursing
homes. Call Cmdr. Bob Prive at
212-3393.
Call Bob or Judy Prive for infor-
mation at 726-3339.
* Edward W. Penno VFW Post
4864,10199 N. Citrus Springs
Blvd, Citrus Springs, (352) 465-
4284. The post will have a picnic
July 4. Sausage and peppers, hot
dogs, hamburgers, potato salad
and beans will be served from
noon to 3 p.m. Karaoke will be
from 4 to 8 p.m.. Come and be part
of the fun.
Friday Dinners served from 5 to
7: Friday - chicken; July 6 ham;
and July 13 - meatloaf.
Bingo: Tuesday at 1 p.m.
Shuffle Board on Wednesday
nights 7 p.m.
Darts on Thursday nights at 7
p.m.
* VFW POST 7122, Floral City,
announces the following:
All dinners are open to the pub-
lic. (Nonsmoking section is avail-
able).


, Sunday: Post Opens at 1 p.m.
June birthday bash - last one -
from 2 to 6 p.m.
Monday: Karaoke Practice at 7
p.m.
Tuesday: Limited food menu
noon to 6 p.m. (bingo cancelled for
the summer)
Wednesday: Limited food menu
noon to 6 p.m.
Friday: AYCE fish (fried, black-
ened or baked) or a three-piece
fried chicken dinner, includes
dessert for $6.75, served from 4:30
to 7:30 p.m. Karaoke with Jannie
Faye from 7 to 11 p.m.
Saturday: Prime rib dinner $9,
includes dessert served from 5 to
7:30 p.m.
The honor guard is available for
veterans services with military hon-
ors at the National Cemetery in
Bushnell, local chapels or local
cemeteries. Call honor guard
Cmdr. Bill Shaw at the post.
VFW and Ladies Auxiliary meet
the first Thursday monthly at 7:30
p.m. Men's Auxiliary meets the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at 7 p.m.
Eligible to become a member of
the VFW? Stop by the post for
details.
Loan closet is available for our
veterans: crutches, walkers, wheel
chairs and canes.


Community service: VFW is an
option for those who have a com-
munity obligation.
VFW Post 7122 is at 8191 S.
Florida Ave. in Floral City. Phone:
352-637-0100.
N Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189 will mark our nation's inde-
pendence with a Big Bang
Celebration at 2 p.m. Wednesday,
July 4, with music by Rhonda. All-
American picnic fare of hot dogs
and hamburgers with all the trim-
mings and traditional sides will be
available for a donation of $5.
The celebration is open to the
public. Put on your red, white and
blue and enjoy a festive patriotic
afternoon. VFW Post 8189 is on
Veterans Drive, Homosassa, west
of U.S. 19. Turn on to Veterans
Drive from U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley
Davidson.
Members will meet at 7 p.m.
Monday, July 9, at the post. All
members are strongly encouraged
to attend and post officers are
requested to be in proper uniform
for the meeting. Veterans interest-
ed in joining VFW Post 8189
should bring a copy of their DD
214 or a Transfer Request.
Call Cmdr. Ron Houlihan at 628-
3160 or VFW Post 8189 at 795-
5012 during its canteen hours from


1 to 10 p.m.
* The H. F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills off County
Road 491, across the street from
Roc's 491 Sports Bar and directly
behind the AmSouth Bank will be
sponsoring the following activities
during June.
Sunday: Bingo in the big hall
beginning at 1 p.m. Lots of games
and lots of payouts. Always plenty
of snacks and refreshments for
your pleasure and all the big time
sporting events on our big screen
television all afternoon.
Monday: The VFW Golf League
plays each Monday at different
courses. Contact Dick Sorrells or
Jim Freiheit at the post for tee
times and locations. The Cake
Crab Company Golf League plays
at Twisted Oaks Golf Club every
Monday at 8 a.m. Check with Lou
Kempf for available tee times.
Drink specials in the canteen every
Monday. Monday night dart tourna-
ment in the canteen beginning at 7
p.m.
' Tuesday: Pool tournament in the


canteen beginning at 2 p.m. House
committee meeting second
Tuesday, staff meeting every third


Installation of officers at VFW Post 7122


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6-24 @ 2007 United Feature Syndicate, Inc


-- After over 17 Years of servicing
Citrus County and the surrounding areas with fine quality
jewelryy and service, KENNETH CHARLES JEWELERS is...





0 ny/ Evev ythiAgt Cty/-t then Store!

Choose From Designers Such As:
P*oberto Coin, Bvl'Cgari, Gregg *Rutai
J-touse of TaylfCor, KJCcLatfy IreCcuanLc
AnducC Others

Everything Must Be Sold!


(




'4.'


Snneth Wharles


89 W Gulf To Lake Highway * 352-527-2556
Mon-Fri 10am-6pm * Sat 10am-3pm F


Special to the Chronicle
New post officers for VFW Post 7122 in Floral City were elected to office In April, their Installation was May 7 and they all offi-
cially took their offices -at noon June 17. Congratulations to the VFW officers, the Ladies Auxiliary Officers and the Men's
Auxiliary Officers. VFW Post officers, front row, from left, are: Rich Bergman-quartermaster; Terry Fergerson, one-year trustee;
Sid Hatten, adjutant and post judge advocate; Alfred "Bubba" Souza, chaplain; Watson "Doc" Fisher, junior vice commander;
John Myers, two-year trustee; Ron Snell, three-year trustee; and Michael Mendez, surgeon. Back row, from left, are: Bob
Merrihue, senior vice commander; and Joel Hughes, commander. Not pictured are one-year trustee Otto Kramer, and officer of
the day Eugene Basinski.


LEFT: Ladies Auxiliary officers, from left, are: Florence DeMint, chaplain; Thayer Fair, treasurer; Shareen Simon, president;
Maddie Farr, junior vice president; Janice Alvarez, senior vice president; Lynn Fergerson, three-year trustee. Not pictured are:
Yvette Storer, conductress; Peggy Basinski, guard; Dawn Freeman, one-year trustee; and Robin Palmer, two-year trustee.
RIGHT: Men's Auxiliary Officers, from left, are: Harold Fair, chaplain; Robert Oberlin, senior vice president; Jack Seaman, three-
year trustee; Kenny Winner, president; James Howell, standing In for guard Dave Jones; and Jack Ziemendorf, junior vice pres-
ident. Not pictured are: Bob Vivian, secretary/treasurer; Pat Devitt, two-year trustee; and Ed Willard, one-year trustee.


I


Tuesday and post general meeting
every fourth Tuesday monthly.
Wednesday: Bar bingo in the
canteen at 2 p.m. Wednesday is
ladies night. Cook out every
Wednesday night serving ham-
burgers, cheeseburgers, kielbasa
dogs, hot dogs and grilled chicken
sandwiches with all the trimmings
for a very nominal donation from 5
to 7 p.m. We'll be playing "Show
Me the Money" every Wednesday
from 5 to 7 p.m. hosted by Bill and
Val VanMeter.
Thursday: VFW Mixed Golf
League every Thursday alternating
between Pine Ridge Golf Club and
Twisted Oaks Golf Club with an 8
a.m. tee time. Check with Randy or
Mary Benfer for available tee
times. Pool tournament in the can-
teen at 7 p.m.
Friday: Dart Tournament at 7
p.m. Cook out from 5 to 7 p.m.
serving hamburgers, cheeseburg-
ers, hot dogs, kielbasa dogs and
grilled chicken sandwiches with all
the trimmings. "Show Me the
Money" game hosted by Bill and
Val VanMeter from 5 to 7 p.m.
Saturday: $1 day from 1 to 5
p.m. Karaoke in the canteen from 8
to midnight. Snacks (sandwiches
and chips) served during karaoke.
Different karaoke host most every
week.
* Hunger and Homeless
Coalition - Anyone who knows of
a homeless veteran in need of
food, haircut, voter ID, food
stamps, medical assistance or
more blankets is asked to call John
Young at the Hunger and
Homeless Coalition at 628-4357, or
pass along this phone number to:
the veteran.
* Dan Campbell Airborne
Association will not have any
meetings during the summer
months. Starting in September theq
meetings will resume on the third
Wednesday of the month at .(
American Legion Post 155, Crystal,
River. The meetings start at 6:30 .
pm. Call Steve Leonard at 726-
3693.
* Landing Ship Dock (LSD) g
Sailors meet at Denny's in Crystal,
River at 2 p.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly. Call Jimmie at 621-0617.q
* The Marine Corps League q
Citrus Detachment 819 meets at
7 p.m. the last Thursday monthly at
the VFW Post 10087 in Beverly ::
Hills. We can ise your help on the
Toys For Tots program, honor
guard or scholarship programs.

Please see VETS/Page 1 A
I


r'-ElMMUIXtXT TLTY


J24








,3rruS OUN' (F) CRONLLLSUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 15A


Today's MOVIESs


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness
Box Office 637-3377
"1408" (PG-13) 12:10 p.m., 2:35
p'm., 5 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Evan Almighty" (PG) Noon,
2:30 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10
f.m. Digital. No passes or super
savers.
"Fantastic Four: Silver Surfer"
(PG) 12:15 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 4:50
p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:05 p.m. No
passes or super savers.
V "Ocean's 13" (PG-13) 12:40
p~m., 3:50 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:55
p.m.
."Surf's Up" (PG) 12:20 p.m.,
2:45 p.m., 5:05 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
9:50 p.m.
C


"Pirates of the Caribbean:
World's End" (PG-13) 12:30 p:m.,
4 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"1408" (PG-13) 12:40 p.m., 2:55
p.m., 5:20 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
Digital.
"Evan Almighty" (PG) Noon,
2:20 p.m., 4:45 .p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
9:50 p.m. Digital: No passes or
super savers.
"Nancy Drew" (PG) 12:10 p.m.,
2:30 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10
p.m. Digital.
"Fantastic Four: Silver Surfer"
(PG) 12:20 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 5:10
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:10 p.m. Digital.


No passes or super savers.
"Ocean's 13" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
Digital.
"Surf's Up" (PG) 12:45 p.m.,
2:50 p.m., 5:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
9:45 p.m. Digital.
"Knocked Up" (R) 12:50 p.m., 4'
p.m., 7 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Pirates of the Caribbean:
World's End" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10-40 p.m.
"Shrek the Third" (PG) 12:30
p.m., 2:45 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
9:55 p.m. Digital.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and enter-
tainment information.


SO YOU KNOW
,, News notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an event.
* During the busy season, expect notes to run no more than twice.
- Submit information at least two weeks before the event.
* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 563-3280; or by
e-mail to newsdesk@ chronicleonline.com.




AN ACTIVE,


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LIFESTYLE



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SCOTT REDRICK, MD
I 582 SE 7TH Avenue, Crystal River, FL 34429


VETS
Continued from Page 14A

Call Commandant Bob Deck at
527-1557,
* Harry F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, is having a
Fourth of July chicken dinner. The
menu is chicken, baked beans,
macaroni salad, potato salad, cake
and coffee and the cost is $6.
Serving will be from noon to 3 p.m.
Tickets can be purchased at the
canteen or from the post auxiliary
members. No tickets will be sold
after July 1. Come join us for a very
happy and glorious Fourth of July.
* U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI) Sturgeon Base meets at
11 a.m. on the first Saturday
monthly at American Legion Post
155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway in Crystal River.
Visitors and interested parties
are always welcome. For more
information, call Base Cmdr. Billy
Wein at 726-5926.
* The Disabled American
Veterans and the Auxiliary,
Chapter 70 in Inverness at the cor-
ner of North Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North, will
not meet during the months of July
and August. We will, however, con-,
tinue to be open from 9 to 11 a.m.
Tuesday and Thursday to service
our veterans.


One of our service officers will
be on vacation for an extended
period of time, but we will still have
at least two service officers avail-
able to serve our veterans. We
look forward to sending out our
next newsletter when our adjutant
returns from vacation the end of
August and will see everyone at
the next meeting on Sept. 11
(Patriot Day).
* Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Purple
Heart (MOPH) meets 1:15 p.m. on
the third Tuesday of January,
March, May, July, September and
November at the Citrus County
Veterans Service Office
Classroom, Citrus County
Resources CenterNA Clinic, 2804
W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto
(off County Road 491 north of C.R.
486). All combat wounded veterans
and lineal descendants of Purple
Heart recipients are cordially invit-
ed to attend and to join the ranks
of Chapter 776.
. Chapter 776 is comprised of
combat wounded veterans who
share the common purpose of pre-
serving the proud legacy of the
Purple Heart Medal, which is the
oldest military decoration in the
world in present use. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 MOPH, please visit the
Chapter 776 web site at www.cit-
ruspurpleheart.org or call J.B. at
527-2460 or Curt at 382-3847.


* Parris Island -Attention all
Jarheads! Luxury motorcoach trip
Sept. 6 to 8 to Parris Island. Two
nights at the Ramada in Beaufort,
S.C., with two. breakfasts at the
hotel. See training of men and
women; meals at the mess hall
with the troops; flag raising cere-
mony on Friday morning followed
by recruit graduation ceremony.
Visit the P.X., museum and officers
club. For reservations, make small
deposit now, with final payment by
July 27. Call Marine Peter Marquis,
637-7292, or Marine Paul Maurer,
726-6238.
* The Fleet Reserve
Association Branch 186 and its
Ladies Auxiliary hosts a "Pearl
Harbor Remembrance" luncheon
each year on Dec. 7 to honor
those who served at Pearl Harbor
during the attack in 1941.
A few years ago, Citrus County
awarded a Proclamation that reads:
"Whereby, commemorating the
attack on Pearl Harbor will instill in
all people of Citrus County a
greater understanding and appreci-
ation of the selfless sacrifice of the
individuals who served in the
Armed Forces of the United States
during World War II," and further-
more "The Board hereby recog-
nizes Dec. 7 of each year as Pearl
Harbor Remembrance Day" in
Citrus County. The Fleet Reserve
and Auxiliary are proud to host an
annual luncheon in their honor.


206-0624SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Board of County
Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida, sitting as the governing body of
the Citrus County Municipal Service Benefit Unit for Water and Wastewater
Utility Services will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, July 24, 2007, at
2:30 p.m. in the Board of County Commissioners' Meeting Room, Citrus
County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida for the
purpose of adopting a non-ad valorem assessment roll for the Halls River
Road Wastewater Special Assessment Area (2004). The total cost of the
improvements is $4,624,636.96.

All affected property owners have a right to appear at this public
hearing and to file written objections with the Board of County
Commissioners within twenty (20) days of the date of this notice. Written
objections or comments should be mailed to the Clerk of the Board of
County Commissioners at 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida
34450.

The geographic area to which the non-ad valorem assessment
applies is as follows:


The unit of measure for which property within the Halls River Road
Wastewater Special Assessment Area (2004) will be levied is as follows:
$5,160.00 per assessment unit.

The non-ad valorem assessments will be added to your ad valorem
tax bill mailed in November of each year. These non-ad valorem
assessments will be collected by the Tax Collector of Citrus County
pursuant to Chapter 197, Florida Statutes. FAILURE TO PAY THE
ASSESSMENTS WILL CAUSE A TAX CERTIFICATE TO BE ISSUED
AGAINST YOUR PROPERTY WHICH MAY RESULT IN A LOSS OF TITLE
TO YOUR PROPERTY.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting
because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the County
Administrator's Office, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida,
34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are
hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Telephone (352) 341-6580.

If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of
County Commissioners with respect to any matter considered at this public
hearing, he will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is
made which record shall include the testimony and evidence upon which
the appeal is to be based.

BY: DENNIS DAMATO, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
710379


.(SITRUS COUIVIY (FL) CHRomca.






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CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicu-)


24 2007


16ASUNDAY, JUNE ,









SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 17A


CTnus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


with gravy, mixed garden vegeta-
bles, mashed sweet potato, whole
wheat bread with margarine, cran-
berry-orange relish mold, low-fat
milk.
Friday: Birthday Celebration -
Curried chicken salad, garden
salad with French dressing, mari-
nated broccoli salad, whole wheat
bread with margarine, cake, low-fat
milk.
Congregate dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal River,
Homosassa Springs, Inverness
and South Dunnellon. For informa-
tion, call Support Services at 795-
6264.


Today's HOROSCOPE


Your Birthday: Many opportuni-
ties to do great things will avail
themselves to you. However, they
can only be promising if you take
full advantage of them and are opti-
mistic about their potential out-
come.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - If
something you were planning to do
socially doesn't come off as expect-
ed, don't waste your day brooding
or moping. Find a fun person with
whom to share a spur-of-the-
moment activity.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - You
could be saddled with someone
Who tries to make you feel selfish
because you wish to spend time on
your own interests. Ignore him or
er; this person is the real culprit.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -
Listen if someone tries to give you
some well-meaning advice, but
seek your own counsel to deter-
mine the consequence of his or her
thinking. Don't act on what is con-
strued as retaliation.
; Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -
When it comes to making money,
you can be pretty good at it.
However, you could be better at dis-
posing of it, especially when you're
With someone who is a gambler or
? free spender.
I Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -
Select your activities and/or com-
panions with special consideration
Ond paint your canvas with consid-
eration and graciousness. It only
takes one bad brush stroke to
muddy the scene.
; Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -
Quietly orchestrate your activities
and intentions from behind the


scenes, and all should run smooth-
ly for you. Overexposure carries a
risk of confusion from outside influ-
ences.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -
Should your friends or associates
give you a million reasons why your
ideas won't work, recheck your plan
for flaws, but implement them if
experience tells you they will work.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -
You might encounter a number of
obstacles that need to be maneu-
vered around in order to achieve
your objectives. If you don't lose
your patience, persistence will win
the day.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -
Be prepared to change or alter your
plans to accommodate an
unplanned development, so you
won't panic when something forces
such an action. Even a major shift
can't spoil things.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -
Before you totally discard- an
involvement on which you've spent
considerable time, recheck the facts
to make certain they are correct.
Don't be rash.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -You
might get caught up in a situation
that is getting a bit too sticky for
your taste. Instead of getting out-
raged, calm the issue with diploma-
cy and charm. Using force could
entrap you.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - Set
the example of cooperation when
working with others on a joint
endeavor. If you recoil and show
displeasure with a job, the situation
could become even more uncom-
fortable


;M Read about local businesses in the Business Digest
SUNDAYS


PHOTO REQUEST GUIDEUNES
N Chronicle photographers will consider requests to take photos of community events. Call 563-5660 for details.


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of the National Champion Florida Gators


AIItel charges a monthly regulatory & administrative fee of up to $1.70, Federal & State Universal Service Fund fees (both vary by customer usage), & a 911 fee of up to $1.94 (where 911 service is available). These
additional fees may not be taxes or government-required charges & are subject to change. Phone Details: Phones & applicable rebates available for a limited time, while supplies last, to new customers & eligible existing
customers with activation of a qualifying rate plan. Contact Alltel to determine if you are eligible. Limit 1 rebate per qualifying purchase. Phone cannot be returned once mail-in rebate certificate has been submitted.
Customer pays applicable taxes. See rebate certificate for details. Bluetooth Wireless Technology: The Bluetooth features of this handset may not be compatible with all devices that are Bluetooth enabled; Alltel cannot
be responsible for compatibility with devices not sold by Alltel. Largest Network Claim: Based upon analysis by an independent research company in April 2007, which compared marketed coverage
patterns at the time of their creation of each wireless carrier without allowance for variations due to electrical interference, customer equipment, topography & each carrier's translation & defined A,.. -..-
preferences of their own internal engineering data. Risk Free: if you're not completely satisfied with your postpaid service within the first 15 consecutive days of purchase, you can end your agreement '. .s-.
with no disconnect penalty & pay only for the service used. Undamaged equipment can also be returned or exchanged. Activation & phonebook transfer fees are non-refundable. See shopalitel.com / consumer
for complete details. Additional Information: This offer may be limited due to time, supplies, coverage, or participating locations. $25 non-refundable activation fee & possible $200 early termination fee information |
applies per line. Service is according to the Terms & Conditions for Communications Services & other information available at any Alltel store or alltel.com. All product & service marks referenced are code /
the names, trade names, trademarks & logos of their respective owners. Screen images are simulated. �2007 Alltel. All rights reserved. Q et^


-==-- June 25-29 MENUS S


CONGREGATE DINING
Monday: Barbecued pork riblet,
pinto beans with peppers and
onions, mixed greens, cornbread
with margarine, pear cup, low-fat
milk.
Tuesday: Steamed frankfurter
over baked beans with tomato bits,
coleslaw with carrot, hot dog bun,
ketchup and mustard packets, cin-
namon apples, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Salisbury steak
with brown gravy, lyonnaise potato,
carrot cuts, whole wheat bread
with margarine, banana pudding
with banana and vanilla wafers,
low-fat milk.
Thursday: Sliced roast turkey


Inverness
* Citrus Shop Ctr. 1 (352) 860-2241

For Business & Government Accounts call 1-866-WLS-BIZZ or visit alltelbusiness.com


�.Y.r.... .... ........ I , - -


11 1 - .. , - LII- j1









18A SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007


Famed U.S. WW II



cemetery gets



visitor center


Associated Press
U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates, second from right, U.S. Ambassador to France Craig R.
Stapleton, right, and U.S. D-Day veteran Walter Ehlers, left, take part in the ribbon-cutting ceremony
June 6 to inaugurate the new Normandy American Cemetery Visitor Center in Colleville-sur-Mer, west-
ern France. The Normandy American Memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer, best known for its sober rows of
white grave markers of fallen U.S. troops in World War II, has at last gotten a visitor's center. The
ceremony marked the 63rd anniversary of the D-Day landings in Normandy.

Ribbon-cutting on 63rd anniversary ofD-Day


Associated Press
COLLEVILLE-SUR-MER,
France - Photos of fresh-faced
privates, wizened U.S. generals
and the largest amphibious
military operation in history.
Dented army canteens that
once dotted killing fields in
France. The booming sounds of
gunships echoing over the
waves in Normandy - this
time, on video.
The Normandy American
Cemetery in Colleville-sur-
'vIer, best known for its sober
rows of white 'grave markers
honoring fallen U.S. troops in
World War II, has at last gotten
a visitor's center.
Nearly a million visitors trek
every year to the cemetery
overlooking Omaha Beach, one
pf the two landing points
where U.S. troops stormed
ashore on D-Day - June 6,
1944 - and helped the Allies
rid the menace of Nazi
Germany over Europe.
Six years in the making, the
pew center was inaugurated
recently by U.S. Defense
Secretary Robert Gates for the
63rd anniversary of the start of
+Operation Overlord" that
helped end the war.
* "We build memorials like
this to remind us of the past. So
that successive generations
vill know the enormous cost of
freedom," Gates said at the cer-
emony
, Designers faced a delicate
task balancing the desire to
educate while not overshadow-
ing sacrifices of nearly 10,000
kmericans buried nearby
SThe $30 million visitor cen-
ter is purposely understated,
with most of the 10,000-square-
feet of display space under-
ground, though 'it is now the
entryway for tourists onto the
cemetery's manicured lawn.
"The cemetery has always
had this extremely powerful
emotional component," said


." 'I III!




^ t ^ ^ ' ^, . ,'- ,'. : !: ,



'An unidentified visitor wearing a U.S. military nurse uniform walks
past graVes June 6 at the American cemetery. In Colleville-sur-Mer,
western France, marking the 63rd anniversary of the D-Day landings
in Normandy.


Macarena Aristegui of the
American Battle Monuments
Commission, which runs the
cemetery and memorial.
"What was lacking was a story
to go with the names written on
the headstones."
The site is one of the most
visited U.S. military cemeter-
ies in the world. It draws veter-
ans' relatives, many of them
Americans who feel proud of
their country's contribution to
the liberation of France and
Europe, as well as veterans
themselves whose numbers
are dwindling - but who still
have many thoughts for 'their.+
fallen comrades-in-arms.
The center displays
scratched and dented
weapons, photos of soldiers
who carried them, and
excerpts from letters they sent
home. It also shows documen-


tary films and news reports
about the war's progress.
U.S. Congressmen David
Obey, D-Wis., and John Murtha,
D-Pa., proposed building the
center in 2001, and it was
designed by French-American
architect Nicolas Kelemen.
The first stone was laid two
years ago.
Some 200 American World
War II veterans were on hand
for the center's June 6. 2007.
inauguration, along with 15
who had fought on the beaches,
some of whom hadn't been
back since the war, Aristegui
*said. *!* 1 *


Services
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BETH J. HARPAZ
AP Travel Editor
NEW YORK - In the past
nine months, passengers have
been kicked off airplanes or
detained at airports for uncon-
trolled coughing, joking about
hijacking, breast-feeding a
baby, kissing and other
amorous activities, cursing at
flight attendants who denied
them alcohol, failing to get a
screaming child buckled in for
takeoff, and carrying a sippy
cup of water.
Whether you side with the
passengers or the workers who
disciplined them, one thing is
for sure. It doesn't take much in
the post-9/11 era to get in trou-
ble on airplanes or in airports
for behavior that might not be a
big deal at a ballpark, beach or
mall.
Here are five tips for getting
to your destination this sum-
mer without getting scolded,
grilled, detained or escorted
off a plane.
* Be discreet "The No. 1 tip


TOUR
Continued from Page A2

Some paid no attention
whatsoever to technique,
something we should have
learned in the rice field the
day before. The technique -
unfold it, find the candle, light
the candle, wait for hot air to
build up, wait some more, hold
this thing in a precise manner,
wait some more, and, voila!
Several beautiful lighted
lantern kites became airborne.
Some in our group didn't pay
attention to the precise holding
technique and soon learned
that one cannot push a kite,
even one with hot air as a
booster, into the air. I should
have known a universal rule
applies: You can't push a wet
string.
When traveling, especially in
a foreign country, be on the
alert for surprises or unusual
events, then join in the fun if it
is appropriate. Spontaneous
events like these are truly


BED-
Continued from Page A2

draped replica ot a Colonial
four-poster bed with an origi-
nal white-and-indigo quilt.
Other necessities from the era
on v\ie are a long-handled bed


LOVE
Continued from Page A2
"Summer of Love Treasure
Hunt" sponsored by San
Francisco City Guides, 11 a.m.
to 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 30.
Participants will solve a series
of puzzles about people and
places from the era, complete


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(Route 50) Between US 19 & Mariner Blvd., Brooksville, FL 34613


is the 'I wasn't raised in a barn'
tip. Whatever you wouldn't do
in a church, don't do on a
plane," said Peter Shankman,
founder of
AirTroductions.com, a social-
networking site for air travel-
ers. "If there's ever been a time
in your life where you don't
want to attract more attention
to yourself, it's on a plane."
* Prepare if you're traveling
with small children. Tell them
what to expect on board. Use
their car seat on the plane so
they're not upset by unfamiliar
restraints. Bring snacks. "Bring
along games and coloring or
connect-the-dots books," said
Joyce Gioia, who writes the
Herman Trend Alert, a busi-
ness strategies newsletter "My
tactic was to pack a brand new
toy my child had never seen."
* Control symptoms for
coughs, colds and other illness-
es. Bring tissues; dispose of
them in the airsickness bag.
Bring a bottle of water for a dry
throat. (You are allowed to
bring water onboard if you buy


it after going through security.)
* Don't make jokes about ter-
rorism. "Jokes and/or com-
ments about threats to passen-
gers or the aircraft will be
taken seriously," the
Transportation Security
Administration's "Summer
Travel Tips" brochure states.
A woman was detained by
authorities in Malaysia after
the crew refused to let her chil-
dren visit the cockpit during a
flight and she jokingly said,
"My children cannot hijack the
plane, but I can."
- Know the rules and plan
ahead. At www.tsa.gov you'll
find detailed information on
what is and isn't permitted in
your carry-on.
"As I'm walking up to securi-
ty, I do a kind of quick mental
scan to make sure I'm in com-
pliance," said Gioia.
If you inadvertently bring
along a prohibited item, you
can leave the checkpoint area
and dispose of it or put it in
your checked baggage.


Part of
the Thai
-:L.. .. .. ,. ...... tour
. �. .,n i.
; . . . .included
'.. ' 1' i " helping
to har-
.,.vest
rice.




On the
Thai tour,
lantern kites
were pur-
chased.
Launching
them was a
test of adapt-
ing
Westerners
. to Eastern
skills.
SSpecial to the
,U Chronicle


memorable and do make a trip
especially meaningful.


Neil Sawyer is a
Crystal River
resident and travels
extensively


' armer ltfi.l ULe b^.s ..p.Bs ,aay^bed ..cla .t
hot coals before sfidrgfr'
cold sheets) a primitive curl- part of the DAR's jrmanht
ing iron, and men's and collection.
women's nightclothes and Visit by Saturday. before the.
robes, Irom simple cottons to museum closes for a week. or
lavish silks, between July 2 and Oct.. 6. For
While at the museum, don't more information, call (202)
miss the original quilts, cover- 628-1776 or visit www.dar.org
lets, china, silver and fully fur- ..museum.

with appearances by costumed the treasure hunt will benefit,
characters Assemble your own San Francisco City Guides, a'
team of up to six people or be project of the local public;
placed in a team the day of the library that leads free walking
event. Tickets are $35 through0 tours.around the city DetailsVa
July 31, $40 after that atd $45 ww., vfcitygu ides.org7 r (415)'
the day of the event Fees from ''557-4266. ' .,'


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CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




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S[INDA JUNE24. 207 I QA


- 60th ANNIVERSARY Yirt f oR - - u- sWedding


The Andres


J " -:4,
Edward and Mildred Andres
of Beverly Hills are celebrat-
ing their 60th wedding
anniversary on June 27, 2007.
They were married on June 27,
1947, at Our Lady Queen of
Peace in New Port Richey.
They have been living in
Citrus County for four years.
Mildred is a homemaker and
Edward is a retired U.S. Army
Major.


Brett and Tanya Gaylord of
Homosassa are proud to
announce the first birthday of
their son, Aiden Jayce Gaylord,
who was born on June 21, 2006.
The maternal grandparents
are the late Brian and Sue
Duffy. The paternal grandpar-
ents are Susan Gaylord of
Homosassa Springs and the
late Jay Gaylord of Homosassa.


They have five children:
Chuck Andres, Floral City,
Gerry Andres, Gatlinburg,
Tenn., Robin Peluso, .N.C., Jill
Taylor, N.C., and Jennifer
Scarpati, Beverly Hills; 14
grandchildren and 10 great-
grandchildren:
There will be a celebration
at Berns Steak House in
Tampa, given by daughter,
Jennifer and her husband
Tony


Wedding.


Matheson-Culen

Ms. Doris Matheson and Mr
Robert Cullen were united in
marriage on Saturday, June 9,
2007, at the Beverly Hills
Community Church, Beverly
Hills. The ceremony was per-
formed by the Rev. Stewart
Jamison III.
The bride was escorted to
the altar by her son Kenneth
Matheson. Sherri Weeks was
the maid of honor for her
mother. Best men for their
father were Andrew and Tim
Cullen. Ushers were Joel . , .
Weeks, son-in-law of the bride,
and Kyle Matheson and Jesse
Weeks, grandsons of the bride. friends and relatives from out
-- The reception was- held -at- of town attending..
the Jack Steele Fellowship The couple lives in Beverly
Hall at the church with many. .Hills..


Alexis Nicole Perrino cele-
brated her first birthday on
May 7, 2007. Alexis is the
daughter of Nicole and Gene
Perrino of DeLand. She is the
granddaughter of Sally and
Ron Diericx of Inverness and
Kathy and Gene Perrino of
Citrus Springs and great-
granddaughter of Elizabeth
Duzy of Lecanto.


New


Congratulations to the fol-
lowing new parents:
* To Jamie and Stacy Leach,
Crystal River, a boy, Quincy
Wade Leach. Born at 4:22 p.m.
Friday, May 4, 2007, at Citrus
Memorial hospital. He was 8
lbs. 10 oz. He joined older
brothers Kobe' and Aiden and
older sister Anniston. Maternal
grandparents are Roy and
Judie Yates of Crystal River.
Paternal grandparents are Jim
and Vickie Leach of Tuscum-
bia, Ala. Maternal great-grand-
parents are Arnold and Ruth
Etheridge of Crystal River.
* To Scott and Tricia Denee
Carhart Sexton, Crystal River,
a son, Xavier Kaine Sexton,
born at 7:58 a.m. Tuesday, May
22, 2007, at Citrus Memorial
hospital, Inverness. He
weighed 8 pounds, 4.5 ounces.
* Bruce and Christine
Boardman (Rock) of Spring
Lake, N.C. are proud to an-
nounce the newest member of


their family, Caleb Joseph. He
was born on June 5, 2007 at
Womack Army Medical Center,
Fort Bragg, N.C. His three-
year-old brother, Brayden,
along with his maternal grand-
parents, Robert and Patricia
Rock and Auntie Liz of
Inverness, and Uncle Rob of
Seymour Johnson AFB,
Goldsboro, N.C. were all there
to welcome him into the world.
* To Brittany Phillips and
Christopher Reeves, Inver-
ness, a son, Cooper-Cain
Douglas Reeves, born at 2:33
p.m. Wednesday, June 13, 2007,
at Citrus Memorial hospital.
He weighed 8 pounds, 15
ounces.
* To Savannah and Dave
Clemens of Homosassa, a girl,
Izabel Joy Clemens, born at
10:38 a.m. Monday, June 18,
2007, at Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center. She was 7
pounds and 3/4 ounce, and 18
inches long.


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dards.
N For more information, call
Linda Johnson, newsroom
coordinator, at 563-5660.


Bryon Scot Roach and
Jennifer Lynne Frasier were
united in marriage at 2 p.m.
Saturday, April 21, 2007, at
Abundant Life Christian
Fellowship in Crystal River.
Pastor David Sininger officiat-
ed the Christian marriage cer-
emony.
The bride, Jennifer Lynne, is
the daughter of Alana Frasier
of Crystal River and Robert
Frasier of Moultonborough,
New Hampshire. The groom,
Bryon Scot, is the son of the
late Jack and Elva (Babcock)
Roach of Flint, Mich.
The bride, given in marriage
by her father, wore a
Michaelangelo white strapless
satin and lace A-line wedding
gown embellished with beads,
sequins and pearls.
Matrons of honor were
Melissa Gonzalez and Alison
Dye, sisters of the bride.
Bridesmaids were Debbie
Leibacher, friend of the bride,
Krysia Bargiel and Sara
Bargiel, cousins of the bride.
Junior bridesmaid was Ariana
Gonzalez, niece of the bride.
Attendants wore Victorian lilac
floor-length A-line dresses
detailed with rhinestones and
gathered waists.
Best man was Jeff
McLanahan, friend of the
groom. Groomsmen were Jake
Roach, son of the groom, Sonny
Bierlein, brother-in-law of the
groom, John Teague, nephew
of the groom, and Aaron
Gonzalez, nephew of the bride.
The groomsmen wore black
tuxedos with Victorian lilac
vests and matching neckties.
Flower girls were Caitlyn
.Dye and .Courtney.Dye,a-ieces
of the bride. They wore white
tea length dresses detailed
with rhinestones and matching
white gloves. They carried
white satin baskets decorated
with purple ribbon and filled
with purple and silver rose
petals. Ring bearer was Isaiah
Gonzalez, nephew of the bride.
He wore a black tuxedo with a
white vest and matching neck-
tie and a white carnation bou-:
tonniere with Victorian lilac
cluster berries.
During the marriage cere-
mony, Aaron and Ariana


Gonzalez sang- "What I've Been
Looking For" and Joel and
Becky Wright sang "Bless the
Broken Road" in tribute to the
bride and groom.
William Gonzalez, brother-
in-law of the bride, played the
keyboard for the marriage cer-
emony.
The reception immediately,
followed the ceremony at,
Citrus Hills Golf and Country
Club in Hernando.
Out-of-town guests attended
from Colorado, Kentucky, New
Hampshire, New York and
Virginia.
Jennifer is a 1988 Lecanto
High School graduate. She
earned her A.A. degree from
CFCC in 2003, her B.S. in
English Education from the
University of South Florida in
2005, and will graduate from
Barry University in December
2007 with a M.S. in: Reading.
She is a seventh-grade reading
-teaeher--at-Gitrus-.-Springs_._
Middle School.
Bryon is a 1986-graduate-of
the University of Maryland,
where he earned a B.S. degree
in Information Systems. He
served 15 years in the U.S.
Army He is . currently
employed with .Papa John's
International, where he is an
operation specialist for the
West Division.
The happy couple honey-
mooned in Fort Lauderdale
and Key West. They will reside
in Florida, eventually making
their home in Colorado.


Frasier-Roach









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ZIDD SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007


Husband starts projects



then abandons them


Dear Annie: My husband, 'Arnold," and I
have been married almost 10 years. We
have a good, solid relationship and four
wonderful young children. I am a stay-at-home
mom, while Arnold runs his own
company, which is quite successful.
The problem? We live in an older
home that is in need of numerous
repairs. Our roof and driveway need . .
immediate attention, our pool
requires ongoing upkeep, and the
basement needs a complete over-
haul. Arnold seems to think he can
do all this by himself. He imagines he
has time to clean the pool, and paint
and plaster the basement Yesterday,
I caught him online looking up how
to lay roof shingles. ANN
Annie, my husband is delusional.
He works 16-hour days and most MAIL
weekends. When he's home, he is too
tired to lift a finger and all he wants to do is play
with the kids. Not to mention, Arnold is not par-
ticularly handy, and his work turns out shoddy
When I suggest we pay someone to fix things,
Arnold gets mad and a huge argument ensues. I
even researched the cheapest laborers in our
area and presented this information to Arnold,
who then freaked out and told me to "drop it"
because he'd get it done. We can afford to pay
someone, no problem, but Arnold refuses.
Right now, I have no bathroom vanity and no
usable sink, as Arnold removed them to paint
the bathroom seven months ago. His procrasti-
nation is making me crazy How do I get him to
understand? - Need a Handyman in Dallas
Dear Dallas: Starting multiple projects and
leaving them unfinished is often a sign of atten-
tion deficit disorder. You can contact the
National Resource Center on AD/HD at (800)
233-4050 or CHADD (chadd.org) for support and
information. In the meantime, tell your husband
you are hiring someone to finish the bathroom,
and then do it, even if Arnold throws a tantrum.
These decisions should not be his alone.
DearAnnie: Do you think it is appropriate for
a mother to scratch her son's back if he is 35
years old? This occurs nearly every time my
husband and his mother are together. And it is
not a "scratch my back real quick, I can't reach"
kind of thing. She usually asks him if he wants


L


her to scratch his back, and then she puts her
hand under his shirt and scratches for up to 15
minutes. Sometimes she will rub his back or
scratch the top of his head as well. Other times,
he will actually ask her to do it, even
a if I am right there.
Is it just me, or is this inappropri-
ate? It makes me so uncomfortable
that I have to leave the room when it
happens. - Torn in Charlotte, N.C.
Dear Torn: This is the kind of
thing that seems to have sexual over-
tones, but most likely is completely
innocent Mom has probably been
scratching Sonny's back since he
was a baby. He likes it. She enjoys
knowing she can do this for him. And
IE'S yes, she may derive satisfaction from
seeing you get all flustered, but
.BOX that's because you allow it. We think
this is too small a deal to make you
so unhappy Ignore it It's no skin off your back
Dear Annie: This is for "Just a Grandma,"
whose toddler granddaughter, "Fiona," misbe-
haved in a restaurant. Bravo to her for not say-
ing one word. Her son and his wife know their
child behaved like a brat. They can see what she
sees. Obviously they do not "give in" to their
daughter all the time, because the parents told
her she couldn't walk around in the restaurant
- hence the tantrum.
Fiona will grow up, but Grandma's words of
criticism will never be forgotten. She raised
hers. Let them learn. - Smart Grandma
Dear Grandma: Many grandparents were
irate that we didn't advise '"ust a Grandma" to
chastise her son and daughter-in-law for the
way Fiona is being raised. We understand the
temptation, but it rarely achieves anything but
resentment


Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell
and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. E-mail questions to
anniesmailbox@comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, P.O. Box 118190, Chicago, IL
60611. To find out more about Annie's Mailbox,
and read features by other Creators Syndicate
writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.


The mechanical bull
My "Check Engine" light is on again. So I you're late for an oil change; it could mean that
unlatched the hood and took a look you should bring it back to the dealer so he can
Sure enough, it was still there. It looked show you all the new stuff in his showroom that-
good, too. Right where it's supposed to be. In the will make that piece of junk you're driving now
middle. Lots of hoses and wires and belts all look like a Third World jitney; it could mean that
over the place. They were a little dirty; but hey, I the 'Check Engine' light needs to be replaced."
live on a dirty street You have to "So you're saying it's just a big
expect a little dirt might get under the scam?"
hood. That's enough checking for me. "Not at all. It's probably that cat-,
Still, the light wouldn't go out Where's alytic thingamajig that reduces emis-
the "OK, I checked it" button? sions. I'm pretty sure you .can't pass
Of course, that would be too easy. inspection if that's not working."
I've fallen into the "Check Engine" "But you're the inspector.",
scam and there's no escaping it "Yeah, it's funny how that works.',
"What could cause the 'Check It's almost like I could make up any-
Engine' light to go on?" I asked my thing I wanted to about your car and
mechanic. you'd have to pay it to get that light to
"Oh, lots of things- my kid starting AM go off."
college, the wife buying new living. MULLEN "There's no way I. can check it
room furniture, that vacation we want myself?"
to take to DisneyWorld, my daughter deciding to "Please. This takes sophisticated equipment
marry that bonehead she's been seeing - it all and years of training."
depends. You'd have to bring it in." "The kid at the parts store said he could do
"Is it OK for me to keep driving it?" I asked. it." .
"Sure, I don't need the money that fast." "Did I say years of training? I meant 15 min-
"I kind of meant would it be safe for me to drive utes. But he can't fix it."
it or do I need to have you look at it right away?" "I'm trying to figure out how much this is,
"I never thought of it that way Let me think going to cost me."
I'm sure it's safe. What's the worst that could "What can I tell you. It could run anywhere:
possibly happen? Your car suddenly stops dead from a day at the spa for the wife to a new paint
on the interstate while an 18-wheeler full of job for my house. Somewhere in that range. But,
steel girders going 65 is tailgating you? You don't worry, I won't do any work unless you,
wouldn't even feel it. By the way, have you filled approve it.".
out that donor card on the back of your license? "Maybe it'd be cheaper to buy a new car than"
Not that there'd be many good parts left, but to keep throwing money at this one. Eight hun-
what's left of your skin could still be used to dred here, 600 there, it's starting to add up.!
help many people. Don't be selfish. Haven't you replaced everything on this car at,
"A thousand things could make that 'Check least once?"
Engine' light go on, from something as simple as "Hardly. You've still got the origin nal back seat
a loose gas cap to a leaky head gasket I'm guess- And the ashtray and cup holders work fine. Are;
ing leaky head gasket because I just bought a you sure you want to take such a drastic step?,,
condo in Boca." Keep itanotheryear My kids want those iPhones."
"But is it dangerous to drive with that 'Check ___ ___ _ _"
Engine' light on? Please. Give. Me. An. Answer"
"I hate to get into the hypothetical. It could
mean so many things: it could mean that your Reach author Jim Mullen ,
.car is no longer under warranty; it could mean , atjim nullen, 'mvay.com.


Sunday -

Puzzle answer is on Page 14A.


ACROSS
1 Shiny quality
6 Radio operators
10 Discard
15 Certain voter (abbr.)
18 Happen again
19 Barroom
21 Guileless
22 Partly (prefix)
23 Lendl and Pavlov
24 Shrine
in ancient Greece
25 Directive
26 Decorate
27 Pickled fish
28 Light meal
29 Small wood
31 Stone for sculptures
33 Phobia
35 Job
36 Sweet coating
37 Put off
38 Exudes
40 Neutral color
41 The Orient
42 - Sue Martin
44 Smithy
45 Sword handle
47 Remotely
51 Great composer
52 Gooey stuff
53 Functions
55 High card
56 Not napping
57 Prejudice
58 Holy Roman -
60 Of the best quality
62 Jobless
63 Horse's color
65 Ireland
66 Followed in secret
67 Sheltered side
68 Encourage
69 Ready, willing and -
71 Memorize
73 Go team!
75 Letters in genetics
76 Tolerated
77 Go wrong
78 Sticky substance
81 Ford that flopped
83 Tilt
84 Eager
85 Male animal
87 Fruit with a stone
90 Cry of woe
92 Underhanded


94 Knock - - loop
95 Ibsen character
96 Pure
98 Samovars
99 A little drunk
100 "Exodus" hero
101 Whiten
103 Be worthy of
105 Gemstones
106 Little ones
108 Griffith or Garcia
109 Throb
110 Spoken
111 Actress Sothern
and others
113 - of the ball
114 Potato state
115 One way to have pie
(3 wds.)
118 Las -
119 Mythical creature
120 Noblewoman
124 Straighten out
125 Animal
126 Mends
127 Chess piece
128 - Hari
129 To pieces
131 Call forth
133 Wide awake
135 Regular
136 Soothing preparation
137 Playing cards
138 Burn
139 "- Rosenkavalier"
140 Direct
141 Florida county
142 Passover meal


DOWN
1 Sorrow
2 Reception
3 City in Florida
4 Celestial body
5 Upperclassmen
(abbr.)
6. Annoy continually
7 Woe is mel
8 Imitation
9 Costa del -
10 Nap
11 Cut to pieces
12 Midway attraction
13 - Maria
14 Spread through
15 Dome-shaped hat
16 Zola
17 Acted out silently
19 Musical work
20 Dressing gown
22 Layers of rock
28 Pole for walking tall
30 Fury
32 Hirt and Pacino
34 Done-again movie
36 Microbe
37 Search into
39 No more than
40 City in Idaho
42 - puff
43 Showy flower
44 Burning signal
45 Scion
46 Immaterial
48 Break down
49 Zenith
50 Marsh plant
51 Postal matter
52 Round Table knight
(2 wds.)
53 Saw
54 Pole on a ship
57 Carried
59 Hard-rind fruits
61 Hoop
63 Like dishwater
64 Most up-to-date
66 Not punctual
70 Big snake
72 Satie and Estrada
74 Cattle group
76 Cut
79 Perfect place
80 Tasty bit
82 Dull
84 Eagle's nest


86 Baseball great
Willie -
87 Converse
88 Big sandwich
89 Use a blue pencil
91 Like a doily
93 Hospital worker
94 Told a white lie
96 Perfume ceremonially
97 Copies
99 Revolve
102 Large extent
of territory
104 Annexes
105 Means of restraint
107 Polynesian islander
109 Pins
110 Boasts
112 Likewise not
113 Kitchen utensil
114 Of the sea
115 Having weapons
116 Depart
117 Subsequently
118 Vitality
119 Turned toward
121 Change for the better
122 Mrs. Homer Simpson
123 Stage direction
125 Bundle
126 Prima donna
130 Tap
132 Directed
133 Beast of burden
134 Falsehood


-%dMA c.-- -,- ,i 'nn-7











* MNILB 2B
* rjEA Tra'P ..& Filjd 3B
* Sc.oreb,,ard 4B
* Gclt 5B
* Eritertainrernt 6B


CITRus COUNTY CHRONICLE


a


U


SUNDAY
JUNE 24, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


*


Local golfer has hit

consecutive holes-in-

one on Father's Day
JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI
jmsoracchi@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Celebrating Father's Day by get-
ting a visit or a phone call from your
loving children is ideal.
Completing one of golf's most sto-
ried feats, however, is an added
bonus.
Sam J. Loethen has five holes-inr
one in his 40-plus years of golfing,
but his last two were something spe-
cial.
The 68-year-old Loethen, a mem-
ber of Southern Woods Golf Club,
has now aced holes on consecutive
Father's Days.
The second one came exactly one
week ago on the 142-yard, 17th hole
at Southern Woods, using an eight-
iron.,
"I hit it and I could tell it was a
good shot," said Loethen, who has
three children and eight grandchil-
dren. "It was late in the evening and
you couldn't really see (the ball)."
When his group walked up the
hole, there was one ball sitting close
to the hole.
A fellow golfer asked Loethen if
the ball was his. Yet Loethen, who
said he marks his balls with red
slash marks, peered into the hole
and found the answer to that query.
"I said, 'No, I'm in the hole,"'
.Loethen recalled with a smile. "I
thought, "Again on Father's Day?
This must be my day."'
Just the year before, Loethen
already had a pretty good memory to
cherish on Father's Day.
Playing on the same course, the
golfer used a six-iron to travel the
164 yards required to ace the par-3


JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI/Chronicle
Sam J. Loethen has earned a hole-in-one at Southern Woods on consecutive Father's Days. The 68-year-old Loethen is an accomplished amateur golfer with
a current handicap of about five or six.


seventh hole.
Loethen said that whenever he
gets to a par-3, he pulls out either the
six or eight iron because "those are
my hole-in-one clubs."
Loethen lives a little less than a


mile from Southern Woods with his
second wife Angie, to whom he has
been married to for the last 20 years.
"She's a pretty good golfer -her-'
self," Sam said of Angie.
Seven years ago, doctors thought


Loethen's days of playing golf could
be over.
,. In June 2000, Loethen (who is orig-
inally from the St. Louis area) said
he was showering and felt a lump on
his neck The lump happened to be


right on his lymph node.
"They did a biopsy and said it was
cancer," he said. ,
"After removing his jugular vein
Please see '" - Page 4B


Oregon State routs North Carolina in CWS opener
�Oregon State routs North Carolina in CWS opener


Associated Press
North Carolina's Dustin Ackley, right, is picked off at first base by Oregon State
first baseman Jordan Lennerton in the second inning Saturday of Game 1 of the
College World Series in Omaha, Neb.


Earnhardt wants


win on road course


Beavers run away

with 11-4 win in

Game 1 ofseries

Associated Press
OMAHA, Neb. - Freshman Jorge
Reyes gave Oregon State another
strong pitching performance, leading
the defending champion Beavers to
an 11-4 win over North Carolina in
Game 1 of the College World Series
championship Saturday night
North Carolina, which won three
straight elimination games to set tip a
rematch in the final, will need to win
twice more to keep Oregon State (48-
18) from becoming the first back-to-
back national champion since LSU in
1996-97.
The Beavers have won all four of


their CWS games and 10 of their last
11 overall.
The Tar Heels (57-15), who have
come from behind to win five games
in the NCAA tournament, couldn't
rally against an Oregon State team
that is 41-0 when leading after seven
innings.
Reyes (7-3), allowed eight hits and
three runs in 6 1-3 innings to win for
the second time in the CWS and third
time in the NCAA tournament
North Carolina freshman Alex
White (6-7) lost for the second time in
the CWS. He was rocked by Rice last
Sunday, and he gave up eight hits and
five runs in 5 1-3 innings on Saturday.
College World Series
All Times EDT
At Rosenblatt Stadium
Omaha, Neb.
Double Elimination
Friday, June 15
Bracket 1
Rice 15, Louisville 10


North Carolina 8, Mississippi State 5
Saturday, June 16
Bracket 2
Arizona State 5, UC Irvine 4
Oregon State 3, Cal State-Fullerton 2
Sunday, June 17
Louisville 12, Mississippi State 4, Mississippi St.
eliminated
Rice 14, North Carolina 4
Monday, June 18
UC Irvine 5, Cal State-Fullerton 4, 13 innings, Cal-
State Fullerton eliminated
Oregon State 12, Arizona State 6
Tuesday, June 19
North Carolina 3, Louisville 1, Louisville eliminated
UC Irvine 8, Arizona State 7, 10 innings, Arizona
St. eliminated
Wednesday, June 20
North Carolina 6, Rice 1
Oregon State 7, UC Irvine 1, UC Irvine eliminated
Thursday, June 21
North Carolina 7, Rice 4, Rice eliminated
Championship Series
(Best-of-3)
Saturday, June 23: Oregon State 11, North
Carolina 4, Oregon State leads series 1-0
Sunday, June 24: North Carolina (57-15) vs.
Oregon State (48-18), 7 p.m.
Monday, June 25: North Carolina vs. Oregon
State, 7 p.m., if necessary.


Gordon, Johnson back


after failing inspection


Junior has yet to

grab victory on

road tracks
I Associated Press

SONOMA, Calif. - Dale
Earnhardt Jr. is generally an
afterthought when people talk
about NASCAR's best road rac-
ers.
' That is something stock car
racing's most popular driver
would like to change Sunday in
the Toyota/Save Mart 350 at
Infineon Raceway
"This weekend is important
to me because I'm sick of hear-
ing people say 'Oh, he can't
drive on a road course,'"
Junior said.
It's not that Junior has been
terrible on the tracks with left


and right turns. While
Earnhardt's best finishes in
seven tries on Infineon's 1.99-
mile circuit have been a pair of
llths, he has a third, a fifth and
a 10th at Watkins Glen
International, the only other
road course the Nextel Cup
races.
But Earnhardt feels he has
something to prove, particular-
ly on this picturesque
Northern California course
with rolling hills and treacher-
ous turns and elevation
changes.
"We've been so close here
before and have always come
away with some sort of issue
that takes away from what we
can really do," said Earnhardt,
who qualified third in the 43-
car field. "I want a top-10 so
bad here, I can taste it
"In 2005, we had a car I
Please see DALE/Page 3B


Associated Press
Dale Earnhardt Jr. races down turn three during
morning practice in the Toyota/ Save Mart 350
NASCAR Nextel Cup auto race in Sonoma, Calif. on
Saturday.


Fixed fenders get

NASCAR drivers

back on racetrack

Associated Press
SONOMA, Calif. -Jimmie Johnson
and Jeff Gordon wasted no time
returning to the track after NASCAR
inspectors approved their cars.
Johnson, the reigning Nextel Cup
champion, and Gordon, his Hendrick
Motorsports teammate and four-time
series champion, were the first cars
on the 1.99-mile Infineon Raceway
road course for practice Saturday.
The two had an unexpected day off
Friday after their cars failed to pass
inspection. NASCAR deemed the
front fenders on the No. 24 and No. 48
Chevrolets illegal and banned the two
drivers from the day's practice and
qualifying.


Assocatea Press
NASCAR driver Jeff Gordon, left, and
teammate Jimmie Johnson, of the
Hendricks Motorsports team, answer
questions Friday after their cars failed
inspection before practice for the
NASCAR Toyota/Save Mart 350 in
Sonoma, Calif. at Infineon Raceway.
NASCAR did, however, allow the
teams to alter the fenders and send
the cars back through inspection.
Both teams did that Friday, but waited
until Saturday morning for official
approval.
"Everything is fine," said Doug
Please see BACK/Page 4B


* For Friday's qualifying results for
the NASCAR Toyota/Save Mart
350 at Infineon Raceway, please
see:
PAGE 4B















.1r.=C)T3UNDAYBASJBUNECiZ-1CONTY (L) CHONICL


Giants outlast Yanks in 13


San Francisco's Ryan Klesko, left, scores the game-winning run behind New York Yankees catcher Jorge Posada in the 13th inning of
Saturday in San Francisco. Klesko scored on a base hit by Nate Schierholtz, allowing the Giants to win, 6-5.


San Francisco wins in extra innings; Braves' Cox ties record for ejections

Associated Press past second. Verlander struck out Gerald Laird hit his fifth homer of and Minnesota totaled 17 hits.
11 while giving up only four hits and the season in the eighth for Texas, For one game, at least, the
SAN FRANCISCO - Rookie two walks. which has won a season-high four Twins managed fine without Justin
Nate Schierholtz ended San Atlanta's Kyle Davies (3-7) gave straight. The Rangers also have Momeau, who remained in the hos-
Francisco's season-long eight- up three hits and two runs in 6 1-3 won seven of nine - all against pital for a second night after bruis-
game losing streak with a two- innings before leaving with a National League opponents. ing his right lung in a home-plate
out RBI single in the 13th strained left oblique. The Braves Wright (1-1) walked six in 5 2-3 collision Friday. The 2006 American
inning for a 6-5 win. have lost four straight and eight of innings, but the Astros only man- League MVP was expected to be
The Giants had to rally from 11 aged three hits off him as he released Sunday and fly home with
in early three-run deficit and earned his first victory with the the team.
overcome Alex Rodriguez's Cubs 2, White Sox I earned his first victory with the the team.
ercome Alex Rodniguez's Cus 2, White Sox Rangers. Carlos Silva (5-8) limited Flonrida
game-tying home run in the CHICAGO - Ryan Theriot's sui- Roy Oswalt (7-5) allowed three to four hits and one run in seven
ninth inning before getting cide squeeze against Bobby Jenks runs and eight hits in 6 1-3 innings, innings.
heir first win since June 12. in the ninth inning drove in the go- He struck out two and walked four. Four Marlins combined to throw
Ryan Kesko started the win- ahead run and lifted the Cubs over 183 pitches and Josh Johnson(0-
ning rally with a single against the struggling White Sox. . Devil Rays 4, Dodgers 3 struggchles, and for the second start in(0-
scott Proctor (14). With two Theriot laid down a bunt between ST. PETERSBURG - Dioner the first 2
ts, Schierholtz blooped adsin- the mound and the plate as pinch- Navarro snapped out of a 2-for-32 months of the season with an

Velky Cabrera. The Giants runner Angel Pagan broke toward slump with his first homer since last elbow injury. The right-hander
poured out of the dugout and home. Jenks (2-3) fielded the ball Sept. 4, a tiebreaking solo shot off allowed eight hits and seven runs in
mobbed Schierholtz on the but had no play at the plate as the Randy Wolf in the seventh inning, three innings.
infield. White Sox suffered their 21st loss Wolf (8-6) gave up four runs.and B 7 1
. . . .. - - . � , ..... i amn 26ames 10 hits over 2-3 innings Brewers 7, Royals 1


vinnme ChulK (Z-Z), an
Francisco's seventh pitcher,
threw a hitless inning for the
win.
That helped the Giants hand
the Yankees their fourth loss in
five games and overcome
another big game from.
Rodriguez, who had four hits
and hit his major league-lead-
ing 28th homer in the ninth
inning against Brad Hennessey.
Tigers 2, Braves 1
ATLANTA - Justin Verlander
pitched seven innings to win his
fourth straight start and the Detroit
Tigers beat light-hitting Atlanta 2-1
Saturday, leading frustrated Braves
manager Bobby Cox to pick up a
record-tying ejection.
Cox was thrown out of the game
in the ninth inning by plate umpire
Chad Fairchild. Cox's ejection gave
him 131 for his career, tying the
record set by John McGraw.
Cox came on the field as
Fairchild tossed Atlanta's Brian
McCann for arguing a called third
strike from Todd Jones, who.got
three outs to earn his 18th save in
22 chances.
Cox already has the record for
most ejections by a manager, since
14 of McGraw's came as a player.
Carlos Guillen homered for the
Tigers, who have won six straight
games.
Verlander (9-2) gave up a fourth-
inning homer to Chipper Jones but
did not allow another baserunner


Michael Wuertz (1-2) got the last
out of the eighth after walking a
batter and picked up the win. Bob
Howry pitched the ninth for his first
save in four chances.
Alfonso Soriano led off the game
with a homer for the second
straight day, and the White Sox tied
it in the bottom of the first when
Scott Podsednik scored on Jim
Thome's groundout.
Mets 1, Athletics 0
NEW YORK - David Wright
dropped an RBI double in front of
diving right fielder Travis Buck in
the ninth inning, helping the NL
East leaders win consecutive
games for the first time since May
27 and 29.
Orlando Hernandez and Oakland
starter Joe Blanton matched zeros
most of the way in a tight game that
included an equipment-throwing
tirade by New York catcher Paul Lo
Duca.
Ramon Castro opened the ninth
with a double off Santiago Casilla
(2-1). Carlos Beltran was intention-
ally walked, and Wright drove in
Castro with a looper to right field.
Billy Wagner (1-0) worked a
scoreless ninth for the win.
Rangers 7, Astros 2
ARLINGTON, Texas - Jamey
Wright overcame shaky control to
win for the first time in almost a
year, and Michael Young had four
RBIs for Texas.


The Dodgers, who stranded 15
runners in the game, loaded the
bases in the fourth and fifth, but
were kept off the scoreboard each
time. Casey Fossum (5-6) retired
Tony Abreu on a flyball to end a
bases-loaded threat in the seventh.
Gary Glover worked a scoreless
eighth, and Al Reyes stranded run-
ners on the first and third in the
ninth for his 17th save in 18
chances.
Blue Jays 11, Rockies 6
TORONTO - Frank Thomas hit
his 498th career home run and
Matt Stairs matched a career high
with four hits for the Blue Jays.
Stairs went 4-for-5 with a homer
and two RBIs and scored twice. It
was the third four-hit game of his
career and first since June 14,
2000, at Minnesota. Thomas fin-
ished 4-for-4 with four RBIs and a
walk.
Aaron Cook (4-5) gave up six
earned runs and nine hits over 5 1-
3 innings to lose his fourth straight
decision.
Right-hander Brian Wolfe (2-0)
pitched one inning for his second
win in as many days.
Troy Tulowitzki homered for the
third straight day for Colorado.
The Blue Jays finished with a
season-high 17 hits.
Twins 11, Marlins 1
MIAMI - Joe Mauer and Jason
Bartlett drove in three runs apiece,


MILWAUKEE - Corey Hart had
three hits and scored two runs to
help the Brewers earn their fifth
straight win.
Hart went 3-for-3 and is batting
.422 (19-for-45) in his last 10
games with five homers and 14
RBIs. He had three hits and four
RBIs in Milwaukee's 11-6 win over
the Royals on Friday night.
Since getting no-hit by Detroit's
Justin Verlander on June 12,
Milwaukee has gone 9-1.
Brian Bannister (4-4), who won
his previous four starts, allowed six
runs and six hits in five innings for
the Royals, who have lost four
straight.
Dave Bush (5-6) gave up one
run and eight hits in seven innings
to get the win.
Indians 4, Nationals 3-
WASHINGTON - Victor
Martinez hit a three-run homer to
straightaway center field in the top
of the ninth for Cleveland.
Martinez hit Chad Cordero's
pitch over the 410-foot mark, end-
ing 17 innings of offensive dol-
drums for the Indians against the
Nationals pitching staff. Cleveland
scored only one run in Friday
night's loss and appeared on
course to do'the same on Saturday
until the big three-run ninth.
Tom Mastny (5-2) pitched the
eighth inning to get the victory, and
Joe Borowski was credited with his
21st save despite a shaky ninth.


Rays owner defends decision on Dukes


TB decide to

place player on

temporary leave

Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG -
Tampa Bay Devil Rays princi-
pal owner Stuart Sternberg
defended the team's decision
to place Elijah Dukes on the
temporary inactive list rather
than release the troubled
rookie outfielder.
Dukes, whose wife obtained
a restraining order after she
said the ballplayer threat-
ened her, was optioned to the
minor leagues Friday and will


be given time away from the
game to try to straighten out
his personal life.
Sternberg said the embat-
tled 22-year-old asked for
help, and that the Devil Rays
will support his effort to get
back on track through coun-
seling from "professional
people who know how to deal
with these sorts of things."
"Quite simply I do every-
thing I can, and I make sure
this organization does every-
thing it can, not to turn its
backs on people. We will do
that now, and we always have
done that," Sternberg said
before Saturday night's game
against the Los Angeles
Dodgers.
"Elijah's a person who is
looking for some assistance,


and we're going to make sure
that he gets it. What the
future holds, none of us ever
knows. But I can look in the
mirror, and I would expect
and hope that everybody in
this organization - fans and
any bystanders who are inter-
ested in this story - can look
themselves in the mirror and
know and feel that we've done
the right thing here. I will not
look back at this with any
regret."
Dukes was suspended for
the final month of last season
at Triple-A Durham because
of a string of on- and off-the-
field incidents. He was arrest-
ed in January and charged
with marijuana possession,
but reported to spring train-
ing determined to leave his


troubles behind.
He not only won a spot on
the roster, but with Rocco
Baldelli slowed by a ham-
string injury, was the opening
day center fielder. He home-
red in his first major league
game and was hitting .190
with 10 homers and 21 RBI's
in 52 games before being
placed on the inactive list.
Dukes' playing time had
decreased since late last
month, when his estranged
wife revealed she sought
court protection for herself
and the couple's children.
Last week, he was given a
personal day off after pub-
lished reports detailed a
pregnant 18-year-old girl's
claim that Dukes is the father
of her unborn child.


Please see 4B for full standings
Giants 6, Yankees 5,
13 innings
NEW YORK (A) SAN FRAN
ab rhbi ab r hbi
MeCbr cf 7 130 DRbrts cf 5 1 1 1
Jeter ss 5 02 1 Winn rf 5 1 21
Frnswrp 0000 Drham2b 5 000
LVzcno p 0000 Bonds If 3 022
Tmpsn If 2 01 0 Hnnssy p 0 00 0
BAbreu rf 711 0 Frndsn ph 1 000
ARod 3b 6341 Kline p 0 000
Posada c 503 1 Figroa ph 1 000
Matsui If 501 1 Chulk p 0 000
Prctrp 1 00 0 Klesko 1b 6 1 1 0
Cano2b 6 02 1 BMolna c 5 01 0
Cairo lb 5 00 0 Feliz 3b 5 2 1 1
Wang p 3000 Vizquel ss 6 120
MMyrs p 0000 Morris p 1 000
Bruney p 0000 JSnchz p 0 000
Villone p 0000 MaSwy ph 1 000
Damon ph 100 0 Crreia p 0 000
APhllps lb 1 000 Tschnr p 0 000
Schrhlt rf 3 02 1
Totals 54517 5 Totals 47 612 6
New York (A)003010 001 000 0- 5
San Francisco001001 300 000 1- 6
E-BMolina (2). DP-New York 1, San
Francisco 1. LOB-New York 16, San
Francisco 10. 2B-Jeter (21), BAbreu (14),
ARodriguez (17), Cano (22), DRoberts (4),
Schierholtz (1). 3B-MeCabrera (4). HR-
ARodriguez (28), Feliz (11). SB-
MeCabrera (5), ARodriguez (9). S-
BMolina, Morris.
IP H RERBBSO
New York
Wang 61-3 6 4 4 2 0
MMyers 1-3 0 1 1 1 0
Bruney 0 1 0 0 2 0
Villone 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Farnsworth 1 1 0 0 0 1
LVizcaino 2 0 0 0 0 1
Proctor L,1-4 22-3 4 1 1 0 0
San Francisco
Morris 52-3 13 4 4 1 3
JSanchez 11-3 0 0 0 1 2
Correia 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Taschner 1-3 00 0 0 1
Hennessey 2 1 1 1 0 2
Kline 2 2 0 0 2 1
Chulk W,2-2 1 0 0 0 1 1


Tigers 2, Braves 1
DETROIT ATLANTA
ab rhbi ab


r hbi


Grndsncf 5000 Harris If 3 010
Planco2b 4 00 0 Diaz If 1 01 0
Shffield If 301 0 Jhnson 2b 4 000
MOrdz rf 4010 Rnteriass 3 000
CGillenss 3 22 1 CJones 3b 4 1 1 1
IRdrgz c 3000 McCnn c 4 000
Casey lb 4 02 1 Frncur rf 4 020
Inge3b 2000AJonescf 2 000
Vrlnder p 2000 Thrmn lb 4 000
Byrdak p 0000 Davies p 2 000
Rodney p 0000 Yates p 0 000
Infante ph 1 000 SItmca ph 1 000
TJones p 000 0 RSrano p 0 000
Wckmn p 0 000
Totals 312 62 Totals 32 1 5 1
Detroit 010 100 000- 2
Atlanta 000 100 000- 1
DP-Atlanta 1. LOB-Detroit 8, Atlanta
7. 2B-Casey (17), Diaz (7). HR-
CGuillen (12), CJones (13). SB-Sheffield
(8), MOrdonez (2), Harris (10). S-
Verlander.
IP H RERBBSO


Detroit
Verlander W,9-2 7
Byrdak
Rodney
TJones S,18 1
Atlanta
Davies L,3-7 6
Yates
RSoriano 1
Wickman 1
Cubs 2, V
CHICAGO (N)


S 4 1 1 2
1-3 1 0 0 0
2-3 00 0 0
0 0 0 1
1-3 3 2 2 3
2-3 00 0 1
2 0 0 0
1 0 0 C
Nhite Sox
CHICAGO (A)


ab rh bi
ASrano If 4 11 1 Pdsdnk If
Fontnt 2b 401 0 AGnzlz rf
DeLeelb 4010 Mckwk rf
ARmrz dh 4 00 0 Thome dh
CFIoyd rf 4010 Knerko lb
Pagan rf 0100 Przyns c
Bowen c 3 000 Iguchi 2b
Ward ph 1 01 0 Fids 3b
KHill c 0 00 0 Terrero cf
Theriot3b 3 00 1 Uribess
Pie cf 4 00 0 Cintron ph
Izturis ss 3 03 0


11
0

3 6
0
S2
0 1
11


r h bi
110
000

0 1 0
0 0 0
000
011
010


0 0 0
000
00
000


Totals 342 8 2 Totals 33 1 6 1
Chicago (N) 100 000 001- 2
Chicago (A) 100 000 000- 1
E-Izturis (6). LOB-Chicago (N) 6,
Chicago (A) 9. 2B-DeLee (26), Izturis
(11), Konerko (12). HR-ASoriano (14).
SB-lzturis (3), Podsednik (4). S-Theriot.
IP H RERBBSO


Chicago (N)
RHill
Marmol
Ohman
Wuertz W, 1-2
Howry S,1
Chicago (A)
JVazquez
Bukvich
Logan
Jenks L,2-3


6 1 1
0 0 0
0 0 0
00 0
0 00


7 5 1 1
1-3 1 0 0
1-3 00 0
11-3 2 1 1


Rangers 7, Astros 2
HOUSTON TEXAS
ab rhbi ab r hbi
OPImro If 301 0 Lofton cf 3 230
Loretta 2b 4000 Kinsler2b 3 2 1 1
Pence cf 3 00 0 MYong dh 4 02 4
CaLee dh 4000 MBrd rf 5 02 1
Lamb1b b 321 0 Ctnotto If 5 0 1 0
Scott rf 2000 HrstJrl If 0 000
Ensbrg 3b 301 1 Laird c 4 1 1 1
Asmusc 4011 Wlkrsnlb 3 1 1 0
Brntlttss 3 00 0 Metcalf3b 3 1 1 0
Biggio ph 1 000 Vzquez ss 4 000
Totals 302 4 2 Totals 34 712 7
Houston 000 101 000- 2
Texas 000 030 04x- 7
E-MByrd (1), Otsuka (1). DP-Houston
1, Texas 1. LOB-Houston 9, Texas 10.
2B-Ensberg (7), Lofton (11), Kinsler (12).
3B-Lofton (2). HR-Laird (5). CS-
Ensberg (1). S-Metcalf.


Houston
Oswalt L,7-5
RiWhite
TreMiller
Quails
Texas
Wright W, 1-1
Francisco
CJWilson
Otsuka
Gagne


IP H RERBBSO
61-3 8 3 3 4 2
1 2 2 2 0 0
1-3 0 1 1 1 1
1-3 2 1 1 1 1


Blue Jays 11, Rockies 6
COLORADO TORONTO


Tveras cf
KMtsui 2b
Holiday If
Helton dh
Atkins 3b
Hawpe rf
Tlowzki ss
Baker 1 b
Trralba c
Innetta c


ab rhbi
4 11 0 VWells cf
4 11 0 Rios rf
5020 Stairs lb
4 00 0 Glaus3b
2 10 1 Thmas dh
3 11 1 AHill 2b
3211 Lind If
3 00 1 JPhllps c
2 00 0 Zaun c
2 01 1 JMcDId ss


ab r h bi
4 001
4 1 1 0
5242
4320
4 1 44
5 220
5022
2000
1 1 1 1
4 1 1 1


Totals 326 7 5 Totals 381117 11
Colorado 012 003 000- 6
Toronto 303 002 12x- 11
E-Baker (2), Stairs (1). DP-Colorado
1. LOB-Colorado 7, Toronto 9. 2B-
Holliday (27), Hawpe (16), lannetta (6),
Glaus (13), AHill (21). HR-Tulowitzki (6),
Stairs (11), Thomas (11). SF-Atkins.
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
CookL,4-5 51-3 9 8 6 3 0
Julio 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
TMartin 1 3 1 1 1 0


St. Louis
Wnwrgt W,6-6
RFranklin
Flores
Springer
Isringhausen


6 7 2 2
2-3 21 0
1-3 00 0
1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0


Twins 11, Marlins 1
MINNESOTA FLORIDA


ab rhbi ab r hbi
LCstillo2b 4120 Amzga cf 4 01 1
LRdrgz3b 1 00 0 Uggla 2b 4 000
Punto 3b 4200 HaRmzss 4 020
Mauer c 4223 Tnkrsly p 0 000
ROrtiz p 1 00 0 MiCbr 3b 3 0 QO 0
Cddyer rf 5 01 0 Pinto p 0 0 0 0
THnter cf 6 23 0 Borchd If 1 0 0 0
LFord cf 0 000 Jacobs lb 4 02 0
Kubel If 4 33 2 Wlnhm If 2 0 0 0
Cirillo lb 5 142 Carrolllf 1 0 0 0
Bartlett ss 301 3 Hrmida rf 4 000
CSilvap 3 00 0 Olivo c 3 1 2 0
Heintz c 1 01 1 Jhnson p 0 0 0 0
Obmllrp 1 000
Wood 3b 1 000
Totals 41111711 Totals 32 1 7; 1
Minnesota 025 003 010- 11
Florida 001 000 000- 1
DP-Minnesota 1, Florida 2. LOB-
Minnesota 12, Florida 6. 2B-Mauep 2
(14), THunter (20), Cirillo 2 (6). 3B-
THunter (1), Olivo (4). CS-LCastillo (3).
S-CSilva, Obermueller.
IP H RERBBSO


Minnesota
CSilva W,5-8 7
ROrtiz 2
Florida
Johnson L,0-2 3
Obermueller 3
Pinto 2
Tankersley 1
Mets 1, Ath
OAKLAND NEY
ab rhbi


4 1 1 0 5
3 0 0 0
8 7 7 3 3
5 3 34 4
4 1 1 12
0 0 0 0 1
letics 0
W YORK
ab r h bi


Buck If 401 0 JBRyes ss 3 000
Kotsay cf 4 00 0 L Ducac 3 0 00
Swisherrf 401 0 RCstroc 1 1 1 0
EChavz3b 4000 Beltrancf 3 020
DJnson lb 3 00 0 Wright 3b 4 0 1
ShStwrt If 1 000 CDIgdolb 3 000
Ellis2b 4020ShGrenrf 3 000
Crosby ss 4 02 0 JoVJlntn 2b 3 0 1 0
Kendall c 3 01 0 Ledee If - 30 1 0
Blanton p 2 000 OHrndz p . 20 0 0
Scutaro ph 1 00 0 Felicno p 0 0 0 0
Casilla p 0000 Heilmn p 0 000
Gotay ph 1 0 6 0
BWgnr p 0 0 e 0
Totals 340 7 0 Totals 29 1 7T 1
Oakland 000 000 000-1 0
New York 000 000 001- 1
E-CDelgado (4), JoValentin (3). DP-
Oakland 1. LOB-Oakland 10, New York
6. 2B-RCastro (2), Wright (18), Ledee (3).
SB-Crosby (7). S-Kendall, Blanton. -
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
Blanton 8 ' 5 0 0 1 6
Casilla L,2-1 0 2 1 1 1 0
New York
OHernandez 7 6 0 0 1 7
Feliciano 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Heilman 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
BWagnerW,1-0 1 1 0 0 0 1
Brewers 7, Royals 1
KANSAS CITY MILWAUKEE
ab rhbi ab r hbi


DJesuscf 3020 CHartrf 3231
EGrmn 2b 3000 Cunsellss-`3 2 1 1
Teahen rf 401 0 Braun 3b 4 1 1 1
Brown If 4010 Fildrlb 3 001
Gordon3b 4 11 0 BHallcf 4 1 1 1
Shealy lb 301 1 JEstda c 4 0 1 2
JoPita p 0000 Jenkins If 4 000
Riske p 0000 Weeks 2b 4 1 10
Butlerph 1010 Bushp 3 000
LaRue c 4010 BShse p 0000
TPenass 401 0 Spuring p 0 000
Bnnster p 2 00 0
Costa rf 1000
Totals 331 9 1 Totals 32 7 8 7
Kansas City 010 000 000-- 1
Milwaukee 203 011 00x-' 7
DP-Milwaukee 4. LOB-Kansas City 7,
Milwaukee 4. 2B-Gordon (14), Butler (3),
TPena (10), Counsell (8), Braun (8),
Weeks (15). HR-BHaIll (9). SB--CHart
(14). CS-DeJesus (2).
IP H RERBBSO


rKansas City
Bannister L,4-4
JoPeralta
Riske
Milwaukee
Bush W,5-6
BShouse
Spurling


5 6 6 6 3 7
2 2 1 1 0 2
1 0 0 0 0 2
7 8 1 1 1 5
11-3 1 0 0 0 1 I.
2-3 0 0 0. 0 0


Devil Rays 4, Dodgers 3
LOS ANGELES (N) TAMPA BAY
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Furcal ss 502 1 Iwmra 3b 4 2 ..
Pierrecf 401 1 BHarrsss 2 1 1.'
Martin c 4 01 0 Crwfrd If 3 0 2
JKent 2b 4 010 Wggntn 2b 3 0 1 1
Saenz dh 2 01 0 DYong cf 4 0 1 0
MrAnd dh 1 00 0 Gomes rf 4 0 2 0
Loneyl b 4120 CPenal b 4 0 01P
Kemp rf 3 11 0 Cantu dh 3 0 0 .1
Ethierlf 4 12 1 Nvarroc 3 1 1 1
TAbru 3b 2000 0
LGnzIz ph 1 00 0
Totals 34311 3 Totals 30 410 .4,"
Los Angeles (N) 000 003 000-, ;
Tampa Bay 200 010 10x-,*/ ,
DP-Los Angeles 1, Tampa Bay )
LOB-Los Angeles 15, Tampa Bay 7. 2B--
Saenz (4), Ethier (13), Iwamura (8,'A *
BHarris (14), Gomes (7). 3B-Loney (15,0
HR-Iwamura (3), Navarro (1). SB-ojt.
Martin (13), Crawford (20). S-Pierre,
BHarris. SF-Crawford, Wigginton. ,
IP H RERBBSO'
Los Angeles l.d.
Wolf L,8-6 62-3 10 4 4 2 5
Tomko 11-3 0 0 0 0 1 .''
Tampa Bay
Kazmir 6 7 3 3 5 .
Witasick 2-3 1 0 0 2 0,.
Fossum W,5-6 1-3 00 0 1 0
Glover 1 2 0 0 0 01 %'
ReyesS,17 1 1 0 0 1 1'M


SATURDAY'S MLB BOXES


9
0
il


a


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NIIAfc)iR ILnAcuE BASEBALLL


2H S[]Nr>Ay. TTINF 24- 2 007


Corpas 11-3 5 2 2 1 0-1
Toronto -
Taubenheim 5 5 5 5 4 4
WolfeW,2-0 1 0 1 0 1 0
Downs 2 0 0 0 1 3
Janssen 1 2 0 0 0 0
Cardinals 8, Phillies 3
PHILA ST. LOUIS
ab rhbi ab r h'bi
Rollins ss 5 03 1 Tguchi cf 4 0 1 o0
Vctrnorf 4 10 0 Spiezio 2b 3 1 2 0;.
Utley 2b 3 01 1 Sprger p 0 0 Q
Howard lb 4 02 1 Isrnghs p 0 0 0 .
Rwand cf 4 01 0 Pujols lb 2 2 1 0
Burrell If 3 00 0 Duncan If 3 1 1 3
Dobbs 3b 3 00 0 RFrkin p 0 0 0 0.
Gearyp 0 00 0 Flors p 0 00 "
Bourn ph 1 00 0 AKndy 2b 1 0 VO0
Mesa p 0000 Rolen 3b 4 1 1 0o
Brajas c 4 11 0 JEcrcn rf 3 2 2- g
Eaton p 1 01 0 Miles ss 4 1 3
Nunez 3b 2100 GBnntt c 4 00 V
Wnwrgt p 2 00-0
Schmkr If 2 0 0 [Op
Totals 343 9 3 Totals 32 811 6
Philadelphia 100 010 100---
St. Louis 100 302 02x- ~J10
E-Victorino (3), Spiezio (4). DP--f
Philadelphia 1, St. Louis 2. LOB,--^.
Philadelphia 7, St. Louis 4. 2B-Rolen I'
(12). HR-Duncan (14), JEncarnacion (5:.
CS-Pujols (4). S-Eaton. - *', t
IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia
Eaton L,7-5 51-3 8 6 6 1 35'
Geary 12-3 2 0 0 1 0 T'O.
Mesa 1 1 2 1 1 0












SPC)RTS SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007_3B


Bryant creating discord for Lakers


MARK HEISLER
Los Angeles Times

Whether Kobe Bryant made
the world crazy or the other way
around, the process is ongoing,
as the last week proved.
This is how it went:
An item that had been regu-
larly re-posted under new dates
oi0 Bryant's Web site was moved
on the wire services as if it was
a new trade demand starting a
weeklong feeding frenzy.
Meanwhile, Bryant, laying
low - finally - but still doing
everything short of threatening
tohold his breath, continued to
try to force the Lakers to trade
him.
ESPN's Ric Bucher said the
Lakers approached Bryant
through back channels, asking if
there was a "possibility of
rebuilding the bridges and


somehow having (him) come
back and play for them again
next season" but the answer
was "a resounding no."
In a classic case of ESPN's
shotgun approach, in which it
gets two stories by discounting
its own report, "SportsCenter"
teased a Bryant segment -
"Why our insiders think the
deal with Chicago is nothing but
bull" - while a Chad Ford story
on its Web site offered scenarios
for Chicago deals.
In the real world, which is
increasingly divorced from the
one in the media, the story has
never changed:
Bryant isn't going anywhere.
The Lakers aren't talking to
Chicago or anyone else.
Not that the Lakers aren't
upset (note to Kobe: if you're
looking for more reasons to
leave, here's another one) but


they're not remotely inclined to
trade him.
Despite suggestions they're
losing leverage, two years from
Bryant's opt-out clause in his
contract, they have it all.
In a year, the leverage will
shift to Bryant but in the mean-
time, there's no reason for the
Lakers to hold their fire sale
early
The Lakers have two options:
1) Trade Bryant and start over;
2) Hope to have a great season
that persuades him to stay.
Otherwise, trade him and start
over.
Since starting over is too
depressing to think about, what
do the Lakers have to lose by
putting it off a year to see if they
can dodge this cannonball?
Of course, there will have to
be a memorable news confer-
ence first in which Bryant apol-


ogizes to all concerned or
blames it on the press.
Talks with Indiana continue
about Jermaine O'Neal, the
problem being that the Pacers
want Andrew Bynum and
Lamar Odom, which the Lakers
insist they won't do.
Ironically, before Bryant
began saying Jerry Buss "lied"
to him and launched a secret
long-term rebuilding project,
Buss had already signed off on
trading Bynum or anyone else
they had to.
A month ago, there was a
good argument to trade anyone
to get Bryant immediate help
but that was with Kobe on board
with what they were doing.
Now, with a growing likeli-
hood they'll lose Bryant in. a
year, the Lakers had better
think twice about trading
Bynum.


Noah tries to impress Hawks


UFstar want to
. ., . ' . �
connce Atlanta

to pick him


Associated Press

ATLANTA - Joakim
Noah mocks those who pub-
lish NBA mock drafts.
"I heard one of them is
like a kid who is 16 years old
' in his basement," Noah
said.
But Noah knows enough
to realize the NBA draft
guessing game this year
begins with the Hawks' No.
3 pick, and that's why he
was in Atlanta on Friday for
a workout.
Greg Oden and Kevin
Durant are almost certain to
be taken by Portland and
.Seattle with the first two
picks on on Thursday.
a Some draft projections
have the Hawks taking a
Florida teammate of Noah's
- center Al Horford - or
Ohio State point guard Mike
Conley Jr.
Noah, a power forward,
tried to convince Hawks
, general manager Billy
.Knight and coach Mike
Woodson that he should be
, the third pick.
' "That's why I'm here," he
said. "If I didn't think I had
'a chance I wouldn't be
here."
The Hawks also pick 11th,
but Noah hopes he's not
around by then.
The draft decision by
Knight, who wasn't talking
on Friday, will affect the
rest of the first round. Noah
is as curious as anyone.
"You know who's going
one and two," Noah said.
"Then you have no idea."
It's a big decision for the
Hawks.
"It's huge for our fran-
chise," Woodson said.
"We're in a position where
we can either trade them if
the trade makes sense or we
pick two young guys who
come in and fit in with the
Young guys we already have.
I think the big thing about
this draft is you can pick a
guy who can come in and
'-play right away. Last year
we got caught when the
injuries occurred, we just
didn't have backup players
that were ready to play."
Noah also has worked out
for Boston (picking at No. 5),
Minnesota (No. 7), Charlotte
(No. 8) and Chicago (No. 9).


Associated Press
Former University of Florida basketball star Joakim Noah recently worked out for the Atlanta
Hawks in hopes that the team will use its No. 3 overall pick on him in the upcoming NBA Draft.


He will work out for
Memphis, which has the
fourth pick, on Saturday.
Noah said trade specula-
tion involving NBA stars
Kobe Bryant and Kevin
Garnett and the phone call
he got Friday from the
Phoenix Suns adds more
mystery to the draft.
"The craziest thing about
it is you have no idea also
what's going to happen if
these big guys go in trades,
these superstars," he said.
"As a player you just have to
be ready for anything.
"Just today, I had an
opportunity to go work out
in Phoenix. Phoenix isn't in
the lottery. Why would they
call my agent and say 'We
want him to work out?"'


Noah said he accepted
the invitation of the Suns,
who aren't scheduled to
pick until No. 24
The 6-foot-ll Noah aver-
aged 12.0 points and 8.4
rebounds as a junior to help
Florida win its second
straight national champi-
onship.
Florida's wealth of talent
made it difficult for any
player to consistently play a
lead role, and Noah's scor-
ing average fell from his
14.2 points per game as a
sophomore.
Woodson said he doesn't
consider Noah to be a
"great scorer." Woodson
also said the 232-pound
Noah will need to add
weight and strength to be a


productive inside player in
the NBA.
Even so, Woodson said he
thinks Noah could make an
immediate impact.
"You kind of cue in on
what he actually does for
his team," Woodson said.
"The fact he defends and he
rebounds and he runs the
floor, for a 7-footer that's all
you can really ask for. He's
not a great scorer. He can
finish at the rim. The fact
he gets up and down the
floor, he'll get buckets that
way
"I look at guys who can
rebound and play defense
and run the floor, and if you
can do those three things
you have a future in our
league."


Associated Press
Kobe Bryant, left, signs his contract as general manager Mitch
Kupchak looks on in this July 15, 2004 file photo. Intentional or
not, Kobe Bryant seems to be doing everything he can to pressure
the Los Angeles Lakers into trading him.



Richards fails to


make U.S. team


Sprinter finishes

fourth at U.S.

Track & Field

Championship

Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS - Sanya
Richards was the fastest
female on the planet at 400
meters a year ago. This year
she won't even be in the race at
the world championships.
Richards failed to make the
U.S. 400-meter team for the
worlds by finishing fourth in
the event under dreary skies at
the U.S. track and field cham-
pionships on Saturday.
The loss broke a string of 18
consecutive outdoor -victories
in the 400 for Richards since
her runner-up finish at the
2005 world championships.
The two-time defending
champion had the five fastest
times in the world, capped by
an American record, a year
ago, but was dogged by a flulike
illness that kept her out of her
first four meets this season.
DeeDee Trotter won her first
U.S. outdoor title in a lifetime
best 49.64 seconds. South
Carolina's Natasha Hastings
was second in 49.84, breaking
the collegiate record Richards
set at Texas. Mary Wineberg
was third at 50.24. Trotter came
from third on the final turn to
draw away.
Richards, who ran under 50
seconds nine times last year,
finished at 50.68.
"I just lost my thinking,"
Richards said. "I thought I was
already on the team and didn't
fight for that third spot, so I'm
really disappointed. But I still
have the 200, and I'm going to
come out and win that."
Richards advanced through
the qualifying round of the 200
later Saturday.
"It was really tough," she
said. "My parents came down
and they encouraged me and
said that maybe the 400 wasn't
for me to win this year. Maybe
it's the 200. I tried to get my
head back into it. I felt OK in
the 200. I didn't feel great. I'm
sure it was more mental than
physical. Hopefully, I'll run
really well (Sunday)."
Tyson Gay, running less than
24 hours after a 9.84-second
clocking in his 100-meter victo-
ry, was the leading 200 qualifi-
er at 20.66 seconds into a brisk
headwind. Wallace Spearmon,
Xavier Carter and Jeremy
Wariner were among the oth-


ers to advance to Sunday's
semifinals.
With Gay, Spearmon and
Carter, the event features three
of the fastest sprinters in the
event's history. A fourth, NCAA
100 and 200 champion Walter
Dix, didn't show for the 200.
"It's a new day," Gay said. "I
really didn't warm up long. I'm
a little fatigued. I just wanted
to get it done."
The top three finishers in
each event make up the U.S.
team for the world champi-
onships Aug. 25-Sept. 2 in
Osaka, Japan. Defending world
champions also make the
team, as long as they compete
in some event at the U.S. meet.
Mikele Barber was the
fastest women's 200 at 22.73.
Hyleas Fountain repeated as
heptathlon champion despite a
serious distraction at home.
"My mom is really ill right
now," she said. "She just got a
mastectomy. I was trying to
deal with that last week and
just visiting. I had surgery on
my left knee, but I believe in
coming out and competing. I
didn't know I could' do this
because of my fitness level. I
made it all the way through. I
wasn't going to give away a
championship."
She said she wanted to dedi-
cate her victory to her mother.
Tom Pappas won his fifth
U.S. decathlon title in a com-
petition that was without
reigning world champion
Bryan Clay, who withdrew
after four events on Friday, cit-
ing fatigue.
"I know if he stayed in the
competition it would have
pushed me more to score.
Then on the other hand I
might have got hurt trying to
do more than I should have,"
Pappas said, "but having
somebody like Bryan out here
is always great"
Pappas was the world cham-
pion in 2003 but has been both-
ered by injuries since. He has
long fought foot problems and
tweaked a groin in training
two weeks before the U.S.
meet.
"If I just put a solid year of
training together without any
injuries, I can get back to the
level that I was at," he said. "I
think that's what's driving me
more than anything."
In the men's 400, Angelo
Taylor ran side-by-side with
LaShawn Merritt, edging
ahead in the finish to win by
0.05 seconds. Taylor, 2000
Olympic champion in the 400
hurdles, won at 44.05 to
Merritt's 44.06. Taylor tum-
bled to the track after the
close victory.


PALE
Continued from Page 1B

'thought had a chance to win
the Cup race, but we were try-
ing a new transmission and it
locked up on the first lap and I
was in the wall. That was so
disappointing - and it was
even worse when we fixed the
car and I went back out and
was still as fast as anyone in a
car that was beat up and taped
together.
"It was frustrating, but it was
another sign that I can do this,"
Earnhardt added.
The Sonoma track is also the
site of one of Earnhardt's scari-
est moments in a race car.
In 2004, while driving a
Corvette in the Sunday
warmup for an American Le
Mans Series sports car race,
Earnhardt lost control and slid
backward into a concrete bar-


rier, igniting a fire. He came
away . with second-degree
burns to the inside of both
thighs, his chin and neck
The injuries forced
Earnhardt to use Martin
Truex, his teammate at Dale
Earnhardt Inc., as a relief
driver in the next race and
provided Junior some very
uncomfortable days until the
burns healed. But it wasn't the
burns that upset Earnhardt
the most.
"It broke my heart that I did-
n't get to race the Corvette here
in 2004 because of the crash
during the morning warmup,"
he said. "I was angry because it
cost that team a chance to race
after they had been so good to
me, but also because I was real-
ly learning a lot and had
improved my road racing
skills."
Although pole-winner Jamie
McMurray and solid road racer
Robby Gordon are starting


ahead of Junior on the grid, his
biggest competition is likely to
come from road course special-
ist Boris Said, who qualified
fourth, and fifth-place Tony
Stewart, a two-time Cup cham-
pion who has five road racing
wins, two of them at Infineon.
"We've got a contender, for
sure," Stewart said. "You know
it's going to be hard with Boris
and Robby up there right now,
and some other guys who might
sneak up there later, we we'll
have to wait and see. But we
definitely have something we
can work with."
Some of the top contenders
could come from the back of
the field, with rookie Juan
Pablo Montoya, one of the
world's best road racers when
he ran in Formula One and
CART, coming off a disappoint-
ing 32nd-place qualifying
effort, and nine-time road
course winner Jeff Gordon and
his teammate Jimmie Johnson


starting 41st and 42nd because
their cars failed to pass inspec-
tion Friday and were banned
from qualifying.
"Where we're going to be
starting, it's going to be a real
challenge," Gordon said. "It's
hard to think about a win, but
this is always a track position
and pit strategy race anyway, so
we'll see if we can work our
way up there and get a good
finish out of it."
This race is the road course
debut of NASCAR's Car of
Tomorrow and Said has done
more testing with the new car
on the serpentine tracks than
anyone.
"It's definitely taken some
getting used to," Stewart said.
"We can drive these cars a lot
faster than what these cars can
go here. The old theory that
you have to slow down to go
faster, that's literally what you
have to do with these new
cars."


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AUTO RACING
Nextel Cup - Toyota/Save
Mart 350 Lineup
After Friday qualifying race Sunday
At Infineon Raceway
Sonoma, Calif.
Lap length: 1.99 miles
(Car number In parentheses)
1. (26) Jamie McMurray, Ford, 92.414
mph.
2. (7) Robby Gordon, Ford, 92.399.
3. (8) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
92.384.
4. (60) Boris Said, Ford, 92.312.
5. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 92.263.
6. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 92.258.
7. (21) Bill Elliott, Ford, 92.203.
8. (9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 92.126.
9. (12) Ryan Newman, Dodge, 92.051.
10. (07) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 91.907.
11. (96) Ron Fellows, Chevrolet, 91.887.
12. (19) Elliott Sadler, Dodge, 91.827.
13. (43) Bobby Labonte, Dodge, 91.753.
14. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 91.744.
15. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 91.698.
16. (44) Dale Jarrett, Toyota, 91.644.
17. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 91.462.
18. (1) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet,
91.388.
19. (22) Dave Blaney, Toyota, 91.375.
20. (14) Sterling Marlin, Chevrolet,
91.357.
21. (91) Marc Goossens, Toyota, 91.313.
22. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
91.309.
23. (45) Kyle Petty, Dodge, 91.265.
24. (5) Kyle Busch, Chevrolet, 91.223.
25. (55) Terry Labonte, Toyota, 91.222.
26. (01) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
91.149.
27. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 91.089.
28. (88) Ricky Rudd, Ford, 91.079.
29. (41) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, 91.065.
30. (23) Butch Leitzinger, Toyota, 91.051.
31. (66) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, 90.996.
32. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Dodge,
90.976.
33. (18) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 90.900.
34. (70) Johnny Sauter, Chevrolet,
90.842.
35. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 90.758.
36. (11) Denny Hamlin, Chevrolet,
90.592.
37. (6) David Ragan, Ford, owner points.
38. (25) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, owner
points.
39. (13) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet,
owner points.
40. (40) David Stremme, Dodge, owner
points.
41. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, owner
points.
42. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
owner points.
43. (00) P.J. Jones, Toyota, 90.899.
Failed to Qualify
44. (4) Ward Burton, Chevrolet, 90.813.
45. (10) Scott Riggs, Dodge, 90.779.
46. (02) Brandon Ash, Dodge, 90.477.
47. (15) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 90.440.
48. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 90.287.
49. (84) AJ AlImendinger, Toyota, 90.147.
50. (37) Brian Simo, Dodge, 90.048.
51. (78) Kenny Wallace, Chevrolet,
89.883.
52. (49) Klaus Graf, Dodge, 89.438.
NHRA-ProCare Rx
SuperNationals Pairings
After Saturday qualifying finals Sunday
At Old Bridge Township Raceway Park
Englishtown, N.J.
Top Fuel
1. Tony Schumacher, 4.455 seconds,
331.94 mph vs. 16. David Grubnic, 4.808,
314.09. 2. Rod Fuller, 4.479, 330.39 vs.
15. Rit Pustari, 4.734, 312.78. 3. Clay
Millican, 4.487, 330.39 vs. 14. Doug
Kalitta, 4.653, 328.38. 4. Brandon
Bernstein, 4.500, 331.04 vs. 13. J.R. Todd,
4.649, 307.79. 5. Cory McClenathan,
4.516, 326.40 vs. 12. Doug Foley, 4.582,
331.20. 6. Whit Bazemore, 4.521, 332.51
vs. 11. Larry Dixon, 4.558, 322.42. 7.
Hillary Will, 4.544, 328.38 vs. 10. Bob
Vandergriff, 4.557, 311.13. 8. Melanie
Troxel, 4.555, 332.43 vs. 9. Doug Herbert,
4.555, 314.90.
Funny Car
1. Tommy Johnson Jr., Chevy Impala,
4.729, 321.96 vs. 16. Gary Densham,
Impala, 4.938, 304.32. 2. John Force, Ford
Mustang, 4.747, 325.37 vs. 15. Gary
Scelzi, Dodge Charger, 4.925, 309.13. 3.
Ashley Force, Mustang, 4.760, 321.19 vs.
14. Robert Hight, Mustang, 4.893, 301.67.
4. Scott Kalitta, Toyota Solara, 4.768,
317.79 vs. 13. Jeff Arend, Impala, 4.841,
319.52. 5. Ron Capps, Charger, 4.775,
319.90 vs. 12. Tim Wilkerson, Impala,
4.819, 323.89. 6. Tony Pedregon, Impala,
4.780, 323.04 vs. 11. Cruz Pedregon,
Impala, 4.811, 318.62. 7. Jim Head,
Solara, 4.785, 324.83 vs. 10. Tony
Bartone, Chevy Monte Carlo, 4.797,
323.97. 8. Jack Beckman, Charger, 4.789,
325.30 vs. 9. Del Worsham, Impala, 4.796,
325.22.
Pro Stock
1. Greg Anderson, Pontiac GTO, 6.592,
210.57 vs. 16. Craig Hankinson, GTO,
6.643, 207.66. 2. Richie Stevens, Dodge
Stratus, 6.598, 209.20 vs. 15. Warren
Johnson, GTO, 6.643, 208.71. 3. Jeg
Coughlin, Chevy Cobalt, 6.612, 209.46 vs.
14. Mike Edwards, GTO, 6.640, 207.91. 4.
Jason Line, GTO, 6.612, 209.95 vs. 13.
Jim Yates, GTO, 6.635, 208.17. 5.
V.Gaines, Stratus, 6.617, 209.30 vs. 12.
Greg Stanfield, GTO, 6.628, 209.01. 6.
Allen Johnson, Stratus, 6.617, 208.81 vs.
11. Kurt Johnson, Cobalt, 6.627, 208.84. 7.
Larry Morgan, Stratus, 6.617, 208.26 vs.
10. Dave Northrop, GTO, 6.627, 209.14. 8.
Dave Connolly, Cobalt, 6.621, 208.42 vs.
9. Max Naylor, Stratus, 6.624, 209.04.
Pro Stock Motorcycle
1. Angelle Sampey, Suzuki, 6.871,
194.21 vs. 16. Mike Berry, Suzuki, 7.033,
189.28. 2. Andrew Hines, Harley-
Davidson, 6.910, 193.57 vs. 15. Paul Gast,
Suzuki, 7.032, 190.40. 3. Chip Ellis, Buell,
6.950, 192.30 vs. 14. Steve Johnson,
Suzuki, 7.024, 190.16. 4. Karen Staffer,
Suzuki, 6.954, 193.24 vs. 13. Eddie
Krawiec, Harley-Davidson, 7.023, 190.14.
5. Antron Brown, Suzuki, 6.955, 192.55 vs.
12. Peggy Llewellyn, Buell, 7.005, 190.38.
6. Matt Smith, Buell, 6.962, 191.05 vs. 11.
Michael Phillips, Suzuki, 7.002, 193.16. 7.
Geno Scali, Suzuki, 6.965, 192.47 vs. 10.
Hector Arana, Buell, 6.987, 189.92. 8.
Craig Treble, Suzuki, 6.969, 194.77 vs. 9.
Chris Rivas, Buell, 6.975, 190.48.
IndyCar - Iowa Corn


Indy 250 Lineup
After Saturday qualifying race Sunday
At Iowa Speedway
Newton, Iowa
Lap length: 0.875-mile
(Car number in parentheses)'
1. (9) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Honda,
182.360 mph.
2. (3) Hello Castroneves, Dallara-Honda,
182.272.
3. (27) Dario Franchitti, Dallara-Honda,
182.043.
4. (8) Scott Sharp, Dallara-Honda,
181.713.
5. (20) Ed Carpenter, Dallara-Honda,
181.644.
6. (17) Jeff Simmons, Dallara-Honda,
181.527.
7. (11) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Honda,
181.516.
8. (&) Sam Hornish Jr., Dallara-Honda,


For thle record


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (6, 10 CBS) Champ Car World Series Racing Grand Prix
of Cleveland.
1 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) IndyCar Racing Iowa Corn Indy 250.
5 p.m. (TNT) NASCAR Racing Nextel Cup - Toyota/SaveMart 350.
10 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing SuperNationals - Final
Eliminations. (Same-day Tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Los Angeles Dodgers at Tampa Bay Devil Rays.
2 p.m. (WGN) Chicago Cubs at Chicago White Sox.
8 p.m. (ESPN) Detroit Tigers at Atlanta Braves.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA World Series Championship Game 2 -
Oregon State vs. North Carolina.
BICYCLING
4 p.m. (VERSUS) Cycling Tour de Suisse. (Taped)
BILLIARDS
2 p.m. (ESPN) 2007 Enjoypool.com Men's 9-Ball Championship
- Semifinals. (Taped)
3 p.m. (ESPN) 2007 Enjoypool.com Men's 9-Ball Championship
- Final. (Taped)
BOATING
8:30 a.m. (VERSUS) Yachting: America's Cup - Race 2.
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) PBAAll-Star Shootout - First Round. (Taped)
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA: BMW International Open - Final
Round.
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Champions Tour: Bank of America
Championship - Final Round.
2:30 p.m. (ESPN2) LPGA: Wegmans Rochester - Final Round.
3 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) World Series of Golf. (Taped)
3 p.m. (6, 10 CBS) PGA: Travelers Championship - Final Round.
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Professional Championship - Final Round.
TRACK AND FIELD
1 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) AT&T U.S. Outdoor Championships. (Same
day Tape)


MLB SCOREBOARD


Boston
New York
Toronto
Tampa Bay
Baltimore

Detroit
Cleveland
Minnesota
Chicago
Kansas City

Los Angeles
Oakland
Seattle
Texas


New York
Philadelphia
Atlanta
Florida
Washington

Milwaukee
Chicago
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Houston
Cincinnati


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB L10
47 25 .653 - z-7-3
36 36 .500 11 z-5-5
36 37 .49311% 6-4
32 40 .444 15 3-7
32 41 .438152 3-7
Central Division
W L Pct GB LID
44 29 .603 - 7-3
43 30 .589 1 z-6-4
37 35 .514 6% z-6-4
29 41 .41413% 2-8
29 46 .387 16 4-6
West Division
W L Pct GB L10
47 27 .635 - 7-3
39 34 .534 7% z-5-5
37 33 .529 8 z-3-7
30 44 .405 17 7-3
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB L10
40 32 .556 - 4-6
38 36 . 514 3 z-5-5
38 37 .507 3% ..3-7
36 39 .480 5% 4-6
31 43 .419 10 z-4-6
Central Division
W L Pct GB L10
43 31 .581 - z-9-1
34 39 .466 8% z-6-4
33 38 .465 8% z-6-4
31 42 .42511% z-5-5
31 43 .419 12 4-6
29 45 .392 14 z-4-6
West Division


W L Pc
San Diego 41 31 .569
Arizona 42 32 .56.
Los Angeles 42 32 .56
Colorado 38 36 .514
San Francisco 31 42 .42
z-first game was a win
INTERLEAGUE
Friday's Games
Chicago'Cubs 5, Chicago White Sox 1
Florida 5, Minnesota 4
Washington 4, Cleveland 1
Toronto 9, Colorado 8, 10 innings
N.Y. Mets 9, Oakland 1
L.A. Dodgers 6, Tampa Bay 3
Detroit 5, Atlanta 0
Milwaukee 11, Kansas City 6
Philadelphia 6, St. Louis 0
Texas 11, Houston 3
Baltimore 7, Arizona 1
Boston 2, San Diego I
Cincinnati 16, Seattle 1
LA. Angels 5, Pittsburgh 4, 11 innings
N.Y. Yankees 7, San Francisco 3
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs 2, Chicago White Sox 1
Toronto 11, Colorado 6
St. Louis 8, Philadelphia 3
Detroit 2, Atlanta 1
San Francisco 6, N.Y. Yankees 5, 13
innings
Texas 7, Houston 2
Minnesota 11, Florida 1
Milwaukee 7, Kansas City 1
Cleveland 4, Washington 3
N.Y. Mets 1, Oakland 0
Tampa Bay 4, L.A. Dodgers 3
Pittsburgh at L.A. Angels, late
Baltimore at Arizona, late
Boston at San Diego, late
Cincinnati at Seattle, late
Sunday's Games
Minnesota (J.Santana 7-6) at Florida (Kim
3-3), 1:05 p.m.
Colorado (Fogg 3-5) at Toronto (McGowan
3-3), 1:07 p.m.
Oakland (Kennedy 2-4) at N.Y. Mets
(Maine 7-4), 1:10 p.m.

181.506.
9. (10) Dan Wheldon, Dallara-Honda,
181.503.
10. (22) A.J. Foyt IV, Dallara-Honda,
181.188.
11. (7) Danica Patrick, Dallara-Honda,
180.974.
12. (26) Marco Andretti, Dallara-Honda,
180.936.
13. (4) Vitor Meira, Dallara-Honda,
180.878.
14. (2) Tomas Scheckter, Dallara-Honda,
180.794.
'15. (14) Darren Manning, Dallara-
Honda, 180.615.
16. (55) Kosuke Matsuura, Dallara-
Honda, 180.221.
17. (15) Buddy Rice, Dallara-Honda,
178.787.
18. (5) Sarah Fisher, Dallara-lHonda,
178.632.
19. (23) Milka Duno, Dallara-Honda,
175.227.
World Series Grand Prix of
Cleveland Uneup


After Saturday's qualifying
Sunday


race


;t GB
9 -
8 -
8 -
4 4
510%


Home
23-12
20-14
23-18
18-20
16-19
Home
18-14
24-11
20-18
15-20
15-24

Home
27-10
21-18
19-15
18-19

Home
20-18
19-17
19-20
15-20
15-23

Home
27-12
15-20
17-18
15-21
17-18
14-23

Home
21-15
22-16
22-14
21-18
17-18


Away Intr
24-13 11-5
16-22 10-7
13-19 9-8
14-20 6-11
16-22 6-10
Away Intr
26-15 13-4
19-19 9-8
17-17 10-7
14-21 4-13
14-22 9-8

Away Intr
20-17 12-4
18-16 10-7
18-18 7-9
12-25 11-6

Away Intr
20-14 7-7
19-19 8-7
19-17 4-10
21-19 9-8
16-20 8-9

Away Intr
16-19 8-6
19-19 7-4
16-20 6-9
16-21 5-8
14-25 8-9
15-22 7-9

Away Intr
20-16 5-8
20-16 6-7
20-18 5-9
17-18 10-7
14-24 4-10


Cleveland (Westbrook 1-2) at Washington
(Simontacchi 4-5), 1:35 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kuo 1-2) at Tampa Bay
(Jackson 0-8), 1:40 p.m.
Kansas City (Perez 4-7) at Milwaukee
(Gallardo 1-0), 2:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Marshall 3-2) at Chicago
White Sox (Contreras 5-7), 2:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 9-3) at St. Louis
(K.Wells 3-11), 2:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Gorzelanny 7-4) at L.A. Angels
(Colon 6-3), 3:35 p.m.
Boston (Beckett 10-1) at San Diego (Peavy
9-1), 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 2-8) at Seattle (Batista
7-6), 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Mussina 3-4) at San
Francisco (Lowry 6-6), 4:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Trachsel 5-5) at Arizona (Davis
4-8), 4:40 p.m.
Detroit (Miller 2-1) at Atlanta. (James 6-6),
8:05 p.m.
Houston (Sampson 6-5) at Texas (Tejeda
5-7), 8:35 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Texas at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Oakland at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay, 7:10
p.m.
Toronto at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Boston at Seattle, 10:05 p.m.
Kansas City at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUES
Monday's Games
Washington at Atlanta, 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Colorado at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Houston at Milwaukee, 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

At Burke Lakefront Airport
Cleveland
Lap length: 2.106 miles
(Car number In parentheses)
Note: All cars are
Cosworth/DPOI/Brldgestone
1. (1) Sebastien Bourdais, 56.363 sec-
onds, 134.514 mph.
2. (15) Simon Pagenaud, 56.388,
134.454.
3. (5).Will Power, 56.473, 134.252. ......
4. (2) Graham Rahal, 56.588, 133.979.
5. (14) Robert Doornbos, 56.751,
133.594.
6. (4) Dan Clarke, 57.001, 133.008.
7. (3) Paul Tracy, 57.065, 132.859.
8. (9) Justin Wilson, 57.079, 132.826.
9. (8)Alex Tagliani, 57.199, 132.548.
10. (7) Oriol Servia, 57.380, 132.130.
11. (21) Neel Jani, 57.400, 132.084.
12. (22) Tristan Gommendy, 57.516,
131.817.
13. (29) Alex Figge, 57.626, 131.566.
14. (19) Bruno Junqueira, 57.758,
131.265.
15. (11) Katherine Legge, 57.811,
131.145.
16. (28) Ryan Dalziel, 57.928, 130.880.
17. (34) Jan Heylen, 58.116, 130.456.


BASEBALL
Indians 4, Nationals 3
CLEVELAND WASHINGTON
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Szmore cf 411 1 CGzmn ss 3 01 1
Gutlrrzrf 3 120 FLopez2b 5 1 1 0
Blake 3b 4 11 0 Zmrmn 3b 4 0 0 0
VMrtnz lb 4 11 3 DYong lb 3 0 1 1
JhPIta ss 3 00 0 Blliard lb 1 0 0 0
Mchels If 2 02 0 Kearns rf 4 0 2 0
Nixon rf 1 00 0 Church If 4 0 0 0
RPerez p 0000 CCrdro p 0 0 0 0
Mastny p 0000 Schndr c 4 020
Hafner ph 1 000 Watson cf 3 22 0
Brwski p 0 00 0 Chico p 2 0 0 0
Shppch c 3 000 Colome p 0 0 0 0
Brfield 2b 3 000 Lngrhn ph 1 0 0 0
Byrd p 2 000 Rauch p 0 0 0 0
Frnciso If 1 000 Logan cf 1 0 1 0
Totals 314 74 Totals 35 310 2
Cleveland 000 001 003- 4
Washington 001 001 100- 3
E-Sizemore (2). DP-Cleveland 1,
Washington 2. LOB-Cleveland 3,
Washington 8. 2B-Logan (5). HR-
Sizemore (12), VMartinez (14). SB-
FLopez (8), Watson (1). CS-Michaels
(3). SF-CGuzman.
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
Byrd 62-3 7 3 3 1 4
RPerez 1-3 00 0 0 1
Mastny W,5-2 1 1 0 0 0 0
Borowski S,21 1 2 0 0 1 0
Washington
Chico 6 4 1 1 3 3
Colome- 1 0 0 0 0 0
Rauch 1 0 0 0 0 1
CCordero L,1-2 1 3 3 3 0 0
TODAY'S MLB LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-MOrdonez, Detroit, .381;
ISuzuki, Seattle, . .358; Willits, Los
Angeles, .347; Jeter, New York, .346;
Posada, New York, .344; OCabrera, Los
Angeles, .340; Polanco, Detroit, .337.
RUNS-ARodriguez, New York, 71;
Sheffield, Detroit, 65; MOrdonez, Detroit,
63; Sizemore, Cleveland, 62; DeJesus,
Kansas City, 54; BAbreu, New York, 54;
Granderson, Detroit, 53; Rios, Toronto,
53.
RBI-ARodriguez, New York, 76;
MOrdonez, Detroit, 68; VGuerrero, Los
Angeles, 66; VMartinez, Cleveland, 62;
Morneau, Minnesota, 57; THunter,
Minnesota, 57; Sosa, Texas, 57.
HITS-ISuzuki, Seattle, 106;
MOrdonez, Detroit, 102; OCabrera, Los
Angeles, 100; Jeter, New York, 100;
Polanco, Detroit, 95; BRoberts, Baltimore,
90; MYoung, Texas, 90; ARodriguez, New
York, 90.
DOUBLES-MOrdonez, Detroit, 34;
DOrtiz, Boston, 27; OCabrera, Los
Angeles, 23; Posada, New York, 23;
Cano, New York, 22; Granderson, Detroit,
22; MYoung, Texas, 22.
TRIPLES-Granderson, Detroit, 13;
Crawford, Tampa Bay, 8; TPena, Kansas
City, 5; Teahen, Kansas City, 5; DeJesus,
Kansas City, 5; Buck, Oakland, 4;
MeCabrera, New York, 4; Cano, New
York, 4; CGuillen, Detroit, 4; Cora,
Boston, 4.
HOME RUNS--ARodriguez, New York,.
28; Morneau, Minnesota, 20; CPena,
Tampa Bay, 17; Sheffield, Detroit, 17;
Rios, Toronto, 16; THunter, Minnesota,
15; VMartinez, Cleveland, 14.
STOLEN BASES-BRoberts,
Baltimore, 23; Sizemore, Cleveland, 22;
ISuzuki, Seattle, 22; Crawford, Tampa
Bay, 20; JLugo, Boston, 19; Willits; Los
Angeles, 18; Lofton, Texas, 16.
PITCHING (8 Decisions)-Bonderman,
Detroit, 8-0, 1.000, 4.01; Beckett, Boston,
10-1, .909, 3.14; Sabathia, Cleveland, 10-
2, .833, 3.34; Verlander, Detroit, 9-2,
.818, 2.78; Haren, Oakland, 9-2, .818,
1.78; Halladay, Toronto, 8-2, .800, 4.08;
Shields, Tampa Bay, 6-2, .750, 3.64;
Gaudin, Oakland, 6-2, .750, 3.05.
STRIKEOUTS-Bedard, Baltimore,
121; JoSantana, - Minnesota, 106;
Matsuzaka, Boston, 102; Sabathia,
Cleveland, 100; Burnett, Toronto, 100;
Kazmir, Tampa Bay, 96; Shields, Tampa
Bay, 89; Haren, Oakland, 89.
SAVES-FrRodriguez, Los Angeles,
22; Borowski, Cleveland, 21; Putz,
Seattle, 20; Jenks, Chicago, 18; TJones,
Detroit, 18; Papelbon, Boston, 17; Reyes,
Tarmpa Bay, 17.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Holliday, Colorado, .359;
DeLee, Chicago, .352; DYoung,
Washington, .335; Helton, Colorado,
.329; Renteria, Atlanta, .329; MiCabrera,
Florida, .327; HaRamirez, Florida, .322;
Utley, Philadelphia, .322.
RUNS-HaRamirez, Florida, 62; Uggla,
Florida, 58; Rollins, Philadelphia, 58;
Utley, Philadelphia, 52; Fielder,
Milwaukee, 51; JBReyes, New York, 50;
Dunn, Cincinnati, 49.
RBI-Fielder, Milwaukee, 61; Holliday,
Colorado, 59; CaLee, Houston, 59; Utley,
Philadelphia, 58; MiCabrera, Florida, 53;
Howard, Philadelphia, 51; Hawpe,
Colorado, 51; AdGonzalez, San Diego,
51.
HITS-Holliday, Colorado, 108;
HaRamirez, Florida, 96; Byrnes, Arizona,
94; JBReyes, New York, 93; DeLee,
Chicago, 93; Utley, Philadelphia, 92;
Rollins, Philadelphia, 91; Renteria,
Atlanta, 91.
DOUBLES-Utley, Philadelphia, 30;
Uggla, Florida, 28; Holliday, Colorado, 27;
DeLee, Chicago, 26; � Church,
Washington, 22; JBautista, Pittsburgh, 21;
AdGonzalez, San Diego, 21; CaLee,
Houston, 21; ASoriano, Chicago, 21.
TRIPLES-Rollins, Philadelphia, 9;
JBReyes, New York, 8; Johnson, Atlanta,
6; CGuzman, Washington, 6; Pence,
Houston, 5; Byrnes, Arizona, 5; 10 are
tied with 4.
HOME RUNS-.Fielder, Milwaukee, 26;
Dunn, Cincinnati, 20; Griffey Jr.,
Cincinnati, 19; Hardy, Milwaukee, 17;
Howard, Philadelphia, 16; MiCabrera,
Florida, 16; Pujols,. St.-Louis, 16. ' :-
STOLEN BASES-JBReyes, New
York, 38; Pierre, Los Angeles, 23;
HaRamirez, Florida, 22; Victorino,


Philadelphia, 22; Taveras, Colorado, 18;
Wright, New York, 16; BPhi.llips,
Cincinnati, 15.
PITCHING (8 Decisions)-Peavy, San
Diego, 9-1, .900, 1.98; Penny, Los
Angeles, . 9-1, .900, 2.12; -Harang,
Cincinnati, 8-2, .800, 3.59; Hamels,
Philadelphia, 9-3, .750, 3.82; BSheets,
Milwaukee, 8-3, .727, 3.19; Smoltz,
Atlanta, 8-4, .667, 3.14; CYoung, San
Niego, 6-3, .667, 2.26; JSosa, New York,
.6-3, .667, 4.05.
STRIKEOUTS-Peavy, San Diego,
110; Hamels, Philadelphia, 108; Webb,
Arizona, 97; Harang,.Cjincinnati, 97;.Wolf,
Los Angeles, 89; CZambrano, Chicago,
86; RHill, Chicago, 85.
SAVES-FCordero, Milwaukee, 27;
Valverde, Arizona, 23; Saito, Los Angeles,
20; Fuentes, Colorado, 20; Hoffman, San
Diego, 19; Dempster, Chicago, 16;
BWagner, New York, 15.


BACK
Continued from Page 1B

Duchardt, vice president of
development for Hendrick.
"We're way behind, but we'll
just go out there and prepare
today the way we would on any
Saturday and hope for the
best"
Johnson and Gordon will
start 41st and 42nd in the 43-
car lineup for Sunday's
Toyota/Save Mart 350.
In the morning practice, with
cooler track temperatures and
fast speeds, Gordon was third
fastest and Johnson 16th. In the
afternoon, Johnson was ninth
and Gordon, who spun harm-
lessly at one point, wound up
10th.
Gordon, a five-time winner
and the defending champion at
Sonoma, said it's going to be
tough to try to drive to the front
on the treacherous road circuit
that winds through the hills of
Northern California wine
country.!
Making it even more difficult
is the fact that this is the road


LOETHEN

Continued from Page 1B

and 42 lymph nodes, the situa-
tion was under control for the
time being. That, however, was
short-lived when six months
later, Loethen found out he
had prostate cancer.
Loethen had that treated as
well,. but still lives with the
understanding that he could
have a reoccurrence.
"My doctor said, 'I can give
you five years (to live),"
Loethen said of the first diag-
nosis. "I've passed that and
gone seven years now."
Southern Woods club profes-
sional Rick Kelso, who teamed
up with Loethen to win a pro-
am event last year, admired his
fellow golfer's resolve.
"Sam's a diehard golfer and
a great guy," Kelso said. "He's
had some scares along the way
(with cancer), but he's kicked
some butts (fighting it)."
Loethen, for his part, still
looks like an athlete, standing
6-foot-2 and appearing to be in
good shape. His golf swing, too,
is a testament to consistency.
While hitting balls on the
driving range before a round
this Friday, Loethen took
smooth; compact swings with
nearly every club in his arsenal.
Although he admits to los-
ing some distance on his shots


racing debut of NASCAR's. new
Car of Tomorrow, a virtually
unknown quantity on this ind
of track
"We're really put into a bind
here and we're going to do our
best, that's all I can say," said
Gordon, the series points
leader. "You know we're going
to do all we can to make the car
as fast as it can be and to try to
come up through that field the
best way, smoothest way pospi-
ble while trying to stay out ,of
trouble and trying to play the
right pit strategy. .
"We'll try to do everything-in
our power to get the best finish
out here we can. I'll be honest,
right now it's a little hard for us
to be realistic about a win. It's
more about being realistic
about trying to get a top 10.'" .
Johnson said the key is, to
concentrate and not get too
upset about the track time he
and Gordon lost. ',
"We can't get that back," he
said. "We just have to make
sure that when we do get.opi
the racetrack that our heads
are in the right spots, were
focused on the right things and
we do the best job that we cax,,"


as he gets a little older, every
shot looked like it could split
the fairway in half.
Now playing at a handicap
of around five or six, Loeth-n
was at one time a plus-tWo
golfer in his younger days..,'.-,
He picked up the game as a
junior in college and his.pat-
sion hasn't waned since.,,
"My love for the game .has
never diminished," Loetbeen
said. "I always want to play
better." -
Loethen quailed for .the
U.S. Senior Amateur in 1995
and 1997, while in '95 winning
the Missouri State Senir"
Amateur Tournament. -,Fp
also played in the Britisji
Senior Amateur in 1997. -.,7
After playing some tough
courses himself, Loethen spi S
he enjoyed watching the .l.S.
Open, where a plus five. wpn
the event. .
"I think par should be, a
good score," he said. "I hate
these courses where these
guys are shooting 25 underj.
Still, the back-to-back
holes-in-one are something
Loethen is very proud of.., Ie
said his three children,t-r
Lori, Bart and Brett -r ,aIl
called on Father's Day and
were very excited to hear
about the feat.
When asked if he planned
to play golf next Father's DPy,
Loethen just smiled and sdd;
"You bet."


SUBMISSION DEADLINES

Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely publication of
submitted material. The earlier Chronicle editors receive
submissions, the better chance of notes running more than
once.
* Community notes: At least one week in advance of the
event.
* Veterans Notes: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sunday,,,
* Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sunday.',,
* Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication
Sunday.
* Chalk Talk: 4 p.m. Monday for publication Wednesday. ,.
* Health Notes: 4 p.m. Friday for publication Tuesday. ''
* Religious events : 4 p.m. Tuesday for publication Saturda~
* Real Estate Digest: 4 p.m. Thursday for publication Sunday-
* Photos and stories are published as space is available. The.,
Chronicle cannot guarantee placement on color pages.
* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crystals
River; by fax at 563-3280; or by e-mail to newsdesk@chroryj
icleonline.com.





Rolling Thunders First Annual



Independence Day



Golf Tournament %

Join the Rolling Thunder Florida Chapter 7 this
Independence Day weekend for a fun filled day!
A golf tournament followed by an all American cookout,
hamburgers, hotdogs and apple pie.

June 30, Pine Ridge Golf Club.
5600 Elkam Blvd, Beverly Hills
8 a.m. shotgun start -


$50 entry fee per person includes:
Greens fees and cart
Coffee and doughnuts
Raffle tickets
Goody bags
1 free putt in putting contest
Old fashioned 4th of July Picnic


Ist place, 2nd place, 3rd
place and worst
Closest to the pin
Straightest drive
Putting contest
Win a CAR in the Hole in
One contest


The proceeds to benefit The Haley House Foundation,
Disabled American Veteran's, Florida Gulf Coast Paralyzed
Veteran's Association and to the Veterans in need within our
community.


CiiiK6~'


For more information call Ray at
230-9750 or Pine Ridge Golf Club
at 746-6177


AIM '>.4 900-7


A


SC4-D~�mBTHAnn











C~as obT FL E SNA, UE2, 075


Ochoa on top at Wegmans


Associated Press

ePITTSFORD, N.Y - Lorena
,0thoa never plays safe, espe-
"�eally when she's ahead.
c' ,'My way is being aggressive,
-*e' that's what I'm going to do
'i11 the way to the end," the 25-
:year-old Mexican star said
tfter shooting a 5-under-par 67
Saturday to take a one-stroke
-led over South Korean rookie
. NW-Kyung Kim after three
*.hinds of the Wegmans LPGA.
:u Ochoa, who tops the money
if8t with $1.25 million, closed
'ith two birdies and will enter
the final round at 9-under 207.
W "It was one of those days that
f Verything is easy - hitting the
driverr good and giving myself a
lot of birdie chances," she said.
9~I"Once you're playing good,
'~fu just need to be aggressive.
4tis bad when you start thinking
;t much and you try to play
Conservative ... I make mis-
IWkes when I don't play aggres-
Sij e."
The 19-year-old Kim, whose
.best finish was a tie for fourth
iatlast month's Coming Classic,
sank a 25-foot birdie putt on
,No. 17 for a 71. That kept her
4-dose heading into Sunday at
.the- tree-lined Locust Hill
course.
-a If I play my best, I don't
Atink I'm going to have any
regrets," she said. "I don't think
Vrii afraid to fail ... I just feel
fveTy calm."
".'First-round leader Cristi
Kerr rallied with a 70 to move
4ifkio third place at 5 under
k '- .They have a saying in a four-
mayz tournament - you play
hM ee days against the course
~&iid one day against your com-
)'4titors," Kerr said. "I like my
position. And if I keep playing
illl, it's going to be tough for
Nfem."
.-Kerr was one ahead of
"LThdsey Wright (72), Mi Hyun
Kim (75) of South Korea, A.J.
Eadthorne (69) and Angela
Sthnford (73).
'MStanford, whose sole victory
came at the ShopRite LPGA
.btlssic in 2003, briefly took
-Mhie lead at 9 under but closed
'Ith three bogeys and a dou-
-ble-bogey. Defending champi-
bni Jeong Jang shot a 71 to get
t6-1 under.
,] -j . - ; .


Associated Pre
Lorena Ochoa watches her tee shot Saturday on the par-3 15th hole during the third round of ti
Wegmans LPGA at Locust Hill Country Club in Pittsford, N.Y. Ochoa leads the tournament at 9 und
par, having posted a 5-under-par 67 for the round.


Ochoa won the Safeway
International in March and
the Sybase Classic in May, was
the runner-up three times,
and placed in the top 10 on
five other occasions in 2007.
She picked up the first of
her six birdies with a 12-foot
putt on No. 2. A wayward drive
on No. 6 produced her only
bogey. She two-putted for


birdie on the par-5 17th and
took the outright lead when
she left her 125-yard approach
shot 2 feet away on the last
hole.
"I always play to win,"
Ochoa said. "I know I can win
anytime I play. I have the con-
fidence and trust and faith. I
have nothing to prove. I enjoy
very much what I do and it's


fun just to be out there ai
trying to make birdies."
"I did everything I cou
today," she added. "I'm ve
pleased and I can't wait to t
here (Sunday)."
Ochoa won here in 2005, ra
lying from five strokes bai
with just seven holes to go
beat Paula Creamer by fob
strokes.


Puzert's strong finish grabs sector lead


n--Three birdies on final

six holes gives golfer

3-stroke margin

Associated Press

SCNCORD, Mass. - Leading the Bank
of America Championship heading into
Ithe-final round is nothing new for Tom
Purtzer. Winning it would be.
Three birdies on his last six holes
Saturday gave Purtzer a three-stroke edge
over seven golfers, including first-day
leader Torm Watson. But he can't forget his
disappointing trend in the event on a short
coie rse here one iot golfer can take con-
trpl.
.Purtzer led after the second round in the
Slasttwo senior tournaments at Nashawtuc
Country Club but couldn't hang on. On
Saturday, his late rally gave him a 68 for a
Sl 1under 134.
SWinning Sunday "would mean a lot," he
'a4d. "I'm not kidding myself that I don't
remember what happened."
v:j-Now, though, he considers himself a bet-


ter player, especially after a switch in his
grip improved his game by "80 percent"
last March. He simply began holding the
club tightly throughout his backswing,
rather than loosening his hands after start-
ing it and then re-gripping.
'All those books that you read say hold
onto the club," Purtzer said. "It's just a mat-
ter of doing it and then trusting it"
In 2004, Purtzer shot a final-round 72 at
Nashawtuc and finished tied for second,
four strokes behind Craig Stadler, who shot
a 64 for the biggest comeback victory since
the tournament began in 1981.
In 2005, he lost to Mark McNulty on the
second playoff hole. The tournament was
canceled last year without anyone teeing
off because of heavy rain and a saturated
course.
On Saturday, playing with Watson, he felt
fans who knew of those close calls were
behind him.
'Absolutely," Purtzer said. "I can't
believe how every green I was going to,
every tee box I was going to, they were
going 'go, get 'em, Tom.' Oh, wait a minute,
maybe that was Watson."
Watson led Purtzer by one shot after
shooting a 7-under 65 on Friday, when


" / . . .. . .. - . . . . _ .

, , - .









Associated Press
Tom Purtzer watches his shot on the fifth
fairway Saturday during the Champions
Tour's Bank of America Championship at the
Nashawtuc Country Club in Concord, Mass.

there were two rain delays. On Saturday, in
sunny and windy conditions, he sank to 72.
"In boxing terms, I didn't lay a glove on it
today," he said. "I'd feel good about my
chances if I played better today."


I SATURDAY'S GOLF SCORES


m w


Pittsford, N.Y.
Purse: $1.8 million


Yardage: 6,328
Third Round
Lorena Ochoa. 69-71-67
In-Kyung Kim 70-67-71
Cristie Kerr 66-75-70
A.J. Eathome 72-71-69
Lindsey Wright 70-70-72
Angela Stanford 70-69-73
Mi Hyun Kim 69-68-75
Wendy Ward 74-70-69
Jin Joo Hong 71-73-69
Pat Hurst 74-69-70
Seon Hwa Lee 71-71-71
Karine Icher 74-70-70
Maria Hjorth 70-71-73
R. Hetherington 70-71-73
Beth Bader 73-72-70
Moira Dunn 73-71-71
Jeong Jang 71-73-71
Leta Lindley 72-71-72
Suzann Pettersen 68-75-72


Meena Lee
Morgan Pressel
Nina Reis
Paula Creamer
Janice Moodie
Young-A Yang
Gloria Park
Jee Young Lee
Joo Mi Kim
C. Sorenstam
Soo Young Moon
Lorie Kane
Ai Miyazato


71-71-73
70-72-73
76-70-70
70-76-70
74-70-72
76-72-69
72-76-69
71-77-69
74-73-70
70-77-70
72-73-72
71-74-72
73-71-73


SPGA -Travelers
Championship
Saturday
At TPC River Highlands
Cromwell, Conn.
Purse: $6 million
Yardage: 6,820
Third Round
Jay Williamson 66-66-67 -
Hunter Mahan 62-71-67 -2
David Toms 67-65-69 -2
Fred Funk 70-65-67 --
Nick O'Hem 67-70-66 -2
Pat Perez 69-68-66 -2
Billy Mayfair 67-72-66 --
Vijay Singh 68-71-66 -
SJerry Kelly 69-68-68 -
Justin Rose 69-68-68 -2
Tom Lehman 67-68-70 -2
Tom Pemice, Jr. 68-70-68 -2
Kevin Na 70-67-69 --
Ryan Moore 66-71-69 -2
Eric Axley 67-70-69 -2
Heath Slocum 68-68-70 -2
Kenny Perry 65-71-70 -2
Steve Marino 68-67-71 -2
Olin Browne 67-67-72 -
Mathew Goggin 69-71-67 -
Tim Petrovic 71-68-68 -2
B.J. Staten 67-71-69 -2
Charles Warren 67-67-73 -2
Steve Allan 66-75-67 -
Bo Van Pelt 73-68-67 -
Bill Haas 72-68-68 -2
Joe Ogilvie 71-68-69 -2
Billy Andrade 66-71-71 -2
Joey Sindelar 66-70-72 -2
Chris DiMarco 64-70-74 -2
Ryan Armour 67-74-68 --
Chad Campbell 69-70-70 --
Brad Faxon 65-74-70 -2
Rod Pampling 66-71-72 -2
Carl Pettersson 65-72-72 -2
Shigeki Maruyama 67-69-73 --
J.J. Henry 68-73-69 -
Cliff Kresge 71-70-69 --
David Branshaw 70-71-69 --
Bob Tway 71-70-69 -2
Woody Austin 66-73-71 -
SJason Gore 68-70-72 -
Peter Lonard 68-69-73 --
Brent Geiberger 73-68-70 --
Jason Dufner 71-70-70 --
Craig Bowden 71-69-71 -
Michael Allen 66-69-76 -
Doug LaBelle II 68-73-71 --
M. Calcavecchia 71-70-71 --
J.B. Holmes 72-69-71 --
Steve Flesch 71-69-72 -
Jeff Overton 69-71-72 -
Kevin Sutherland 68-71-73 -2
Robert Gamez 70-69-73 -2
Andrew Buckle 71-70-72 -2
Tripp Isenhour 72-68-73 -
Ben Curtis 69-71-73 -
ess P. Harrington 71-68-74 -2
he Steve Wheatcroft 68-71-74 -2
e Arjun Atwal 68-71-74 -2
er Stewart Cink 68-70-75 -
Kevin Stadler 68-70-75 -
Bob Heintz 65-72-76 -
nd Corey Pavin 70-66-77 --
Michael Sim 65-70-78 -'
Ild C. Beckman 75-65-74 --
ry Brian Davis 71-69-74 -
Craig Kanada 68-71-75 -
be Tim Herron 71-70-74 -2
D. Maruyama. 68-72-75 -2
al- Frank Lickliter II 69-71-75 -
ck John Mallinger 71-69-75 --
to Glen Day 69-70-76 -
to Will MacKenzie 67-74-75 -
iur Alex Cejka 68-71-77 -
S. Gutschewski 72-69-77 -,
Mark Brooks 70-70-78 --
Jesper Parnevik 72-69-78 -
| 'Bren Ven-rn 70-70-80 -

S LPGA - Wegmans LF
Saturday
A I oc . Ust U-ill . t', n Plh


Par: 72

- 207 -9
- 208 -8
- 211 -5
- 212 -4
- 212 -4
- 212 -4
- 212 -4.
- 213 -3
- 213 -3
- 213 -3
- 213 -3
- 214 -2
- 214 -2
- 214 -2
- 215 -1
- 215 -1
- 215 -1
- 215 -1
- 215 -1
- 215 -1
- 215 -1
- 216 E
-216 E
- 216 E
- 217 +1
- 217 +1
- 217 +1
- 217 +1
-217 l+1
- 217 +1
-217 +1
-217 +1


Reilley Rankin 73-71-73 - 217
B. Lindcicome 69-75-73 - 217
Erica Blasberg 75-68-74 - 217
Se Ri Pak 73-74-71 - 218
Goetze-Ackerman 71-74-73 - 218


Jimin Kang
Amy Hung
Mhairi McKay
Becky Morgan
Alena Sharp
Hye Jung Choi
Song-Hee Kim
Kate Golden
Angela Park
Michele Redman
Diana D'Alessio
Giulia Sergas
'Katherine Hull


70-75-73
70-75-73
72-72-74
70-72-76
67-74-77
74-74-71
73-75-71
71-77-71
76-71-72
73-72-74
71-74-74
76-68-75
71-73-75


Par: 70

199 -11
200 -10
201 -9
202 -8
203 -7
203 -7
205 -5
205 -5
205 -5
205 -5
205 -5
206 -4
206 -4
206 -4
206 -4
206 -4
206 -4
206 -4
206 -4
207 -3
207 -3
207 -3
207 -3
208 -2
208 -2
208 -2
208 -2
208 -2
208 -2
208 -2
209 -1
209 -1
209 -1
209 -1
209 -1
209 -1
210 E
210 E
210 E
210 E
210 E
210 E
210 E
211 +1
211 +1
211 +1
211 +1
212 +2
212 +2
212 +2
212 +2
212 +2
212 +2
212 +2
213 +3
213 +3
213 +3
213 +3
213 +3
213 +3
213 +3
213 +3
213 +3
213 +3
213 +3
214 +4
214 +4
214 +4
215 +5
215 +5
215 +5
215 +5
215 +5
216 +6
216 +6
218 +8
218 +8
219 +9
220 +10
PGA

lub


- 218 +2
- 218 +2
- 218 +2
- 218 +2
- 218 +2
- 219 +3
- 219 +3
- 219 +3
- 219 +3
- 219 +3
- 219 +3
- 219 +3
- 219 +3
- 219 +3
- 220 +4
- 221 +5
- 221 +5
- 221 +5
- 221 +5
- 221 +5
- 221 +5
- 221 +5
- 222 +6
- 222 +6
- 222 +6
- 222 +6
- 222 +6
- 222 +6
- 222 +6
- 223 +7
- 223 +7
- 224 +8
- 224 +8
- 225 +9
- 228 +12


Champions - Bank of
America Championship
Saturday
At Nashawtuc Country Club
Concord, Mass.
Purse: $1.65 million
Yardage: 6,741 Par: 72 (36-36)
Second Round


Tom Purtzer
Kirk Hanefeld
Jack Ferenz
Jay Haas
R.W. Eaks
Tom Jenkins
Keith Fergus
Tom Watson
Jim Thorpe
Danny Edwards
Leonard Thompson
Brad Bryant
Morris Hatalsky
Chip Beck
Bob Gilder
Rick Karbowski
Massy Kuramoto
John Jacobs
Jim Ahern
Tim Conley
Scott Simpson
Jay Sigel
Tom Kite
Lonnie Nielsen
Allen Doyle
Dana Quigley
David Eger
Tom McKnight
Bruce Summerhays
Joe Inman
Larry Nelson
James Mason
Denis Watson
Nick Price
David Edwards
Mike Smith
Bruce Fleisher
Des Smyth
Mark McNulty
Jim Dent
Wayne Levi
Joe Ozaki
Denny Hepler
Kenny Knox
Curtis Strange
Andy Bean
D.A. Weibring
Mike McCullough
Ed Dougherty
Jerry Pate


66-68
71-66
71-66
71-66
73-64
68-69
68-69
65-72
71-67
72-66
69-69
71-68
71-68
71-68
71-68
70-69
68-71
67-72
71-69
70-70
70-70
70-70
70-70
68-72
71-70
72-69
72-69
70-71


- 134 -10
- 137 -7
- 137 -7
- 137 -7
- 137 -7
- 137 -7
- 137 -7
- 137 -7
- 138 -6
- 138 -6
- 138 -6


69-72 - 141
69-72 - 141
68-73 - 141
,71-71 - 142
72-70 - 142
72-70 - 142
71-71 - 142
72-70 - 142
70-72 - 142
74-68 - 142
71-72 - 143
72-71 - 143
72-71 - 143
70-73 - 143
68-75 - 143
72-72 - 144
72-72 - 144
71-73 - 144
71-73 - 144
72-72 -,144
71-73 - 144
73-71 - 144


Dave Eichelberger 70-74 -


Walter Hall
Bobby Wadkins
Craig Stadler
John Harris
John Ross
Peter Jacobsen
Mike Reid
Hale Irwin
Graham Marsh
Bruce Vaughan
Bruce Lietzke
Scott Hoch
Lee Trevino
Jim Colbert
Mike Hill
Mike Goodes
Mark Johnson
Tim Simpson
Jack Renner
Tom Wargo
Dale Douglass
Jim Albus
Pat McDonald
Ron Streck
J.C. Snead
Dick Mast
Hugh Baiocchi


73-71
74-70
70-74
68-76
71-74
71-74
73-72
74-71
73-73
74-72
77-69
76-71
77-70
78-69
74-74
74-74
75-73
75-74
74-76
77-73
77-73
78-72
79-71
73-78
76-76
77-75
75-80


144 E
144 E
144 E
144 E
144 E
145 +1
145 +1
145 +1
145 +1
146 +2
146 +2
146 +2
147 +3
147 +3
147 +3
148 +4
148 +4
148 +4
149 +5
150 +6
150 +6
150 +6
150 +6
150 +6
151 +7
152 +8
152 +8
155 +11


illiamson holds narrow advantage at Travelers


Gofer trying to

'et back on PGA

Tour full-time

Associated Press

ICRORMWELL, Conn. - Jay
\Nlrianison would like to get
back to playing PGA Tour
events full-time. He's one day
alvay
I Playing on a sponsor exemp-
tion in the Travelers
Championship, Williamson shot
a third-round 67 Saturday for a
o e-stroke lead over Hunter
$ahan after the third round. If
ih can hang on, he'll get back
h s Tour card and be the first
|p ayer to win on the PGA and
nationwide Tours in the same
yar since Jason Gore in 2005.
S"My mind-set all week has
been I'm just really happy to be
lihre," he said. "It's great not
pbPing on the other tour right
now. Now I've really got an
Jobportunity. If I can get within
n;ne holes left with a chance,
IWho knows what can happen."
I ,The 40-year-old won the
Nationwide Tour's Fort Smith


Classic in Arkansas in May and
ranks seventh on that tour's
money list with $153,249 in earn-
ings. He'd take home a cool $1
million with a win.
Williamson bested his second-
round co-leader David Toms,
and first-round leader Mahan
over the final four holes to finish
11-under par.
"I wasn't really looking at the
leaderboards," he said. "I fig-
ured if I could just keep making
birdies, making good swings,
I've got 18 holes and we'll figure
it out tomorrow."
So far this week, he has hit 36
of 42 fairways and 42 of 54
greens in regulation.
He hit an 8-foot birdie putt on
the par-4 No. 15 to go 11-under
and made par the rest of the
way, nearly chipping in for
birdie on the 18th.
"I don't usually get excited on
the golf course," he said. "But if
that ball would have gone in, I
don't know what I would have
done."
Williamson graduated from
nearby Trinity College in
Hartford, where he played base-
ball and hockey. He said he did-
n't even know this Tour event
existed when he was in school.
Now he's playing for an


exemption through 2009.
"There's a lot riding on this,
obviously, if I really sat there
and thought about it, I may be
overwhelmed."
Toms, a 12-time winner on
Tour, including the 2001 PGA
Championship, has five top-10
finishes this year. But he
bogeyed the par-3 16th, and he
fell two back after his drive on
the signature 17th hole found
the water.
His 69 was good enough for
third place a stroke behind
Mahan, who shot a 67.
"I'm in good shape for tomor-
row," Toms said. "I just have to
keep playing. I feel I can play
this golf course well."
So can Mahan, who finished
second here a year ago. He had
a tournament-best 62 Thursday
and hit 71 on a windy Friday. He
said there is just something
about the course that brings out
the best in his.game.
"You just see the greens a lit-
tle better than in most places,"
he said. "You see your tee shots
better, the yardage seems better,
just everything is easier for
you."
Williamson was trailing by
one when he birdied No. 15.
After Toms and Mahan bogeyed


the 16th, he saved par to take
sole possession of the lead.
Fred Funk, a gallery favorite,
shot a 67 to finish alone in fourth
place. Funk has already won
this year on two tours, taking the
PGA Mayakoba Classic in
March, a month after winning
the Turtle Bay championship on
the Champions Tour.
"It's nice to have options," he
said Saturday.
Pat Perez and Nick O'Hern
were four back at 7-under.
O'Hern, who shot a 66 Saturday,
has never won on tour, but fin-
ished second at last season's
Booz Allen Classic, which also
came just after the U.S. Open.
'The thing about this week is
that everything is going to seem
a bit easier," O'Hern said.
Vijay Singh also shot himself
back into contention with a 66.
He hit birdies on Nos. 2 and 3,
bogeys on Nos. 4 and 5, and then
hit his second shot on the par-5
6th hole to within 5 feet of the
pin and made an eagle.
Jay Williamson hits his third
shot on the 18th hole during the
third round of the Travelers
Championship golf tournament
in Cromwell, Conn., on Saturday.
Associated Press


I-- -- I


SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 5B


C-OTCLF


rc^^i--. r ,. f CT ) r rnrmTrf F


Sophie Gustafson 70-74-75
Sun Young Yoo 72-73-75
Sherri Steinhauer 74-74-73
Nancy Scranton 76-71-74
Katie Futcher 71-76-74
Ji-Young Oh 71-76-74
Catriona Matthew 71-75-75
Karrie Webb 72-73-76
Christina Kim 70-75-76
Jamie Hullett 74-74-74
Meunier-Lebouc 72-75-75
Silvia Cavalleri 76-70-76
Beth Daniel 75-71-76
Na Ri Kim 74-72-76
Young Kim 70-76-76
II Mi Chung 72-73-77
Brandie Burton 74-73-76
Sherri Turner 71-76-76
Eva Dahllof 70-77-77
Candle Kung 72-74-78
Yu Ping Lin 73-74-78
Karin Sjodin 72-75-81












6B


Entertainment


SUNDAY
JUNE 24, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Child support battle
finds 50 Cent in court
CENTRAL ISLIP N.Y. -
The $25,000 a month in child
support and household
expenses that rapper 50
Cent pays to the mother of
his 10-year-old son is not
enough, says the boy's moth-
er, Shaniqua Tompkins.
The rapper
is "worth
tens and tens
of millions of
dollars," said
her attorney,
Raoul Felder
said.
The par-
50 ents of young
Cent Marquise
Jacklon are
wrangling over the issue in
family court in this Long
Island community, where 50
Cent arrived Friday in an
armored SUV equipped with
a satellite dish.
50 Cent no longer needs to
worry about the choice he
famously expressed on a
2004 album - "Get Rich or
Die Tryin."'
With his G-Unit record
label, clothing line, ring
tones and other enterprises,
50 Cent - whose real name
is Curtis Jackson - reeled
in an estimated $33 million
in the past year, according to
Forbes.
His lawyer, BrettKimmel,
called Tompkins "insatiable."
"Her demands keep esca-
lating," he told the Daily
News.

'Suge'Knight's
Malibu house for sale
MALIBU, Calif. - Marion
"Suge" Knight's seven-bed-
room, 9 1/2-bath home has
been placed on the market
for $6.2 million, part of the
rap music mogul's financial
overhaul under Chapter 11
bankruptcy protection.
The 8,272-square-foot
Mediterranean-style man-
sion was
built in 2001
and is locat-
ed on a 6.79-
acre lot in
the hills
above the
Pacific
Ocean. It has
Suge access to two
Knight beaches and
is being sold
with an additional 2.11 acres
of land.
The gated property, which
includes a pool and tennis
courts, was listed earlier
this month by Coldwell
Banker
An Internet listing notes
that the home is being sold
"as is," and its sale is subject
to approval by the bankrupt-
cy court.
Knight sought bankruptcy
protection for himself and his
record company, Death Row
Records, in April 2006. He
claimed debts of more than
$100 million in each filing.
At the time, Knight esti-
mated personal assets of
zero to $50,000.
In the 1990s, Death Row
was home to recording
artists such as Snoop Dogg
and Tupac Shakur.

Owen Wilson adds
to The Green Book'
LOS ANGELES -It's not
just trendy to be environ-
mental, it's easy. So says a
new book that features
everyday tips for greener liv-
ing, plus advice from celebs
- from Jennifer Aniston to
Owen Wilson - who've
already gone green.
"Sometimes it can be a bit
daunting and seem like
you're in algebra class trying
to figure out some of the
stuff involved with helping
the environment," said
Wilson, one of a dozen
celebrities who contributed
personal essays to "The
Green Book."
Wilson, 38, said that when
he bought a Prius a few years
ago it acted as a "gateway
drug" that inspired him to


become more environmental.
Other stars who share
their stories of bourgeoning
environmentalism in the
book include Cameron Diaz,
Dale Earnhardt, Jr., Robert
Redford, Will Ferrell and
Justin Timberlake.
- From wire reports


'Burn Notice' lights USA's fireERIES
S- -& Here are the


BY FRAZIER MOORE
AP television writer


For those who aren't in the spy game,
the term "burn notice" may not ring a
bell.
Its definition: "An official statement by
one intelligence agency to other agen-
cies, domestic or foreign, that an individ-
ual or group is unreliable."
Just think of it as a combination of get-
ting the boot and getting blacklisted. And
it all happens to secret agent Michael
Westen, hero of USAs lighthearted action
drama, "Burn Notice."
No longer the freewheeling, globe-trot-
ting spook-for-hire, Westen (played by
Jeffrey Donovan) is now stuck, unem-
ployed, in his hometown of Miami, where
he's burning to discover who slapped him
with this burn notice - and why.
Adding to his travails: He's in the same
town as his demanding, hypochondriac
mom (played by Sharon Gless).
But he has help when he needs it, from
ex-girlfriend and spy Fiona (played by
Gabrielle Anwar), as well as Sam (Bruce
Campbell), his pal and a former spy now
living the Miami good life.
Can Michael track down some
answers? And can he find enough odd
jobs as a sleuth to pay the bills in the
meantime? "Burn Notice" premieres
Thursday at 10 p.m. EDT.
Other shows this week to look out for:
* Take a! spin with Jay Leno as DIY
Network launches "Celebrity Rides," a
new franchise about high-profile person-
alities and the cars they adore, including
Leno, who, not just a late-night talker, is
also famous as a car buff. This one-hour
special features him with his prized col-
lection of Duesenbergs. Leno shares sto-
ries about his automotive masterpieces,
while world-renowned Duesenberg
restorer Randy Ema provides tips on how
you can transform your own classic into a
modern marvel. "Celebrity Rides" pre-
mieres Sunday at 9 p.m.
* Rachel, a popular high school senior,
is jolted by the news: Her neighbor Jason,
who died an untimely death, turns out to
have been an intravenous drug user and
was HIV-positive. Rachel now fears for
her own health, since she and Jason once
had unprotected sex. Can she muster the
courage to take an AIDS test? What will
the test reveal? The Lifetime film "Girl,
Positive" is timed to National HIV
Testing Day (June 27), and stars Andrea


Jury: Author


Associated Press

NEW YORK - A woman
who used the alter ego of a
nonexistent male prosti-
tute to pen an autobio-
graphical novel defraud-
ed a production compa-
ny that wanted to make
a film about her life, a
jury decided Friday.
The Manhattan feder-
al jury awarded the pro-
duction company
$116,500 after deliberat-
ing for several hours in
the case against San
Francisco writer Laura
Albert. Antidote
International Films
Inc. had sued Albert,
aura who went to strange
bert lengths to hide her
a s identity behind her
ered alter ego, a male pros-
pay titute named JT
M LeRoy.
lated LeRoy was identi-
fied as the author of
"Sarah," the tale of a
truck-stop hooker that


Associated Press
This undated photo, provided by USA Network, shows actor Jeffrey Donovan as Michael
Westen in USA's new dramatic series "Burn Notice," which premieres at 10 p.m.
Thursday.


Bowen ("Desperate Housewives").
Jennie Garth ("Beverly Hills 90210")
plays a teacher in Rachel's school who
has been secretly living with the virus for
years. S. Epatha Merkerson ("Law &
Order") plays the head of a local AIDS
clinic. The film airs Monday at 9 p.m.
* Shaq is on the attack against child-
hood obesity on his new ABC series,
"Shaq's Big Challenge." With a team of
experts (including the NBA superstar's
own physician-trainer), Shaquille O'Neal
embarks on his crusade to help transform
six obese middle-school Florida young-
sters into healthy, fit kids - and, in the
process, demonstrate how others can
help fight this epidemic. Shaq's dream
team faces such challenges as preparing
tasty, kid-friendly nutritious meals on a
budget, and incorporating more exercise
into kids' daily routine. The goal: to
implement a wellness program for the
children of the community, and ultimate-
ly, for the entire state of Florida that can
serve as a template for the nation.
"Shaq's Big Challenge" premieres
Tuesday at 9 p.m.
* Can't get enough of Paula Abdul on
"American Idol"? A new Bravo reality
series, "Hey Paula," will zero in on this
entrepreneur, choreographer, artist and
personality. The seven-episode "Hey
Paula" promises a three-dimensional
portrait of Abdul, from the stressed
celebrity and tough business woman to
the fun-loving prankster. In the premiere,


defrauded m(

was marketed as being based on his life.
The jury ordered the $110,000 paid to
Antidote, along with $6,500 in punitive
damages.
U.S. District Court Judge Jed Rakoff
said he would rule later on Antidote's
motion to recover its legal fees in the
case.
To extend the ruse, Albert's friends
donned wigs and posed as the fictitious
LeRoy at book signing. They duped
journalists with the phony back story
about a past as an underage male prosti-
tute. Albert even made phone calls to a
psychiatrist while posing as the troubled
teen, and grabbed the attention of such
authors as Tobias Wolff and Dave Eggers,
and filmmaker Gus Van Sant.
Although Albert stared straight ahead
when the verdict was read, and said she
expected the decision, she was quick to
condemn it.
"This goes beyond me," Albert said.
"Say an artist wants to use a pseudonym
for political reasons, for performance
art. This is a new, dangerous brave new
world we are in."
She said that Antidote had succeeded
in exposing more of her life story during
the trial, and will try to make more
money off of it.


a whirlwind 48 hours awaits her as she
gets red-carpet-ready for the Grammys,
then, after the awards, changes out of her
Valentino gown in the car while making a
mad dash to catch a red eye. Landing in
Philadelphia, she rushes to QVC to see
her jewelry designs, only to find they're
not what she expected. Will the changes
she demands be made in time for her live
show, just hours away? As if all this action
weren't enough, a second episode imme-
diately follows. "Hey Paula" premieres
Thursday at 10 p.m.
N It's no secret that the price of the war
in Iraq is staggering - $500 billion, by
one reckoning, with current spending $2
billion each week. Meanwhile, more than
3,500 U.S. military personnel have died,
with more than 25,000 wounded. Now a
CNN Special Investigations Unit docu-
mentary examines the unexpected conse-
quences of this protracted war. On
"Battlefield Breakdown," CNN corre-
spondent John King reports that nearly
two-thirds of the U.S. Army's 42 active
brigades are rated unable to perform due
to shortages of manpower and equip-
ment, including armored vehicles, lithi-
um batteries, even water. And he reports
that, early on, the Pentagon resisted
Congressional efforts to add more
armored vehicles, perhaps mistakenly
believing the war wouldn't last long
enough to warrant the investment.
"Battlefield Breakdown" premieres
Saturday at 8 p.m.


movie company

"They made my life public domain. It's
about commerce," she said. "They're
going to try to hijack my copyrights,
which is like stealing my child."
Antidote and its president, Jeffrey
Levy-Hinte, said they spent $110,000
working on a film based on the book. The
company, which still holds a one-year
option on the book, has no plans to use
the rights now, but "they might be valu-
able to somebody else, who knows," said
Antidote's attorney, Gregory Curtner.
"I think we would have preferred that
we never had to get here," Curtner said
after the verdict. "We have sympathy for
Laura Albert."
Albert, between tears and laughter, tes-
tified that she had been assuming male
identities for decades as a coping mech-
anism for psychological problems
brought on by her sexual abuse as a
child. To her, she said, LeRoy was real.
But Curtner said Albert stepped over a
line by signing contracts and obtaining
copyrights under the phony name.
Albert's attorney, Eric Weinstein, said
his client was disappointed by the ver-
dict but didn't question the jury's deci-
sion.
"We had a very smart judge and a very
smart jury, and we can't change the out-
come," he said.


Disney cans straight-to-DVD sequels


Decision influenced by Steve Jobs


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES - In a
major strategy shift, the Walt
Disney Co. said it will stop
making lucrative direct-to-
DVD sequels of such classic
animated films as
"Cinderella," a move that
reflects the growing influ-
ence of former Pixar
Animation executives John
Lasseter and Steve Jobs, who
once called the films "embar-
rassing."
The change comes with a
shake-up at the company's
DisneyToon Studios, includ-
ing the removal of longtime
president Sharon Morrill,
who will continue with the


company
capacity,
Friday


in another
Disney said


' dislike of the lucrative spinoffs


produce original
DVD films, including
the upcoming film
qfnri ncr ht qir


DisneyToon Studios i a , rg ai .Lta y
will become part of Tinkerbell. "Little
Walt Disney Feature. Mermaid III," cur-
Animation and report rently in production,
directly to Animation and report will be the last DVD

President Ed Catmull Steve sequel released.
and Lasseter, who Jobs Disney has been a
assumed roles there largest Disney leader in the direct-
after Disney bought shareholder. to-DVD category, sell-
Pixar Animation ing millions of copies
Studio last year for $7.4 bil- of such films as "Lion King 1
lion in stock. 1/2" and "Bambi II."
That deal made Jobs, the Although those DVDs were
former Pixar CEO who also moneymakers for the studio,
runs Apple Inc., into Disney's Disney purists scoffed,
largest shareholder and got including Lasseter and Jobs.
him a spot on Disney's board. In a 2003 conference call
DisneyToon will now only with financial analysts, Jobs


said how much he hated the
DVD sequels.
"We feel sick about Disney
doing sequels," Jobs said. "If
you look at the quality of
their sequels ... it's pretty
embarrassing."
When Disney bought Pixar,
it put former Pixar president
Catmull and Lasseter in
charge of its own animation
efforts.
Lasseter has made no
secret of his disdain for
sequels in general, although
he is working on "Toy Story
3," scheduled to hit theaters
in 2010.
Disney shares fell 5 cents to
$34.14 Friday.


winning numbers
selected Saturday
in the Florida
Lottery: .


CASH 3
3-6-5
PLAY 4
8-9-1-9
FANTASY 5
12 - 21 - 24 - 26 - 28
FLORIDA LOTTERY
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FRIDAY, JUNE 22
Cash 3: 6 - 9 - 9
Play 4:1-4-3-2
Fantasy 5:1 - 23 - 29 - 35 - 36
5-of-5 0 winners
4-of-5 275 $1,051
3-of-5 9,642 $11.50
Mega Money: 16 - 18 - 23 - 43
Mega Ball: 19
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $500,000
4-of-4 7 $1,309.50""
3-of-4 MB 48 $418.50
3-of-4 1,171 $51
2-of-4 MB 1,610 $25.50
2-of-4 35,180 $2
1-of-4 MB 13,860 $3
* THURSDAY, JUNE 21
Cash 3: 4 - 6 -3
Play 4:9-8-3-8
Fantasy 5:5 - 9 - 11 -28-34
5-of-5 2 winners $112,008,58
4-of-5 319 $113 .
3-of-5 10,531 $9.50;f

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double ieck
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially posted
by the Florida Lottery. On the
Web, go to www.flalottery
.corn; by telephone, call (850)
487.7777.


Today in
HISTORY
Today is Sunday, Jdne 24, the -
175th day of 2007. There are 190
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On June 24,1948, Communist
forces cut off all land and water
routes between West Germany
and West Berlin, prompting the
western allies to organize the mas-
sive Berlin Airlift.
On this date:
In 1314, the forces of Scotland's
King Robert I defeated the English
in the Battle of Bannockburn.
In 1509, Henry VIII was
crowned king of England.
In 1807, a grand jury in
Richmond, Va., indicted former
Vice President Aaron Burr on
charges of treason and high mis-
demeanor. He was later acquitted.
In 1908, the 22nd and 24th
president of the United States,
Grover Cleveland, died in
Princeton, N.J., at age 71.
In 1940, France signed an armi-
stice with Italy during World War II.
In 1968, Resurrection City, a
shantytown constructed as part of"
the Poor People's March on
Washington, D.C., was closed
down by authorities.
Ten years ago: In Freehold, o
N.J., 18-year-old Melissa Drexler,
who gave birth during her prom,-,
pTeaded not guilty to murder in the
death of her baby. The Air Force
released a report on the so-called
"Roswell Incident," suggesting the
alien bodies that witnesses report-
ed seeing in 1947 were actually
life-sized dummies.
Five years ago: President Bush
urged the Palestinians to replace
Yasser Arafat with leaders "not
compromised by terror" and adopt
democratic reforms that could pro-
duce an independent state within
three years.
One year ago: Patsy Ramsey,
who was thrust into the national
spotlight by the unsolved slaying of
her daughter JonBenet, died in
Roswell, Ga., at age 49.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Al
Molinaro is 88. Comedian Jack
Carter is 84. Movie director Claude
Chabrol is 77. Actress Michele Lee
is 65. Musician Mick Fleetwood is
65. Actor-director Georg Stanford
Brown is 64. Rock musician Jeff
Beck is 63. Singer Arthur Brown is
63. Actor Peter Weller is 60. Rock
musician John Illsley (Dire Straits)
is 58. Actress Nancy Allen is 57.
Actor Joe Penny is 51. Actress ,
Danielle Spencer is 42. Actress
Sherry Stringfield is 40. Singer
Glenn Medeiros is 37. Actress .
Minka Kelly is 27.
Thought for Today: "If a man
makes a better mousetrap than his
neighbor, his neighbor will borrow
it."-Anonymous.


I.t











C
SUNDAY
JUNE 24, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Ass5.:'dia Press
In this image released by the U.S. Army, a squad leader with 1st Platoon, Company B, 4-9 Infantry Regiment pulls security as an Iraqi man speaks to an
interpreter in a village in the outskirts of Baqouba on June 19. Soldiers of 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 4th Stryker Brigade Combat Team are
assisting Soldiers of 3rd Stryker Brigade Combat Team in the clearing of Baqouba, a major operation known as "Arrowhead Ripper," by isolating Baqouba
right outside the city limits, to prevent insurgents from getting in, or out, of the city. Both Stryker brigades are with the 2nd Infantry Division, from Fort
Lewis, Wash.



More than just troops


A New England professor says a bigger military isn't the answer in global terrorism war


BY AmR'Ir.Ew -J. BACEVICM
Special to the Los A ngeles Times
Is the U.S. Army too small?
The Democrats \ying to succeed
George W. Bush think so
Presidential hopefuls Hillary
Clinton. John Edwards and Barack
Obama all promise, if elected, to
expand our land forces. Clinton has
declared it "past time to increase
the end-strength of the Arimy and
Marines." Edwards calls for a "sub-
stantial increase." Obama offers
hard numbers: His program speci-
fies the addition of 92.000 soldiers.


Leading Republicans concur.
John McCain has long advocated a
bigger Army. Rudy Giuliani and Mitt
Romney are now chiming in.
Giuliani wants to expand the Army
with an additional 10 combat
brigades. Romney says that "at least
100,0(00" more troops are needed.
This bipartisan consensus -
which even includes Bush, who
recently unveiled his own five-year
plan to enlarge the Army and
Marine Corps - illustrates the
inability or refusal of the political
class to grasp the true nature of our
post-9.11l foreign-policy crisis. Any


Sgt. Jake Richardson, left, of St. Johns, Ariz., points out insurgent firing posi-
tions while Sgt. Erik Osterman of Tempe, Ariz., retrieves an AT-4 rocket dur-
ing a firefight in Baghdad on June 16.


Early primary could make Florida a major player


A great deal of discussion - California, Colorado,
has gone on in the press Connecticut, Delaware,
about what would hap- | w- Georgia, Illinois, Kansas,
pen if Florida has its own pri- Missouri, Montana,
mary on Jan. 29. . Michigan, New Jersey,
As it stands, the Iowa caucus- New Mexico, New York,
es will be on Jan. 14, the North Carolina,
Nevada caucuses on Jan. 19, ' Oklahoma, Oregon,
and the New Hampshire elec- Pennsylvania, Rhode
tion and the Wyoming Island, Tennessee, Texas
Republican caucus will be on Lou Frey and Utah. This is truly a
Jan. 22. South Carolina will OTHER Super Tuesday.
hold the Democratic primary VOICES Both parties have noti-
on Jan. 29 and possibly the fled Florida that they will
Republican primary, cut in half the number of
Tuesday, Feb. 5,2008, is scheduled for delegates to the national convention if
primaries or caucuses in the following they have a primary before Feb. 5.
States: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Nationwide, there are 4,367 total


Democratic delegates, 3,515 pledged del-
egates selected by primary voters and
caucus participants and 852 unpledged
delegates, so called Super Delegates,
which includes the Democratic National
Committee Members, Democratic
Members of Congress and Governors.
On the Republican side, there are
2,517 total Republican delegates. One
thousand three hundred and five (1,305)
are Congressional delegates (three for
each of the 435 Congressional Districts),
560 Base-At-Large Delegates, 168 party
delegates and 484 bonus delegates.
Florida presently is scheduled to
have 241 Democratic delegates, 5.51
percent of the total Democrat dele-
gates. On the Republican side, there


will be between 130 and 140 delegates
ranging from 5.16 percent to 5.56 per-
cent of the total Republican delegates.
If this penalty is enforced, this decrease
in delegates is absolutely meaningless
because the conventions today are
nothing but beauty contests, which are
long and boring. Furthermore, nothing
is decided at the conventions, as the
nomination will be over on Feb. 5.
From Florida's standpoint, it is really
a no-lose situation. The first caucuses
and primaries involve only small states.
Florida, by positioning itself a week
before Super Tuesday, has an opportu-
nity to become the key state in the nom-
Please see FREY/Page 3C


politician who thinks that the chief
lesson to be drawn from the last fil e
years is that we need more
Americans toting rifles and carrying
rucksacks has learned nothing
This enthusiasm for putting more
Americans in uniform (and for
increasing overall military spend-
ing) reflects the persistence ofa sec-
ond consensus to which leading
Democrats and Republicans alike
stubbornly subscribe.
This second consensus consists of
two elements. According to the first
element, the only way to win the so-
called global war on terrorism,


thereby precluding another 9,11, is
to "fix" whatever ails the Islamic
world. According to the second ele-
ment, the United States possesses
the wherewithal to effect just such a
transformation. In essence, by
employing American power, begin-
ning with military power, to amelio-
rate the ills afflicting Islam, we will
ensure our own safety.
This is sheer twaddle, as events in
Iraq have manifestly shown. Yet
even today, among mainstream
Republicans and Democrats., expec-
Please see .'OPPF/Page 3C


Mike Wright
WRIGHT
ON TARGET


Voters get

pushed

aside
Recent action by our two
major political parties
is beginning to leave
the impression that they are
totally out of touch with voters.
Item No. 1: The national
Democratic Party may penal-
ize Florida for moving its pres-
idential preference primary to
Jan. 29. Hence, Democrats in
Florida might not participate
in selecting a presidential can-
didate.
Item No. 2: Republicans and
Democrats are cold-calling
voters to see if they need
absentee ballots, and if they
get an affirmative answer, the
person is patched through to
the Supervisor of Elections
Office. Confusion ensues and
voters are angry.
I'm sensing a feeling out
there that political parties are
so focused on getting their peo-
ple in office that it doesn't mat-
ter who they bowl over in the
process.
This nonsense about the
Democratic presidential pri-
mary is a classic example.
The national party has a
rule: Only certain states can
have their primaries before
Feb. 5 and Florida isn't one of
them.
The state Legislature this
year moved up the primary
from March to January to give
us an actual say in the process.
Please see -;:- ''T/Page 4C


Nat Hentoff
OTHER
VOICES


Gonzales

versus

Hamilton
O n June 11, when Senate
Republicans blocked a
Democratic resolution
expressing no confidence in
Attorney General Alberto
Gonzales (Democrats were
seven votes shy of moving the
resolution to full debate), they
were joined by Independent
Democratic Sen. Joseph
Lieberman of Connecticut. I
admire Lieberman's inde-
pendence of party labels and
dictates, but I am appalled at
his indifference to the attorney
general's persistent role in
radically diminishing respect
around the world for what
used to be this nation's rule of
law.
At the time of the Senate
vote on the resolution, 25 CIA
agents were being tried, in
absentia, in an Italian court as
"fugitives" for kidnapping an
Italian citizen to be tortured in
Egypt during a "rendition."
This CIA crime, violating U.S.
and international laws, is
among many by the CIA that
Gonzales, as our chief law
enforcement officer, has never
opposed. I could add many
examples of his faithful adher-
ence to this administration's
revisions of the Constitution
and violations of our interna-
tional treaties.
As Dianne Feinstein, D-
Calif., a co-sponsor of the no-
confidence resolution, said
Please see GONZALES/Page 4C


Pi


1.-. - ' . ' Il. ..4 ' .' ' ; '
Assoc.a&l PieP -
Soldiers of the Alabama National Guard's 128th MP Company's Third
Platoon gather for a mission brief before rolling out of the gates of Camp
Speicher on June 18 in Tikrit, Iraq.


Adrl-m
WOO









0 "The buck stops here.


Harry S Truman


C TRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ............ .............. publisher
Charlie Brennan ............ ..........editor
Neale Brennan ...... promotions/community affairs
Kathie Stewart ...............circulation director
Mike Arnold .......... ....... managing editor
Founded in 1891 Curt Ebitz ............ .............. citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Mac Harris........... .............. citizen member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

DOMESTIC INTRUSION




,Aggressive



tactics turning



voters off


he right of citizens to be
left alone was acknowl-
edged by the U.S.
Supreme Court in Olmstead v.
U.S. in 1928, stating that it's the
most comprehensive of rights
and the right most valued by civ-
ilized men.
The Federal Trade
Commission (FTC), responding
to the growing
intrusion of tele-
marketing calls and THE IH
acting under the Poli
authority of the telerna
Telemarketing and
Consumer Fraud OUR 01
and Abuse
Prevention Act, Don't
amended the hand cas
Telemarketing bal
Sales Rule to create
a national-do-not- YOUR OPII
t: h on r ,. I,7,-n
call registry. Since r.ocmnt ia
becoming effective ,Ch.rnc.:
!on March 31, 2003,
tens of millions of
Americans have enrolled with
the registry, causing the tsunami
of telemarketing calls to ebb to a
trickle.
However, the Act, mindful of
the inherent tension between
the right of privacy and the First
Amendment right to free speech,
exempts political campaigns and
political fundraising. Thus, dur-
ing political campaign seasons,
the domestic tranquility afford-
ed by the national-do-not-call
registry that citizens have come
to welcome is punctuated by
political telemarketing aimed at
getting out the vote and the can-
didates' messages. -
While most citizens recognize
that this domestic intrusion is
necessary for an informed elec-
torate and a healthy voter
turnout, the aggressive telemar-
keting spurred by the abbreviat-
ed special election campaign for
Senate District 3 and House
District 43 has pushed the intru-


sion to the point of harassment
for many citizens.
A deluge of automated candi-
date messages and negative
attacks from faceless 527 groups
with organizational names akin
to motherhood and apple pie,
which continued to play even
when the recipient hung up, has
angered many prospective vot-
ers. Further, the tac-
tic used by both the
$SUE: Democratic and
ical Republican parties
rketing. of automatically
patching prospec-
I|NION: tive voters to the
supervisor of elec-
ite the tions office to
dting the request an absentee
ot. ballot has been
especially counter-
ION: Go c. productive to both
South o the political parties
ecatounra. and the electoral
process.
Dozens of
prospective voters became so
enraged that they wanted to can-
cel their voter registration until
convinced otherwise by elec-
tions office personnel.
Nevertheless, dozens remained
so disenchanted with their
party's tactic that they switched
their voter registration to no-
party affiliation.
There is a fine line between
privacy and free speech. As evi-
denced by the angry reaction of
prospective voters and the
expressed concern of
Supervisor of Elections Susan
Gill that "we've gone over the
edge," the aggressive campaign-
ing during this special election
has crossed that line.
If the political parties, candi-
dates and 527 groups want to
keep voters engaged in the elec-
toral process and earn their
vote, they would be wise to exer-
cise restraint and not bite the
hand casting the ballot.


The Chronicle Editorial Board has endorsed the following can-
didates for the upcoming special general election:
* State Senate District 3 - Charlie Dean
* State House District 43 - Ron Schultz
* Crystal River City Council Seat 3 - Maureen McNiff


Screen flashing 0
You know, it's bad S
enough to have so many
commercials when you're
watching a program, but
then they flash "You're
watching so and so and so
and so." We know what
we're watching...We can
read our TV guide. It's 5n6
ridiculous. We can't see 563-
half the stuff on the bot-
tom because these are
flashed across.
Tie up your cat
June 17, there was a person com-
plaining about their cat was killed by
a car. Well, if that person would have
kept their cat inside their house
instead of letting it run all over the
neighborhood doing its business in
other people's planters and all of this
climbing on other people's cars, and
put a leash on it or a rope or some-
thing, their cat would still be alive.
Median strip
I would like some answers to some
questions I have. First off, as far as
the new road built on U.S. 19 in


Crystal River, I would love to
know who designed these
roads and who approved
the designing of these
roads. As far as heading
south on U.S. 19, I think
the speed limit is, I do
believe, 40 mph. As you're
going approximately 30
mph, when you approach
r0579 the red light at the Kash 'N'
0 Karry, if you ride in the left-
hand lane, you all of a sud-
den realize you're in the turning lane.
And if you're going 30 mph, what do
you do, slam on your brakes and hit
the person in front of you? Who's at
fault, you or the City of Crystal River
for their designing? Another thing is
the median strips. How many busi-
nesses have been affected by these
median strips? How many accidents
will this cause?
Thank-you calls
I can't help but wonder if Chris
Gangler and Mike Jarret would appre-
ciate getting thank-you calls from us
every time their respective parties
invaded the privacy of our homes
with one of their "helpful reminders."


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Effects of the Powell factor


C olin Powell con- -
firmed on "Meet the
Press" that he twice
met with Barack Obama to
discuss foreign and defense
issues. More significant: , -,
President Bush's first sec-
retary of state twice refused
to say he'd definitely back
the Republican nominee a
next year. "I'm going to sup-
port the best person that I Cokie &
can find," he insisted. Rob
Powell is hardly alone. A OTI
rising number of VOI
Republicans are disillu-
sioned with their president
and their party, and that's bad news for
the GOP heading into 2008.
Look at the Senate, where seven
Republicans defied their leadership
and voted to debate a Democratic res-
olution declaring no-confidence in
Attorney General Alberto Gonzales.
The real number of unhappy
Republicans is much higher. Sen.
Arlen Specter got it right when he said,
"There is no confidence in the attor-
ney general on this side of the aisle."
Or look at the latest Pew Research
Center poll. Bush's overall approval
rating has slumped to 29 percent.
Among Republicans, his support has
dropped to 65 percent, down from 77
percent only two months ago and 95
percent five years ago.
Of course, any Democratic candi-
date has to be careful consorting with
Powell, who sold the Iraq invasion at
the United Nations using deeply
flawed intelligence. The general's
once glistening reputation has dulled
considerably, and his interview on
"Meet the Press" showed why.
As he told interviewer Tim Russert,
he "would've preferred no war" and
warned the president that invading
Iraq would saddle the United States


(


"with a major burden for
many years." But once his
advice was ignored, he sup-
ported the mission and
never considered resigning
in protest "That's part of
being part of a team," he
explained. .
Powell's determination
to play the good soldier -
and not apologize for his
Steven actions - infuriates anti-
erts war critics like Sara Meric,
IER who wrote to the Los
DES Angeles Times: "You chose
to salute and keep quiet
How many American mili-
tary and Iraqi civilian lives could you
have saved if you had used your pres-
tige to speak out forcefully against the
planned invasion of Iraq based on an
immoral pack of administration lies?"
But Powell remains an important
political figure. Don't forget, in 1996
CBS News asked voters who they'd
choose if the general was heading the
GOP ticket instead of Bob Dole. The
result: Powell 50, Bill Clinton 38.
Powell contemplated a candidacy
that year, but never took the plunge.
His wife Alma was worried about his
safety and the family's privacy. As his
cousin told us at the time, Powell
longed for financial security and want-
ed to earn enough money so that he
could afford to be secretary of state,
and that's exactly what he did.
But a key reason for his decision was
the rightward drift of the Republican
Party. He was in tune with GOP doc-
trine on defense and economic issues,
but far more liberal than the party's
conservative base on matters like affir-
mative action, abortion and gay rights.
One example: He told Russert that
"gays and lesbians should be allowed
to have maximum access to all aspects
of society." That comment reveals why


Powell;, like many moderate
Republi��ns, is unhappy with a party
that uses "God, guns and gays" to ener-
gize their hardcore supporters.
Another issue fracturing the GOP
today is the rule of law. Powell
declared that the Guantanamo Bay
prison camp should be closed "not
tomorrow, but this afternoon," because
it has become "a major, major problem
for the way the world perceives
America."
The administration's handling of
enemy combatants is only.one of many
reasons why so many Republican law-
makers have lost confidence in
Attorney General Gonzales. They are
appalled at how he has allowed raw
politics to infect decisions on U.S.
attorneys, immigration judges and
prosecutorial priorities.
That's what Democrats do, they say,
use their power to bend the rules.
We're the party of law and order,
remember?
But it's Powell's views on Iraq that
foreshadow the worst problem for
Republicans next year. The public
face of the war is now unflinching in
his criticism of how that mission has
been handled. His presentation at the
United Nations was poisoned by a
"total failure" of the intelligence agen-
cies to get the facts right Iraq is
gripped by a "civil war," and the effort
to train Iraqi security forces and bring
Baghdad's warring politicians togeth-
er "is not going well." Failure to talk to
Syria and Iran is "shortsighted."
Colin Powell is no longer the hero he
once was, but his potential defection
signals a world of trouble for
Republicans next year.

Steve and Cokie Roberts can be con-
tacted by e-mail at
stevecokie@gmail.com.


LETTERS to the Editor


Close border first
I cannot understand why the House
and Senate will not, or cannot, do
their job as the majority of Americans
expect and that's to close the border
first.
It's really a matter of respecting our
laws, as we all must It is not against
the Mexican people. Like my folks
did, use the front door, not an open
window.
When we secure the borders, then
we concentrate on how we clean up
the mess. Its a can-do job and if our
leaders cannot cope, then we will
move them all out for those willing to
try. Get with it, guys, as time is run-
ning out and the bank will fail.
Gerald Ruble
Inverness

Water quality
I applaud your editorial of June 21,
"Time to halt degradation of county
waters."
You have echoed what so many of
us have been trying to get across to
our government agencies for what
seems like forever
I will be at the PDRB again to reit-
erate how important a small issue like
changing the wording in the compre-
hensive plan from "preferred high
performance septics" to "mandatory
high performance septics" would
make a huge difference in the way our
county views and handles our water
quality restoration and protection.
I would much prefer to see the
whole county on a central sewer sys-
tem, but in the real world, I'm not


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chronicle edi-
torials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
* Viewpoints depicted in political car-
toons, columns or letters do not neces-
sarily represent the opinion of the ecdito-
rial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited to
express their opinions in a letter to the
editor.
9 Persons wishing to address the editorial
board, which meets weekly, should call
Linda Johnson at (352) 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and include a
Shone number and hometown, including
letters sent via e-mail. Names and
hometowns will be printed; phone num-
bers will not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit letters for
length, libel, fairness and good taste.
" Letters must be no longer than 350
words, and writers will be limited to
three letters per month.
* SEND LETsERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to (352) 563-3280; or e-
mail to leffers@chronlclonlleM.com.

sure that would be cost effective in
some areas. However, if a strict stan-
dard were set for septic systems, the
system would have to be designed
around the standard, and I believe
that would be our best solution.
I realize that septic systems are not
the only contributor to our poor water
quality; however, with all the growth
in the county during the past several
years, especially in close proximity to
our shorelines, I believe it's now the
No. 1 culprit
Again, thank you so much for airing
your views on this very critical issue.
Dee Atkins
Crystal River


Overblown story
When is the Chronicle going to get
over its fixation with the Tom
Dick/June Fisher matter? Dick was a
county employee who was fired by, his
boss. Why does such an unimportant
matter (except to Dick and family)
deserve all the front-page headlines
that the Chronicle has given it for the
past number of weeks? People get
fired every day. He wasn't beheaded
or tarred and feathered or run out of
the county on a rail.
The front page headline on today's
paper, June 13, proclaimed that the
"County takes heat for firing." I ,
expected to read that thousands of
marchers with banners and flags had
stormed our county center shouting
slogans and making threats. Instead,
the story says that three residents
criticized commissioners for allowing
it to happen when it wasn't even in
their purview to get involved - which
your paper had repeatedly pointed
out in its many articles on the subject
Obviously, those three people didn't
read these stories.
Really now, how many people, in or
out of the county, were or will be
affected by Dick's departure? Won't
our county business go on without
him? Nowhere in any of the
Chronicle stories has it been reported
that he was irreplaceable. Why not let
the matter take whatever course Dick
wants to take it and then tell your
subscribers the final story. But please
don't make it a headline matter. It
doesn't deserve it
Burl Keys
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions on any subject. You do not need to leave your name and have up to 30 seconds to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


2C
SUNDAY
JUNE 24, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


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SUNDAY, JLINIi: 24, 2007 3C


CI'I'RI ~is COU N'Il'Y(FL) CHRONICLE ___________________________


Memories bring back taste for green cheese


In the old-time TV show,
'"The Honeymooners,"
Jackie Gleason's character,
Ralph Kramden, often threat-
ened to send his wife on an
:astronomical journey with, "To
the moon, Alice, to the moon!"
When I was a little boy, I was
fascinated by the moon. I had
an old pair of binoculars and
Should sit on the doorsteps
after dark gazing up at the
heavens for hours.
My mother's sister, Eva, was
married to John. Nobody
called him John, he was


"Buddy," ergo, talk about the moon.
Uncle Buddy (Come He convinced me it
to think of it, Uncle was a big chunk of
Buddy looked a lot -green cheese and
like Jackie Gleason, 'W"W *] that its craters were
both were well-. X caused by hungry
rounded guys.) . moon mice.
I never heard - - As far as I was
Uncle Buddy threat- . concerned, that set-
en to send Aunt Eva tled it - the moon's
to the moon. On the Fred Brannen made of green
other hand, once in A SLICE OF cheese.
a while when they'd LIFE Uncle Buddy
visit, Uncle Buddy wouldn't have lied
would sit on the to me, would he?
front steps with me and we'd On a July afternoon in 1969,


we watched in amazement as
television images flashed the
event back to Earth.
Neil Armstrong and his
Apollo 11 teammates had
landed on the moon!
Some folks cried, "Hoax!"
It never occurred to me to
doubt I scoffed at the unbe-
lievers. Americans had made
it to the moon and those nasty
old Russians hadn't We'd beat
en 'em. We'd won the space
race. It really happened. I saw
it with my own eyes.
Besides, Uncle Sam would-


n't have lied to me, would he?
Through the years, I've
come to realize some things
might not be as they appear.
With videographic special
effects, there are no limits to
what one can "see."
I've also come to realize that
while Uncle Sam might be
true blue, some of his spokes-
people, also known as politi-
cians, have been known to lie.
I'm not saying I now believe
the moon landings were fake,
but I do have a couple of ques-
tions:


If we went to the moon dur-
ing the 1960s, in light of the
technological advances since
then, why haven't we been
back?
And, of greater importance,
if we did indeed send men to
the moon, why did they bring
back nothing but moon rocks
- what did they do with all of
the green cheese?


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist


Endorsement REBUTTAL


I appreciate the time and
., effort the editorial board of
the Citrus County Chronicle
. took in interviewing me. All
the members were attentive
and well informed, which
made the process easy.
Unfortunately, if I were run-
ning for the office of property
appraiser rather than state
*-' representative, I might under-
stand why the board chose to
7- endorse my opponent The
fact remains the title of this
seat literally sums up the
. responsibility of the position
and that is to "represent" the
Citizens of District 43.
Perhaps it is understand-
'able to be enamored of the
bravado it takes for my oppo-
nent to proudly admit that the
, majority of his financial sup-
Q port has been from out of dis-
trict, "special interest groups
whose representatives roam
the hallways of the Capitol try-
.. ing to get laws changed"
'(Chronicle, June 18). But the


question is, will the voters
appreciate the same irony?*
I'm betting they won't and I'm
hoping they look past the one
issue expertise of my oppo-
nent and realize that as prop-
erty appraiser he was part of
the bureaucracy that led to
our current property tax cri-
sis. There is more at stake in
Tallahassee and my local gov-
ernment experience will be
invaluable in creating a work-
able solution.
According to the Chronicle,
"... it is Diaz-Fonseca who bet-
ter connects with people.
She's bright, articulate, ener-
getic and likeable. As a former
Inverness City Council mem-
ber, she's familiar with the
workings of government and
has gained exposure to state-
level matters in the course of
her council work She's a
civic-minded activist who has
demonstrated a true commit-
ment to Citrus County"
(Chronicle, June 18).


Property insurance, educa-
tion, health care, the environ-
ment, and affordable housing
are not within my opponent's
expertise. I would match my
background and experience
dealing with all these issues
against anyone's. The reality
of the matter is you don't have
to be an expert to do an excel-
lent job as a representative.
You just have to want to work
very hard at understanding
the issues, do your homework,
listen to your constituents,
build some consensus and put
what's best for your communi-
ty at the forefront of your deci-
sions. It's that simple.
I will do all these things for
my district because I truly
understand what "represent-
ing" them means. For these
reasons, I believe that I am
the best person to represent
the people of District 43.
Sophia Diaz-Fonseca
Democratic Candidate For
State Representative, District 43


Endorsement LETTERS


Outside the box
The Susan Franks campaign
has initiated an interesting dis-
cussion regarding a solution to
'-both the property tax dilemma
I and the regressive Florida
f sales tax. A 3 percent state
income tax on the combined
gross income of Florida's citi-
zens would be enough to pro-
, vide the revenue to replace
, both the current regressive
S.sales tax and the problematic
property tax, and have funds?
left over to adequately fund'
SDepartment of Children and
Families, the Medically Needy
1 program, implement the class
size amendment, and ade-
S quately fund Florida's state
university system.
The revenue would be gen-
erated by all of Florida's per-
sonal income, rather than only
that personal income spent on
purchases covered by our cur-
rent exemption-riddled sales
. tax structure. Working people
currently spend virtually all of
Their income on purchases
, except for what they spend on
t' shelter. That means that for
e- the average working family, 6
#` percent of most of their
- income goes to state taxes.
Shelter expenses include
either direct property taxes or
increased rent passed on to
working families to cover
property taxes levied on their
landlords. Property taxes also
unfairly burden the employers
of working people, and there-
by, contribute to the lack of a
diversified state economy in
Florida. A constitutional
amendment eliminating the
Florida property tax would
eliminate the need for county
property appraisers and their
staffs.
The 3 percent state income
tax would be deducted from



TROOPS
Continued from Page 1C

stations persist that the United
; States can somehow reform
and therefore pacify the
S'Muslim world.
In fact, the great lesson of
Iraq (further affirmed in
Afghanistan) is that the umma
- the Arabic name for the
entire Muslim community - is
all but impervious to change
,imposed from the outside. If
anything, our ham-handed
efforts to inculcate freedom



FREY
Continued from Page 1C

nation process. The momentum
That will be created, if there is a
clear winner in Florida, will
probably control who wins the
Feb. 5 elections.
Conversely, a big loss in the


gross incomes in figuring fed-
eral income taxes. The bottom
line is that eliminating
Florida's sales and property
taxes and replacing them with
a 3 percent state income tax
would cut the state and local
tax load of the average work-
ing family in half' This isn't
rocket science! It is arithmetic!
Susan Franks is the type of
person who thinks outside the
box to find solutions to the
problems facing Florida. We
need such people in.
Tallahassee. I, for one, am
going to vote to send her there.
John Bassett
Inverness

Tireless in serving
I would like to take this
opportunity to endorse Sophia
Diaz-Fonseca for State
Representative House District
43. I had the pleasure to serve
the people of Inverness along
with Sophie as members of
City Council. She was tireless
in her desire to understand
the issues and ensure her
decisions were always made
with the best interest of the
citizens paramount She was
not afraid to buck the bureau-
cratic status quo when protect-
ing citizens' rights and their
tax dollars. I never once
doubted that Diaz-Fonseca
served on council for the sole
purpose of serving the citizens
of Inverness and I'm confident
she will do the same for the
citizens of District 43.
By contrast, Sophie's oppo-
nent, Ron Schultz, has served
local government for nearly 30
years as property appraiser in
both Pinellas and Citrus coun-
ties. He dutifully carried out
that job, utilizing every techni-
cality in the property tax law
to increase the tax base and


and democracy, even if well-
intentioned, have played into
the hands of violent Islamic
radicals. The Bush administra-
tion's strategy has exacerbated
the problem it was designed to
solve, while squandering
American lives, treasure,
moral standing and political
influence to little avail.
Given the mess in which we
currently find ourselves,
increasing the number of men
and women under arms makes
about as much sense as drink-
ing bourbon to treat depres-
sion. In the short term, the anti-
dote might make you feel bet-

Florida primary will probably
kill the chance for a good show-
ing on Feb. 5. The legislators in
Florida are smart and know that
being a key state or the key state
in the primary elections will
help the political clout of
Florida with the next adminis-
tration. It would not be incon-
ceivable, for instance, that a can-
didate running in Florida would


thereby feed the insatiable
appetite of local government
for increased tax revenue.
The property tax crisis has
harmed the ability of our citi-
zens to change homes to fit
their family needs, to realize
the dream of owning their own
businesses and utilize real
estate as a viable investment
plan for their retirement secu-
rity. Instead of speaking for us,
the citizens, back when the
unfairness and unpredictabili-
ty of our property taxes could
have been solved with less
pain to our local governments
and their employees, he chose
to continue serving the desire
of local government for more
and more tax dollars.
For me the choice is clear,
Sophia Diaz-Fonseca has
fought for and represented all
citizens of Inverness and I'm
confident she will continue
her good work and goodwill
for every citizen of House
District 43. She will serve us
with honor and resolve and
always place the interest of
the citizens of District 43 first
Marc L. Wigmore
Inverness

Waterway support
In my capacity as chairman
of the Citrus Waterways
Restoration Task Force, I need
to speak from time to time
with our legislators.
Charlie Dean has always
taken the time for my calls. I
know that our waterways are
dear to Charlie's heart and he
has always supported the effort
of the restoration task force.
I personally endorse Charlie
Dean for Florida Senate
District 3 Seat
Mike Moberley
Homosassa


ter, but at a cost of masking the
underlying problem and allow-
ing it to fester.
The underlying problem is
that the basic orientation of
U.S. policy since 9/11 has been
flat wrong. Bush's conception
of waging an open-ended glob-
al "war" to eliminate terrorism
has failed, disastrously and
irredeemably Simply trying
harder - no matter how many
more soldiers we recruit and
no matter how many more
Muslim countries we invade
and "liberate" - will not
reverse that failure. More med-
dling will evoke more hatred.

agree with Florida leaders to
push some kind of national cata-
strophic insurance, a popular
issue in Florida because of the
multiple hurricanes.
It is possible that Super
Tuesday will not be decisive.
Super Tuesday was decisive in
2000 and 2004, the only differ-
ence being Super Tuesday was
held on the first Tuesday in


.Paved roads
I was wondering, if you need
to have paved roads to get a
certificate of occupancy, how
come the houses in Inverness
Village are occupied now?
Wild animals
Isn't it amazing how we're so
concerned about the wild ani-
mals and wildlife. It's save the
whales, save the turtles, save
the alligators, save the bald
eagles, save the dolphins. Yet a
woman who walks into the
emergency room coughing up
blood, and nobody cares.
Maybe next time I get sick I'll


The challenge confronting
those aspiring to the presiden-
cy, therefore, is to devise an
alternative to Bush's failed
strategy. To pass muster, any
such strategy will have to rec-
ognize the limits of American
power, military and otherwise.
It must acknowledge that
because the United States can-
not change Islam, we have no
alternative but to coexist with
it
Yet coexistence should not
imply appeasement or passivi-
ty. Any plausible strategy will
prescribe concrete and sus-
tainable policies designed to

March, not in February Super
Tuesday will decide the primary
elections in both parties.
The question then becomes
what do the nominees do for the
next six or so months waiting for
their official coronation at the
respective conventions.
Presidential campaigns used to
start on Labor Day. How do you
find something new or interest-


Sound OFF


go into the emergency room
acting like a wild animal. Then
maybe they'll take care of me
or maybe I'll get locked up for
being a wild animal instead of
being a human being. Go fig-
ure.
Flocked with flags
What is going on with our
country, the United States? I
heard the other day that some-
body wanted to put up a bunch
of flags on their property. They
were told that they can only
put three up. Why can't we put
more than three up? And if
anybody that's running for
office this election has anything


contain the virulent strain of
radicalism currently flourish-
ing in parts of the Islamic
world. The alternative to trans-
formation is not surrender, but
quarantine.
Over time, of course, Islam
will become something other
than what it is today. But as
with our own post-Christian
West, that evolution will be
determined primarily by forces
within. Our interest lies in
nudging that evolution along a
path that alleviates rather than
perpetuates conflict between
Islam and the West In that
regard, the requirement is not

ing to say when you have been
campaigning for many months
already?
The biggest impact of the pri-
mary elections will be on the
Congress, where the ability of
each party to maneuver will be
limited by the positions taken by
the party's nominee. This will
add to the normal gridlock of a
presidential election year and


to do with this, I will not vote
for you, that's for sure.
Find your pet
When your pet is missing,
phone and place a free add in
the Chronicle's Lost section of
the classified. Don't let your
pet be put to sleep because
you did nothing. Go to the
Citrus County animal shelter
every other day and ask to see
all of the stray animals of that
species. Rescue your devoted
friend, don't abandon the affec-
tion it has for you. Wouldn't
you save a toddler? Your pet is
no smarter. Don't let it die
because it got lost!


for a bigger Army but for fresh
ideas, informed by modesty
and a sense of realism.
The candidate who can artic-
ulate such ideas might well
merit respect and popular sup-
port.
Those who in the absence of
serious strategic analysis
reflexively posture about the
need for more troops deserve
only contempt


Bacevich is a prokbssor oit
history and international rela-
tions at Boston University.

make the possibility of any
major legislative initiative near
zero. This is not a pretty picture.


Lou Frey Jr. is a political ana-
lyst, commentator and news-
paper columnist and former
Florida representative in
Congress. Send e-mail to
lou.ti'eyf)lowndes-law.com.









9A UrND1CAY C, JUINII CU..SCJ- NI (F,--/- CHON


The right perspective: Reducing health care costs


he cost of health insur-
ance is much higher
than it ought to be. One
simple way to lower that cost is
to let people choose what they
want covered. For example, a
married couple in their forties
with three teenage boys and no
history of substance abuse or
psychiatric problems may wish
to drop coverage for psychi-
atric care and substance abuse
treatment. Likewise, they
could exclude maternity and
newborn care. Rather than
buying coverage for preventive
care and routine office visits,
they may choose to pay out of


pocket as needed.
They would pick a
deductible that would
not cause great finan-
cial hardship, if paid
out If they could buy
the coverage from any ./
company based in the
U.S. and subject to our
rules and enforce-
ment, this family Willie
would end up with an Gi
insurance package
that would cost 50 per- CO
cent less than a stan-
dard low-deductible covers-all
policy They would be protect-
ed against the most likely


i
a
U
L


health risks, which
might otherwise
destroy the family
wealth. Business
owners could do
the same thing to
offer their employ--
ees limited but life-
saving coverage.
The problem
m Dixon with this approach
JEST is that our legisla-
tors won't let us do
LUMN it! Why not? Surely
some of them feel
we are just not smart enough to
make wise decisions regarding
our health care. And they have


been heavily lobbied by groups
.of health care providers who
might be excluded, if people
had a choice. Then there is the
issue of subsidizing some
health care such as maternity
and substance abuse which
might be too costly if everyone
were not made to chip in. This
sort of legislative lunacy is not
unique to health insurance: We
all pay an add-on Hurricane
tax to our home insurance to
subsidize people who choose to
build in high-risk coastal areas.
And FEMA taxes us so they can
help rebuild homes repeatedly
destroyed on barrier islands


and in flood plains. Don't count
on much help from your repre-
sentative on this one.
What to do? The chances for
legislation enabling individual
choices in health insurance
coverage are currently zero to
none. The insurance compa-
nies don't want it The legisla-
tors and the state insurance
czar don't want it Medical uni-
versity faculties and the state
health department don't want
it, either Nothing will get done
until the current health care
system collapses under the
weight of its own cost. Then,
those legislators and interest


groups most responsible for its,
collapse will blame the market
and devise yet a bigger and bet-
ter government scheme to con-
trol health care costs. Yup!

William L. Dixon is an
Inverness resident and retired
surgeon. He earned his M.D.
degree from New York
Medical College, an MBA from ,
University of South Florida -
and his bachelor's from
Columbia College. He served
11 years in the U.S.Army,
achieving the rank of
lieutenant colonel.


Endorsement LETTERS


By far the best
On June 26, voters will elect a
new state senator in District 3.
There is only one right
choice in this election.
Charlie Dean has served
Florida residents, especially in
Citrus County, for many years.
He has served in the military,
in our public school system, as
a juvenile officer and as sher-
iff. He was well respected in all
of those positions.
After retirement from public
service, Dean was called back
in 2002 when Nancy
Argenziano ran for the senate
seat he now plans to serve
After five and one-half years as
Citrus County's state represen-
tative (the district also extends
to portion of neighboring coun-
ties), Dean is ready to serve as
our new senator for District 3.
Charlie is by far the most
qualified candidate for this
office. I urge you to mark your
ballot for Charles Dean when
you vote in the special election
for State Senator in District 3.
Election day is Tuesday, June
26. Be there and vote.
Bob Hagaman
Homosassa

Intelligent voice
The Florida Legislature is
going to force counties and
cities to roll back the property
tax rate, which will result in less
inoney to run the City of Crystal
River Regardless of how much
property tax you pay now, this
new law will affect you. -
Maureen McNiff has been an
outspoken and intelligent voice
at council meetings for years.
Her commitment is to the com-
* munity and not to any particu-
lar special interests therein.
Ms McNiff is the best quali-
fied candidate to make the sen-
sible decisions necessary to
bring the budget of the City of
Crystal River into compliance
with the laws of the state of
Florida with the least amount
of negative impact on its citi-
zens. I urge you to join me in
voting for her on June 26.
Harry Pierce
Crystal River

Make a difference
There are few times in a
voter's life when one's vote
will make a difference that


can absolutely, positively
impact you and your neigh-
bors. This is one of them.
Dean has been a lifelong
positive influence in this area.
As part of our community, he
understands our needs and
cares about our future.
Please vote for Charlie Dean
this Tuesday. I know we are.
Joe and Cindy Cino
Inglis

Informed decisions
Having lived in Crystal
River for 13 years, and owning
property for 17 years, I have
seen a lot of changes in our
city council. It seems there are
always changes such as the fir-
ing of city managers, privatiz-
ing our garbage collection and
a host of what appears to be
personal agendas.
Now, in this upcoming elec-
tion for Seat 3, we have some-
one running, not with a per-
sonal agenda, but with great
business sense to look at our
problems, get answers to docu-
ment decisions, to spend tax
money on the true needs of
our city. That person is
Maureen McNiff. She is con-
cerned about the growth in
Crystal River and about keep-
ing our taxes affordable. As
our city grows, city govern-
ment grows. We must find a
way to manage the city with-
out excess burden on citizens
of Crystal River
McNiff will use her business
management experiences to
first get the facts before making
decisions to spend tax dollars.
We need Maureen McNiff to
fill Seat 3 in order to help
maintain a solid business
approach in Crystal River Our
citizens deserve to have their
tax money used properly
Herman (Hank) Butler Jr.
Crystal River
Takes time to listen
During the past several
years, I have had the opportu-
nity to see an elected official
demonstrate concern and
action on behalf of the citizens
of Citrus County.
Whether the issue addresses
preservation of our water, sup-
port of our Second Amendment
rights, devotion to the family
unit, concern for the safety and
well being of individuals,


and/or resolution of the current
.property tax and home insur-
ance crises, Charlie Dean has
shown that he does care and
relates well with citizens.
Quite simply, this man takes
the time to listen to the con-
cerns of the community He is
visible to the citizens and keeps
abreast of the issues that are
near and dear to the hearts of
those living in Citrus County.....--
In my opinion, it is impei-a-
tive to have our representative
to the Senate someone who has
lived in the county for his
entire life and has experienced
the "growing pains" of a small
county in a state like Florida.
For these reasons, there is no
one more deserving to be our
Senator than Charlie Dean.
Debbie kessler
Inverness
He's one of Us
State workers lost a great
friend and champion when
Sen. Nancy Argenziano was
appointed to the Public Service
Commission. In the face of pri-
vatization and stagnant budg-
ets, state workers don't need to
just put their "faith" in an
unknown candidate.
Senate District 3 has huge
numbers of state employees
from the steps of the Capitol in
Leon County to Northeast
Florida State Hospital in
Macclenny to the
Transportation district head-
quarters in Lake City to the
prisons inalinost all ofthe dis-
trict's counties. I and other state
workers met with Charlie Dean
and consider him one of us: a
lifelong public servant who has
served as a teacher, a sheriff
and a state representative.
He understands the need to
protect and strengthen the
Florida Retirement System and
to pull the Career Service out
of the country's basement in
salaries. Charlie Dean has
promised to fight privatization
as hard as Nancy Argenziano,
who has endorsed him.
As a member of the majority
"partyi-Deauzwill, b our voice in
the leadership when lasft-
minute deals are the difference
between a real raise or a bonus.
These are facts, hot faith.
State workers need to support.
Charlie Dean. He's one of us.
Lynda Lloyd
Tallahassee


Letters to the EDITOR


Law violations
This message was sent via
Congress.org, June 14, 2007, to
Sens. Martinez and Nelson
and to Rep. Brown-Waite.
It is time for Congressional
oversight and action to correct
the Executive Branch in con-
tiinuing to ignore the"
Constitution, laws and statutes
of this country. One way to get
their immediate attention is to
return their proposed budgets
for re-examination and
removal of items other than
for social purposes. There
must be many other ways in
which the Executive Branch
can be forced by Congress to
comply. I prefer the impeach-
ment route for both.
Government operations con-
tinued satisfactorily during
Clinton's impeachment and it
can under that of Bush and
Cheney.
As an example of how
brainwashed many of our
Republican citizens are: I
was involved in a Peace Rally
in Homosassa Springs last
Tuesday and a passerby in a
car stopped and advised, "It's
only because of President


Bush that you are able to hold
that sign calling for return of
our troops." This directly
relates to multiple public
statements by both that those
who oppose the war are not
patriotic and those who are
not for us are against us.
As reported in the
Washington Post by Staff
Writer John Solomon, the FBI
continues to violate the law,
no doubt at the behest of
Bush and Vice President Dick
Cheney in support of check-
ing on phone calls from citi-
zens suspected of terrorist
ties. Telephone companies
and Internet providers gave
FBI agents phone numbers
and e-mail records that the
agents did not request and
were not authorized to collect
In other cases, agents
requested information that
U.S. law did not permit them
to have.
George Harbin
Homosassa

Flag Day
On Thursday, June 14, your
local chapter of the Korean


Veterans of America Chapter
192 along with other veterans
organizations were privileged
to participate in the annual
"Flag Day" ceremony at the
Inverness Government
Center.
It was a pleasure to be with
our various-other veterans -:-
and join together in this out-
standing event.
It is significant to mention
a few who made a contribu-
tion: Mayor Bob Plaisted as
usual represented the city
with distinction. Our county
Veterans service officer J.J.
Kenney reminded us of what
it means to be an American
and the price others paid to
keep us free. And Lionel
King who played "taps" - he
is like a fine wine - it just
gets better.
Let me encourage all our
Citrus County Veterans
Organizations to mark their
calendars and attend this
event in 2008.
Neville Anderson
Director
Korean War Veterans
Chapter 192


TARGET
Continued from Page lC

That's because most presi-
dential years, by the time
March rolls around the nomi-
nees are pretty much set and
we don't count for much.
The thinking is that if
Florida mattered in the pri-
maries, the leading candidates
in both parties would spend
more time in the Sunshine
State promising us all sorts of
goodies if elected. If our pri-
mary is worthless, they sell
their souls to places like Ohio
and Montana instead.
Howard Dean, the one-time



GONZALES
Continued from Page 1C

during the debate: "(Gonzales)
has turned the Justice
Department into an extension
of the White House rather than
a scrupulous, independent
enforcer of the law."
On the same day, in a 2-to-1
decision by a 4th Circuit Court
of Appeals panel in the "enemy
combatant" case of a legal resi-
dent in this country, Ali al-
Marri, Judge Diana Motz ruled
- as the 2004 Supreme Court
had previously decided in the
case of an American "enemy
combatant" - that, as Sandra
Day O'Connor said, "a state of
war is not a blank check for the
president." (That 2004 decision
was greatly diminished by the


presidential candidate who
now leads the national donkey
party, says Florida's primary
won't count (as of my deadline,
Florida's congressional
Democrats were groveling
over Dean, hoping he'd change
his mind). Rules are rules,
Dean says, and Florida broke
the rules. Therefore, we can't
play.
Words cannot describe how
ridiculous this is. Democrats
have a good chance to take
back the White House and,
rather than rallying the troops
to support their top candi-
dates, they are rubbing our
noses in some silly rulebook Is
it any wonder why Democrats
can't hold unto power once

Republican-controlled
Military Commissions Act of
2006.) Motz, nonetheless,
declared emphatically: "To
sanction presidential authority
to order the military to seize
and indefinitely detain civil-
ians - even if the president
calls them 'enemy combatants'
- would have disastrous con-
sequences for the Constitution
- and the country" Gonzales's
Justice Department will
appeal that ruling.
Before he became attorney
general, Gonzales, as White
House counsel to the presi-
dent, stoutly supported this
dangerously sweeping doctrine
of the president's "inherent,"
unilateral constitutional pow-
ers. Bush also used it to evade
the Geneva conventions and
our own War Crimes Act by
allowing "coercive" interroga-


they get it?
Now, I certainly understand
the national party's problem.
States can't keep leapfrogging
each other to get in early on
the presidential primary.
Everyone wants to be first, but
only New Hampshire is first.
Just like the Detroit Lions and
Dallas Cowboys always play
football on Thanksgiving Day
Why? Because that's the way it
is, that's why. .
My solution - and this will
never work because it makes
too much sense - is one pri-
mary day. A one-day primary
puts New Hampshire in the
same category as Texas. It
places Florida right in there
with Idaho. Logistical prob-

tions of non-American
"detainees" that often turned
into torture.
Moreover, Gonzales had no
qualms. in upholding the denial
of meaningful habeas corpus
rights to our imprisoned terror-
ism suspects - in defiance of a
Supreme Court 2006 decision
that the later Military
Commissions Act of-2006 -set
aside cavalierly.
Republican Sen. Arlen
Specter (Pennsylvania) has
called this refusal of habeas
corpus rights, also concerning
conditions of confinement,
"atrocious." Specter, unlike
Lieberman, has "absolutely no
confidence" in Gonzales.
I recommend to the Senate
as a whole, and especially the
president, the following highly
pertinent statements by
Alexander Hamilton and the


lem? Sure, but we have one
Election Day and that seems to
work OK
But the larger point is that
Howard Dean apparently feels
it's no problem to purposely
disenfranchise 4 - million
Florida Democrats (including
me).
We also learned recently
that state Democratic and
Republican Party officials feel
it's no problem to bug people
in their homes to get them to
vote.
Party leaders, say that for
every two or three voters who
are angry over cold calls,
another six or seven apply for
absentee ballots and will vote
in Tuesday's election. That's

Supreme Court Justice Joseph
Story .
Hamilton, in the Federalist
Papers (76), declared the
Framers' clear intent was to
avoid having officials with "the
pliancy that would render
them obsequious instruments-
of (the president's) pleasure."
Story, whose 1833
"Commentaries on the
Constitution" remains influen-
tial to this day, was nominated
to the Supreme Court by
President James Madison, who
knew more than a little about
the Constitution, certainly
more than Gonzales does. Story
wrote that public offices are
"not for cringing favorites or
court sycophants (but) to give
dignity, strength, purity and
energy to the administration of
the laws." Do you recognize the
present attorney general in


nice, but I wonder about the
two or three who would rather
not vote than be bothered at
home. And I wonder about
party officials who think it's
OK to toss aside those voters.
. It's a strange and uncomfort-
able attitude, frankly It sug-
gests that people are not
important. Their problems are
nothing more than polling
numbers. Their lives do not
matter In short, voters are in
the way.
Driving to work Friday, I saw
that someone, I'm guessing
from one of the political par-
ties, had placed a bunch of
signs for one of the candidates
along the right of way on State
Road 44 where they're not

that job description?
For these enduring
reminders of our presently
weakened basic American val-
ues, I am indebted to George W
Liebmann of Baltimore, who
quoted Hamilton and Story in a
June 8, 2007, letter in The
Washington Times. (In the
newspapers I read regularly, I
pay attention to the letters to
the editor because so-called
"ordinary" Americans often
know more clearly why we are
Americans than some profes-
sional commentators.)
And, listening on the night of
June 12 to Tom Ashbrook's
always-challenging Boston
radio hour (www.wbur.org), I
heard, during a discussion on
the CIA trials in Italy, a caller
from Germany who also knows
why we're Americans: "I was
an exchange student in


allowed. I know the candidate
knows better because that can-
didate's other signs are where
they belong.
All candidates on Tuesday's
ballot are honorable people
who would serve us well in
office. Their campaign han-
dlers, especially those in the
political parties, must think
voters are too thick to see that
If this is the new politics,
we're all in trouble.

Mike Wright is a senior
reporter and assistant editor
for the Citrus County
Chronicle. He can be reached
at 563-3228; or wright@
chronicleonline.com.

America years ago, where I
learned most of what I know
about the rule of the law and
democracy in the United
States. I am dismayed at what
has happed to the American
rule of law giving up what
we're fighting for"
That wasn't just a symbolic
no-confidence resolution on
Gonzales,-which failed:It was a
message to all of us Americans
- and to the world - on how
he has failed America's rule of
law.

Nat Hentoff is a nationally
renowned authority on the
First Amendment and the Bill
of Rights and author of many
books, including "The War on
the Bill of Rights and the
Gathering Resistance" (Seven
Stories Press, 2004).


----------------


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 5C


CITRUS CUNTY PUr(L) CHRONLE~L


Deadly weapon
The drag racing that killed
six spectators in Selma, Tenn.,
re-emphasizes that an automo-
bile can be a deadly, danger-
ous weapon, and needs even
more care than a loaded semi-
automatic Glock.
Traffic fatalities in 2005
totaled 43,443 with 2.6999 mil-
lion persons injured, and
property damage at $6.159 mil-
lion.
Adolescents (16to 20)
accounted for 40 percent of
these accidents, and those 65
and older 25 percent Males
were three times more apt to
be involved than females with
10,000 of all automobile fatali-
ties related to excessive speed.
Speeding by teenagers
accounted for 38 percent of
their accidents, but elder
speeding decreased with age
with only 7 percent as a
causative factor at 75.
Contrary to what some may
think, 86 percent of speed
accidents were not on inter-
states.
Researchers have found that
the three major causes of
vehicular death are due main-
ly to alcohol, the use of cell
phones and entertainment
manipulations, and sleep dep-
rivation.
Studies have shown that the
use of cell phones is about as
deadly as the use of alcohol.
Thirty countries have prohibit-
ed using phones while driving,
and in the USA a number of
states have such a prohibition.
Atlanta is cited as the most


dangerous area in the
Southeast to drive (13 fatali-
ties per 100,000), which is not
much of a surprise to those
who have driven the 10 inter-
state lanes through the down-
town area.
Less of a factor than the
above is the safety of automo-
biles and trucks, to include
lights, tires and brakes.
The starting point in one's
own automotive safety, and
that of their families, is to
always be cognizant that their
car can be a deadly instru-
ment, then pay attention to
driving and not be distracted.
And, of course, no eating
and drinking of anything
(especially alcohol), no use of
cell phones and no sleepy
driving; no one wants to be a
permanent Rip Van Winkle.

William C. Young
Crystal River

No confidence
On June 19, 36 senators (two
Democrats and 34
Republicans including Mel
Martinez) blocked an amend-
ment to the Clean Energy Act
(H.R. 6) that would have taxed
oil companies $32.1 billion -
the revenue going to fund
research for alternative
sources of energy.
Had the amendment passed,
as surely it would, we con-
sumers would have been stuck
with paying the $32.1 billion
tab because the oil companies
would simply embed their
increased tax obligations in
the price gas.


Letters to the EDITOR


Every one of the 57
Democrats and Repul
who supported the ar
ment (including Bill I
Hillary Clinton and B
Obama) knew this.
They knew, but didI
Sticking it to the oil c
nies is good politics -
kind of stuff you can
elected. Sticking it to
stituents is of minor c
They figured that mos
weren't paying attention
besides we wouldn't f
pain until after the 20
tions.
On June 20, a Gallu
showed that public cc
in Congress had fall:
percent - an all-time
Small wonder.

John I


Selling to both
The United States
America is the world'
manufacturer and sel
arms. The arms mere
the U.S. often sell to 1
in a given conflict Th
make money in any c
The Bush family is co
to arms manufacturer
through the Carlyle g
I saw "No Time for
Sergeants" on TV, bef
was a stage play and
movie. I had also read
book upon which the
was based. What stru
hilarious and has sta:
me all of these long y


blicans
mend-
Nelson,


a young Andy Griffith tasting
booze other than moonshine
for the first time and intoning,
"tastes familiar"


arakk For some months, claims
have been made that Iran is
n't care. supplying al-Qaida with arms
ompa- in Iraq. Fortunately, these
- the claims have not been taken all
use to get that seriously because the
con- Bush administration has not
concern. been able to back up those
st of us statements with facts.
ion and However, a media blitz, attrib-
reel the uted to Cheney, who is fearful
008 elec- that Bush will not make the
right decision on Iran (attack)
.p Poll has begun. This campaign
confidence accuses Iran of supplying
n to 13 weapons to the Taliban in
e low. Afghanistan. Thankfully, this
tactic has thus far backfired as
the claim has been flatly
McFadden denied by Secretary of
Inverness Defense Gates and the com-
mander of the NATO forces in
i sides Afghanistan, Daniel McNeil.
of While some arms from Iran
os largest are making their way into Iraq
[ler of and Afghanistan, it appears to
hants of be from private sources rather
both sides than from the Iranian govern-
,Ile f.^. ment


Ius, tney
conflict.
unnected
rs
group.

'ore it
then a
d the
program
ck me as
yed with
ears was


The point remains, however,
that this administration is
orchestrating for a war on Iran
by accusing Iran of supplying
weapons to the enemies of the
U.S. The administration
claims that Iran supports both
al-Qaida and the Taliban.
Sound familiar?

Marilyn J. Day
Beverly Hills


USS Liberty
June 8 was the 40th
anniversary of the Israeli
attack on our Navy ship -
the USS Liberty. The
Liberty was sailing off the
east of Egypt at the time of
the attack.
Israel claims it was mis-
taken identity. Thirty-four
American servicemen were
killed and 134 were wound-
ed by Israeli naval and air
force. The attack against the
Liberty went on for hours.
The media was as silent
as they could be. At the
time of the attack, I was in
the military. We knew what
had happened. More and
more people, who were
there, are coming out
telling the truth about what
really happened.


Ton


Important
Mike Wright's ar
June 17 appeared
Crystal River count
election down to jt
issue, the police d
ment. By doing thi
media are shortch
readers. Other im]
issues are facing t
Many, of course, co
tax burden and pa
cial mismanageme
city.
This same article
Jim Farley, saying
vote for Maureen
would be a vote to


with the police department.
Isn't that exactly what he
said about the election of
Kendall and Ebert?
That was six years ago and
the police and fire depart-
ments are still in existence.
These scare tactics have got
to stop.
Reasoning would tell any-
one that to get the best deal,
one must shop around. No
one buys the first car or
house they see. They get the
facts and figures and make
an educated decision of
what they can afford. When
that car becomes a gas-guz-
zler or that house becomes
too tax heavy to keep or
needs costly repairs, they
shop to downsize.
That only makes good
sense, especially when you're


using someone else's money
n Kirschner - namely ours!
Homosassa If any candidate refuses to
e. get all the facts and figures
IssueS regarding the cost to the city
article of of any of its services, he or
to boil the she is doing a disservice to
icil special the taxpayers. The candidate
ust one who makes a statement about
epart- "not saving any money" with-
s, the out checking and rechecking
hanging all avenues available is doing
portant a disservice to the taxpayers.
his city. The voters are smarter than
concern our you think.


ist finan-
ent by the

e quoted
he felt a
McNiff
do away


Believe me, they will shop
around and choose the candi-
date best for their pocket-
books.

Gail Jannarone
Crystal River


I ~ I Y


* Citrus Springs Concert Series -
Broadway Revue
* Playhouse 19 -
The World Goes A Round
" Salute to our Community
* Citrus Jazz Society
* Manatee Festival
* Sports/Celebrity Auction/Dinner Dance
* Flanagan Memorial Golf Tournament
* Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration
* Martin Luther King, Jr. Parade
* Ultimate Tailgate Experience Winner
* CFCC Performing Arts -
Mac Frampton
* Cattle Barons' Ball
* West Citrus Elks Parade of Fashions
* Tractor Pull & Show
* ACT - Pygmalion
* Parade of Fashions
* Galaxy of Stars
* Gulf-Island Theater-Knock Em Dead


* ACT - Pygmalion
* Altrusa Monte Carlo Night
* Junior Achievement Bowl-a-thon
* Crusin' At The Hop
* Light Shine-A Social History of Florida
* Fitness in Citrus begins
* Citrus County Jazz Society Jam
* NAMI - Walk of Hope
* Dinner and a Song
* Citrus Springs Concert Series -
Rich Natole
* Nature Coast Golf Tournament
* Barbershoppers Singing Valentines
* CFCC Performing Arts-Southern Fried
Chicks Comedy
* Playhouse 19- True West
* Beverly Hills International Festival
* Celebration Fashion Show
* 'School'astic Golf Tournamnet
* CCBA Parade of Homes
* Grand Ole Opry
* Purple Heart Ceremony
* African-American History Month
* Spring Fling
* Savor The Art
* Family Safety Fair
* GCUSBCA Women's Bowling


* Playhouse 19 - True West
* Strawberry Festival
* Manatee Car & Truck Show
* WCE Card Party
* Experience the Orient
* CR Historic Home Tours
* Citrus County Jazz Society Jam
* Fourth Annual Car & Truck Show


* Italian Street Festival
* Steak & Steak
* Charity Ball
* Irish Variety Show
* CFCC Performing Arts, The
Tamburitizans
* Plant & Garden Expo
* Citrus Memorial Health Systems
Salute to Our Community
* Randall Jenkins Memorial Golf
* CS Concert Series
* Fashion Cares
* Homosassa Rotary - New Odyssey
* St. Pat's Golf Tournament
* Citrus County Fair
* Crazy For Quilting
* Mickey Finn Show
* Fort Cooper Days
* Springs Fashion Show
* Luminating Art Night
* Corvettes In The Sunshine
* Walk For Life
* Marble Expo
* Captivating Styles
" Clean Air Ride
" Wood Wind & Water
" SCORE Golf Classic
" ACT - Wife Begins at Forty
" Fitness in Citrus
* Inverness Relay For Life
" Light Shine-Azalea String Orchestra
" United Way Awards Luncheon
" Power Boat Races
" Black Tie & Blue Jeans
* Friends of the Library Book Sale
* Car Wash & Bazaar
" Citrus Community Concert Choir
" Sugamill Chorale Concert


* Power Boat Races
* Friends of the Library Book Sale
* Citrus Jazz Jam
* Citrus Community Concert Choir
* Engaging Mature Workers Week
* Friends of the Library Book Sale
* Swing For A Cure
* Christians United In Christ Golf
* Citrus Springs Concert Series
* Dinner and a Song
* Nature Coast Dog Walk
* Market Days and Garden Show
* Run With The Mayor
* Am Irish Club Golf Tournament
SFriends of Dunnellon Library Book Sale
� Bowl For Kids Sake
* Me and My SK8 Contest
* Week of the Young Child
* Citrus County Bass Challenge
* Superintendent's Golf
* Volunteer Fair
* Earth Day Bird-A-Thon


* ACT- Curtain Up On Murder
* Car Wash and Bazaar
* Playhouse 19 - Godspell
* Swing Into Spring
" CCBA Fishing Tournament
" Hurricane/Disaster Expo
* Ozello Adventure Race
* Interfaith Council Musicale
* Central Ridge Relay For Life
* Panter Golf Tournament
* Casting For Kids
* Goods and Services Dinner/Auction
* Citrus County Bass Challenge


* Playhouse 19 - Godspell
* Nereids Cards & Games Party
* Cool Springs Ranch Balloon Classic
* Sheriff's Summer Safety Expo
* Gospel Jubilee
* Greater Gas Association Fishing Tourn.
* Lecanto Relay For Life
" Informational Fiesta
" Flag Day
" A Day of Fine Arts
* World's Greatest Baby Shower
" Rotoract Kickball Tournament
" Swing With The Breez
* Mother's Tea
" ACT - Curtain Up On Murder
* Gulf Island Civic Theater-Look, No Hans
" Citrus Memorial Ball
" Spring Greek Festival
" Fly-In
* LHS Project Graduation
" CHS Project Graduation
" Hurricane/Disaster Expo
* Comedy Show


* Hurricane/Disaster Expo
* Fiesta Tropicale
* An Affair To Remember
* Inverness Flag Day Ceremony
* Homosassa Fireworks Show
* Cobia Big Fish Tournament
* Hernando Heritage Yard Sale
* Gulf Island Civic Theater-Look, No Hans
* Rolling Thunder Golf Tournament
* ACT - Music Man


* ACT - Music Man
* Patriotic Evening
* Crystal River Fireworks
* Run For The Money Auction
* Key Run For the Money
* Key Center Telethon
* Boys & Girls Club Car Raffle Drawing
* Citrus Community Concert Choir


* Ovarian Cancer 5K Run
* United Way Kickoff


* Harvest Moon Craft Show
* Sunset Festival
* Christmas In September
Arts & Crafts Show
* Citrus Harvest Food Drive/Postal Service
* AKC Responsible Dog Ownership Day
* We Can Weekend
* German Club Oktoberfest
* Citrus Jazz Society Jam
* Save our Waters Week
* Jesse's Place Charity Golf Tournament
* Industry Appreciation Week Awards
* Industry Appreciation Week Barbecue
* Memorial Golf Tournament
* Secret Garden Tour



SRails to Trails Bike Ride
* Realtors Benefit Golf Tournament
SSertoma Oktoberfest
Rotary Chili Cook-Off
* Library Fall Book Sale
" West Citrus Elks Annual Card Party
- St. Scholastic Men's Club Craft Show
STexas Hold 'Em
* Columbus Day Memorial Service
* Music on the Square
* Night of the Heron
" National Wildlife Refuge Week
" Southwest Regional Chili Cook Off
* CCBA Parade of Homes
* Nature Coast Fine Arts Show
* Prevue Holiday Ideas
* Pumpkin Patch
* Inverness Sertoma Golf For Kids
* Scarecrow Festival
* Playhouse 19 - Haunted House
* Knight of Columbus Craft Fair
* Greater Citrus USBC Men's Tournament
* Sportsman's Showcase
* Cooter Blast
* Haunted Tram Rides
* Greek Festival
* Great American Cooter Fest
* Zeke Lapinski Golf Tournament
* Heritage Festival & Cattle Drive
* Veterans Appreciation Show
* 4-H Saddle Up
* Cooterween
* Cooter Triathalon
* Father Willie Golf Tournament
* Taste of Citrus
* BH Lions Arts & Crafts Show
* Day of Caring
* West Citrus Elks Arts & Crafts Show
* Citrus Jazz Society .Jm Sessionn .


* Festival of the Arts Wine Tasting
* CCBA Home and Outdoors Show
* Women of Sugarmill Fashion Show
" Festival of the Arts
" St. Scholastic Golf
* Continuity of Care Wine Auction
* Veterans Fair
* NJROTC Golf Tournament
* Homosassa Lions Christmas Square
* Beverly Hills Lions Craft Fair
* Yankee Air Force Fly In
* Citrus Jazz Society Jazz Jam
* Knights of Columbus Nickle Social
* Citrus Springs Concert Series
* Rotary Blood Screening
* Veterans Day Parade/Memorial Service
* Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast
* Homosassa Book Sale
* 4th Annual Dinner & Auction
* Humane Society Ride For Rescue
* America Recycles Day
* Caruth Camp Challenge
* Citrus Stampede Rodeo
" Parade of Trees
" Veterans Appreciation Show
" West Citrus Elks Annual Craft Show
* Campaign Sight First II
* 4-Person Golf Scramble
* Winter Wonderland Craft Show
" Ozello Arts & Crafts Festival
" West Citrus Elks Annual Craft Show
" Light Shine - University of Florida Choir
" Dinner and a Song
* Dunnellon Library Book Sale
" Discover Chamber Lunch
" Rotary Radio.TV Auction


* Rotary Radio.TV Auction
* Floral City Heritage Days
* CCCC Handels' Messiah
* Father Christmas Ball
* Crystal River Christmas Parade
* Inverness Winter Celebration
* Crystal River Christmas Parade
* CFCC Performing Arts
* Crystal River Christmas Parade
* BH Holiday Parade
* Sugarmill Chorale Concert
* Playhouse 19 - Variety
* Deck The Halls
* Celebration of Lights
* Chronicle/Pines Tennis Tournament
* CS Concert Series - Cool Yule
* Country Rocks the Canyon
* Inverness Christmas Parade
* Citrus Jazz Society
* Beverly Hills Parade
* Citrus Springs Parade
* Homosassa Boat Parade
* Night of Lights


24 25 26 27 28 29 30


ACT-Music Man ACT-Music Man
Rolling Thunder
Golf





1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ACT-Music Man Patriotic Crystal.River
Evening Fireworks ACT-Music Man ACT-Music Man








8 9 10 11 12 13 14

ACT-Music Man
ACT-Music Man ACT-Music Man
Car Drawing


I T R u S&*0% .0 U PA V


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Business


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

Fr-1


1 *ue




Local inventor says


crazy blue light should

make teeth white
CRUSTY LOFTS
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Mike Barne, is an inventor working to make it
bie.
He doesn't have any fancy degrees in engi-
neering or business. It's all been a matter oftrial
and error and finding just the right idea.
"I do it really for the challenge," Barnes said.
Barnes, 63, lives in Dunnellon and his latest
creation is a toothbrush equipped with a special
blue light that he believes \\ill whiten people's
teeth and kill bacteria.
With his company TechLight Systems, Barnes
has created UltraBlu - a toothbrush that he
hopes will sweep America
Basically, Barnes based his product on
research by Dr. Max Goodson of Forsyth
Laborator.. A 2006 article in the Harvard
Gazettesaid the blue light can suppress bacteria
associated with ,gum disease.
While UltraBlu has never been formally test-
ed, Barnes believes his toothbrush cannot only
help kill bacteria, but also w hiten teeth.
Barnes got the idea for the toothbrush while
he was \working to create a light for dentists that
would enhance the performance of oral prod-
ucts during teeth-whitening procedures Now,
about a year later, Barnes is waiting for his first
shipment of 2,000 UltraBlu toothbrushes from
China The toothbrushes cost about $10 apiece
to make
Once he gets the first order, the toothbrushes
will go to a Kansas media marketing company.
that %\ill create a 60-second infomercial to sell
the product for Barnes. The company gets about
half the profit and TechLight gets the rest.
The iUtraBlI toothbruishes will sell for $39 95
each. The two companies are contracted to work
together for nine months.


II


special


Dunnellon resident Mike Barnes has created a toothbrush that emits a blue light
in killing bacteria and help in whitening teeth.


The brush takes two AA batteries to run the
light and consumers will get free brush heads
for the life of the toothbrush, Barnes said.
The light stays on for two minutes at a time so
users know when to stop brushing.
While Barnes has invented airbag products
and other things in the past, the UltraBlu has
been quite a challenge
"No, I'm not an engineer - just smarter than
the average bear.," Barnes said.
He was always attracted to welding and
-"building stufff"
Barnes said he's hit a lot of learTniii eur'e:-.
throughout the process He's had to apply for a


patent, market his produce
entire thing.
Always thinking ahead, B
day ha\e a distribution ce
But that won't come until U
"The real money is getting
in stores," Barnes said.
For now, he's waiting for
to come. The problem with
that Barnes didn't think the
blue enough Once ho? app
the larger shipment v.. ll co
"aW'\V:'' .II l l 11t i hr ,' .
waiting "


Reader should check for Trojan hors


ROB PEGORARO
The Washington Post


Q: A couple of times in the past
month, my e-mail address has been
hijacked and used to send out spam.
One day, I opened my mail to see more
than 100 returned messages, all of
which were using my e-mail to send
spam! How can I prevent this?
A If you're sure you didn't have a
virus or Trojan take over your com-
puter, the most likely explanation is
that a friend's computer got hit with a
virus.
The virus picked up your address


Help FILE


from an address book, an e-mail mes-
sage or some other document, then
used it as a fake return address for the
spam it sent out from the friend's
machine.
It's nothing special to send a mes-
sage that appears to come from some-
body else's address - you can do that
with a few moments of tinkering in
most e-mail programs.
Unfortunately, there's almost noth-
ing you can do to fix this problem.
Because all the mischief happens out-


side your computer, your only option
is to hector your friends to keep their
computers safe ,
In an extreme case, it may be easier
to change your address - then be
choosy about who you give the new
one to.
Q: It looks like I'll be reinstalling
Windows, which means I'll need to
reinstall all of my software. Is there
any way to inventory everything I've
put on the computer?
A The only surefire way to elimi-


nate a deep
to erase thE
ing up yoi
Windows
requires re
software, as
computer
remember
In these
called
(www.belar
It will gene
ware loade
then print
while you lI
or downloa


Savvy shoppers hold key to the future of supe:


Stephani Nelson
COUPON
MOM


I am not sure.why, but I have
always loved grocery shop-
ping. Ever since my mother
started leaving a blank check and
a shopping list on the kitchen
counter as soon as I had my dri-
ver's license, I've thought of gro-
cery shopping as a fun game.
When my husband took an early
retirement, he took over our
weekly grocery shopping.
Fortunately, he is willing to
follow the list I write and use the
coupons I cut out to go


with the list.
His shopping experience has
made me see how confusing and
frustrating grocery shopping can
be for many shoppers, and why
most people simply give up and do
their shopping without paying
much attention to prices or sav-
ings strategies. Even shoppers
like my husband who are working
diligently to follow a specific list
get thrown off track by mislabeled
prices on promotional items,
items stocked in seemingly unre-


lated sections, and cashiers who
do not understand how certain
coupons or promotions work.
Fortunately for shoppers who
can relate to my husband's experi-
ence, tech companies are working
on practical solutions to make
shopping and saving much easier
than it is today.
Silicon.com recently reported
that Hewlett-Packard is working
on developing a shopping kiosk
system that could revolutionize
the shopping experience, called


the "R
Althou
from i
nation
close
grams
Acc(
RSA k
shopp
coupon
would
and or


Natural Disasters and Recovery Loans: How you ca


he last two hurricane recovery funding available to
seasons were cruelly individuals and small business
unrelenting, owners.
resulting in damaged According to
property and flooded www.fema.gov, the
or damaged homes Small Business
and/or businesses, as Administration
well as long-term . (SBA) is the Federal
power outages and Government's pri-
the resulting prob- mary source of
lems. Many people funds for homeown-
whose homes or busi- ers, renters and
nesses suffer damage non-farm business-
by hurricanes are Betty Striffler es, of all sizes,
unaware of the steps CLERK OF through its low-
they can take to interest disaster
recover, or to pre- COURTS loans.
pare, for future natu- You can find a
ral disasters. Loans and grants complete list of available
are the key sources of disaster services at www.fema.gov/busi-


ness/index.shtm.
Available to individuals is
funding through the well-
known disaster recovery
agency known as the Federal
Emergency Management
Agency (FEMA). FEMA's
Disaster Housing Program pro-
vides grants for those whose
homes are damaged or
destroyed and need temporary
housing while home repairs
are made. For a complete list of
grant monies available to indi-
viduals, see
www.fema.gov/individual/grant
.shtm.
As media informs us of an
approaching hurricane,
Floridians have learned to


withstand the storm by prepar-
ing our property and ourselves
... to the best of our ability. In
the aftermath, many of us add
items to our list of "gear" we
need on hand in preparation
for the next one. Most of us
remember to include the obvi-
ous items for hurricane pre-
paredness, such as plywood,
masking tape, flashlights, non-
perishable items and gallons of
water, but it is easy to forget the
items we will need in the event
our home incurs damage or
destruction. Among the most
important ... the certified deed
to your property. A certified
copy is as good as the original
and is substantive proof of


own
pro
kee
dee
oth
safe
hor
dar
a ci
the
cho
assi
H
hel
Cle
ten
cop
cho


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY



Deadbeat


dad puts


ex-wife


in a bind


EAR BRUCE: Three or
four years ago, I co-
signed for a car for my
ex-husband. The car kept
breaking down, and no one
could fix it. He returned the
car to the dealership and left it
on the. lot. They said it would
take about $6,000 to fix the car,
and he had it for only three
months. The finance company
wrote it off as a bad debt but
also turned it over to a collec-
tion agency The collection
agency never contacted me.
Now that I am getting back
BRIAN LaPETERcrf.r .:1 on my feet after taking a big hit
t he believes will aid during the divorce, I am trying
to clear up my credit. I con-
tacted the company to try to
ct and finance the make payment arrangements.
The debt is $14,000. I am a
acres hopes to one mother of two young boys, and
niter in Dunnellon. II am not receiving any child
iltraBlu takes off. I support because my ex-hus-
g it ii the shelf and i band cannot keep a job. I
offered to pay them $100 per
10 sample brushes month. Do you have any sug-
the first batch was I gestions about how I should
bristles were quite . have handled this, orhowlcan
roves the first ftew, handle this now? I have
Mn already paid the first $100
B.ii ie- -aid. and installment. -N.V., via e-mail
DEAR N.V.: Let's start with
an unfortunate fact: You co-
f signed and are responsible for
n - o-- . - -- 7-. this debt (along with your hus-
band, a poster child for irre-
sponsibility). I'm sure the debt
e has been sold to a collection
we, i m agency. At $100 a month, you
l will never pay it off. If there's
someone you trust in the fami-
)-seated virus infestation is ly, an attorney or accountant,
e hard drive - after back- you might ask him or her to
ur data - and reinstall negotiate for you. You could
from scratch. But that offer to sign a new note for a
installing all of your other fraction of the $14,000, per-
owell, and if you've had the haps $1,000 to $1,200.
for a while, you may not Apart from that, you can say
all of these other programs. you have no assets and there is
cases, try a free program no way you're going to be
Belarc Advisor responsible for a debt of this
c.com/freedownload.html). size. If they say they are going
rate a list of all the soft- to garnish your salary, you
d on a PC, which you can might reply that Chapter 7 was
and use as a reference made for circumstances of this
ook for their installer disks kind. I am reluctant to suggest
d new copies off the Web. bankruptcy, but this could be
one of those situations where
it is absolutely necessary


with their mistakes and don't
etail Store Assistant (RSA)." support their children. About
gh Hewlett-Packard is far the only good thing in this
introducing this technology whole scenario is that he is
ally, the company says its your ex!
to implementing pilot pro- DEAR BRUCE: I am a grad-
in select areas. uate student trying to save
wording to the company, the money for law school. I work
iosk would make it easy for almost full time at a job where
ers to save money with I can afford to save $2,000 a
ns and sales, and shoppers month. I currently have $5,000
not even have to cut out in my savings account, but I
organize coupons in advance, want to earn higher interest I
will not need the money until I
Please see : -. . /Page 4D start law school in September
I know I can put it in a six-
month CD, but do you have any
e " in better suggestions of what I
m prepare can do to obtain a reasonable
rate of interest on my savings?
nership of your home and/or - LK., via e-mail
)perty. Of course, it is best to DEAR K: First, let me con-
�p your original certified gratulate you. I am always
ed, property records and impressed with students who
er important papers in a are willing to work, not just
e place, away from your borrow their way through
me. If your home suffers school. Unfortunately, since
mage by floodwater or wind, you are only going to need to
certified copy will be one of invest the money for a short
items required, should you period of time, you will have to
lose to apply for disaster settle for a much lower rate of
distance. interest, but surely the six-
low can the Clerk of Courts month CD will return more
p you? You may visit the than the savings account.
rk's office or submit a writ- Rather than worrying about
request to obtain a certified the return, you should contin-
?y of your deed. If you ue to work as hard as you can
S, to submi t a , written and save as much as you can


Please see CLERK/Page 4D


Please see MONEY/Page xD


----------








Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


2Dho

SUNDAY 2
JuNE 24, 2007 Eh-


her


nnection


5,.- ~. 3 1 -


Women plan



to 'Chill-Out'
he Crystal River Woman's Club invites the public (over 18
years of age) to participate in their "Chill-Out" Fundraiser
on Wednesday, July 25. At that time in our hot summer, you
will welcome a cool day to spend at the International Plaza in
Tampa. We promise a fun day, so make your reservation now to
hop on the bus with us!
The bus will leave the south parking lot at Beall's in Crystal
River (next to Applebee's) at 8:30 a.m. and will return at about
4:00 p.m. Price for the day is $40, including round trip bus fare,
tolls, tip for the driver, and best of all, a fabulous brunch in a pri-
vate dining room at Nordstrom. Nordstrom's food is absolutely
delicious and they are famous for their fresh luncheons.
It will be Nordstrom's annual sales week and the new clothes
just arriving for late summer and fall will be available to us at
annual sale prices! That sounds almost too good to believe, but it
is true! The new clothes will go back up to their original prices
the following week. What a great way to save money!! During
brunch, Nordstrom's professional staff will show us how to put
their clothing together for a great look and tell us which depart-
ments to shop for our needs.
After our visit to Nordstrom, you will still have time to shop
Coldwater Creek, Dillard's, Neiman-Marcus and other fine
stores before boarding the bus to return to Crystal River. All
International Plaza stores normally have fantastic sales that
time of the year. It is not too early to make your first come, first
served reservation, as bus space is limited. Deadline date for
reservations is July 3.
Please make out your check to "The Crystal River Woman's
Club" and mail it, along with a self-addressed, stamped envelope
to: CRWC c/o Lois Thomas, 17 Redbay Court East, Homosassa,
FL 34446-5121.
Include your telephone number so that we will be able to con-
tact you if needed. For more information, call Helen at 628-1380
or Lois at 382-0777.


Chamber Staff

Kitty Barnes ............... . . ......... . Executive Director
Suzanne Clemente ............Office Manager (Inverness) and
Special Events Coordinator
Tomarra Post ............. Office Manager (Crystal River) and
Membership Coordinator
Marion Elson .................. Office Assistant (Homosassa)
Joyce Greene ................. Office Assistant (Crystal River)
Diane Nally .................... .Office Assistant (Inverness)
Kelly Marker ....................Office Assistant (Inverness)
Mary Ann Lynn ..................... Membership Retention

Inverness .............. . ... .... .............. 726-2801
Homosassa ................................ 628-2666
Crystal River .............................. 795-3149


Always There Assited Living LLC


JIM SHIELDS/Special to the Chronicld
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for Always There Assisted Living LLC. Pictured above are: Chambe;
Ambassador Rhonda Lestinsky, Denise Ruff, Leslie Huntley, Chamber Executive Director Kitty Barnes, Jonathon Huntley, Mark Ruffi,
Chamber Ambassadors Bonnie Hardiman and John Porter. Always There Assisted Living is six-bed facility that offers an intimate settingC
where seniors receive the care they need in a warm, home-like environment. Their staff takes great pride in the relationships forged within
residents, creating a family-centered haven. They offer personalized care and attention. Every resident receives an abundance of one ov
one care and companionship each day, while independence is still encouraged. Residents are able to personalize their room with their?
own furnishing and familiar belongings. Cherished pets and visiting children are a daily part of our residents' lives. Always There Assiste&'
Living is at 1321 Lakeview Dr., in Inverness; for more Information, call (352) 726-9405.


AVEDA


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be more than, less than or equal to the amount initially invested. FDIC insurance
does not cover losses in market value in these instances. Early withdrawal may not
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EdUwfluU LjiLn1e
MAKING ~~~SENEO NETN


JIM SHIELDS/Special to the Chronicl4
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for Ink Blot Graphics, Inc. Pictured above are: Chamber Ambassadors
John Porter, Kandy Krementz and David Heinz, Gary Bryant - CEO, Tara Bryant and Tony Demarco - Operations Manager. Ink Blot
Graphics fabricates and supplies the highest quality graphics and signs using a complete range of media. They offer full color custom
made tee shirts with NO MINIMUMS. The work is done on a new state of the art machine by Brother that produces amazing detail and
clarity. Ink Blot Graphics also has a wide selection of vehicle graphics from pin striping to rear window graphics. Whatever your needs;
large or small, Ink Blot Graphics can fill them. Visit Ink Blot Graphics Inc at 80 North Florida Ave. in Inverness; visit their website at
http://inkblotgraphics.net/ or call (352) 344-3100.


Peddler's
Post
IVI 1,,L2, 62k . .7 Peddler's Post i6
paper! They offer free

features, jokes, and
. ,more! Stop by a
Chamber location to
pick up your copy or
t visit www.peddlers-
4.0 . Ipost.com for more
.... 1 information.


JIM SHIELDS/Special to the
Chronicle


Help organization and win a Corvette


First of all, THANK YOU if you already pur-
chased tickets.
Your donation goes directly toward serving
more children with mentors in our communi-
ty!
If you haven't got your ticket yet - IT'S NOT
TOO LATE!
You could win a brand new 2007 Corvette!
Steve and Jewel Lamb, owners of Crystal
Chevrolet in Homosassa, have donated a
brand new 2007 victory red Corvette for their
annual drawing to benefit Big Brothers Big
Sisters and Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus


County.Tickets are available for a $100 dona-
tion each.
There are less than 500 left out of 2,000
tickets available - so get yours today
because THEY'RE GOING FAST.
The winner will be announced during the
official drawing at 2 p.m. July 14 at Crystal
Chevrolet in Homosassa. Winner need not be
present.
All proceeds will benefit the programs of
Big Brothers Big Sisters serving Pinellas
Hernando & Citrus Counties and Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County.


HOW TO GET TICKETS
CALL ONE OF THE
FOLLOWING PEOPLE:
* Sally at 727-518-8860 or
e-mail Sally@bbbspc.org
* Beth at 352-344-0400 or
e-mail Beth@bbbspc.org 1
* Suzanne at 352-584
7904 or e-mail �
SuzanneH@bbbspc.org


meet your match.


mom ME
lip









Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


Connection


S e~ S I S mom


3D

SUNDAY
JUNE 24, 2007


Nature Coast Productions


Member News


1 , JIM SHIELu/Special to the unronicle
lhe Citrus County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for Nature Coast Productions.
Pictured front row are: David Walton, Gary Jorgenson, Wendy Walton. Pictured middle row are:
Chamber Ambassadors Rhonda Lestinsky, Crystal Jefferson and Lillian Smith Pictured back row are:
�Chamber Executive Director Kitty Barnes, Chamber Ambassadors Jaysen Hanson and John Porter.
stature Coast Productions is proud to present your memories brought to life. Why settle for "just plain
pictures" when you can have them turned into a movie that will bring back all of your memories of
your special occasion * suitable for most all current DVD players. We take your photos, add a sound-
Irack, and burn to DVD. From a simple photo session to a full digital production, Nature Coast
�Productions can handle all of your photographic needs. In addition, we offer a full line of web prod-
ucts. We can do a simple website and hosting, to a custom designed professional site. Nature Coast
productions specializes in High Definition format. For a free consultation call (352) 400-1357 or visit
their website for more information www.naturecoastproductions.com.


mno
Citrus County Board of County
Commissioners has lifted the residen-
tial bum ban in Citrus County.
Residential open burning will be per-
mitted if the following conditions are
met:
1. The open burning does not pro-
duce smoke, soot, odors, visible
emissions, heat, flame, radiation, or
other conditions to such a degree as
to create a nuisance.
2. The open burning must be
enclosed in a non-combustible con-
tainer or ground excavation covered
by a metal mesh or grill. The non-
combustible bum container or pit
must meet the following setbacks:
* 100 feet or more from any
occupied building other than owned
or leased by the individual doing the
burning.
* 50 feet or more from any public
highway or road.
* 50 feet or more from any resi-
dence on the property where burning
is conducted.
* 25 feet or more from any wood-
land, forest, brush or any unoccupied
building.
3. Burning cannot begin before
9:00 a.m. and must be extinguished
one hour before sunset.
4. The fire must be attended at all
times and adequate fire extinguishing
equipment is readily available at all
times.
5. Green or wet materials may not
be burned.
Burning yard trash is restricted to
the site where the material was gen-
erated and may not be transported to
another property to be burned. Yard
trash means vegetative matter result-
ing from landscaping and yard main-
tenance operations and includes
materials such as tree and shrub,
trimmings, grass clippings, palm
fronds, tree and tree stumps. Plastics,
rubber, oil, tires, household garbage,
construction debris, or other illegally
hazardous materials may not be
burned. While burning of yard trash is
legal to do without authorization, it is
important to remember that you are
totally responsible for your fire and
liable for any damages should your
fire escape. Weather can have a
direct influence on your ability to con-
trol and contain your fire. For your
benefit, the Citrus County Chronicle,


in cooperation with the Florida
Division of Forestry, publishes a daily
fire weather forecast. The purpose of
this forecast is to let you know when
it is or is not safe to bum. REPORT
BY: Patty Jefferson, Assistant Fire
Chief
MEN
Please join us in welcoming
Carlotta Spires to American Mortgage
Lenders. Carlotta comes to us with
over 30 years of banking experience,
9 years of bookkeeping /administra-
tive experience and 15 years of man-
agement/lending experience in the
banking field. We are so excited to
have her on our team. Why don't you,
stop in to meet her and welcome her
in person or give her a call at 352-
795-5626 to see what she can do for
you.
moe
Circle of Fire Art & Bead Shop
1813 US 41 N Inverness (352) 344-
Fire. Summer is here and it's HOT,
HOT, HOT! So come inside and
check out our new classes. Starting
July 14th at 10am Marcia Balonis will
be teaching a basic Spiral Rope
Bracelet; easy for beginners and fun
for everyone. On July 21st at 10am,
Marcia will also be teaching a Flat
Peyote Cuff Bracelet with a fringe &
Czech glass center. On August 4th, at
10am Marcia will be teaching a Bead
Gravy Bracelet. A beautiful brick stitch
bottom with multi mix looped top. We
also offer one on one or small group
beginner's class by appointment on
your schedule. We are now featuring
in the store: Bridal bouquet
Swarovski inserts and custom maid
bridal and bridesmaid's jewelry.
Come check it out for yourself, as
always class samples are here daily
for you to view. Hope to see you
soon.
m om
The Humane Society of Citrus
County is currently putting together
their first ever cookbook and would
love to have you send your favorite
recipes. This cookbook will feature all
the tried and true favorites, as well as
vegetarian recipes and recipes for
food and treats for our beloved pets.
They need to be in before August
31st. and can be sent to: Humane
Society of Citrus County, P.O. Box
2283, Inverness, FL 34451 or you
can email them to:


bonnieal 5@humanesocietycitrus.co
m the recipe books will be for sale in
November (just in time for holiday
giving).
ONE
Would you and your friends like to
have the time of your lives while help-
ing support your local hospice pro-
gram? Set sail on Royal Caribbean's
"Mariner of the Seas" with Hospice of
Citrus County, Hospice of Lake and
Sumter Counties, Hospice of Marion
County and Hospice of the Nature
Coast and Don Bruce as your Host.
This adventure will disembark from
Port Canaveral on Sunday,
December 9 and arrive back on
Saturday, December 16. The ship will
visit Cococay, Bahamas, Charlotte
Amalie, St Thomas and Philipsburg,
St Maarten. Reasonable prices
include transportation, all government
fees and taxes, an onboard welcom-
ing cocktail party, special surprises
and celebrity guest Don Cherry. He
will perform and be available for a
book signing. Get a group of friends
together. Not only will you have a ball
on this cruise, The Travel Authority
will contribute a minimum of $150 to
your local Hospice for each cabin
booked. Secure your room now with
a fully refundable deposit. Contact
Buzz Bernard at the Travel Authority
at (800) 334-8838 or Hospice of
Citrus County Public Relations
Manager Joe Foster at 352.527.2020
for additional information.
MEN
Pam Schultz of Mikes Friendly
Pub in Homosassa donated pro-
ceeds from their 3rd annual Memorial
Run for Hospice of Citrus County.
The 2007 Memorial Run was held in
honor of Steve (Chop) Lehnertz. All
vehicles were welcome and partici-
pants included Mike's. Friendly Pub,
Bayport Inn, Horse & Crown Pub,
IRRU Club, Sandy Hill Saloon and
Augie's Nut House. A great time was
had by all - including live music by
Ritchie Vee and the Blue Team, great
food, door prizes (many great dona-
tions), and lots of memories of Chop.
Hospice of Citrus County, licensed in
1985 and accredited by the Joint
Commission, is proud to serve as
your original hometown provider.
Hospice of Citrus County is' preserv-
ing the integrity of hospice philosophy
in the finest traditions of serving you.


Seniors vi

n just under five years,
the dedicated staff of
L Citrus County's Seniors
is. Criine storefront has
topped the mark of recover-
ing more than $1 million for
local seniors victimized by
scams, frauds and deceptive
business practices. Located
In the Beverly Plaza next to
the sheriff's Ridge Area
Community Resource Office
in Beverly Hills, the Seniors
vs. Crime storefront is a joint
project of the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office and the
Florida Attorney General's
Office. In fact, it was the first
of its kind in the state to com-
bine the multiple resources
of a sheriff's office and the
AGO to assist older adults.
The project is specifically
intended to recover monies


Crime group reports success


lost by seniors who have been
victims of fraudulent busi-
ness transactions. Perhaps
even more importantly, the
storefront's staff is commit-
ted to teaching seniors how to
recognize and avoid similar
situations in the future. Since
the storefront opened its
doors on July 2, 2002, the
measurable success of the
venture has far exceeded all
expectations. During that
time, the project's capable
staff of resourceful, well-
versed volunteers has inves-
tigated 959 cases of every-
thing from simple
business/customer miscom-
munications to deceptive
business practices. Of that
number, 922 cases have been
resolved successfully and to
date, $1,008,522 in lost


monies has been recovered
for the project's victims. A
team of 16 staff members has
volunteered 13,385 hours to
help advocate for not only
older adults, but citizens of
all ages who believe they've
been bilked by unscrupulous
vendors, telemarketers, serv-
ice providers and others. The
Beverly Hills storefront is a
haven for seniors who are
alone, without support or sim-
ply at the end of their rope.
Hours are from 8:30 a.m. to
1:30 p.m., Tuesdays,
Wednesday and Thursdays.
However, during the summer
months of June, July and
August, the storefront is open
only on Tuesdays and
Wednesday. Walk-ins are
always welcomed, but to
make an appointment for this


free service, call 249-9139.
Complainants should bring
with them their cancelled
checks, receipts, statements,
contracts and other documen-
tation for an initial interview.
Once a complaint is deemed
valid, staff members strive to
resolve the matter favorably
and in a timely manner. "Our
volunteers are the unsung
heroes of the Sheriff's
Office," said Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy, "and the efforts of
those who work with the
Seniors vs. Crime project
have reaped a million
rewards for this community."
For more information about
Seniors vs. Crime or to sched-
ule a speaker for your club or
group, please call the store-
front manager, Don Moran, at
249-9139.


Business Women's Alliance pinches pennies for girls


T he Citrus County Business
Women's Alliance is avidly work-
ing on their first project by collect-
ing pennies to provide a General
Equivalency Diploma for girls at Camp
E-Nini-Hassee. The goal is to reach
100,000 pennies before Thanksgiving.
So far a collection of 90,978 pennies
have been collected! They hope to sur-
pass their goal to provide the much
needed funding. Lois Eatz of Camp E-
Nini-Hassee and member of the
Business Women's Alliance stated "It
is such a relief to know that all
campers will be able to take their
GEDs when they are ready. Before
your generosity, the cost ($150 each
including books and testing fee) fell to
the parents or to Camp. Many times
there were no funds in either place


and the GED was postponed and some-
times never taken. Thanks to you, we
can now help those who fall into this
category." Mrs. Lillian Smith who is
spearheading this project urges every-
one to bring those pennies that are sit-
ting in a corner in a bottle at so many
homes saying "please use us". She is
also very proud of the fact that the first
project to help the girls at the camp
has started with ease and in record
time with record amounts over and
above our goal with PENNIES!! Camp
E-Nini-Hassee is an 8 - 14 month
wilderness program for emotionally
disturbed female offenders ages 10 to
17. The program stresses education,
recreation, home and community rela-
tionships, including community serv-
ice experience, and group living. To


donate those pennies stop in at any of
the three Chamber locations, Pro-
Fitness Gym or Beverly Hills Cleaners.
For more information, call (352) 795-
0101 or (352) 795-3149.
The Mission Statement of the
Business Women's Alliance is to sup-
port, develop and promote all women
through education, mentoring, infor-
mation exchange, partnerships and
alliances with other organizations, and
by promoting opportunities for all
women in Citrus County. As women in
business and Chamber members' part
of the Business Women's Alliance
vision is to support women in busi-
ness with networking opportunities
that would include quarterly lunch-
eons and working together on commu-
nity projects.


CFCC to teach Microsoft Office basics at Lecanto campus
Central Florida Community through Aug. 7, in Building Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. more information or to regis-
College will offer Microsoft L2-201B, 3800 S. Lecanto Students should have basic ter, call Continuing
Office Basics beginning in Highway, Lecanto. The computer knowledge. Education at the Citrus
June at the Citrus Campus. course fee is $105. This Certificates of completion Campus, 352-249-1210 or
The course will be held from course offers an introduction will be awarded following enroll online at
6 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, June 26 to Microsoft Office programs completion of course. For www.CFCCtraining.com


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CITRUS COUN'I (FL) CHRONICLE


.3.3 U -J7P-


4D SUNDAY, JUNIE 24, 2007


Workforce center


anounces recent


staffing changes


Special to the Chronicle

CLM Workforce Connection
has realigned their business
structure to meet the needs of
the shifting labor market and to
execute a new regional industry
cluster strategy. Margaret
Spontak, an Ocala native, was
recently appointed Senior Vice
President of Business
Development to lead the newly
appointed Business
Development Team. During the
organization's restructure,
Senior Vice President Kathleen
Woodring was promoted to
Chief Operating Officer.
Woodring, a 10-year administra-
tor at CLM Workforce
Connection, led the planning
and research which created the
new strategy. Woodring assumes
responsibility for the organiza-
tion's program and support
functions and One Stop Center
services.
Spontak left her position as
Assistant Director for the
University of Florida
Leadership Development
Institute to assume the position
this month. During her three
year stint at UF, she designed
leadership development pro-
grams for some of Florida's
largest corporations including
Citicard's North American IT
Division, Publix Supermarkets'
Facilities Division, First
American, Rayonier and
Haskell Corporation. Prior to
leaving for Gainesville, she
served as Executive Director for
Corporate and Continuing
Education at Central Florida
Community College.
The Workforce Board part-
nered with Spontak during her
time at CFCC on two targeted
sector grants in information
technology and manufacturing
bringing approximately $1 mil-
lion in training revenues into
the region. She was also the
architect for the Regional Great
Places to Work Project support-
ed by CLM Workforce
Connection and involving 52
companies in the three county
region. The project received a
national workforce award. CEO
Rusty Skinner said, "Margaret
has the necessary skills in train-


ing and development, strategic
planning, grant writing and
community partnership build-
ing to successfully lead our
newly restructured business
development services."
Four Industry Specialists
focusing on each of the targeted
clusters, and a Community
Relations Manager were select-
ed to serve on the Business
Development Team with
Spontak. The four clusters are
led by the following Industry
Specialists:
* Health Services Industry
Specialist Nicole Maragh brings
10+ years of dedicated cus-
tomer service working with
diverse customer bases.
* Manufacturing and
Distribution Industry Specialist
Carol Dalbeck is a Certified
Workforce Development
Professional with an exemplary
background in human
resources. Carol received her
Human Resource Certification
from UCLA and is a member of
the Ocala Human Resource
Management Association Board
of Directors currently serving as
Workforce Readiness Chair
i Construction and Utilities
Industry Specialist Terry
Widener has strong leadership
in training development and
coordination. His most recent
involvement with the Florida
reBuilds Program established
construction related training
for nearly 300 Citrus, Levy and
Marion residents. Terry has a
Master's degree in
Management Administration.
* Business and Professional
Industry Specialist Kaysey
Welch has extensive business
consulting experience in a
labor relations capacity.
* Community Relations
Manager Blaire Peterson, a
Citrus County resident, brings
experience in working with
special events, job fairs, public
relations and grants manage-
ment
The entire team is located on
the 2nd floor of the Enterprise
Center on CFCC's Ocala
Campus. The team serves
Citrus, Levy and Marion coun-
ties for business development
services.


Bourdeaux to
manage art shop
Paradise Art Angels is pleased
to announce the appointment of
Valerie L. Bourdeaux as manager
of Paradise Art Angels and its resi-
dent potter. Bourdeaux brings to
the position a wealth of knowledge
and experience in art, crafts, jewel-
ry and working with clay. This was
gained from many years in the
business, though her first love is
working with clay and handcrafting
tiles and jewelry.
Classes are offered on a wide
range of topics. Workshops and
demonstrations are available for
groups and schools. The shop also
participates in shows and special
events. Gallery space is available
to display artists' work to the public.
Paradise Art Angels is at 406
N.E. First Ave., Crystal River
(behind Hospice Thrift). It is open
from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, with an hour for
lunch from 1 to 2 p.m. Call 564-
2788.
Agents attend
mortgage convention
George Bendtsen, CSA, and
Philip Sapp, independent software
agents of United First Financial,
recently returned from Salt Lake
City, Utah, where they attended the
first Annual Convention of Ufirst.
United First Financial, its software
agents and subsidiaries provide
Web-based software and support
services which enable people to
pay off their mortgages in as little
as 1/3 to 1/2 the time. Bendtsen
can be reached at 726-1403 and
Sapp can be reached at 613-0827.
Skillbank sets
summer hours
Effective immediately, the new
summer hours for the Skillbank


Business DIGEST


office will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Regular hours will resume Oct. 1.
CFCC to offer medical
transcription courses
Central Florida Community
College will soon offer courses in
medical transcription, a field in
which the Bureau of Labor
Statistics predicts a shortage of
qualified workers through the year
2014.
"CFCC is pleased to offer the
courses necessary to prepare you
for a career in this high demand
occupation," said Debra Mackey,
coordinator of Continuing
Education.
The series of four, 11-week
courses are presented online and
guided by a qualified instructor.
They are available beginning July
1. Students who complete the
courses successfully will receive a
certificate.
Physicians and other health care
providers employ state-of-the art
electronic technology to dictate and
transmit highly technical and confi-
dential information about their
patients, said Mackey. These med-
ical professionals rely on skilled
medical transcriptionists to trans-
form spoken words into compre-
hensive records that accurately
communicate medical information.
Medical transcriptionists work in
doctors' offices, hospitals, clinics,
laboratories, insurance companies,
medical libraries, legal offices, and
as home-based, independent con-
tractors.
To register for the courses,
visit www.CFCCtraining.com.
Call Mackey at (352) 854-2322,
ext. 1204.
CFCC plans
Excel workshop
The CF Institute at Central
Florida Community College will


offer Microsoft Excel courses for
the beginner and expert spread-
sheet user starting in July.
Excel for Beginners will meet 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday, July 10 and 12.
Students will learn to produce
number-crunching spreadsheets
by creating basic formulas and
functions. The course fee is $89.
Intermediate Excel will meet 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. July 24 and 26
and will cover automation and
advanced functions, collabora-
tion, etc. The fee is $89.
Two new courses are being
offered for the advanced user.
Graphs in Microsoft Excel will
meet 9 a.m. to noon Monday,
July 9 and will focus on creating
and manipulating graphs.
Formulas in Microsoft Excel will
meet 9 a.m. to noon Thursday,
July 19 and will focus on creating
and editing formulas for cell data.
The fee for each of the advanced
courses is $49.
All courses will be held on the
Ocala Campus, 3001 S.W.
College Road. Additional sec-
tions are available for day,
evening or weekend courses.
Complete schedule, course
descriptions and registration are
available at
www.CFCCtraining.com, or con-
tact Coordinator Marcey Mast at
352-854-2322, ext. 1301.
CFCC to offer
Quickbooks boot camp
OCALA - The CF Institute at
Central Florida Community
College will offer QuickBooks
Boot Camp beginning in July at
the Ocala Campus, 3001 S.W.
College Road. QuickBooks is an
accounting software package
that is currently used by more
than 2 million small businesses.
A Basic Training section will be


from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, July 10
to 24. It will cover setting up a
company, working with lists,
invoicing services, processing
payments, entering and paying
bills, and working with bank
accounts. The course fee is $109
and includes the textbook.
A Specialized Training section
will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday,
Aug. 7 to 21. Students will learn
how to set up an inventory, sell
their product, track and pay sales
tax, customize forms and prepare
payroll. The course fee is $99.
To register for either section,
contact Marcey Mast at (352)
854-2322, ext. 1301, or e-mail
mastm@cf.edu.
Center educates
businesses, public
Dr. Russell Lewandowski, well-
ness advisor, dedicated in the
health and wellness of the people
and businesses of Citrus County,
is available to speak at communi-
ty/business meetings, clubs, etc.,
on various topics such as
strengthening employee relation-
ships, reducing job injuries and
healthy lifestyle changes.
As a community service, the
"Proadjuster" Lifestyle Magazine
is mailed to more than 800 busi-
nesses in Citrus County. Each
monthly issue contains new and
exciting topics on health and well-
ness such as diet, sleep, nutri-
tional supplements, exercise,
stress relief and many other
informative health and lifestyle
improvements.
They also offer this service to
individuals. Call Barbara at 726-
0888 to be placed on the mailing
list, or to arrange for the doctor to
speak at your organization. There
is no charge for this community
service.


SAVNG RTE


MONEY 3-MONTH 6-MONTH 12-MONTH 24-MONTH
MARKET C.D. C.D. C.D. C.D.


C.D.


C.D.


bU-.D.UN
C.D.


S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY

EDWARD JONES 4.47 4.57 4.90 4.90 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.05 5.05 5.05 5.05 5.05 5.05 5.10 5.10
(352)527-3700 - -
STATE FARM 1.64 1.65 4.59 4.70 4.83 4.95 4.88 5.00 4.97 5.10 N/A N/A 4.97 5.10 4.88 5.00
Call your local agent
RAYMOND JAMES N/A 4.74 4.65 4.76 4.70 4.81 4.88 5.00 4.88 5.00 N/A N/A 4.88 5.00 4.97 5.10
(352) 527-3700


Please note: Banks and other financial institutions offer a wide variety of investment opportunities. Each institution has its own set of
requirements to qualify for the rates listed above. Contact these financial institutions directly for up-to-date information on the
options listed above, or inquire at your bank for other investment opportunities. Financial institutions interested in listing their rates
can call the Citrus County Chronicle at 563-5660.


ONEM | years left to pay. Our only other
M ONEY Wdebt is a $35,000 line of credit I
have been putting only 2 per-
Continued from Page ID cent into my 401(k), but I can
invest up to 10 percent.
and also reduce your expenses My question is, should I stay
as much as possible. I know with a regular 401(k) contribu-
that makes for short-term dis- tion, move to Roth (more taxes
comfort, but when you finish now) or keep putting 2 percent
school, you'll be happy you fol- in my 401(k) and the rest into
lowed this course. Again, you retiring the house debt as
have my congratulations and quickly as possible? My hus-
admiration. band thinks the more we put
DEAR BRUCE: I am 59 years into a Roth, the better; but I
old, and I currently earn don't agree with him. He has
$100,000. My company recently $190,000 in an IRA from a pre-
.made the Roth an option for vious job several years ago.
our 401(k). I have $95,000 in my The house is worth $600,000. I
401(k), along with $150,000 in think I want to retire here in
my company pension. I plan to California, but I may sell and
work six to eight more years. buy a cheaper place in
My husband makes $20,000 a Arizona, depending on where
year, just enough to cover his my kids end up. - J.R., via e-
expenses. The mortgage on our mail
house is $160,000 at 5-1/4 per- DEAR J.R.: The beauty of the
cent, with payments of $1,600 Roth is that the money can be
on a 15-year loan. We have 11 left forever and the earnings


CLERK
Continued from Page 1D

request, you must provide the
Official Records Book and Page
Number of the document This
information is located on the
tax bill for the property, which
you may obtain by performing a


SHOPPER
Continued from Page 1D

Shoppers would simply scan
their store loyalty cards at the
RSA kiosk when they enter the
store, and they would get a
printed list of special dis-
counts and shopping items
based on their shopping histo-
ry and grocery list created
online from home. The list
would note special store sales
on preferred items as well as
coupons available for the
items. Rather than having to
cut out coupons for each indi-
vidual item, the shopper
would simply have the cashier
scan one barcode on the print-
ed list that would have the
coupon information for every
item.
The list would also make it
easy for shoppers to find the
items they need. On the back of


name search on the Clerk of
Court Web site. You can also
purchase certified copies on-
line, through the
MyFloridaCounty website at
www.MyFloridaCounty.com.
For more information
regarding obtaining a certified
copy of your deed, contact our
Recording Division at 341-6475.
To determine if you are eligible

the list would be a map of the
store and the location of all of
the listed items. Shoppers
could go directly to the items
without having to search
every aisle.
The RSA list will even help
shoppers in their planning so
they will not forget to pick up
an item they needed. For
example, the software will
know that the shopper buys
milk every week, eggs every
other week, and flour once a
month. The items would
appear on the list based on
timing, even if the shopper
forgets to add the item to their
list created from home. When
the cashier scanned the bar-
code, the purchased items
would be deleted from the list
so that each week's list would
be timely and accurate.
I can see that technology like
this would be a boon for shop-
pers like my husband. The map
alone could save him hours of


are totally tax-free. The money
in the 401(k) will result in a fat-
ter paycheck right now, but it's
fully taxable at withdrawal. My
inclination is to side with your
husband, toward the Roth.
As to the home, you might
wish to retire in California, but,
as you point out, it's an expen-
sive place to live. I know it's
nice to be near the children,
but that would not be the pri-
mary ingredient in choosing
where I retire. You guys have
done well, and you should have
solid golden years. Since you
are coming to the end of your
working career, the more you
can stash right now, the more
comfortable you will be in
those retirement years. You
should max out the Roth and
put the max into your 401(k);
this might mean a little strain
right now, but it is certainly
going to look good 10 years
down the road.

for disaster assistance, call
(800) 462-9029. For additional
information regarding Natural
Disaster Preparedness, please
visit www.royutah.org/commu-
nity/FEMA.htm, a link provid-
ed by FEMA.
m -
Betty Striffler is the Citrus
County Clerk of Courts.

frustration a year Automatic
coupon savings would make
every shopper feel like a bril-
liant consumer, and would be
reason enough to continue
shopping at the stores that fea-
ture the RSA kiosks.
Unfortunately, as with any
new technology, I am afraid we
will be waiting for quite awhile
before this service starts at our
stores. In the meantime, I think
I'll go back to doing our fami-
ly's grocery shopping. I miss it!

Stephanie Nelson shares
her savings tips as a regular
contributor on ABC News'
"Good MorningAmerica." You
can find more ofher savings
tips in her book "The Greatest
Secrets of the Coupon Mom"
and on her Web site at
www.couponmom.com. She
can be reached at
shoppingmom@
unitedmedia.com.


CITRUS HIG H SCH OO L


CLASS


0 F 1 9 9 7


Join in the fun Labor Day Weekend, August 31 - September 3 as the
CHS Class of '97 celebrates its...

10 Year Reunion!
Starting off with an Evening Mixer on August 31, the weekend events will include
a Reunion Dinner, open bar party and a Family Fun Day at the Roller Barn. The
main event will take place on Saturday, September 1 at the Greek Orthodox Church
and will include giveaways, raffles, dancing and...
A video confessional. Please come prepared to share your high school crushes,
confessions, regrets, and accomplishments. Or, break out the yearbook and read a
funny/entertaining entry. A private 'confessional room' will be set up and all are
encouraged to participate.
Tapes will be available for purchase after the event. Dress to Impress.

Tickets
$75 individual, $130 couple.
Ticket price includes Hors d'oeuvres, open bar, dinner and keepsakes.
Payment must be received prior to 7/27. Cost will double at the door.


For More Information
Please visit www.myspace.com/canesclassof1997.


Please cut-out and submit with check :


CHS '97


Tickets


Sponsored by:
w. L[.. rvcc ok.,o,
Swww~chronicleonllne.com


CIAyr--
SREUNION
August 31 - September 2, 2007


$75 individual, $130 couple. '
RSVP by July 27th.

Name(s):
" If married, please Include maiden name.

Please make checks payable to CHS 97 Reunion and mall to 2218 E. Hercala Ln., Hemnando, FL 34442


"USINESS


I I


I










On1us Co UNI (FL) CHRONICLE ____


m A Nhroicle]I h


DECLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 5D


To place an ad, call 563-5966
--


Classifieds .0


E17.u-7td- -7 11;


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa:(5)53-65 1Tl Fe:(8)82-30 1E al:.asfes .oilolnecm Iw bit:w wcrniloln-o

[ -R= Cgh*g 0n i ISe C= ,* Free J.bC" y wL "6
Vaato C2FreC2CeeerClrca/ esoa
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"C ctoii-IesOfr C fes I = noneet nc =, osCyt


Gay White Female,
5'10", 180 Ibs,
Auburn Hair, blue eyes,
looking for same for
friendship, movies,
conversation.
N/S preferred.
(352) 795-0309

HELLO, SWM 61, 5'9",
150 Ibs. financially OK,
But lonely, seeks SWF,
slender, for companion
and friend, who likes
dancing, beach & din-
ing out to a share a sin-
cere and honest rela-
tionship. Smoker and
casual drinker OK, but
no drugs, Thanks
Dennis (352) 628-1775

SWF Attractive, F/T
seeks trim gentleman,
58-68 who Is
affectionate, with
sense of humor to enjoy
Inside/outside activities
with for LTR.
(262) 745-1150 Local

SWM, Semi-retired,
Italian, 5'8" 1551bs.
seeks female friend
or companion.
Age, color, race
unimportant.
(352) 746-6159

WWM In Search WF, 65,
to enjoy country music,
flea markets, traveling
USA, in Class A Motor
Home. Send Response
To: Blind Box 1329P
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River Fl.
34429


RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
Srentalfindercom




$$CASH WE BUY TODAY
Cars, Trucks, Vans - rt
FREE Removal Metal,
Junk Vehicles, No title
OK 352-476-4392 Andy
Tax Deductible Recelot
3 Cedar Trees
You Remove
(352) 796-6773
$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's AutoParls
352-628-4144
25' TV ANTENNA
W/rotor, take down
and its yours.
(352) 637-9654
$$ CASH PAID $$
Having Code
Enforcement problems
w/ Junk vehicles in your
yard? (352) 860-2545
$ CASH $ PAID FOR
Unwanted Vehicles
CALL (352) 220-0687
COMMUNITY SERVICE
The Path Shelter is
available for people
who need to serve
their community
service.
(352) 560-6163 or
(352) 746-9084
Leave Message


Free Boxes
Good for Packing
(352) 527-2769
FREE FEMALE CALICO
KITTEN, to good home
(352) 344-9928
FREE FEMALE PUPPY
Part Golden Retriever.
Very Lg. Dog/Very
loving. (352) 563-2084
FREE KITTENS
(352) 726-9942
FREE KITTENS. Calicos,
Persian/Angora mix.
Long hair, Beautiful.
(352) 621-4800
FREE New Hampshire
Roosters, 5 months old
Brlng your cage
(352) 341-5553
.FREE REMOVAL OF.*
ATV's, bikes, cars, Jet skis
mowersjacuzzi's, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
FREE REMOVAL
Of unwanted househid
& Garage Sale Items.
Call (352) 726-9500
JACK RUSSELL
NEEDS FENCED IN AREA
FREE TO EXCELLENT
HOME.
352- 637-5745/464-3625
KING SIZE pillow top
mattress and box
spring (352) 465-4892
RED LAVA ROCK
(352) 628-3507
After 5 P.M.
The Path Shelter
will pick up your
unwanted vehicle
Tax deductible
receipt given
(352) 746-9084


THOMAS ORGAN
needs work
(352) 201-9018

WE PAY CASH
FOR
JUNK CARS
Top $$ paid $$
Toll Free
(888)480-1170
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645



* FRESH SWEET CORN *
@ BELLAMY GROVES
1.5 miles E. on Eden Dr.
in INVERNESS
* (352) 726-6378 *
* YOU PICK PEAS 0
* $8 a bucket
220-8109 or 302-3687
Located in Lecanto



BLACK LAB, 4 yr. old,
male, orange collar,
vic. of Hendricks Dr.
Dunnellon.
(352) 697-2069
CATS 2 Long hair Tortie
missing 2-2/d wks, (F)
Short haired torti
declawed missing 10
days (M) 20 Ibs. grey/
wht declawed missing
6/17 Vic. Pine Ridge
Golf course 746-0492
MALTESE. 4 Ib. Female
Vic. Inverness,
Little John Ave. 6/12.


r DIVORCES
BANKRUPTCY I
- Name Change |
I *Child Support a
*Wills I
We Come To You |
* 637-4022 *795-5999









DRUM LESSONS
Prof. drummer, Music
field 50+ yrs. 794-0265
Glory Recording Studios






Humane Society
of Inverness
offers Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Service
In our Mobile Clinic.
Appointments avail.
Cat Male $40,
CatFemale $50,
Dog Male $60,
Dog Female $70.
Prices including spay
or Neuter, 3 Yr. Rabies
shot Annual Vaccines
Nail Clipping, Micro
chipping & Micro
chip reg.
Appt. avail Wed,Thurs,
Sat. Inverness &
Crystal River. Call for
appt. 352-726-8801
* PROFILE T SHIRTS *
Custom Screen Printing
Hats, Shirts, Jackets &
morel 352-344-1978


r -;--q
RENTAL FINDER
Swww.chronlcle
rentalflnder.com
* SOD * SOD * SOD-
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032


Need help rehoming
a pet - call us
Adoptive homes
available for small
dogs
Requested donations
are tax deductible

Pet Adoptions
Thursday,
June 28th
12 -2 pm
Mercantile Bank
Rt. 44, Inverness

MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY







ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
BUYERS AGENT
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANT ASSO.CPTIONSM
CAT ADOPTIONS


Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open 8:00 A
M till 4:00 P M
Monday-Friday.
Week-end and
evenings by
appointment.
All Cats and Kittens
are altered, tested for
Feline Luk and Aids.
Up to date on vac-
cines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofspha.orga.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant
Ave. Corner of 44
and Conant.
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw prints.





a and read

1,000's of Items sold
everyday using the
Chronicle classified.
Call today and we'll
help you get rid of
your unwanted stuff.

CHi"opNiCLE
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-1441


2 Deslreable Crypts
Level 2 $6,500 & Level 3
$6,000 Fero Memorial
(619) 448-3455
Fountains Mem Park,
Homosassa, Lots 1,2,3
& 4 in Peace 114
Garden $6995 for all
four. (352) 799-2970-
Brooksvllle





Your WebsIte
Chronicle Website
Directory in print
and online.
Our search engine
will link customers
directly to your site.
In Print
+ Online
= One Price
$51.95
(3 lines of copy
for 30 days)
Header and
Website Address
Call Today:
(352) 563-5966

|= CAR SALES I
www.naturecoast
wheels.cornm
Get The Value of Your
Home
www.naturecoastllving.n
2t
Hurricane Info
www.chronicleonline
.com
NEWSPAPERS
www.chronicle
onllne.com
Real Estate Information
www.FreeCitrusCounty
Homelnfo.com

www.chroniclehome
finder.cam

www.naturecoast
homefront.com

www.chronicle
rentalfinder.cpm



BRIGHT BEGINNINGS
PRESCHOOL
Is Accepting
Applications For:
EXP. TEACHERS'
ASSISTANTS
(352) 795-1240




CITRUS COUNTY
Clerk of Courts
Is accepting
applications at this
time. For the
positions of
*SYSTEMS
ANALYST
*SWITCH BOARD
OPERATOR
For additional
information please
view our website at
www.clerk.citrus.f.us
or contact
Human Resources at
(352) 341-6483


BILINGUAL
RECEPTIONIST
Needed part time for edu-
cational foundation. Must
be fluent in Spanish. Fax
resume to 352/795-1970.

P/T
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
Immediate opening
Must have excellent
phone skills & general
office knowledge
with computer
experience.
20 hrs/wk. M-F.
Please fax resume to:
(352) 344-0067 or
emaillbkssard
edtours-us.comr

PROGRAM CLERK
In our Crystal River
Office. Part time.
Must work well with
the public, be detail
oriented, and have
strong organizational
and communication
skills. Send cover
letter and resume to:
American Red Cross,
HR Dept
7449 W Gulf to Lake
Hwy Unit 3,
Crystal River, Fl 34429
Fax to 352-732-8596

TITLE INSURANCE
CLOSING AGENTS,
MANAGERS AND
SALES REPS.
New office locations to
open in Citrus, Hemando
and Marion County. Sal-
ary plus commission
available. Must be expe-
rienced and motivated
with current customer
base. Fax resume for
confidential interview to:
Southern Security
Title-Nancy Sloan@
352-527-6413.

PesUa







icn1Beut




Do .aIr-kn al


SALON & SPA HELP
WANTED
(352) 795-0919




$$$$$$$$
$1500.00
Sign on Bonus!
Licensed Nurses
11-7
If you possess above
average skills, are
dedicated to the
higher standards of
elder care, good
documentation and
a genuine caring
attitude, we have a
place for you. We
offer a salary range
comparable to your
experience and
great benefits.
Crystal River Health
and Rehab Center
136 NE 12th Ave.
Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 795-5044 HR/
Connie DFWP/ EOE


cc[
aimso[iire�nEKa

LPN & RN
(3:45pm-12:15am)
Second Shift
(1 1:45pm-8:15am)
Third Shift
(Full Time)
GREAT BENEFITSIII
Paid Vacation,
Holidays, Health
Insurance & 401K

Ready for a change?
The best kept secret
in nursing is In
Correctional Nursing.
Current FL LPN or RN
license & valid Drivers
'"license is required
To apply for a new
challenging career
visit our facility
M-F 8:30am - 4:30pm
2604 W. Woodland
Ridge Drive
Lecanto, Fl 34461
To apply via Internet
www.correcfions
corp.com
M/F/VET/HP
E.O.E.. Drug Free
Workplace



Your World







C;asfK4ds


LPN
Needed For Busy
Urology Office
Fax Resume to:
352-726-8763 or Mail
609 W. Highland
Blvd. Inverness 34452
3-11
FULLTIME NURSE
Avante at Inverness
Is currently seeking
a 3-11 Fulltime Nurse
Avante offers
excellent
compensation and
premium benefits
Including 401K.
Please apply
In person at:
304 S. Citrus Ave.,
Inverness
or fax resume to
352-637-0333
or email to
tcvpret@avonte
grop~ucom







of Citrus County
A Skilled Facility has
an opening for:
MDS Coordinator
RN/LPN Salary
comensurate with
experience. Excellent
Health & Dental Blue
Cross/ Blue Shield of FL
& paid vacation &
holidays. Come loin
our Excepioffnal
Nursing Teaml
Fax Resume
(352) 746-0748 or
Apply in person
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
(352) 249-3100
Arbor Trail Rehab
has a new opening.
*RN Weekend
Supervisor
Come join a
great team
We offer excellent
benefits:
*401 K/Health/
Dental/Vision
*Vacation/Sick Time
Apply in person
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, FL
EOE
Ave


Your world first.
Every Day


ARNP
Exp'd, F/T for Busy
Doctors office and
Nursing Home.
Send Resume To:
(352)795-7898


ARNP
Needed for busy
medical office.
Competitive
salary & benefits.
Please fax resume to:
(352) 746-7767


BRENTWOOD
Retirement/
Assisted Living
Has the following
Openings
* LPN's for PRN
* FT CNA's 3-11
& 11-7

All positions -
Insurance after
60 days. Vacation
After 90 days.

Sign on bonus &
paid by exp.
Apply in Person:
Brentwood Retirement
Community
Commons Build.
1900 W. Alpha Ct.
Lecanto 352-746-6611
DFWP/EOE



Response
Workers

The Centers
is seeking Therapists,
an Addiction
Counselor & Case
Mgrs to provide,
emergency
intervention therapy
to individuals &
families in crisis. Some
on-call. MA to BA
degree in Human Svc
field reqd w/min lyr
exp. Submit salary
req. Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE Fax or
e-mail resume to
HR, the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580.
lobs@thecenters.us
For more Info visit


www.theceners .us


Citrus County Chronicle
Homosassa Beacon
Crystal River Current
Williston Pioneer Sun-News
Riverland News
Chiefland Citizen


* The Visitor
* Inverness Pioneer
* Sumter County Times
* South Marion Citizen
* Riverland Shopper
* Tri-County Bulletin


Services

$172.68


Examples:

Transportation

$77.95


(Q> hit


Our family of newspapers

reaches more than 1 70,000

readers in Citrus, Marion,

Sumter, Levy, Dixie and

Gilchrest counties.


ONE CALL,

ONE PRICE

Reach 82,000 "^

Homes & Businesses


AT THiE HEAAtT OF OUR. COM)4U-NUIY-4"



i& R.ING. .. FOR MANY YLEARS,


I N.MANY WAYS.'.

F~n.IfJiia-I .11i'ti(IrtI.-t~n-oroi l e~tih S3.rtcni ICAI I iI i i hL'� n m altry -jrc iv. ihc commruNhlUl
Aihb, 0 t..%I'I.l ajcng iiw fultliik ..h ir V114".tlet ' Anl di ordioaili .1111 nure itil 1I
i... ktimtera ii ho grers ponpie by oume Iit.su., our wa.rr

RNs (Full-Time):

*Enzplowe Health Nurse Orthopedics
N* NLLro 1lemn-er Operahing Room and Firsi A~sisLanL
Care Coordinator - FT & PRM
R. ilirn* teni IIi 1,N IIII PN 1lion.,.d iI h~ L AZT% III ,1.Iit.InhtilIIIIInildfliJIVlIII 11L IMlt it.irhoffhci
i..."I ..,Yi rL rnri r~d Frnlirnrrt - ncludc Aidr .tia.u., o .tr&d,t'i tir, cc in nhlrfil~,Irrcpencncc %utib
li � ,tI.i Wi, .-L are\1 i n tvoxw. iilid yrurit-d A.ini,, vii tiamn ?IL-..I lMCAnrdchniLn,

Director, Risk Management
H eqiirn. [uhch-f ,dcgrcc in.i health iirebiol irt-U I NMa cr sprcl-nrwdi, pcrierucill ithealli, cu/'vfId.eI1~
I X.P1iti1 it,10 u, " ill, ltr-priteinisei ut. I& PilP~l.,'.it-i3rogir-ew r ,i.id [iar~d~iti R4 tiln..('icni c cr ii.i
Manager, Plant Operations
Rulidt.,r .tegrt in Lnijnt-cringa.nJ a nhlin-itim .jI IIitv I cj,e ridit-i e cniginwietng awim~t,,sni recnLnL~
fit .i air..ui,'htil'lk-rc t, nhirunnmuji Pollentia.ndf .rkmvi; , i-ut... Lf - J ,i C AHO ri-ruhnyuin . CHA drillihcr
n ionnkiLll rCghtII. ir) r,,1uircmeviit h1t
Rehabilitation - Clinical Coordinator
Rop-qarxr ii~ldkl. dr .Ci- Oiarr , .pTkro md i itoiAcuptitunal Thrr.lMFipv ht'aJ ]1wrariportin S.I/Ljnjt~ulW
VAIo..il, rl, . r.it. uh, ii .,t Li idUnit, ,-..,i anti kIl..ur,.t,,kItihe .)L.IcIf V4 H102 Dea. rtmelnni tiofHeaiir. ~ ol o
Qv, Ili s ,'uuran., Miirimui-nu siti3 wn ,lp.(heiflfivn .tIn ah- i I wiini titfj5rrchn,.
RN - Cardiovascular Progressive Care Manager/PCU
L i-,hiJjie,nI I ItI-errsp. 'ils~icit ,.r ijiint~g iii jlahrlii[-,NI air LI,', it.11v UtI IIL Req I I C- .IMIUIIfjII hil. i i!di.i.i ..dicutt
I., rti.i4, woi.i.d tirUsn-FIriy Pflt crt-ii1.mni~nimairn ..it r'.vistritn -utl t-Xpt-fctin Cin .n t.uic ae r.4rcIing;
aind .umir iiI! JK -w ALStiC liwtrcpt-fd idii1-1) LLi v N('t I.' nuin-d ilih oe n iir.Miinimuiiii
Q L-. .ei~.itJ t-, PuIC[ prcid T' rd
I; I.i ."1.1ii'Ii Iri.,. m ...,ifa..cra%: I. .,nIr.in Iltirull. NW I Iirr I, -D I. rut nLt Iti h e I ami im Hal4.areuia.
I, 1-ir 1 ,,Lin1 ,.i a Itrai.i % i'r~pLltx*, --fe:rv tik i� n �Cjre, r. k.a tiir~eil ithirie ikrt
,Iferl , i la ..~1t 1 31 1 t J St I ILt 'Iscn .
txmtli pj.kagr jr. I rdu-in in,.jtiuanizt-
Haei'k-..c1irI,i ldi..'iftt'It. Wild. iromin. CITRUS MiEMiOR IA L


The best way to reach the

growing Nature Coast market is

through our award-winning,

growing newspapers.







1 624 North Meadowcrest Boulevard
Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 563-6363
www. chronicleonline.comrn


Real Estate

$97.95


Call for details

(352) 563-5966

Classifieds Working For You


SUND", JUNr-. 24, 2007 5D


CLASSIFIED

















Evening/
Weekend
Receptionist
Come join a fun
team Multi-phone
system and data
entry skills preferred.
Dependability a must.
Apply in person
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, FL
EOE


F/T CNAs
11-7
Avante at Inverness
is currently
accepting
applications for
CNAs all shifts.
Avante offers
excellent pay for
years of experience,
shift differential,
weekend differential,
bonuses for extra
shifts. Excellent
benefits package for
fulltime employees.
Please apply at:
304 S. Citrus Ave,
Inverness
or fax resume to
352-637-0333 or you
can email a
resume to
tcypreQg
avantegroup.com


Healthcare
People. Strength.
Commitment.
HCR Manor Care
of Brooksville, a
leading provider
of skilled nursing
and rehabilitation
is seeking:

RNs
PRN- All Shifts

CNAs
3pm-11 pm &
1pm-7am
PRN- All Shifts

HOUSEKEEPERS

We offer excellent
benefits including
Medical, Dental,
and 401(k)l
Please send/fax
resume to:
Heartland of
Brooksville,
575 Lamar Avenue
Brooksville, FL 34601
Fax: (352)799-5368
Apply online at
www.hcr-manorcare.c
om
EEO/Drug-Free
Employer

iirornorive
Your world fi st
Es I <>-I- :L.1
( t ti ( t :tF
eL,,.,,i~ 1 ,,


HOME HEALTH
AGENCY

SEEKING
RN Case Mgr.
& LPN
Competitive Salary.
(352) 746-2549
Fax Resume:
(352) 746-2952
ADVOCATE HOME
HEALTHCARE
Lic# HHA299991842


Homeless
Advocate

The Centers
Is seeking a Homeless
Advocate who will
assist homeless men-
tally ill and/or sub-
stance abuse individ-
uals currently living in
shelters with navigat-
ing pathways to find-
ing shelter and finan-
cial support. Ideal
candidate has case
management exp or
homeless shelter
work. BSW preferred.
Salary $13.00 -
$14.28/hr. Full benefits
pkg. DFWF EOE Fox
or email resume to
HR, the Centers, Inc.
352-291-5580,
iobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www. thecenters.us


CHIROPRACTIC
ASSISTANT

Willing to train.
must be energetic
and dependable,
Fax Resume To:
352-726-2106

LICENSED
PHYSICAL
THERAPIST
Opportunities for
Physical Therapists to
work full-time or
weekend shifts in an
outstanding inpatient
and outpatient
Rehab Department in
a beautiful, LTC
facility. We offer
competitive rates,
and premium be
nefits including
401(k) and continuing
education
reimbursement.
Please submit a
resume by mail
or fax to:
Marion House Health
Care Center
3930 E. Silver Springs
Boulevard
Ocala, FL 34470
(352) 236-2626 phone
(352) 236-0888 fax
Email:
hr-marlon@
seniorsmanagement.c
om
EOE


LPN/RN
11-7 Shift
Looking for
Experienced Nurse
Leaders to join our
Great Team!
We offer excellent
benefits:
*401 K/Health/
Dental/Vision
'Vacation/Sick Time
Apply in person
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, FL
EOE

MDS
Coordinator
ARBOR VILLAGE
NURSING

Seeks MDS Coord. to
join our quality team
Minimum
Requirements:
Current RN iUc
1+ yrs prior MDS Exp.
Good assessment
skills.
LTC Exi. required
GREAT SALARY +
BENEFITS
Great
Management Team
Call 800-442-1353
Fax 877-571-1952
Jobs@CQcare.com
490 S. Old Wire Rd.


MDS
We are looking for
the right RN to
complement the
nursing staff in our
beautiful
LTC facility. MDS
and PPS experience
required.
If you are looking
for that friendly,
professional
atmosphere, come
join us at
Marion House Health
Care Center.
Qualified Individuals
may apply in
person at
3930 E. Sliver Springs
Blvd., Ocala, FL 34470,
or fax resumes to
(352) 236-0888.
E-mail:
hr-marion@seniors
management.com
EOE


MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Full-time, for busy
Gastro Enterology
practice.
Excellent pay and
benefits package,
Mall Resumes to:
Blind Box 895-P
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle,
106 W. Main St.,
Inverness, FL 34450


EXPERIENCED
PHLEBOTOMIST
W/ Front Office
experience.
FT for busy Dr's office
$$ Good benefits SS
Fax resume to
352-746-6333



- .- - - m
Medical Front Office
COORDINATOR/
REHAB TECH
Citrus County
Floater
Prominent out
patient physical
therapy operator
in Citrus County
is seeking
an independent.,
energetic medical
front office
coordlnator/rehab
tech. Qualified
candidates will
have 1-2+ yrs.
medical front office
exp., data entry
and good
communication/
customer service
skills. Full time,
excellent salary
and benefits,
Reply with resume:
FAX (352) 382-0212
tmcrecruiting@
therapymgmt.com
--i--- - Ji


-









MEDICAL
ASSISTANT/LPN

For busy Orthopedic
practice. Immediate
opening please faox
resume to: Nettle
352-746-0333

MEDICAL HELP
Seeking two indCividu-
als to work in Clerical
& Medical Positions.
Must be energetic,
self motivated &
interested in pursuing
oan excellent
opportunity for career
growth. The selected
individual should be
able to work in a fast
paced environment
and easily handle
multiple medical tasks
efficiently with a
willingness to
learn surgery.
Please Fax resume to:
352-746-2635
No phone calls
please. References
required


CLASSIFIED


a,,rtnIflrl~ C
Your' s.,crld flrsr


ICA Medical


RI

up tS$3

LPI

upto$2



C si


**Nurses**
3-11

If you possess above
average skills, are
dedicated to the
higher standards of
elder care, good
documentation and
a genuine caring
attitude, we have a
place for you. We
offer a salary range
comparable to your
experience and
great benefits.
Crystal River Health
and Rehab Center
136 NE 12th Ave.
Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 795-5044 HR/
Connie DFWP/EOE
RESTORATIVE THERAPY
*F/T, P/T PRN
ST, OT, & PT
Positions Available
ONLY Fax Resume to:
(352) 795-2796


A/C Tune up w/ Free
permanent filter +
Termate/Pest Control
Insp. LUc & Boned Only
$44.95 for both.
(352) 628-5700
caco36870
F-- "-*-- EI
iL k

ADVERTISE YOUR
BUSINESS IN THE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
TODAY!
SS$$$$$$SSS$$$$SS$$$$
Its Less than
Pennies per day
per household.
$$ $$$$$$$$$$$$$
IF WE DON'T HAVE
YOUR BUSINESS
CATEGORY.
JUSTASK.
WE CAN GET
IT FOR YOUIII

CALL TODAY
(352) 563-5966

MARY'S
PRECIOUS PETS
Pet Sitting Service
(352) 503-5414











r ,

H AFFORDABLEPS,
I HAULING CLEANUP, I
| PROMPT SERVICE I
I Trash, Trees, Brush,
I Appl. Furn, Const, I
I Debris & Garages
352-697-1126

All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
COLEMAN TREE SERVICE
Removal & trim. LU. Ins.
FREE EST. Lowest rates
guaranteed 726-8010
,DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
HaulingCleanup,

D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272
R WRIGHT TREE SERVICE,
tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Lic
#0256879 352-341-6827
WEST LANDSCAPERS
Tree trimming and lawn
service. 352-422-6917






A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd friendly
serve. Lowest rates Free


All Computer Repairs
We come to your home
or office. 21 yrs. exp.
7 days (352) 212-1165


I


CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch,clean, repair
Vinyl, Tile, Wood, (352)
341-0909 Shop at home
REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch * Installation
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 5861Z28


We Install YOUR Floor!
Carpet, vinyl, & tile
All jobs welcome! We
travel. (813) 843-4059



B----E
1r 71 Mr.FixI - I
Prof. painting, Pres-
sure washing, Home |
repairs, Gutter cing
& Screen repair. I
1 220-9326/382-3647
Uc#99990255609

VChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Uc#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533
CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
CHEAP/CHEAP/CHAP/CHEAP
DP Pressure Cleaning
& Painting. Licensed &
Insured. 637-3765
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any job. lic
# 99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
A# 1 L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too small 24/7
Lic3008 352-341-1440
All Phaze Construction
Quality painting & re-
pairs. Faux fin. #0255709
352-586-1026 637-3632
FERRARO'S
PAINTING SERVICE
Interior, Exterior.
Free Estimates.
Senior Discount.
(352)465-6631
George Swedllge
Painting- Int./Ext.
Pressure Cleaning- Free
est. 794-0400 /628-2245
Henry's Painting Press.
wash, roof clean. Ins.
Accept Cr. cards. Lic#
30555 (352) 302-4928
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Uc./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
* RUDY'S PAINTING *
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Cleaning
FREE EST. (352) 476-9013


-s-

MOBILE DETAILING.
"We'll Come To you"
Res/Com, Us
Chrilse 3OAO22AA34


Affordable Boat Maint.
& Repair, Mechanical,
Electrical, Custom Rig.
John (352) 746-4521
DOCKS, SEAWALLS,
Boat Lifts, Boat Houses,
New, Re decks, Repair
& Styrofoam Replace.
Lic.CBC060275. Ins.
(352) 302-1236


MORRILL MARINE
Outboard Repairs,
Dockside Service. Elec.
Installed (352) 628-3331




AT YOUR HOME Res.
mower & small engine
repair. Lic#99990001273
Bob, 352-220-4244




BATHTUB REGLAZING
Old tubs & ugly
ceramic tile is restored
to new cond. All colors
avail 697-TUBS (8827)



Carpet, Tile Grout &
Upholstery Cleaning
Free est. Formal Carpet
Cleaners. 352-628-0112
MR. TILE CLEANER
Cleaning & Sealing
Floors, showers, lanai
Res./Commercial
352-586-1816, 746-9868




Dependable & Caring
Daytime companion
for your elderly love
one. Call 352-560-3011
*PRIVATE*
Adult Family Care
Home. Licensed.
Get one on one care.
Semi-private & private
rooms available
Come see us at Floral
City. (352) 637-3253




Childcare in Our Dunn.
Homel Mon.-Fri.
Call for Rates
352-522-1183/615-1669



-eow
VChris Satchell Painting
& WallcoverIng.All work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Uc#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533




HOMES & WINDOWS
Serving Citrus County
over 18 years. Kathy
(352) 465-7334
MAID 2 CLEAN
Res/Comm Cleaning.
LUc, Ins & bonded
Call Liz (352) 302-5468
PARTNERS IN GRIME
Commer/Res. 20 yrs
exp., LiUc. & Ins. Free Est.
Call (352) 628-4898
PHYLLIS' CLEANING SVC
Homes/Offices/Condos
20+ yrs exp.* ref's avail
352-795-1443
Touch of Class Cleaning
Service, 15 Yrs. Exp.
Also If you Need Help?
With Errands, Things
Around the House. Ref.
Nancy (352) 628-2774




Spiffy Window Cleaners
Superb service at
a reasonable Rate
lic. & Ins. (352) 503-3558


* The Window Man *
Beats any Est. by 10%
Com./resid., Lic. & Ins.
-A .512C2R-7295 *rn


AFFORDABLE
CABINETS &
COUNTERTOPS
(352) 586-8415




Additions-Kitchens
Bathrooms - Decks,
Woodfloors - Ceramic
DJM Constructors Inc.
Uc. & Ins. CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620
DOTSON Construction
25 yrs. in Central FL. Our
own crews! Specializing
in additions, framing,
trim, & decks.
Lic. #CRC1326910
(352) 726-1708
HOME or COMM.
Renovations. We sell &
install ICF's (Insulated
Concrete Wall Forms)
30 yrs. exp.
Uc#CBC1250751 Ins.
No job too smalill
Affordable rates. Ron
Whitehead Bldr. Major
CC.C Acc. 352-628-4211
ROGERS Construction
New HomesAdditions
Florida Rooms.
637-4373 CRC1326872




FL RESCREEN
352-563-0104/257-1011
1 panel or comp cage
Family owned &
operated. Also aval.
super screen wIOvr
manufacturer warr.
Screen rms,Carports,
vinyl & acrylic windows,
roof overs & storm
panels, garage screen
doors, siding,
soffit fascia, Llc#2708
(352) 628-0562
SOFFITS, SCREEN RMS,
REPAIRS- Free Est.
Montalto Alum. Lic.
#2807 (352)503-4924




CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
A# 1 L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too small 24/7
LIc3008 352-341-1440
AUGIE'S PRESSURE
Cleaning - Quality
Work, Low Prices. FREE
Estimates: 220-2913
Henry's Painting Press.
wash, roof clean. Ins.
Accept Cr. cards. Lic#
30555 (352) 302-4928
PICARD'S PRESSURE
CLEANING & PAINTING
Roofs w/no pressure,
houses,driveways. 25 yrs
exp. Uic./Ins. 341-3300
Pressure Cleaning
Work Contact Keith,
Available any time
$100. (352) 621-0168




#1 IN HOME REPAIRS,
paint, press.wash, clean
roof&gutters, Reliable,
#0169757 344-4409


r#1 A+ Mr. Fix-AIll
Prof. painting, Pres
sure washing, Home
repairs, Gutter cing
I & Screen repair. I
| 220-9326/382-3647
SLic#99990255609

#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash & Gutters
Lic.5863 (352) 746-0141
1 Call does it AIII No lob
too sm.l Remod., Home
Repairs, Press. Clean.,
etc. CRC1326431
(352) 746-9613
3 J's HOME
IMPROVEMENT, INC.
General malnt. Painting
Int & Ext, landscaping
Free est Lic2951
352-527-3341/302-5994
Andrew Joehl
Handyman. General
Maintenance/Repairs
ftessure & cleaning.
Lawns, gutters. No job
too small! Reliable. Ins
02562Z1352-465-9201
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any job. lic
# 99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
A# 1 L&L HOUSEHOLD
.REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too small 24/7
LIc3008 352-341-1440

AFFORDABLE,
I HAULING CLEANUP, I
PROMPT SERVICE |
Trash, Trees, Brush,
Appl. Furri, Const, I
I Debris & Garages u
S 352-697-1126 *

ARTISAN HOME
IMPROVEMENTS
General Maintenance
& Repairs. LIc # 34064
(352) 228-7823
FASTI AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs.
Free Est. LIc # 0256374
(352) 257-9508
Handyman Wayne
Lic 34151, 352-795-9708
Cell 352-257-3514
Handyman.
If Its broke Jerry can
fix It. Lic#189620
(352) 726-0762
HOME REPAIR, You
need it done, we'll do
It. 30 yrs. exp. Uic., Ins.
#73490256935,489-9051
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Tile Work,
Framing. 30 yrs. exp.
344-1952 CBC058263

'"A/C
L-�C4 ifi^


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &,
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash & Gutters
Lic.5863 (352) 746-0141
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC INC.
Elec. Serv./Repairs. New
const. Remodel Free Est
726-2907 EC13002699
FULL ELECTRIC SERVICE
Remodeling, Lighting,
New Install! Uc. & Insur.
#2767 (352)257-2276


C---QU---
AFFORDABLE, I
I HAULING CLEANUP, I
PROMPT SERVICE I
STrash, Trees, Brush, -
Appl. Furn, Const, I











Moving items delivered,
clean ups.Everythng
from A to Z 628-6790
CJ.'S TRUCK/TRAILERS
Furn., appi, trash, brush,
Low s$$/Professional
Prompt 7 day service
726-2264/201-1422
Furn. Moving / Hauling
Dependable & Exp.
CALL LARRY
352-270-3589, 726-7022
Nature Coast Contain-
ers, Comm./ Res. 12 yd.
dumpsters, mulch deliv-
ery& hauling. 302-7100
WE MOVE SHEDS
352-637-6607




CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch,clean, repair
Vinyl, Tile, Wood, (352)
341-0909 Shop at home




VIglione Asphalt Paving
Driveways, Sidewalks,
Patios, Etc., Free Est.,
lic./lns (352) 726-3093




All kinds of fences
JAMES LYNCH FENCE
Free estimates.
(352) 527-3431
ROCKY'S FENCING
Working In
Citrus County for 25 yrs.
Free Estimate, Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279
25 Years In County
Free Est., Res./Comm.
FENCES BY DALLAS
Lic./ns (352) 795- 110
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est,, 10% off any job. Ec
#99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing.
All types.Free estimates
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BARNYARD II FENCING
Serving Citrus Co. Since
1973. Free Estimates
(352) 726-9260
BEACH FENCE
Free est., Lic. #0258336
813-763-3856 Cell





New Systems &
Repairs. Ins. Lic.3000
SOD- ALL VARIETIES
Cut outs & New
Homes. Installed &
Rolled. A.L. EVANS
(352) 637-5825


HOERPI


HOME REPAIR & MAINTENANCE, INC.
"Caring for Your Home is Our Business"
- Offering A Full Range of Services -
.-, Residential


Commercial

628-4282


Chamber
Member 7


#1 in Service
Hise Roofing
New const. reroots &
repairs. 25 yrs. exp. leak
spec. #CCC1327059
(352) 344-2442
J. Vauahn Roofing. Inc.
New Roofs, Re-Roofs &
Repairs; C.C. accepted
Ins/Lic CCC 1327365
(352).795-6659
John Gordon Roofing
Reas. Rates. Free est.
Proud to Serve You.
ccc 1325492.
795-7003/800-233-5358




All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios- ,
Sidewalks. FREE EST.
Lic#2579 /Ins. 746-1004
Concrete Slabs, Pavers
Remove & Haul Debris
Demolit. 352-746-9613
Lic# CRC1326431
CONCRETE WORK.
Sidewalks, Driveways Patios,
Free est. Lic. 2000. Ins.
795-4798
Decorative concrete,
River rock, curbing &
concrete, Fuston's River
Rock (352) 344-4209
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
driveways & tear outs
Lic.1476 726-6554




A+ QUALITY WORK
SPAFFORD's CONST.
Specializing in room
additions, remodeling,
bathrooms, windows,
garages. Lic. RR0066831
352-726-7855
Additions-Kitchens
Bathrooms - Decks,
Woodfloors - Ceramic
DJM Constructors Inc.
LUc. & Ins. CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620
DOTSON Construction
25 yrs. in Central FL. Our
own crews! Specializing
In additions, framing,
trim, & decks.
Li. #CRC 1326910
(352) 726-1708
HOME or COMM.
Renovations. We sell &
install ICF's (Insulated
Concrete Wall Forms)
30 yrs. exp.
Lic#CBC1250751 Ins.
No job too smailll
Affordable rates. Ron
Whitehead Bldr. Major
C.C. Ace. 352-628-4211






Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Tile Work,
Framing. 30 yrs. exp.
344-1952 CBC058263
We do it ALLI Big or Sm.l
Additions, BA & Kitch.,
Drywall,Crown molding,
Demo. CRC 1326431
(352) 746-9613




CERAMIC TILE INSTALLER
Bathroom remodeling.
handicap bathrooms.
Lic/Ins. #2441 795-7241


CUTTING EDGE Ceramic
Tile. Lic. #2713, Insured.
Showers, Firs, Counters
Etc. (352) 422-2019
FREE ESTIMATES
Honest & Dependable


JD Drywall
Top Quality WorkI
Lic#99990257292
Free Est. (352)476-2342
ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cert. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs,
Texture, Additions,
Homeowners, Builders
Free est. (352) 220-9016
Lic.#SCC 131149747




FILL, ROCK, CLAY, ETC.
All tvoes of Dirt Service
Call Mike 352-564-1411
Mobile 239-470-0572
AFFORDABLE Top soil,
fill, mulch,rock. Tractor
work. No job too small.
352-302-7325 341-2019
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
FLIPS TRUCK & TRACTOR,
Landclearing, Truck &
Tractor work; House
Pads, Rock, Sand, Clay,
Mulch & Topsoil.
(352) 382-2253
LARRY'S TRACTOR
SERVICE Finish grading
& bush hogging
352-302-3523/628-3924




All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
DONALD KERNZ'S
M.H. demolition, red
tag cleanup, land
clearing (352) 634-0329
TREE REMOVAL,
Landclearing, Fill Dirt,


BILL'S LANDSCAPING
& Lawn Service, Flower
Beds, Mulch, Plants,
Sod, Trees, Clean-ups,
FREE Est. (352) 628-4258

D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272
Lawncare-N-More LLC
Bushes, Beds, Leaves,
Pres. Washing, Debris
Removal. 726-9570
RAM Landscaping &
Lawn care, Specializing
In Pruning. Call Me
(352) 637-6588


* SOD * SOD * SOD-
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032




"El Cheapo" cuts $10 up
Beat any Price. We do
it All. Call 352-563-9824
Or 352-228-7320
#1Yard Dogz; Lawncare
quality cuts starting $10.
Reliable & dependable
Free Est. (352) 382-1504
A TROPICAL LAWN
Family owned & oper.
Satisfaction Guaran.
352-257-9132/257-1930
Advanced Lawncare &
More, Pressure Wash.,
No job too small,
Res./Comm., Lic./Ins.
352-220-6325/220-9533
BARKER'S LAWN,
SERVICE & MORE
(352) 228-2231
Bob's.Pro Lawn Care
Reliable, Quality work
Residential / Comm.
Lic./Ins. 352-613-4250

C & R LANDSCAPING
Lawn Maintenance
clean ups Mulching,
We Show Up
352-503-5295,
503-5082
LAWN SERVICE
We do re-sodding
and patching.
Free Estimate 795-4798.
Lawncare-N-More LLC
Bushes, Beds, Leaves,
Pres. Washing, Debris
Removal. 726-9570
RITTER LAWN CARE
Lawn Maint., Press.
Clean., Sm Tree Remov.
Free Est.(352) 257-6001
ROB'S LAWN CARE
Free Estimates
(352) 563-0376
Steve's Lawn Service
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lice. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166




AQUA AZURE
Total Pool System Care
Personalized Service &
Great Prices 344-4796
EVERCLEAR POOL SERV.
10 yrs exp., We offer
Reliable and Quality
Service (352) 344-5122
George Fisher Pools
PleaseCleanMvPool.
cam WEEKLY POOL
SERVICE 422-6123
POOL BOY SERVICES
Aqua guard, Epoxy,
Coatings, Acrylic
Decking. Lic./Ins.
i 352-464-3967 a
POOL DOCTOR
Wkly. & Monthly Maint.
Repairs & Acrylic
Decking. 352-212-7272
POOL REPAIRS?
Commercial & Residen-
tial, & Leak detection,
lic, 2819, 352-503-3778
352-302-6060




R.C. (GATOR) EDSON
Pump Serv. Well Drilling
Ins'd. Lic. 9397
352-637-2519/302-6217
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs on all makes
& models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard


Bill's Mobile Welding
Nights &.Weekends
Visa & Master Card Acc
352-257-2240/726-6122




Here Come The StormsI
Plywood Cut & Install
To fit windows/doors
Lic./ Ins.(352)634-0171
Nature Coast Contain-
ers, Comm./ Res. 12 yd.
dumpsters, mulch deliv-
ery & hauling. 302-7100
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
BUYERS AGENT
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM




BOOKKEEPING SERV.
Out source your
AP, AR, Invoicina. PR.


* RAINDANCER 0
6" Seamless Gutter
Best Job Availablell
Uc. & Ins. 352-860-0714
ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM e
S Quality Pricel
6" Seamless Gutters
Uc & Ins 621-0881




PRO EXTERIOR SYSTEMS
Safe & Effective Low
Pressure Roof Cleaning
5yr. warr 352-400-5028




MUSIC LESSONS
Call Ted, 20 yrs. exp.
beginner to advanced
Drum, Guitar, Bass
Guitar $25. V/hr. $30 hr.
(352) 860-2008


Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!'


Classifieds


Roof Cleaning Specialist
The Only Company that can Keep Mold & Mildew Off
Siding - Stucco - Vinyl - Concrete Tile & Asphalt Roofs

GUARANTEED!
Restore * Protect * Beautify - Residential & Commercial

Suncoast

Exterior
Restoration Service Inc.

S877-601-5050 * 352-489-5265


COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



--- --

r NURSE P/T v
11-7

JOIN OUR TEAM
CYPRESS COVE
CARE CENTER
700 SE 8th Ave.
I Crystal River
(352) 795-8832
Lm - m m


I IFORATIN0


Installations by .
Brian CBC1253853
_e'w 4 ad4y/mted ly aour iwatM atNu X i
352-628-7519 fo
www.advancedaluminum.info

K %.


IINFOMAIO .


C= Carpet
cc Repair


lr-- A


'0 \


=:��-=7777---�]
C-11 (352) 563-3209 or
(352) 563-3206 To Place Your Ad!


I









Cn'RUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EARN AS YOU LEARN COCKADOODLES Auto Detailer
HNeallicam CNA Test Prep/CPR EXECUTIVE We Are Adding $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
Speciaists Continuing Education HOUSEKEEPER To urFamily Exp & Dependable WRITE YOUR OWN
341-2311 /Cell422-3656 HIRING: Lawson's Detailing
NURS AD 341 2311/Cll 422-3656 S KJ I For 114 Room Resort *EXP. MANAGERS (352) 302-0063 PAYCHECK!
NURSES AND Hotel n Crystal River, *P/T BREAKFAST IRRIGATION Exp. phone Sales
THERAPIST HIN3 years prior Reps Needed.
experience in position COOKS & INSTALLER Call 3526280187
Immediate Work A. required. Health *FRIENDLY SERVERS WANTED
Are you looking for Vacation & Holidays Competitive Pay Exp. pref'd. Clean FL
extra work? Fax resume with & Great Hours driver's lic. req'd, Drug ATTENTION!!!
You pick the days salary requirements Crystal River 563-0594 free. Apply in person:
yHome Hewant to wh kiscll tootiv to 352-795-3179 Inverness 637-0335 CLOVERLAWN reer
leSs stress pID EXP. LINE COOK 1723 N. Lecanto Hwy. Opportunity
andgreatpayl300New/Usedper(352) 746-4451 In RV Sales
and great payl i l FACILITATOR Apply in person LOCAL TOWER FLAGSHIP RV'S
� -,, -. --, ,-^^..,, t,^, - 0 L; I.t .*] Y-dl:-J l l' INVERNESS
Per Diem RN Central Florida Shared Servce Golf & Country Club SERVICE COMPANY is currently looking
* Per Diem RN CentraM Forida *r l, Alliance of Citrus Co. (352) 726-2583 to hire and train,
Behavior Health Community LIGlIs seeking a Looking for motivated each of our consei-
Per Diem PT/OT College ProfessionailFacilitator individual capable of eant locationveyour
*PerDiemPT/OTLthat provides, SERVERS ascend and servicing lo okingfor a newur
Instructional administrative tall broadcastinglooking for a new
A+ Healthcare Home Manager - V Ft&R support and reports We will train towers. Electronic/ career in sales,
Health towers.nEeectrstonSAcome take of
352-564-2700 ESL & International to the SSA Board. This Please Apply before electrical/Strobetaof
EIsoaPortitimelannua I 1am or after 2pm experience a plus- training and high
rkeefer@atlantlc.net Education: A contract position, Cafe on the Ave. Training provided, ain g th g
Ocala: m. AA degree req., 631 N. Citrus Ave. Travel throughout the successful yrs. in Flthor -
"" AkA"A [emfGRAT wor ^ Bachelors preferred (352) 795-3656 Southeastern U.S.ccessfu yrs. n For-
NOW HIRING Bachelors' degree e .nvir Salary $15,000-$20,000 $20 Company vehicle/ ida we can supply
Experienced, required. Masters' based on exp./ __ fuel/hotel provided you with a 15 million
Caring & Dependable degree preferred. YIN PERO education. No Bene- for travel. Good dollar inventory.
Three to five years of Exct-ive fits. Send Resumes Pay-Health Fun Environment 5
CNA's/HHA's experience which 92S.Hy41, for consideration to: Benefits -Per Diem- dayal thewk.no
CA's/HHA' Include one or more Brad Thorpe Vacation & Bonusesl exp. needed. Good
Hourly & Uvesin, of the following 3600W. Sovereign 1 acond attitude a must.
Flexible schedules require leacing: Path se 3600 W. Sovereign Background Check- Apply in person.
CALL LOVING CARE Language or other WR YOUR OWN NEVER'S I NSE At FLAGSHIP 'S
fields of study PAYCHECK Apply In person at: 17736 US HWY 27 N.
Curriculum FIELD TECH 4177 N. Citrus Ave Clermont Fi. 34715
development (ESL), 4177 N. Citrus Ave Accepting Applica-
OPTICAL TECH Program (ESL), Exp. phone Sales Crystal River, FlI tons Through 6/30.
development For Concrete testing Reps Needed. LP/Natural Ga
Don't miss out on (International must have valid ACI Call 352-628-0187 LP/Naual Gas
great opportunity! Education), Field Concretre Installers
Send resume to Supervision of OPERATIONS Certifications. Full HEALTH CAREGIVERS
Box1331P c/o international students DIRECTOR benefits. WILLIAMS INSURANCE SALES Helpers Needed
Citrus Publishing and International or EARTH SCIENCES for BC/BS no exp. necessary. S & S Resource &
1624 N Meadowcrest Intercultural Utilities Regulation 727-639-6789 Starting at $9.00 Services is seeking
Blvd. Crystal River, Fl. experiences. Office Requires 2-15 license, persons to work with
34429 STRUCTURAL STEEL Inverness office, Call Drug Screen developmentally
Open until filled. Responsible DETAILER/ 352-237-1141, ext. 114 mandatory, disabled.
PHLEBOTOMIST/ Screening will begin administrative work DRAFTSMAN fax 352-237-0903 Apply: Call (352) 637-3635
MEDICAL ASST. 7/9/07. aimed at the DRAFTdholder@holde Anderson Gas Service
management, nsurane m '3029 E. Thomas St.
Needed for Family Vice President - tracking and Exc. Pay. Work @ home Inverness | .
Practice Office, Student Affairs: resolutionof or office w/Auto Cad or ***** (352) 344-1059
Inverness. Work exp. Ocala: complaints of citizens on drawing board. OUTSIDE SALES
necessary. Fax resume e degree served by regulated (352) 628-1700 Auto Shopper is looking MOTORCYCLE &
to 352-726-5818 required, preferably water/wastewater for a self motivated PWC TECH DELIVERY ROUTES
in student personnel utilities as well as r - - Outside Sales Rep. PaidWANTED AVAILABLE IN
RN or a related field. A cable television TMCs seeking an Training with above aver- WCRYSTAL RIVER
minimum of five years providers. Position Exp'd age income after training. CRYSTAL RIVER.
of experience in requires professional, PAYROLL Health and 401K. Call C itrus Kawasak is
For Endoscopy center. progressively administrative and ADMINISTRATOR 800-367-1723 experience & Earn $200 a week 23
No endoscopy exp. responsible positions technical skills and Realtors Wanted responsible person to early morning hours,
necessary, in student affairs or a abilities developing, Jon r pe. Top ay w ,
For Part time & related field s implementing, Responsible for all join our team. Tap 7 days a week.
S n relaqfii admse nd asp s ofmulti-site/ Small productive pay and benefits in There are currently
Hours 7-3:30 regulating water multistate payroll non franchise office.
Hoursr7-3:30sinslooking for a career delivery routes
Fax resume to: Open until filled and/or wastewater processing for Pleasant working position call Paul @ a lable In the
(352)637-2525 Screening will begin utility applications, companies/1000+ cond., Good comm. 352-27-0129 or Crystavailable n the
7/23/07. utility extensions and employees. Exp. In split. Interviews Email r Crystal River are
rate adjustment ADP software and confidential., confidential Call 563-3201
RN, LPN, CNA, For additional requests. Bachelor's Report Smith (352) 795-9123 toubyadelphia resum and leave your name,
CMA NEEDED Information visit degree desired or preferred. Ability to to:suby@adelphia.net telephone number
ALLSTAR www.GoCFCC.com or training and work independently,Drivers and the best time to
ALLSTAcall 352-873-5819. experience matain confidenti- OT Truck Drivers and the best tile to
Professional Mail application equivalent to a four ality, high attention The La st required.
Staffing Services and transcripts to: year degree., to detail, analytical i The Largest
3i i 2-560-6210 CFCC, Aft: H.R. Dept Candidate with & problem solving Florlda-Based
352-560-6210 CFCC ABox H , experience n area of skills. Must be A/C Exp. Installers Refrogerated Trucking C'
Ocala, FL water and computer & Excel & Sales People In$efy and On-Tsimn e B teJ
34478-1388. wastewater utilities proficient. We offer aes eope n Safety and On-Time
34478-1388. desired. Candidate a competitive Delivery.------
N/N CFCC Is an with utility account- salary & benefits Top Pay 352-726-1002 We Offer:
RNAPN EEO/AA/DFW Ing, customer service, Submit your resume 352-597-4002 Employment
S11 T employer, rate setting and/or and salary 9A No Touch Freighl
3-11 FT regulating will be requirements to: AC High Milesl CHILDHOOD
11-7 PT -- --mm- given preference. TMC TECHNICIAN/ bedIcated DEVELOPMENT
11-7 PT - - 8477 S. Suncoast INSTALLER Dispaotchers! SERVICES, IN.
$2,500 Sign-on MANAGER Pay range � Blvd Homosassa, FL ALLp Pay, Beneftsl SERVICES, ING.
Bonus TRAINEES $1,912.02-$2,868.05 Fax (35324446 2-8024 Must have own tools, Class-A-CDL The following positions
B/W. Starting Fax (352) 382-8024 clear driving record. CIou-A-CDL The following positions
Are you ready to salary DOQ. mprzepasniak@ Fax Resume to Required. are available in
Looking for that begin a satisfying therapymgmt.com (352) 522-0831 DFWP Call (800) 362-0159 or Citrus County for a
individual with and rewarding Apply at or send 1-m- 1 A Apply at New Program.
exceptional career which allows resume to Citrus BLOCK MASONS & ww.LTbscom
Clinical Skills and you to I ur ountyeHumane TENDERS WANTED g onusHEALTHY FAMILIES
work ethics. you to realize your ReCountysHuman, Utilities Senior TENDERS WANTED Call Now
true potential? Resources Office, ___ lNowl_ PROGRAM
Fax resume to If you have good 3600 West Sovereign EngineerMANAGER
Geri Murphy at communication Path, Suite 178, (352) 302-4776 POOLTECHS * HEANAGER
352-746-0866 I :3 ; .i ,L Lecanto, Florida Highly responsible - WANTED PROGRAM
Health Center at e .Fpri.-.,, :ois 34461 administrative and C R - +
eeathCeneratSUPERVISOR
rentwood experience, EOE/ADA supervisory position TE In Wildwood. Exp. * HEALTHY FAMILIES
We are a enthusiasm, and the with an emphasis on WORKERS preferred. Will train. FAMILY SUPPORT
drug freefacility" desire to provide engineering of (352) 748-3987 SPECIALIST
EOE D/V/M/F excellent customer water/sewer piping F/T. Experienced in Apply In person
service, Massey projects. Performs FDOT Curb & Gutter. PROPERTY or call our
ve is ready t engnenl desns , MANAGER JOB LINE/Web Page
Syoul After producing of utility related Qualified applicants M A for more details:
twenty + years of projects, peer review Call 352-726-3940 NEEDED 1-800-635-KIDS
RN/LPN substantial growth, RESIDENT of engineering plans Fax: (352) 351-4279
CNA/HHA'S we are the SERVICES and specifications, DRILLER'S ASST. 59 Unit property, www.childhood
review of reports and Exp. required, develoDment.org
Sorganeaton that DIRECTOR permit applications, Needed. Lng hours Brooksville area. Atn: HR
New competitive pay can help advance contract Needed. Long hours. 352-3960295. 9am- 4
New compete pay your career. Barrington Place, part ad nof Clean Class D license & 1601 NE 25th Ave.
rates. Call n e administration of Clean Class D licensepm. Mn. - Fri. Suite 900
Interim Health Care Our benefits include of Emeritus Assisted design and driving record. Paid or resume to
(352) 637-3111 Uving, a dynamic, constction holidays & vacations 35 OcalaFL34472-787-1912
(352)7 A Comprehensive rapidly expanding contracts, Work may 352-400-0398 before 9p Benefits offered.
= Training and * company committed include planning and L EOE DFWP
RN/LPN I Development to providing quality preparation of ELECTRICIAN
Rewarding position Program care for seniors, is engineering feasibility - - FRONT DESK
working with adults re- Starting Salary seeking a motivated, reports and cost Must have exp. inQUALIFIED
covering from mental ill- $30000+ated self-directed estimates for commercial residen- SERVICE TECH I Hotel experience
+ Acceleratedv g 30,0 s et e es r atialandservice.NMust * n required.vGreat
ness as part of an As- advanceera nt individual to proposed projects. be a team player r ir. G t
sertive Treatment Teamt advancement coordinate resident Graduation froman be a team player I vebef A tsIFuTN
providing psychiatric re- opportunities care activity accredited four year Insurance Benefits Must have ynerson.
habilitation in the cam- Company veicle Including resident college or university n-Thurs. experience andFL B er
munity. Active FL K)Retirement assessments, with a degree in civil (352) 341-2004 Driveren seI 614 NWHwy 19,
RN/LPN license req. medication engineering and two Crstal River.
Must have clean driving Pd. Lfe Insurance management & years of experience EQUIPMENT DAn person: 3 C
S nyrex ealt and Dent nd years of experience EDFWPMENT Daniel's Heating &
record. Ap ply Health and Dental overall resident in the field ofwater OPERATOR XAiOS Se
LifeStream Behavioral nsurancesatisfaction & staffing, and wastewater utility 48 1 .r IGROOMER
Ctr. 515 W. Main St Paid Vacation st ato CATIN 4581 S. Florida Ave
Leesburg or and Holidays engineering. Florida Now accepting nverness ASSISTANT
www.lsbc.net -Tuitio n leadership & professional engineer EXPERIENCED Countryside Animal
DFWPEOEsement technical ability Is preferred. DOZER, EXCAVATOR, SHOP FOREMAN Clinic looking for
Foraconf den documented history BACKHOE & LOADER Groomer assistant/
For a confidential of working with the Pay rang. WORK REQUIRED W/min. 5 yrs. exp. to bather. Exp. preferred,
FThrapists interview call elderly, the ability to $1,718.17 to $2525.70 for road construction, work w/diesel,
S Bill Joyce problem solve & B/W. Starting Full Time w/ paving & general
The Centers Regional Manger Implement resident pay DOQ. benefit package . construction

counties who have I your resume to: assisted living, nursing Send resume, or 3411 W. Cdgorg ato s & GENERAL

u health environment Citrus County Human DFWP/EOE 352-267-3702
4 state requirements. Path, Suite 178, C GSTUCCO3
Salary. Fuli benefits LPNfoPAmust. Exeant FLn36 COATING PAPTERERS E
pkg DFWFEOEFaxor . Lecanto FL 34461E/ADA APPLICATOR PLASTERERS
e-mail resume to HIR, We provide & ALSO LABORERS L OTHERS LAWN CARE
the Centers, Inc. comprehensive LABORERS WORKER
5-bs -hecente5s8 us www.massev benefits, including d Must have valid D.L., be Self motivated
For more inf o visit I servicescom competitive pay.,liH drug free & able to do NEEDED W/hedge trimming exp.
www.theoenters.us = DFWP EOE medical, dental, -'9l some out of town work. , 352621128 Dependable w/llc &
and paid vacation,

Blood Binr Supervisor candidates please
Hem-iology Supervisor Barrington Place Pride in our Past...Promise for the Future
Fax: (352) 746-4166 Apply in erson at:
' Medical Technologist EOE PIZZA HUT
AThe Start of of CRYSTAL RIVER
PhviciaI Therapist Something Wonderful or HOMOSASSA COO
V CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE
PhLsical Ther:py Assistant , CFCC is a fully accredited, two-year college that focuses
k on student learning and student development.

Serving the Developmentally Energetic, purposeful, creative, CFCC promotes learning in
Disabled inc 1 . an open, caring, inclusive environment which encourages
Disabled Since 1966. individual and community development inspired by shared
$ Increased pay rates and $ values of integrity, service, responsibility and dignity.


- . , competitive benefit package for 3
Competitive eneit package or We are currently recruiting for a Vice President of Student
I I all F/T employees after 90 days Affairs. The Vice President will provide leadership and
RNs: .administrative oversight for the Student Affairs Division. A
Critical Care Positions Available: Doctorate is required, preferably in student personnel or a
PACU .Residential- FT& PT related field. A minimum of five years experience in
Emergency Instructor Assistant - FT& PT progressively responsible positions in student affairs or a
Inquire about our sign-on bonus Certified Supported Living Coach - PT related field is required. Must possess positive human
for select FT positions! Resident Manager - FT relations' skills and have knowledge of contemporary
SRRMC is part of the HMA family of hospitals Manage a group home for persons with programs and goals of college student development and
For information about these and other
opportunities, please apply to: multiple disabilities student affairs administration.
Human Resources
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd.,Crystal River, FL 34428 DRUG FREE WORKPLACE i . n A
Fax # 352-795-8464 This position is open until filled. Application screening will
Job Line # 352-795-8418 Apply at the Key Training Center begin July 23, 2007.
Email: Business Office
Linda.Macaulay@srrmc.hma-corp.coinm , Business Office
Web Site: wwwsrrmcom ., 130 HeightsAve.,Inverness For additional information visit www.GoCFCC.com or call
O RUOREWORLA T RIV RS ..........352-341-4633 352-873-5819. Mail application and unofficial transcripts to:
SSEVEN RIVERS or Online at keytrainingcenterore CFCC, Att: H.R. Dept, P.O. Box 1388, Ocala, FL 34478-
SREGIONAL MEDICAL C NT ER (TDD: 1-800-545-1833 ext. 347) 1388. CFCC is an EOE/AA/DFWP employer.


1141


I --JL I


E-L I


I -.L I


I-L - . I I


chae cre careers
T AM ND begin here




Join us al our HIRING EXPO this week
Monday through Wednesday. June 25th - 271h
8AM-5PM

APPLY IN PERSON:
MICHAELS- Brooksville
Coastal Landing Shopping Center
7131 Coaslal Blvd . Brooksville, FL 34613


IMMEDIATE WEEDS!
Sales Associates * Cashiers
Merchandisers * Stockers
No experience required we'll Iroini
If you are unable o arnend the Hiring Expo, you can
CALL or FAX your resume ao ATTN
Rhonda Cantu, Store Manager,
PHONE: (352)597-8537,
FAX: (352)597-1513
YOU'LL RECEIVE: Com,:poii, .'e
Compernar.on Package Fl ,-.b le
Schedules 251- Merchandise
D.scouni Career Advanerrenr


1-j~lno al MICHARSjcOM JOBS


-)


LAWN SERVICE HELP
EXP. ONLY , F/T position.
Must have clean Dr. Uc.
Cell: 352-302-6034

LAWN
TECHNICIAN
FULL TIME clean
Dri. Lic., Lawn experi-
ence preferred.
Will train, benefits
Apply in person
CITRUS PEST MGT.
5 N. Melbourne
Beverly Hills, Fl 34465

MAINTENANCE/
HANDY PERSON
Handy person
needed for multi-site
office repairs and
general mainte-
nance. Must have a
clean driver's license
and be able to pass
a complete back-
ground check.
Excellent starting
salary and benefits
including company
vehicle. Please
email resume to:
resumes4227@
vahoo.com
Or Fax to:
(904) 212-1419

Utilities
Maintenance
Worker
Semi-skilled manual
work assisting in the
Installation,
operation, repair and
maintenance of
sewer forcemains,
gravity lines,
manholes, lift stations,
water mains, fire
hydrants, water
meters, backflow
devices, valves, valve
boxes and other
appurtenances
related to water and
wastewater utility
operations. H.S
diploma, GED
certificate or related
vocational training.
Work experience in
the repair of
water/wastewater
mains and facilities
preferred. Must have
or be able to obtain
Florida CDL Class B
within one year of
employment.
Starting pay
$8.45 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
Must possess a valid
Florida Driver License.
Apply at the
Citrus County Human
Resources Office,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
no later than Friday,
June 29, 2007.
EOE/ADA







DELIVERY ROUTES
AVAILABLE IN
CRYSTAL RIVER.

Earn $200 a week 2-3
early morning hours,
7 days a week.
There are currently
several newspaper
delivery routes
available In the
Crystal River area.
Call 563-3201
and leave your
name, telephone
number and the best
time to call. Back-up
vehicle required.

CH)pNICLE




Do airSkn-Nil
Massage Therap


Contractor Table Saw
12", 220v
Belsaw Planer, 12x6
Shaper, Craftsman
Ratio Arm Saw
(352) 560-7690
PRESSURE CLEANER
Electric, 1750 TSI,
10 mos. old. Exc. Cond.
$100 (352) 586-2996
TRUCK TOOL BOX
Diamond plate tool
box 63 inches, almost
new $100.00 firm call
560 7802, Inverness.



52" Panasonic
Cinema vision, plays
great, $625:
(352) 628-1722
57" High Definition TV
Hitachi Ultravlsion wide
screen, High Def. tuner,
2 memory card slots,
See the picture,
Cost $2899, Sell $950.
(352) 563-5921
61" RCA
Rear Projection TV,.
PIP, works excellent
$600. obo
Call (352) 601-3237
COLOR TV w/remote
Exc. Condition $75
MICROWAVE White.
Uke new $25
(352) 382-0010
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER W/2 TOWERS & "
bridges fits any size big
screen TV!!! $200/obo
(352)464-3711



16' Pine Fence Board, '
$5.50@; Cherry lumber, -'
$2.00/ft. Rough sawn,
air dried, 352-212-4122- -



DIESTLER COMPUTERS
Internet service, New &
Used systems, parts &
upgrades. Visa/
MCard 637-5469
http://www.rdeell.com


ELIMINATE YOUR
MORTGAGE
Own your home Free
and Clear In 1/2 to
1/3 of the time & save
thousands of $$$
in interest For info.
Call 1-866-754-7832




6 Station Beauty Salon
US Hwy 41 S., Inverness
$25K John Hoffmelster,
Franklin RE Consult.
352-476-7236/341-1365
Diana's Flower &
Wedding Shop-Offering
"Basic Floral Design"
classes (352) 400-4912



Decorative Concrete
Turnkey Operation! Will
train. Very profitable.
Marc (352)527-6914
- GREAT LOCATION!
Just remodeled,
turnkey operation.
Cellular Store. $30,000
352-726-7444/228-1197
Landscape Curb Co.
Est, 1990, Profitable.
Citrus/Marion Co.
Sm. Investment, Big
Rewards 352-302-4375
THRIVINGZZA & SUB
Take-out BIZI $144,900
Lg. cust. base. Growth
oppor. for Hands-on
Owner. PROFITABLEII
Owner will train. Doris
Miner at C-21 JWMorton
DE 4A4-1515/ 726A-.A66


ALL STEEL BUILDINGS



25x25x7 (2:12 Pitch)
1- 9x7 garage door,
2 vents,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED-415,995
25x30x9 (3:12 Pitch)
Roof Overhang
2-9x7 garage doors,
2 vents, entry door,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED- $16.495
Many Sizes Avail.
We Custom Build
We Are The Factory
Fl. Engineered Plans
Meets or Exceeds
Florida Wind Code
METAL STRUCTURES
LLC.COM
1-866-624-9100
metalstructuresllc.com
WE MOVE SHEDS
352-637-6607



"LIVE AUCTIONS"
www.charliefudge.com
For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-542-3877
40's Mahogany Bed.
Rm Set, 4 Poster bed,
Chest, Vanity w/ mirror,
Mahogany Din. Rm
Table, 6 chairs, Iron Bed
40's Wooden High Chair
& much more. No
Checks (352) 212-9783
BEST OF BEST
ANTIQUE STORE FOR
'07 IS MOVING.
JUNE 30TH 50% or
more off! Heritage
House Antiques
657 N. Citrus Ave.
LIBRARY TABLE
Victorian, mahogany
531/4" X 33 /2"
Restored! $650
(352) 860-1536



2 COLLECTIONS
(75)BARBIES (1989-2002)
$700/set;
BEANIES (1,270+)
$1,600 (352) 795-7192



A+SPAS.COM
Authorized Hydro
SPA DEALER
5 Person, 15 Jets $1,950
6 Person, 40jets $3,650
(352) 572-7940
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers,jacuzzl's, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084




A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
-* 2 Ton $780.00
- 2-Vs ton $814.00
- 3 Ton $882.00
*Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Also Available
Free Delivery!
Call 746-4394


AC Bri.soue Appliance
Refrigerators, washers,
stoves. Service & Parts
(352) 344-2928
AC SYSTEMS
HEAT PUMPS, MH UNITS
ALL SIZES, 13 SEER, FROM
$475. 352-400-4945
Dryer for Sale
runs good, extra Ig.
capacity very clean
100.
(352) 628-1044
FREEZER, UPRIGHT,
1hcu.ft. $75;
Great for garage use.
(352) 726-4052
GE REFRIGERATOR
27 CuFT. Side by Side
Filtered Ice/Water in dr.
Energy Saver. Designer
white. Exc. Cond. $500.
(352) 220-6820
REFRIGERATOR
G.E., 20.6 cu. ft. with
Icemaker. White on
White. Exc. Cond.
$175. (352) 726-2330
Wards 20 cu.ft.
Energy Saver
Refrigerator
Side by side
Good cond. $150
(352) 795-8863
Washer & Dryer
works good
$125 for both
(352) 628-4994
Washer & Dryer, like
new, $295/set Satisf.
guar. Free Del. & set up
(352) 293-2529
economyappl.com
WASHER/DRYER
Kenmore White,
Deluxe. Like Newl
$395
352-843-7777/861-0823
Westinghouse heavy
duty washer & dryer
set, $400. 1 yr old
(352) 228-1820 or
228-1819




SOUTHERN
AUCTION
MARKETING &
APPRAISALS

AUCTION
Every Monday
Night 7:00 PM
24.5' Wellcraft 250
Sportsman cutty
cruiser, 2001 19'
Carolina Skiff, both
with trallersi Furniture,
more...
See pictures of sale
items @
www.auctionzip,
#4341
15991 NE Hwy27 Alt.
Williston, FL
352-528-2950
Col. Joel Kulcsar
AU1437-AB2240
10%BP on all soles


CLASSIFIED


-l\,~-T 7DTr .















PENTIUM 3 17" color
CRT, Internet ready,
complete, $100
(352) 726-3856




SCHWING CONCRETE
PUMP 250hrs. Exc.
Cond. Hoses & water
tank Included. $12,800
(352)302-0345




Dump Trailer
Tandem axle $5,800.
Kawasaki Mule 2001,
3010, $4,000.
PTO Generator 25 KW,
w/ manual, transfer
switch $2,500.
(352) 303-0967
MASSEY FERGUSON
1125 Front Loader
w/fork. Shuffle shift.
finish mower, 4 X 4
$9,500 (352) 212-6067




3 pc. Wicker Set $125.
9 Pc. Metal set, dining
table w/ 4 chairs, sofa,
2 chairs & coffee table
$250. set (352) 628-4031
11 PC. PVC SET
Pool Furniture. 3 Chaise
Lounges, Table
w/chairs. serving cart
& towel rack.
$500 (352) 613-6799
Patio Set, White
Aluminum, 48" round
Scratch resident glass
top, 4 sling back chair,
2 fixed, 2 swivel, white &


2 Antique Brass Beds,
Vanity, Dresser, $300.
(352) 628-6790
2 BERKLINE ROCKER
RECLINERS, I Is swivel,
Seafoam green, very
. good cond. $100 ea,
(352) 527-1810
4 DRAWER
DRESSER
$40 .(352) 726-3716
5 Pc. Bedrooms set
twin beds, excel cond.
$250.
(352) 637-2838
PRE OWNED FURNITURE
Unbeatable Prices
NU 2 U FURNITURE
Homosassa 621-7788
5pc. BEDROOM SET
King size bed with
headboard, dresser
with mirror, chest and
(2) nightstands. $625
(352) 302-0889
5' Athol mfg. Kitchen
set, solid, natural oak,
w/4 chairs, table has
ebony legs, paid $750,
asking $500.
(352) 726-1083
Bedroom Set
Double Bed w/ lighted
headbrd, dbl. dresser
w/ mirror, chest & 1
night stand, like new
$275. 352-564-0823
BEDS 4% BEDS .:. BEDS
The factory outlet stores
For TOP National Brands
Fr.50%/70% off Retail
Twin $119 -* Full $159
Queen $199 / King $249
Pleqse call 795-6006
Broyhill Liv. Room Set
Leather sofa, lounge
chair, ottomans, & ta-
bles, $800. Like New
Will Separate
352-726-0040,212-3571
CITRUS HOME DECOR @
Homosassa Sprgs. Plaza
Consignment, like new
furniture (352) 621-3326
COCKTAIL TABLE - NEW
Marble topped,
antique ornate carved
light color wooden legs,
48"X36", Cost $500, Ask-
ing $200. (352) 527-9446
CURIO / BABY BED
Lighted Curio Cabinet
$500. Jenny Lind style
baby bed, no mattress
$25. 352-382-7992
DAYBED, METAL, CREAM
COLOR W/GOLD TRIM,
Includes mattress &
comforter set. $150
(352) 249-0851
DINING / BEDROOM
9 piece dining set $700.
5 piece queen
bedroom set $700.
352-382-7992
DINING ROOM SET
Stanley, Bleached Oak.
Table w/6 chairs, 2
leaves, China Hutch, &
table pad. $350 OBO
(352) 637-3009
DINING ROOM SET
W/CHINA CABINET
Solid Oak. Exc. Cond
$550 Call for size.
(352) 563-6314
Dining Room Table
64" ext. to 88", beige 6
upholst. chairs. $125.
SET-GLASS TOP COFFEE
Table Beige/gold, &
2 matching end tables,
Two -3 way lamps $95.
(352) 382-0091
DINING ROOM TABLE,
Maple, leaf & 6 chairs,
exc. cond, $100.
(352) 344-0172
Dining table, 2 leafs,
4 chairs, solid wood,
$150. (352) 726-2428
DINING TABLE,
6 CHAIRS, 1 leaf, new
solid wood. Creme,
Was $1500, Sell $375.
Call (352) 382-7223,
after 11am
Dinning Rm. Table,
& 6 chairs, Black
Shellac $100
Adjustable Twin Bed
$250.
(352) 793-5803
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Solid Oak, Glass Doors,
Storage, Lighted, TV
opening 35W X 37.5D.
Exc. Cond. $600
(352) 527-0239
GLASS TABLE TOP
54", heavy w/beveled
edge, No base. $100.
Call 422-7176
LAMPS, DESIGNER PAIR
New - $800,
Sell- $100
Call (352) 382-7223,
after 11am
LEATHER COUCH &
LOVESEAT, exc. cond.
both items recline,
$500; GLASS TOP KIT.
TABLE w/ 4 castor chairs
$150. (352) 489-4934
Living Room Set
Blue/Gray $325.
Excellent cond.
(352) 637-2258
(352) 634-4657
LIVING ROOM SET
Includes Sofa, Loveseat,
Chair, Ottoman $375
obo, light colored
GREAT DEAL!
352-615-7055


Loveseat & Matching
chaise chair, neutral
colors, $395. Ent. center
& floor lamp, $1 10/both
(407) 716-3193, cell
PINE CUPBOARD
Hutch, Quebec, old.
$250.
Call (352) 382-7223,
after 11am
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40
Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
QUEEN SIZE
Simmons Beauty rest
Box Spring Mattress and
Frame. Like new $150
ANTIQUE BUREAU $100
(352) 560-3048
QUEEN SIZE SLEEPER
SOFA, slate blue
w/wood trim. $250.
(352) 746-1058
RECLINER
Not too big and not too
small. Tan tweed, good
condition, clean. $90.
(352) 527-2456

R NTAL FINDER
www.chronlcle
" rntalfinder.com

SINGER Sewing
Machine
w/Cablnet. Older
Model, Good Cond.
$50 (352) 628-2119
SOFA Lg. floral print,
LOVE SEAT Sleeper.
$50/each Both
excellent condition.
(352) 270-3641
The Path's Graduates,
Single Mothers,
Needs your furniture.
Dining tables, dressers &
beds are needed.
Call (352) 746-9084
TWIN HOT WHEELS BED
Childs bed, $75/obo
(352) 794-0809




42" 12.HP, master cut,
Riding Lawn Mower
runs good cuts grass,
$275. (352) 527-4191
52" HUSTLER MOWER &
60" HUSTLER MOWER
700 hrs. $3,500 obo/ea.
(352) 621-4777
BUSH HOG
4ft, $350 obo
(352) 628-0824
Craftsman 42" cut,
rider, mower, w/17HP
Kohler, ready to cut,
$450 (352) 628-2769
DIXON ZTR 50" CUT
22HP Briggs & Stratton
$1800. (352) 628-9848
*FREE REMOVAL OF-
ATV's bikes,bikes, cars, jet skis
mowersjacuzzi's. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
MOWER 4/SALE
Riding Lawn Tractor
11 H.P.36" Cut. Owners
Manual included
$375.00 Call - 560-3700
PATIO SET
48" Rnd. Table, 4 chairs,
Bar & 2 Bar Stools,
$225
(352) 220-2253
SEARS SELF PROPELLED
LAWN MOWER
$140.00
(352) 860-0158
SPRING MOWER REPAIR
Hernando, Pick up &
Delivery, Quick Service,
Don Mead 400-1483
TORO TRACTOR 0 TURN
20HP, 2 cyl. Kohler, runs
great, needs elec.
clutch for blades. $395/
abo. (352) 341-4449
Yard Man Rider
42" cut, $400.
(352) 628-3736




BEVERLY HILLS
OAKWOOD VLG.
ESTATE SALE
SAT SUN 8-2
Lots of furn. Ltd. Ed.
guitar w/ampllfler &
case, lots of hshld misc.
4224N Stankwlck Tr
FLORAL CITY
Moving Sale 6/19-6/25
8-4 everything must go
9081 S. Watervlew dr.
Floral city
352-464-1571
INVERNESS
Sat. 7a-? Lots of misc.
1105 Woodcrest Ave.
off Turner Camp
LECANTO
Furn, baby items, lots of
misc, 6/23, 6/24 8-3
2799 W Live Oak St.
(352) 746-6390
ROYAL OAKS, INV.
Elderly Couple Moving
Fine turn, DR set w/htch
+6chrs., Kit. set 4/chrs,
wicker furn, Ig. comp.
desk, king sz. bdrm set
Incl mattff/springs, misc.
lamps & end tables, etc
By appt. (352) 637-0321
SUGARMILL WOODS
Give Away Prices/


1 Patio Table $10.
4 PVC chairs $20.ea
obo
(352) 628-4031
5 PC. DRUM SET
Collectors item. With
hardware. $1100/obo
WATER TANK, 165 gal.
brand new. $200/obo
(352) 422-2028

2007

SPECIALS
6 lines - 10 days
Items totalling
$1-$150...........$7.95
$151-$400......$12.95
$401-$800.......$17.95
$801-$1,500....$22.95
CALL CHRONICLE
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
726-1441 OR
563-5966
Two general
merchandise Items
per ad,
private party bhly,
(Non-Refundable)
Some Restrictions
May Apply
16' JON BOAT
RV & Trailer
and Much More
Call (352) 637-0209
Blue Queen Comforter
Set, with matching
picture & 5 throw
pillows, $125.
(352) 382-7510
BOOKS
Diabetes, Cooking, As-
trology, Movie Stars,
Foreign Dictionaries, Fa-
mous Diets, misc.
(352) 527-2869


C4r
C"Frnriturefi


(352) 382-7992




WASHER /DRYER
$100 for set. Also tram-
poline, good condition
$75.00 352-613-5599




BOW FLEX
Power Pro w/Leg
Attachment.
Exc. Cond. Pd. Over
$800; Sell for $399 OBO
(352) 527-9625

-S

COLT 22 Caliber
Revolver Official
police, $575;
COLT 38
Caliber Revolver
Police Positive $495
(352) 344-9502


" Computers

c C4 f--


* BURN BARRELS *
$10 Each
Call Mon-Fri 8-5
860-2545
Computer desk w/
hutch top by Hooker,
cherry, w/ high back
green leather chair,
$375, (352) 527-0557
DRAFTING TABLE,
w/chair & lamp, $175:
ARMOIRE room for 32"
TV, DVD, & storage,
closed looks like chest
$225. (352) 746-3522
GOODYEAR TIRES
4 Wrangler AT/S LT
275/65R18 tires in very
good condition. $200.
OBO Call 352-344-4639
Gun Safe for Sale
Fort Knox, 5', 2'/2'W,
2' Deep, fully carpeted
$1,000.
(352) 341-4433

New Systems &
Repairs, Ins. Lic.3000
*~QD- ALL VARIETIES
Cut outs & New
Homes. Installed &
Rolled. A.L. EVANS
(352) 637-5825
King Sz. Mattress & Box
Spring good cond.
$100.
Wedding Dress, sz. 6
$85. (352) 628-4031
LARGE COLLECTION OF
BOYD BEARS &
accessolres., $200;
15' Diam. Pool, new
pump, $50.
(352) 628-1722
MISC. FOR SALE
Everything must gol
1958 secretary desk, 2
Bassett Chester
drawers, picnic table,
old cabinet, singer
sewing mach. twin bed
cherry new matt. 27"
stereo TV Like new. 3
Lamps, enclosed utility
trailer 5'x7" homemade
weight bench set.
352-795-2894/586-6611
Moving Boxes
Various sizes, used
once. $40 for 50
(352) 746-4160
MUST SELL
Baly pinball machine
1982 speakeasy $800.
Pool table + acc
$150.00
(352) 422-4495
MUST SELL
Large Trampoline full
enclosure $125.00
Window AC unit $75.00
OBO 352-560-3480
OLD JACUZZI
$100;
New Whirlpool Tub
Never Usedl
New $4,900/Sell $700
(352)621-3135
PATIO SWING
W/CANOPY $95
2 concrete pedestals,
$40 ea
. 352-860-0444
REFRIGERATOR
10 Cu. Ft.
&
Beginner's MANDOLIN
Great Shapel $35 ea.
(352) 746-4063
Refrigerator, 20 cu.ft.
Icemaker, exc. cond.,
$150. Queen BR set,
chest of drawers,
dresser & desk, $75
OBO (352) 341-7757
Sears Elec. Blade
Edger, $30;
Rattan Queen
Headboard, $40;
Gaming Table, $75.
(352) 860-0158
Sliding Glass Door
8' H, x 12' W, 3 panel
like new
$300. obo
(352) 527-3086
SOD. ALL VARIETIES
Bahla, $80 pallet,
St Augustine, $150
pallet. Install & Del.
Avall. 352-302-3363
The Spot Family Center
Needs Donations
For Community
Family/Youth Events
Land, Storage Racks,
Containers, Folding
Tables, Event Tents, Bus,
Box Truck. Please call:
Brian (352) 220-0576
Vita Master
Air Exercise Bike
Slightly used
$100.
Roll Top Desk
$50. (352) 527-2610
WEDDING DRESS
Sz. 5-6, Floor Length for
5'9", Long Train, Off
Shoulder, Wht. w/pale
pink flowers. Must Seell
$350 (352) 382-4734




JAZZY 1143 ELECTRIC
WHEELCHAIR like new,
new battery, a good
buy at $800. LIFT
CHAIR, green, $300
exc. (352) 257-1584
Jazzy Motorchair,
cost $5,000. Like new
Asking $500 obo
(352) 650-0333
PRIDE JET 3 Power
Wheelchair, new
$5,500/ asking $700.
Hardly used SHOWER
CHAIR- New $35
(352) 746-1462




BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676




Hammond organ,
good condition
$400 (352) 344-0968
or 637-7105
PIANO
Piano for sale $150


CITRlUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SD s ND ] 24 2007


m


U AY UNE


3 WHEEL BICYCLE
w/basket in back.
$50/obo
(352) 860-2090
GOLF CLUBS
Tommy Armour,
845 Silver Scott, like
new Irons 3-PW $175.
352-860-0288, 634-4592
Pool Table, 9FT.
3 pc. 1" slate. 2,000 Ibs.
Solid oak, like new
$1,500. (352) 341-0645
RECUMBENT BICYCLE
Like Newl "Trek"
Pd. $1,395/
Asking $800
(352) 302-5875
Tree Stand,
Excellent condition,
$50 (352) 527-6709
TURBO HOCKEY TABLE
Sportcraft,
38W x 66L x 31"T,
Exc. Cond. $50
(352) 746-6303
WE BUY GUNS
On site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238
Welder Home Gym
& Treadmill
Like new] $250 obo
(352) 560-7848
YAMAHA CLUB
CAR
36V -2 Seat Golf Cart
With Charger
$895.00/OBO
Ph.# 352-804-1812




4 x 6 ft. Custom Box
Trailer w/ removable,
canvas covered over-
head frame 16" wheels,
like new tires, w/ spare,
$325.(352) 382-4004
2005, 6 X 12 End Trir.
Side Door &
Barn Doors on rear.
$2,150. Good Cond.
(352) 533-3130
23FT flatbed
utility trailer
tandem axle,
new floor $1,000 obo
(352) 400-5342
5X8 w/gate, w/ad $650
5X10 w/gate w/ad $699
EZ PULL TRAILERS 6532' W
Gulf to Lake Hwy. CR
DUMP TRAILER
6x12', Tandem axle, roll
out brush cover, $2,200.
(352) 344-0236
Enclosed Handyman
Maint. Trailer
w/16" Tires $450 obo.
See on Hwy 19
By Dallas Fence
Call (352) 464-0779
FLATBED TRAILER
12' X 5.5' Dual Axel
Good Cond. $700
(352) 628-4306
Heavy Duty
16 X 6 Trailer
dbl, axle, New tires,
Must sell.
$950 obo
(352) 464-1616









UTILITY TRAILER
needs box, $150/obo
(352) 220-6473



Boys Baby Clothes
0-12mos. $200/all or will
divide. Baby Items, sw-
Ing, bouncer, saucer,
walker, pack-n-play,
etc. $150 or will divide.
(352) 249-0851
MATERNITY CLOTHES,
Sm. Med. Lg. $300 or will
sell separately.
(352) 249-0851




ACOUSTIC
& ELECTRIC GUITARS
Bass, Banjo, Uke,
Mandolin, Amps,
Effects. Any
age/cond. We get
you tap dollar, Do not
sell anywhere else.
M-F 10-6 563-1779.
BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Too $$$$ Paid


FERRET DUO
two females, one white
and one sable.
includes large cage.
$150.00 please call
352-341-0948
Humanitarians
of Florida
Low Cost Spay &
Neuter by Appt.
Cat Neutered $20
Cat Spayed $25
Dog Neutered &
Spayed start at $35
Low cost shot clinic
Tues, Weds & Thurs
1st & 3rd Saturdays
10am-4pm
(352) 563-2370
Miniature Dachshunds
3 females, 6 wks old,
ready July 5, $400. ea
taking deposits.
(352) 563-1479
SPECIAL SOMEONE
NEEDS COMPANION
Got 2, (1) great loving
Lab and a Chihuahua
$200/ea 613-2822 8-12P
Umbrella, Molluscan,
Cockatoos, Sun con-
jure, Nanday, Quaker,
2 cockatiels, w/cages
$1,300. for all Will Sepa-
rate (352) 746-4590
Yorkle, Male 7 mos.
AKC $800. obo
Two Lhasa Apso 5 yrs.
$100 ea. obo
352-746-9536, 613-2422




2 Thoroughbred Horses
1 Is an exc, rider, other
needs TLC. Exc. Cond.
$1,000/both
(352) 795-9633
ARABIAN STRAIGHT
EGYTIAN COLTS'
For sale, starting at $500
(352) 472-7462
Yearling Colt, Black
white markings, UTD
shots & cogglns, kind,
gentle, easy to handle,
Straight and correct.
$650. (Must Sell)
(352) 400-1620

E-PI

BABY GOATS FOR SALE
$125 EACH
Call 352-634-1205
GREENBELT
4-8MOS OLD CALFS
ALL BREEDS, Ranging
from $300-$500. (352)
628-1190/813-763-3856




1979 MERCURY
65H, OUTBOARD,
Runs good, $450/obo
(352) 795-9187,
ask for Bob


FIEDSS




Deep cycle Battery
Like new, w/ case
$45.
(352) 746-7992




Canoe
16 ft. Fiberglass,
aluminum paddles, life
jacket, & cushions inci
$225. (352) 382-7875
SEA DOO Ltd/Set
'03 & '03 GTX 3 Seaters
Low hrs Grg kept & serv.
Dual galv, trir. Mint!
$12,900 (352) 382-1623




2 SUNFISH
w/Trailer. Garage Kept.
Very Good Cond,
$1,500/all
(352) 201-0142
16 ft. Fiberglass
Boat,
Center Console,
w/ trailer $1,000. obo
(352) 637-3934

14'-28'
Let us sell your
clean used boat.
THREE RIVERS
MARINE



(352) 563-5510

17ft. PATHFINDER
'99, Tunnel Hull,
Yamaha 50HP, trim
tabs, power pole, 85 Ib
trolling mtr, much more
$8,500. (352) 628-5418
22ft. HURRICANE
'03 Deck Boat w/GPS,
Fish/Depth finder, 115
HP Yamaha outboard,
rigged up for fishing
and/or pleasure, Mint
cond. less than 100 hrs.
$17,500., 352-795-2270


NOTICE
Pets for Sale
In the State of Florida
per stature 828.29 all
dogs or cats offered
for sale are required
to be at least 8 weeks
of age with a health
certificate per
Florida Statute.
AKC REG. SEAL & WHITE
Italian Greyhound
Male. 12 yrs, old. 12Lbs.
Sweet & loving, must
sell. $475/obo.
(352) 212-9125
BABY COCKATIELS
$35
(352) 726-7971
BICHON FRISE
Neutered male, 10mos.
All shots, $350/obo
(352) 382-5915
BLOODHOUND PUPPIES
Purebred, 2 Females.
1 Red, 1 Black & Tan
$350
352-628-5432/302-8726
Blue American Pitbull
Terriers. ADBA Reg.
Great tempermenti
Short & Wide $600-$800
352-613-0263
Bull Mastiff, Female,
sweet, lovable,
showmanship
bloodline, $900.
(352) 586-2590
CHOCOLATE LAB
PUPPIES
Showmanship
bloodline, 3 males,
$350, (352) 586-2590
Humane Society
of Inverness
offers Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Service
in our Mobile Clinic.
Appointments avail.
Cat Male $40,
CatFemale $50,
Dog Male $60,
Dog Female $70.
Prices Including spay
or Neuter, 3 Yr. Rabies
shot Annual Vaccines
Nail Clipping, Micro
chipping & Micro
chip reg.
Appt. avail Wed,Thurs,
Sat. Inverness &
Crystal River. Call for
appt. 352-726-8801


AEROCRAFT 19.7'
Boat w/trir. 4.3 Ltr., V-6
Merc, OD, Trim Tabs,
Runs Good. $1,750
352-628-3969/205-0291


AREAS LARGEST
SELECTION
OF PONTOONS
& DECK BOATS
Crystal River
Marine
(352) 795-2597

CAROLINA SKIFF
'01 17DLX, '04 Yamaha
60HP 2 strk. 1 yr. warr.
GPS, DF, LOADED
$9,995. (352) 422-1412
F16 SEARAYDER
'96, Jet Boat, bimiln top,
radio, 92 hrs,. exc. cond
garage kept, $5,000
obo (352) 465-5796
GLASSTRON 16'
150HP Mariner, motor &
trailer like new. Boat
needs some Intr. work.
$2500/bo 352-220-9476,
GODFREY 22'
HURRICANE Deck Boat
'91, 115 hp Merc, many
new parts w/Trlr. $8,000
(352) 726-2408
GRADY WHITE 22.6'
W/A Cuddy, 200 hp
Mariner, 0/B, Alum. Top
W/Top Gun Outriggers.
Garmin Chart plotter.
$12K obo 352-302-8266
GRADY WHITE '78
115 Yamaha Outboard
$2000.
(352) 476-9013
HURRICANE
23ft. Deck Boat, 150
Mariner, new rebuilt
'03, trailer, $8,500.
(352) 212-7500
KAYAK
Eddy Line Merlin XT 15'
w/ Swift paddle cockpit
cover great shape
$1,500 352-586-1248
KW 196 BAY REEF
Low hrs. Well maint. by
Sr. owner, loaded w/
features, set-up for gulf
& flats w/jackplate, 130
Honda, Great white &
full electronics. Asking
$17,500. Call for details.
(352) 697-0199
McKEE CRAFT 14'
W/25 hp. Suzuki, Runs
Great w/Nice Trailer
$2,500 (352) 621-0848


New Boat Trailers
GALV. & ALUM.
All at Far Below
Dealers Pricing
SUMMER CLEARANCE
* MONROE SALES 0
9am-5pm Mon-Frl
352-527-3555

NOVA PROWELD
'00, Jon Boat 16 ft., 40HP
Johnson, PT & tilt, troll.
mtr., FF, seat & trir. runs
perfect, more info.
$3,700. (352) 527-4191
PONTOON BOAT
2004, Bennlngton, 50 hp
E-Tech Eng., 4 yr. warr.,
full top, changing rm,
live-well, trlr, low
mileage. Lots of extras!
Pd. $23K, Asking $14,900
(352) 621-1959
PROLINE
'04, 24 ft., 225 Honda,
Donzi Hull, black, low
hrs. lift kept, NICE
$35,000. (352) 586-9349
PROLINE
'06, 19ft., '06 Mercury
Optlmax, 115 H out-
board, T-Top, color
electronics, still under
fact. warranty, many,
many options w/boat &
trailer, asking $22,500.
(352) 628-4668
PROLINE 17' SPORT
'87 W/115 HP Johnson,
w/trailer, $3500/obo
(352) 628-3617
PROLINE 17'
W/50 HP Mercury 4 strk,
Runs Great, w/trir,
$2,500 (352)621-0848
REGAL 20'
Bowrlder, 5.7 Merc I/O
Real Clean! Nice trir.
$2,500 (352)621-0848
RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfnder.com

REPOWER SALE
NEW MOTORS
70-4s Suzuki $5,295
60-4s Mercury $5,430
50 Evinrude E-TEC
$4,900
Other Brands and HP
available
Nature Coast Marine
352-794-0094
AAA
BOAT DONATIONS
Tax Deductible @
appraised value
when donated to a
43 year old, :.
non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Maritime Ministries
A (352) 795-9621 A
SABRE
16FT center console,
70HP Johnson, bimlnl
top, Performance trailer
$2,000 (352) 726-5329


SLEEK CRAFT
Jet Boat, 400 cu in. short
block, w/ high lift cam,
edelbrock manifold & 4
barrel carburetor, new
aluminum pert,f trailer,
new power wince, HD,
$10,000. (352) 503-5071
SLIPPER SAILBOAT
1,7' in Exc. cond. w/2
sets of sails, $2,500OBO
tall (352) 795-7777
STAMAS 1982 24'
Cuddy cabin, new eng,
new outdrive in 1996.
Low hrs. Fly bridge,
outriggers, fishing ma-
chine. See at Aqua
Power In Inglis. $9000.
SUNRAY
'81, 21 ft., 40HP, 95 en-
gine, great cond. incl,
trailer, ready for water
$4,700. (352) 422-0058
Wanted: Boats in Need
of Repair, also motors
and trailers, Cash Paid
(352) 212-6497





A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.951*
- .2 weeks In the
.2 weeks OnlineI
*Featured In Tues.
"Wheels" Sectloni
Call Today

(352) 726-1441
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
GEORGIA BOY
1979, 27FT., Perfect
cond. $4,200
(352) 637-4938,
GULFSTREAM 32'
'94,62K, Sleeps 6, new
AC, flooring, tires. Exc.
Cond. $10,000
352-270-3162/257-2387
JAMBOREE 29'
2005, V-10 Class C
113K, Loadedl Perfect
Gonditon! Ready to gol
p48,500 (352)465-2138
KZ JAG '06
Sips 8, full length awn-
; Ing, load distributing
Switch, refrig, micro,
range, shower, bath.
" Operates off Gas or
elec. Very clean, used
very little. Must sell
$13,000/obo.
(352) 201-0649
MONACO
'00, Monarch, 34', Class
A w/slilde, 30K, V-10,
spotless. Just serviced,
$47,000 (352)746-9457


RV FOR RENT
31', Sleeps up to 7.
Loaded! Just bring your
clothes & food! $800wk
(352) 422-7794
WE NEED RVSII
We will buy or consign
your clean RV @ NO
EEI Bobby Clark RV
(352) 726-5999




T RV DONATIONS T
Tax Deductible for
Appraised Value
Maritime Ministries
T (352) 795-9621 T
4 Tires 255-70R-15 on
ICW alum 15x7 5 lug,
Chevy truck $525
(352) 422-3821
Mon-Thurs. 7am-7pm
5TH WHEEL 30'
Super slide 2000
Meadowbrook, Exc.
cond. $18,200
(352) 746-0348
ADVANTAGE 2004
5th whl. 36' 3 slides,
Asking
$24,900/obo.
(352) 270-3349
AIRSTREAM 31'
1979, Great Shape!
New AC, carpet, tires,
uphol., $8,900 obo
(352) 257-4260
AUO TT by Skyline
New w/warranty.
Only $109/mo.
'92 WINNEBAGO
BRAVE 27'
Like New! < 10K
'03 VIKING POP-UP
Great Cond.
Must Sell! 4.995
2008 CLIPPER Pop-Up
Stock # cllp00246
* New! 8.995 I





(888) 348-1144
� AVION 1964 17'
Like Alrsteam, $600
(352) 746-2271
COLEMAN POPUP
'89, Air, refrig, stereo,
exc. cond. $2800/ obo
(352) 489-9736 or
(352) 422-2874
FLEETWOOD
TERRY '98 26 ft. travel
trailer/ must see/
loaded 352-220-0214
or 352-228-3456
Handyman Spec.
'78 COACHMAN, 26'
5TH WHEEL, $1200/
OBO (352) 503-5381
leave message.
I BUY RV'S
Travel Trailers, 5th
wheels ect.Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778









CLASSIFIED

BH iassic
cra1 VehicmBBle


JAYCO 36', '04
5th Wheel Toy Hauler
4,000W Gen, 15,000 AC,
Fuel Stat., Slide $26,950
(502) 345-0285 (IN FL)
JAYCO Pop Up
'01, Sleeps 7, all acc.
Like new, $7,000.
(352) 344-4327
Kodlac
'03 Skamper 190,25ft,
AC, heat, full Bath, 2
showers, like new,
many extras, all manu-
als, clean, $8,000. obo
503-5487, 313-477-3125
LAYTON 26' 1993
Micro, AC, Fr/bk drs. 23'
awning, new tires, refrig.
Exc. cond. w/'98 Dodge
Durango. 4X4, V-8, tow
pkg. 6 pass, Rr AC,
both/ $12,900
Call (352) 628-3376
POP UP CAMPER
'00 Hunter Coachman,
good cond, sleeps 6,
cold AC, easy setup,
$250& (352) 69-7-024--
PROWLER
'03, 30ft, 12ft slide out,
loaded, sleeps 6,
refrig. , micro, stove,
$12,000. (352) 564-4170
SLIDE IN CAB OVER
CAMPER, for 8' bed.
$400.
(352) 746-2271
Starcraft
'85, Pop up, refrig., hot
water, new tires, excel.
cond. $1,800. obo
(352) 341-1019-'



3 Tires
255-70-16
$7. ea.
(352) 212-7806
'94 LINCOLN
for parts only,
$900/ obo
(352) 220-6473
FORD F-150 1996
for parts, 4.9 motor, M50
D trans, 2dr. dash/trim,
front end, wiring
harness, 70K ml. $500
the lot or will separate.
352-274-5522/274-5523
SET OF 4 WHEELS
20x9 Dodge Ram Hemi
Sport Wheels, high
polished aluminum.
Like New $400
(352) 613-3095
TINTED REAR SLIDE
WINDOW w/moldingfor
Ford F-150
'88-'96, lyr. old. exc.
cond. $100.
(352) 726-4052
TRUCK TOPPER
From 6' bed.
Exc. Cond. $250
(352) 220-3273


$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
CASH BUYER-No Junk
for Trucks, Vans & Cars
Larry's Auto Sales
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333




*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, Jet skis
mowersJacuzzl's, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084

WE PAY CASH
FOR
JUNK CARS
Top $$ paid $$
Toll Free
- (888) 480-1170

$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk' Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645



ttt
t----

We wish to give @
least 30 Cars to
BATTERED
WOMEN'S SHELTER
this year.
Tax Deduct. Avail.
PLEASE HELP US.
MARITIME MINISTRIES
9 (352) 795-9621 9

3.5L V6 #H08966A i
I Sporty, Low Miles
and Extra Clean I
I $14, 890. or $ 249. @ I
mo. 866-838-4376

' Cadillac Sedan
Seville DTS, #P5363,
Loaded with the
Works, Like New I
$28,970. I
866-838-4376
S-.- m-- m l
'06 Honda Accord
LX #P5330 and I
#P5331, Here Is Your
Chance For A
Honda $16,942 or I
$289 @ mo. |
866-838-4376

S' Chevy Impala
LT, #P5391 Only 11k
mi, excellent cond.
$17,946 or $297. @
Sro. 866-838-4376
L . i i -i m I


E --
1980 NISSAN 280Z
Body in good shape.
Good mechanical
cond. but needs trans.
$650 (352) 201-9018
r 07 Ford Fusion
i#H09689A, Lots of
Car for the Money
Only 8K mi. 16,770
I or $286. @mo.

$5001 Police Impounds
For salel Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext, 7374

9BUICK LeSABRE CUSTOM
70.Xs , aLoade......$4,995
98 FORD CONTOUR GL
4 WD, Loded, 53K Mles..$4,995I
'01 HYUNDAJ ELANTRE GLS
Sedan, Low.ML, Loaded.$6,995


A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.951*
*2 weeks In the
*2 weeks Onllnel
*Featured in Tues.
"Whees" SecflonI
Call Today
(352) 726-1441
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
ACURA RSX-S '04
6sp man., mnrf, 54K,
leather, 6cd pampered
$14,900/obo
352-344-4505



















I BUICK
1995, For sale $1,500
Call 352-795-8634


BUICK
2003 Century, 5,000
miles $8,000
(352) 795-7210
BUICK LESABRE
'00 CUSTOM, very
clean, low mileage.
$5,950 (352) 746-7128
BUICK LESABRE
'94. Low Miles. No AC,
Good Cond.
$2.000 obo
(352) 726-5844
CADILLAC DEVILLE
'99 73,800 ml. Air Cond.
Leather, Mother of Pearl
w/ bik convertible top
Dual Power Seats,
Premium Sound, AM/FM
Stereo. Cassette,
Premium Wheels,
$9,500. (352) 860-0444
CHRYSLER Crossfire
2005, 18K Miles,
YOU GOTTA SEE ITI
#6149823B Citrus Kla
(352) 564-8668
DODGE INTREPID
'99. 2.7L, 30MPG HWY,
48K ml. All power, CD,
tinted windows, non
smoker, women driven,
garaged, exc. cond.
$5200. (352) 795-6151
FORD
1985 Country Squire
Station wagon,302,
sm. V-8 $350
(352) 795-8863
FORD
'97 Explorer. One owner
188K, $1,500 as-is
795-6850
FORD FOCUS
2002
Clean & Economical
#7056199B Citrus Kia
(352) 564-8668
Honda Accord
2001,88K mi, very
good cond. All service
records. $6900
(352) 621-0828
INFINITI J-30
'93, Pearl White.
Good Cond. garage
kept. All records.
$4,300 (352) 726-1138
KIA OPTIMA EX
2004, V-6, 18K ml.
Like NEWI
#7060610A Citrus Kla
(352) 564-8668
LEXUS ES 300 '97
84,300 mi, Loaded, Ex-
cel cond. Service rec-
ords, new tires. $8700
352-425-1518.
LINCOLN
2000, Signature Series,
Exc. cond. 72k mi.
hardly driven.
$10,000 Negotiable
(352) 489-0122
LINCOLN TownCar
2003, Signature Series,
Showroom Cond.
Carriage Roof. $17,500
OBO (352) 489-1639


LINCOLN Towncar
'93, SIg. Series, leather,
123K ml.. Great Shapel
Everything works Cold
AC. $2200 341-0718
MERCEDES 450 SL
1978, 81K, w/both tops
$8,500.
(352) 257-1355
MERCURY COUGAR
Sunroof, DIx Wheels.
Low Miles. Reduce
from $5,000 To $3,000
(352) 628-5213
MERCURY SABLE '99
V-C, Cert. Technician
Car 173K, 33MPG.
Almost everything new.
$4500 Invested. $2600
352-795-2894/586-6611
MITSUBISHI '03
Galant GTZ, 3.0, V6, 54K
auto, extrmly well kept,
many upgrades.
$15,000(352)464-0433
MITSUBISHI
'97, Eclipse, silver, new
motor, transm. & tires
$4,000 obo (352)
637-3659 or 302-0119
TOYOTA
'94, Camry Sedan,
clean inside/out, excel.
running cond., auto
137k ml $3,200 obo
352-465-4801
VOLVO
1987 4-dr. sedan, runs
good, $700 or best offer
(352) 726-0887
(352) 476-8329
Your Donation of
A Vehicle
Supports Single,
Homeless Mothers
& Is Tax
Deductible
Donate your vehicle
TO THE PATH
(Rescue Mission for
Men Women &
Children)
at (352) 527-6500



1972 BUICK
ELECTRA 2DR
$1200 OBO Mechani-
cally Sound. Some rust.
352-212-8951
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374
'82 CADILLAC Biarritz
Pristine, classic,
collectible. 9,137 orig.
miles. Black w/red
leather Int. S.S. roof,
custom made spoke
wheels, new Redline
tires. All rec. incl. orig.
invoice. $15,000 firm
352-586-9663/795-8634


'83 Monte Carlo SS
Ltd Edition, Good
condition.
All original$4,000
(352) 563-0340
CHEVY EL CAMINO
'65 $8,900.00 worked
350, turbo 350 tranny
Just needs to be fin-
Ished 352-489-8633
FORD 1940
New paint, Chevy
350 motor & trans. drive
it home. Very clean.
(352) 212-7500
FORD
1956 T-Bird, Red, new
restoration, rebuilt eng.,
new paint, both tops,
Pwr. Steer. $29,500.
(352)628-1734
FORD THUNDERBIRD
'89 Super Coupe. 5 spd.
Super Charged Eng.
$1800/obo
(352) 382-7001
MERCEDES
1987, 560 SL, 125K,
White, Both tops, New
Mich. tires, $10,500
(352) 586-6805
MGB
1977, good shape, new
tires, new roof, $4,000
obo. Moving
(352) 400-1068
VOLKSWAGON
1965, Custom Baha.
Solid floors, glass body.
Many extras. $3,400
(352) 560-3222
VOLKSWAGON
'77 BEETLE, needs some
work, runs/drives great.
$2000/obo
(352) 697-1236



'03 Chevy Tahoe LT
#P5421, DVD, I
Leather, sunroof,and
more $22,760. I
I or $383. @ mo.
866-838-4376

'05, Chevy SIIverado
ILS,#P5351, Need I
Towing Power and
Space Call $18,944 I
i or $324 @mo.
866-838-4376 I
L mE i !.- m. i =
'06, Dodge Ram
1500 #P5348 I
Quad Cab, V8,
fullsize for less I
I $19,776 or $339. @
mo. 866-838-4376
L i m mm ma i
.",,-d -- ---"E
'07 odge Caliber
I #P5392 and #P5363 I
i Factory Warranty,
Carfax, Save Lots,
I $14,770. or $249. @ I
mo. 866-838-4376 �
L . i= m i i I


$5001 Police Impounds
For sale Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374
A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95r
S2 weeks in the
Chroniclel
*2 weeks Qnllnel
*Featured In Tues.
"Wheels" Section!
Call Today
(352) 726-1441
or (352) 563-5966
- For details.
"5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
CHEVY
'02, Silverado 2500 HD,
4 x 4, black, crew cab,
fully loaded, leather,
tow, pkg., $19,000 obo
(352) 344-5323
CHEVY
'92, Silverado 1500, Ext
cab, Lng bd., w/ topper
350 eng., new trans.,
$2,900.obo
(352) 220-7273
CHEVY P/U '00
71k mi, 2 8ft toolboxes
/roof rack. 1 owner,
Well maint. 5495.00
OBO (352) 613-5869
CHEVY S-10
'02, Exc. Cond. Bed liner
& Tonneau Cover,
Tint, 69K, $6,300
(352) 344-2331




DODGE DAKOTA
QUAD CAB '01.
Drives, runs like new.
$8500.
Call (352) 794-0123
DODGE RAM
2004
READY TO
GO TO WORKII
#7051944A Citrus Kla
(352) 564-8668
FORD
'90, F350. 460 engine,
w/ overdrive trans,
crew cab, runs excel.
$3,000. (352) 201-9018
FORD F250
'96 Power Stroke 7.3
Liter Diesel. Gd Cond
Rebuilt Title, DOT Cert
$6500.00 352-302-0456
GMC 2500 1977
87k ml., $6000.00,
HD.TOWER OR HAULER.
AS IS. FLORDA TRUCK.
CELL 910-797-4871.
LEAVE MESSAGE.


L-AIKIIQ�Y
INTERNATIONAL
2000 Semi w/Sleeper
9200 Model series,
60 Detroit, 10 spd. trans.
air ride, tandem rear
end 273, w/ wetiine, PC
set up, $20,500. obo
(352) 726-1373
NISSAN
'99, Frontier XE, 99k ml,
new tires, rurs great,
Asking $4,800.
(352) 527-8706



r 02, Ka Sportage
#H09374A, SUV Style I
I For Less, Great
Student Car $5,766.
Sor$119.@mo.
866-838-4376

'04 Ford Ranger
I Edge #P5437
i X-Cab and Lots of-j
- Stylegreat Student
Car $11,770. or $196.
@ mo. 866-838-4376
'04, Mercury
Mountaineer #P5431
SSUV and Space For
Less Only $16,880. or
I $281. @ mo. I
* 866-838-4376 -

I '06, Ford Expedition
XLT, #P5359, 7 Pass,
SOnly 28k mi., Must
See $21,794 or $362
@ mo 866-838-4376

'07 ChevyTrailblazer
I LS, #P5389 I
SUV For Less, Only
13k mi. $20,980.
Sor $349 @ mo.
866-838-4376
---- - E


FORD EXPLORER
1991 Air Condition,
Rear Wheel Drive,
$1500 Good Condition
(352)464-3671
ISUZU AXIUM
2002,
Sharp Looking SUVI
#7042529A Citrus Kla
(352) 564-8668
JEEP CHEROKEE
'96 4x4, gd. tires, mint
engine, cold air, runs
great, 140K mi. $2500.
(352) 382-4142
JEEP CHEROKEE
'96 85700 orig miles,
$4500. firm, A/C, AM/
FM/CD, alarm syst, blk
leather seats, front/rear
bumpers, tow pkg, roof
rack, 2 dr, 5 speed. exc
cond. 352-476-5604


KIA SORENO
2006, 4 X 4, Low miles
2 to Choose From
Citrus Kla
(352) 564-8668
SATURN V6 AWD
VUE 2003 60k ml. Blue,
Loaded, Moon Roof,
Cargo Racks, etc., 28
MPG Hwy, graphics re-
movable $10,500 OBO
352 628 5957
SUBURBAN 4x4 '88
Navy/grey, front & rear
air, tow pkg. Clean &
solid machine.$2,200.
obo (352) 795-3970
TOYOTA
'90, 4Runner, V6, 4x 4,
2 door, low ml. runs
great $2,500.
352-302-3803



$5001 Police Impounds
For sale Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374
A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the
Chronicle
*2 weeks Onllnel
*Featured In Tues.
"Whees" Sectionl
Call Today
(352) 726-1441
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
*$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply


^--- U
r 07Ford Freestar
#P5396 Vacation
I Time, Lots of space
$15,840. or $269. @
Smo. 866-838-4376
$5001 Police Impounds
For saleI Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374
CHEVY
'94, Conversion Van, TV,
tape player, new tires,
completely tuned,
(352) 228-2239
CHEVY CARGO
VAN 2002, 8600LB. 5.7L,
bin pkg, tow pkg.
Roof racks, $7800.
(352) 628-6300
CHEVY LUMINA
'95, Looks good, runs
good. New tires,
battery & brake pads.
$2,100 (352) 726-7262


DODGE
'89 Conversion Van, V8,
auto, TV, runs great,.
$1,900. cash
(352) 637-1257 -,
DODGE
98, Caravan, 4 cyl.,
7 pass, auto, cold AC,
154k mil., excel, cond.
$2,300.352-341-0718
FORD
'97, Aerostar, New tires
Asking $1,500. obo
(352) 628-9548
(352)464-1633
FORD AEROSTAR
'95, Cold AC, 4.0 V-6,
Looks & Runs Goodi
$1,800 OBO
(352) 527-1285
FORD WINDSTAR
LX
2000, Cruise, P/S, P/B,
Cold AC. Well kept!
Non-Smoker. 100K
$3,500 (352) 465-3539
STown & Country
'94, Mini Van, 25 MPG,
leather, AC, all elect.
options, -dependable-
$2,400. (719) 660-6686
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY






ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
BUYERS AGENT
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO COM


KREE KEMUVm'.L r.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers,jacuzzi's, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
Kawasaki KX250
'06 < 6 mo. old, < 20 hrs.
over $4K worth of extras
serv, contract incl. Best
Offer. (352) 697-2395
POLARIS ATV
'05, Kid's 50cc, bought
new In summer, 2006.
Mint Cond. $950
(352) 527-4529
SUZUKI LT-R450
2006 Quad racer $4,500
YAMAHA Y2 426 F
2001 Dirtr bike $2,700
352-422-2339
Yamaha Blaster '00
200cc, Runs like a
Banshee! After market
upgrades! $1,650obo
. 52-533-3130



04I


FIND OUT EXACTLY WHAT YOUR CAR IS WORTH,

NO MATTER WHERE YOU PLAN TO BUY!

CALL THE

INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE






FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE ABOUT THESE VEHICLES


1-800-325-1415 EXT.


2007 CAMRY

AV 0SE
',200,


r�sw FREE 24 HOUR
J'TI RECORDED MESSAGE
(J ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
' 800-325-1415 EXT 2701


$17,777


2007 GRAND MARQUIS


SAVE
P6,000


FREE 24 HOUR
RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT 2701


$15,777


CARS


2007 CADILLAC






L-t- FREE 24 HOUR
RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
S800-325-1415 EXT 2702


s26,777


2007 TOWN & COUNTRY


SAVE
*7,000


,-- FREE 24 HOUR
RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
' 00-325-1416 EXT 2702


$18,777


2007 TOWNCAR

SSAVE
200



FREE 24 HOUR
RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
S800-328-1416 EXT 2701


$27,777


2007 F-250


'SAVE
i1$1,500


6


FREE 24 HOUR
RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-328-1415 EXT 2701


$24,777


2007 TRAILBLAZER

SAVE




- FREE 24 HOUR
JY RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1416 EXT 2702


$19,777


2007 EXPEDITION


SAVE
$12,500


FREE 24 HOUR
RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT 2702


$26,777


SUVS


2007 FOCUS $11,477 2007 TACOMA

2005500s soo 20,777 2007 FRONTIER

2007 CALIBER $11,777 2007 RAM QUAD

2007 OPTIMA $12,777 2007 RANGER


2007 GRAND PRIX $14,777 2007 COLORADO


$15,777 2007 GRAND CHEROKEE $19,777

$14,777 2007 WRANGLER $20,777

$17,777 2007 XTERRA $17,777

$14,777 2007 DURANGO $18,777


$14,777 2007 TAHOE $29,777


(800) 342-3008 (352) 622-4111 "
ALL PRICES WITH '1,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY PLUS SALES TAX, LICENSE FEE AND $395 DEALER FEE. ALL INVENTORY PRE-OWNED AND SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY. PICTURES RE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY.


TRUCKS


OCALAN ISSAN


2200 SR 200 OCALA


10 PM

TONIau'mrn.


SUNDAY, UNE24,20079D.
"Sport/Utility C4
-L Vehicles lc=Van


Cjrpfl-� Couloly �FL)






CITRUS CouNTr (FL) CHRONICLE


IOD SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007


)Dodge Ram Mega Cab -1.
lGOO' fM" NEW Dodge Durango
q ooo"ff
-.1


NEW Jeep Commanc


Chrysler Sebring


17 Dodge Ram 15


;2007 Jeep Liberty Sp


for
1l~imO mo0


2Uiof mfor
$2, " .,/M'''O'mos.


IRT" Smo�for
60
$2-11/MOOImos.


CRYSTAL PRE- OWN EL


Open -1 hcirl't -A day At
www.ovlyal.toilA ,5on i


Freo CAR9AX
Vehiol@ HI-Story


SII


I I


1995 CHEVROLET LUMINA 1997 CHEVROLET MONTE CARLO LS
CR-27343A CR-27319A
*5,488t *6,888t
'E ~�.ep


1998 CHEVROLET BLAZER LT 4X4 2000 MERCURY SABLE GS 2002 FORD FOCUS ZX3 PREMIUM
27442A CR-J60569A CR-J70023A
$8,888t s8,888t $8,8888t

� IB a


2002 DODGE INTREPID SE 2005 CHEVROLET IMPALA


J60528G
$8,888t


CR-9932P
$8,998t
-.j A --.64,^


1994 DODGE DAKOTA SLT 4X4 2
CR-J70063A
$9,888t


Z004 KIA SEDONA LX 1995 JEEP WRANGLER SE 4X4 2004 DODGE NEON SE
3618P CR-27075B 3589P
$9,888t $9,888t $9,988t


2004 FORD TAURUS SES
CR-3549P
$9,998t


2001 CHEVROLET BLAZER LT 2001 CHEVROLET MONTE CARLO SS
CR-27300A 3603P
$9,998t $10,888t
^^ -s~tX^*n.. B


2003 CHEVROLET MALIBU LS


2004 DODGE DAKOTA SLT PLUS 2003 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE GLS


2005 BUICK LESABRE


2003 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED


1999 DODGE RAM 1500 SPORT 4X4 2003 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE GLS 1.8T


CR-27438A CR-27392A CR-J70306A CR-A7188B CR-27182B 3650P 27466A
$10,888t $12,888W $12,998t $13,888t $1 3,988 $14,888t $15,888t

rA NI


2002 CADILLAC DEVILLE DTS
3595P
$15,888t


2003 CHRYSLER 300M
CR-3581-P
*15,888t


2007 CHEVROLET EXPRESS G2500 HD CARGO


2006 NISSAN PATHFINDER LE


2005 TOYOTA TUNDRA SR5 OFF-ROAD


2005 FORD F-250 XL


2007 CHEVROLET CORVETTE Z06


3612L 27096A CR-J70284C CR-J70270G CR-T-BARN
*16,888t $22,888t $23,998t *24,998t *74,900t


1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD., HOMOSASSA.
14358 CORTEZ BLVD., BROOKSVILLE
2077 HIGHWAY 44 WEST, INVERNESS
S-.866-43 4-3064

1 -8787-MY-CRYSTAL
CRYSTALAUTOS.COM


I


ML CANG


C"tS'V f Jio sE Jeep
-sri DO OS


AUTO


MOTIVE


VISIT US 24/7

CRYSTALAUTOS.COM


I.....-


I ]


n


~-1
ii


Li.


H G-






RTIC us ouNTY ( ) HR E


'-I


AN AMERICAN R-WVOUJTION
t IW


Cer tified
Pre-Owned


AUTOMATIC .
COBALT


AUTOMATIC
mm LT
AL


1995 CHEVROLET LUMINA
CR-29343A
$5,988t
1998 FORD CONTOUR
97333A
$6,888t
1995 JEEP WRANGLER SE 4X4
CR-27075B
$8,888t
mi200 ERUR SBL G


2000 MERCURY SABLE GS
CR-J60569A
$8,988t
2002 FORD FOCUS ZX3 PREMIUM
CR-J70023A
$9,988t


SINVERADO
.REG. CAB
AUTO WI H A/g',


SILVERADO
EXTO WITHCA
AUTO WITH A/CM


2004 KIA SEDONA LX
$9,988t


2004 DODGE NEON SE
__ 3589P
$9,988t


2747C


'285


AUTOMATIC
TRAILBLAZER


-P &


4 4;V


LOADED

AVALANCHE


2005 CHEVROLET IMPALA
CR-9932P
$9,998t
2001 CHEVROLET BLAZER LT 4X4
CR-27300A
$9,998t

2003 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE GLS
CR-J70279A
$11,997t
2004 FORD TAURUS SES
CR-3549P
$11,998t

2003 FORD ESCAPE XLT
CR-3486B
$12,488t
2003 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED
I CR-27182B
$12,488t
1999 DODGE RAM 1500 SPORT 4X4
$14,888t


LOADED
SUBURBAN
-,--'. _


2006 HONDA CIVIC EX
CR27:29B
$17,488t
2002 GMC SIERRA 2500 HD SLE 4X4
J703.18A
$18,988t
2004 TOYOTA TUNDRA SR5 OFF-ROAD
CR.J70264C
$22,488t


2006 NISSAN PATHFINDER LE
'4 27096A
^$2 Gaut


'Dealer retains all rebates and incentives Plus tax. tag. title and dealer fee of $399 50 plus $2.500 down (cash or trade equity) W.A.C. Pictures are for
illustration purposes only. See dealer for details


Pnce ecu~ iesi ag bk d deAe fee c.1S399 50 and .Judes$1 Qi0jown icroir trde eqir I W A C


1035 S. Suncoast B
Homosassa, FL


Iv<


I


Open 24 hours a day at
www.crystalautos.com I


I Free CARFAX
Vehicle History


(866) 434o3065

1 -877-MY-CRYSTAL
CRYSTALAUTOS.COM.


ms


CRYSTAL
C H E V R O L E T
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL
(866) 434-3065
CRYSTALAUTOS.COM


SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 11D


C"~r~ FL Cn tivII ~nvr


127AA


rm.vl-rj RTVI


Cm--oPlex


eo""QN


904.
AM















MUST SELL
2006 Kawasaki Pri
360 4x4 100hrs $40(


A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks In the
.2 weeks Qnllnel
*Featured In Tues.
"Wheels" SectionI
Call Today
(352) 726-1441
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
"S5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
BIG DOG
'98, Chromed Out,
board & stroked,
12k mi. Sacrifice. Please
Call. (352) 228-2239
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers,jacuzzi's, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000 Elec. Glide Classic
1450 cc, Vance N Heins
pipes, sport windshield,
lots of chrome, only
15,800 mi. Like new
$11,000 (352) 467-0872


HARLEY DAVIDSON
'05, 1200 Sportster Cus-
tom, many extras, well
maintained, $7,895.
(352) 637-6284
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2006, Street Glide.
1450CC, Like Newi 2,200
ml, bik, $13,500 OBO
(352) 400-0360
HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA2005
6200mi, $12,500 wind-
shield, bags, 4000 miles
of warr. (352) 697-0243
HONDA
'03, CR250R, like new,
never riden, $800. of ex-
tra new parts incl.
$2,500. (352) 572-6023
HONDA '07
Aero 750, Mint Cond.,
Showroom new, Less
than 1,500 mi. $6,600.,
Includes Windshield
and 2 Helmets. New
house forces sale.
352-400-2277
HONDA 2003 VTX
1300, well maintained,
garage kept, lots of
xtras, Exc. cond. $6500.
(352) 527-6639
KAWASAKI 1200 '01
Voyager Trike. Exc.
cond. (MUST SEE)
$10,000. (352) 628-6461
TRIUMPH
2002 Bonneville
America, 8600 miles like
new, $4,700 OBO
(352)586-1248


210-0624 SUCRN
Citrus County School Board
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County School Board will hold a Special
Meeting and Workshop; 1:00 p.m. on Tuesday, June
26, 2007 In the Board Room of the District Services Cen-
ter located at 1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida.
The purpose of the Special Meeting is to approve engi-
neering and design for upgrades to the. Marine Sci-
ence Station Sewage Disposal System, purchase orders
to close out the cost of concretables and various per-
sonnel recommendations. The purpose of the Work-
shop Is for an FCAT update, technology and facilities
budget update and an overview of the 2007-2008
budget.
If any person decides to appeal a decision made by,
the Board, with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting, he may need a record of the proceed-
ings and may need to Insure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made, which record should Include
testimony and evidence upon which his appeal is to
be based.
Sandra Himmel
Superintendent
Citrus County School Board
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 24, 2007,


209-0624 SUCRN
Citrus CountySchool Board
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE,
The. Citrus County Scroio foii 10' wfii raid a Workshop:
1:00 p.m. a Special r.reer-,g 500 prr, and a Public
Hearing: 5:30 p.m. :,. Tue.,-a, Ji, .I, 2007 In the
Board Room of the District Services Center located at
1007 West Main Street, Inverness. Florida.
The purpose of the Workshop is to review and discuss
various items outlined. on the agenda. The Special
Meeting Is to approve personnel Issues. The purpose of
the Public Hearing Is to adopt the Tentative Millage
Rates, to adopt the Tentative Facilities Work Program
and to adopt the Tentative 2007-2008 Budget.
If any person decid.-J: ri.;- c.ai o j.-zi.,slon made by
the Board, with re.pe.: 'o jn, mrr.an- considered at
this meeting, he may need a record of the proceed-
Ings and may need 10 io . u- rr r a- .e-C.ai.Tr . record of
the proceedings i. rra-,ce ..r-.r, ,i.::i.3 r,:ui.j Include
testimony and e. e ,'.e upc.r, ..r.icr, r,; appeal is to
be based.
Sandra Hlmmel
.... . �".*' -* ...: . urr , e. irl , -,der-i
"u . i u- ;f. 'r, 1, r.o l r,, ,

Published ohe (1)'time Itn *r, CirruC' Cur'.r, Chronicle.
Juhe 24, 2007. -



208-0624 SUCRN
C.rru. C:..unrr OMB
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
The Citrus County boara ol Cr'u,-.r, Commissioners will
accept sealed bids for:
BID NO: 112-07 '
PROJECT TITLE UIe.. Ho.-T.a.,:. LiDrary
CIi-: I Iari,. �T ,' ' . l'r ,-p 1.3lo ,-,r,
DEPARTMENT: Clur. Cc.,i,-,r, Lio.,ar, :,.I,.T
PROJECT DESCRIPTION: I .
The general scope of work is r:, !ufi:c, aid ,i .rall data,
phone. CATV cabling at the Je... H.:.Tr,.,,:;i. Public Li-
brary located at 4100.S. C-rar-.ar-fa,.ri Ave. The County
Is expecting a complete i.j.r, kt Installation, which
shall be completed In 30 .:.3i,.raar -days from the No-
tice to Proceed. ' . "
Citrus County will hold a non-mandatory PreoBid meet
ing at 1000 A.M on Wednesday, July 10. 2001 al the
New Homosassa Public Library located at 4100 .
Grandmarch Ave.. Homosarso Floiaa Alttendance Is
recommended bul not required io submit a bid lot Ihis
project. A site visit will also be conducted Immediately
following the Pre-Bid meeting. No additional site visits
will be provided and no Independent sile visits are al
lowed A copy of your company's Worker's Compen-
sation Insurance Policy or any exemption I applicable
must be provided prior to the sote viit
Ar., pei':.:r. euinrig eai,6rori le acci r.,-T. ,noia .r,. ,Or
rr.i: meerw.-'-a becaa ':e of a dijbilirr on ic-r.,:i: 1 i.Tipa,
rn--r. :nc.jular : -r.,i.x i tr.e Mjn.ageiT.er.,i B-jj:.g3eil c
fic, .3r ir.e Lec,:or,.:. ,- c .errmenl B.ujll.',ia ooar.-: L r
ke. .:.d' b, .: aii'_ aL 2 52 '*2'203 at le.:. r.ic 1`. ,01 . .1:1
r.rie ire nr, -ee irig Ii ,ou a,.o r.aeiirig ., .pee.r- . hr.
paired u. ir,. A ,r Telec.r. f.e i 2 . 2' .'i-
Suomitoal Dare July 20 2007 at 2 00 P.M to
'irj .- :j-.r, B ,ar j .:.ri C,:ur.r, -,CT.T,I':I,.. .,ei
. , ri, F : 3 ir.. La3 L Pau.ii
3600 W. Sovereign Path
SLe: -.r' :.,-,er,'r.T-erii Euiidli.,g 'uiti 2;.:'5
S L ,',-: .r: FI :uJ..o.i
Public Opening of Bids: July 20 2007 at 2 05 P M
The Bid Opening will be rej or me t L.:or.nr. ,.:.,-,ir.
ment Building. ,


DENNIS DAMATO, CHAIRMAN
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Published In the Citrus County Chronicle on June 24,
2007.


203-0624 SUCRN
CiTY OF INVERNESS
PUBLIC NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed proposals for Construction of Well #2 581
Water Plant will be received until 1:00 P.M.., EST. July 9,
2007 at the City of Inverness City Hall, located at 212
W. Main Street, Inverness Florida 34450. Sealed enve-
lopes containing proposals shall be marked "City of In-
verness, Bid Number DPW2007-002 enclosed within a
sealed envelope with the words Construction of the
City of Inverness Well #2, 581 Water Plant, and the
bidder's name, address and the Florida Contractor's U-
cense Number clearly shown on the outside there of.
Bids must be delivered not later than the time set forth
herein. The owner will not be responsible for any lost or
late arriving bids sent via the U.S. Postal Service or other
delivery services. Mailed bids shall be sent to the At-
tention of Debbie Davis, City Clerk, City of Inverness.
Any proposals received after that time and date speci-
fied will not be accepted and shall be returned uno-
pened to the Bidder.
A mandatory pre-bld conference shall be held at 10:00
a.m. local time, on the 26th day of June, 2007 In the
Conference room, 1st floor at 212 W. Main Street, Inver-
ness Florida at which time all prospective Bidders may
* have questions answered regarding the "Bidding Docu-
ments" for the Project. Attendance at the pre-bld con-
ference Is mandatory. A Bidder's failure to attend the
pre-bid conference shall result In the rejection of this
bid. Bidding Documents may be examined In the of-
fice of Hoyle Tanner & Associates, Inc. 2424 North Essex
Ave. Hernando Florida 34442.
OPENING OF BIDS: will be opened and read aloud pub-
licly at the City of Inverness Government Center on
July 9, 2007 at 2:00 p.m.
AWARD OF CONTRACT: The owner reserves the right to
waive technicalities or Irregularities, to reject any or all
bids, and/or to accept that bid which represents the
offer that Is in the best Interest of the City of Inverness.
The City of Inverness Is not responsible for expenses In-
curred prior to the award of the bid.

Frank DIGIovanni
City Manager
To be Published two (2) times In the Citrus County
Chronicle, June 17 and June 24, 2007.


207-0624 SUCRN
. . CITRUS COUNTY OMB
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
Invitation to Bid
No. 116-07
Carpet Installation
Citrus County Central Ridge Library
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners, Depart-
ment of Community Services, Division of Library Ser-
vices Invites Interested parties to submit a Bid to furnish
and install approximately 1,590 square yards of carpet-
ing atthe Citrus County Central Ridge Ubrary.
To obtain a copy of the Invitation to Bid and scope of
work concerning this announcement, please visit the
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners' Website


at www.bocc.cltrusfl.us, and select the link titled "Bid
Information" at the bottom of the Home Page, or, call
Citrus County's Office of Management & Budget / Pur-
chasing Section at (352) 527-5457.
A MANDATORY pre-bid meeting will be held on July 3,
2007 at 10:00 AM. The meeting will be held at the job
site located at 425 W. Roosevelt Boulevard, Beverly
Hills, Fl. 34465. It is at this time Bidders will be allowed to
take measurements and develop their work scope for
the project. Please note that only those Bidders who
attend the pre-bld meeting will be permitted to submit
a Bid.
SEALED Bids are due on or before July 10, 2007 at 10:00
AM and are to be submitted to Ronald Bamer, Office
of Management & Budget, Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners. 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite
266. Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for July 10,
2007 at 10:15 AM at the Lecanto Government Building
- Room 226, which Is located at 3600 W. Sovereign
Path in Lecanto. Florida.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to at-
tend the Public Opening because of a disability or
physical Impairment should contact the Office of Man-
agement & Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days
before the scheduled date. If you are hearing or
speech Impaired, use the TDD telephone (352)
527-5312.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Dennis Damato, Chairman
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle
on June 24, 2007.

211-0624 SUCRN
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County
Commissioners of Citrus County. Florida, certifies that
the final assessment roll for the Halls River Road Waste-
water Special Assessment Area (2004) has been exam-
Ined and approved by the Board of County Commis-
sioners. The Board of County Commissioners, sitting as
the governing body of the Citrus County Municipal
Service Benefit Unit for Water and Wastewater Utility
Services, will hold a public hearing for the purpose of
hearing objections to such assessment roll on Tuesday,
July 24, 2007, at 2:30 P.M. In the Board of County Com-
missioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida. The as-
sessment roll for the Halls River Road Wastewater Spe-
cial Assessment Area (2004) shall be available in the of-
fice of the Clerk of the Board In the County Courthouse
of Citrus County, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida, beginning on the 25th day of June, 2007, and
shall remain so available until the day for hearing ob-
jections to such assessment roll.
The nature of the Improvements consisted of con-
struction of a sewage disposal system and sewer Im-
provements in the Halls River Road area and surround-
Ing areas more particularly described as the Installation
of collection lines, mains, laterals, force mains, lift sta-
tions, and other miscellaneous appurtenances as were
required to connect to the County's wastewater facili-
ties and shall also Include and embrace the Installation
of sewage lines, mains, laterals and other wastewater
facilities as may be necessary in order to provide for
the health, safety and welfare of all residents of the
area. Said Improvements were constructed on all
lands, streets, roads and property described in Exhibit
"A". It is the Intent of the Board of County Commission-
ers that the lots abutting the sewage disposal system
and sewer Improvements described above shall bear
the entire cost of said Improvements by payment of a
special assessment levied against each property In the
assessment area on the basis of assessment units.
At the public hearing the Board shall meet and re-
ceive objections of all Interested persons to the assess-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




ments and accuracy of the amount thereof against
any lot or parcel of land owned by such Interested per-
sons. At such hearing, or thereafter at a definite time
announced at such hearing, the Board shall equalize
and either annul, sustain or modify in whole or In part
the special assessment roll according to the special
benefits which the Board determines each lot or par-
cel of land will receive as a result of such Improve-
ments. When the assessment roll becomes final by the
confirmation and approval of the Board, the assess-
ment roll and the Resolution confirming and approving
the same shall be recorded in the office of the Clerk of
the Circuit Court. From the date of such recording the
assessment shall constitute liens upon the properties as-
sessed co-equal with the lien of general County and
district taxes. Including ad valorem taxes, and shall be
superior in rank and priority to all other liens, titles and
claims.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made
by the Board of County Commissioners with respect to
any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings is made which record shall Include the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal Is to be
based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation
at this meeting because of a disability or physical Im-
pairment should contact the County Administrator's Of-
fice, 111 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida 34450.
(352) 341-6560. at least two days before the meeting.
If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use the TDD Tel-
ephone (352) 341-6580.
BY: DENNIS DAMATO, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
HOMOSASSA PHASE III HALLS RIVER ROAD WASTEWATER
SPECIAL ASSESSMENT AREA 2004
EXHIBIT "A"
West Hals River Road SR 490-A: Beginning at the east-
erly line of Parcel 33110, Section 22, Township 19 South,
Range 17 East and Parcel 41230, Section 27, Township
19 South, Range 17 East, adjacent to West Halls River
Road SR 490-A, to the westerly line of West Halls River
Road SR 490-A, Section 31, Township 19 South, Range
17 East.
Blue River Cove East Plat Book 13 Pages 31 - 32:
West Wood Fern Court, South Riverpointe Terrace &
West River Holly Path
Bide River Cove Unrecorded Subdivision:
West River Cove Place, West Fern Creek Trail, South
Blue River Cove Terrace &
South Wood Creek Point.
Also included Is a 30.38' Temporary Utility Construction
Easement, over and across Lot 4-5-2.1,
to the easterly line of Lot 4-5-2.5.
Blue Springs Park Unrecorded Subdivision:
West Grotto Court & West Blue Springs Court
-Hadley's Unrecorded Subdivision:
'West Hadley Court
Homosassa Company Subdivision - Unrecorded Subdi-
vision of Lot 28
West Lenz Lane, South Cox Point & South Charles Al-
bert Point
Twin River Estates:
West Port Court, West Twin River Lane & South
Capecove Loop
Volonte Springs Unit 1 Plat Book 3 Page 102:
South Washington Point & South Jefferson Point
Volonte Springs Unit 2 Plat Book 4 Page 95:
South Roosevelt Point, South Taylor Terrace, West Hazel
Lane, South Eve Point,
South Marva Terrace & West Marva Court.
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle
on June 24. 2007.


FIND OUT EXACTLY WHAT YOUR CAR IS WORTH,

NO MATTER WHERE YOU PLAN TO BUY!

CALL THE

INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE


800o- 42-_ 008


29a a 07 TITAN


Month*


t199
Montht


07 ALTIMA


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.'i. l ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
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=18,777


M169
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$11,777


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' 800-325-1415 EXT 2016



$15,777


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OCALA.NISSAN



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(800) 342-3008


(352) 622-4111


'TIL



10 PM

TONIGHT!


ALL PRICES WITH '1,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY PLUS SALES TAX, LICENSE FEE AND *398 DEALER FEE. ALL INVENTORY PRE-OWNED AND SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY. PICTURES RE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY.
t 39 MONTH LEASE, 39,000 MILES, '3000 DUE AT SIGNING, '12,800 OPTION TO PURCHASE, W.A.C.* PAYMENTS AT 72 MONTHS AT 6.9% APR, W.A.C.











SUNDAY, JUNi 24, 2007 13D
CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE---


SEE OUR ENTIRE INVENTORY AT: nicknicholasford.com


4

� 3 ............
7 77 . . . . .. . .. �Y ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
..........
2000 Ford F750 Dump Track 200S Ford F350 Cob & Chassis 4A 2006 Ford Explorer XLT 20'02 Ford Expic r 07 Ford Fusion 2005 Jeep Liberty Sport 4x4
Cat diesel, 9 yard durnp. #NP4925A XLT, 6 spd, diesel. #NP4912 Loaded!,#NPR481A Auto, A/C and loaded! MUM N Fuel sipping 4 cyl. #NP4977 Diesel. #N7C160A
1950 $299910 1161500 $17,760
$29 $20,880 $12 850


lf,60








CnIus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


14DSUNDAY IpU~p7 24.2007


I S ar ing at A s o w as 60 m o thS


ISatnat As Lw s 0 mnh


46-*IW 3UNUAY, j UNI- Z-1, 4kiki /


S t a r t in 9 at 60 months
M


Finance
with
Nissan
1�1










Hona


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



A day at the beach


. - . - 1. '.':-�t .m .... . . . ; - 1. ... '-;'. --. . :-- . ., - s -- --- " - ~ -~ -- - ' -- .- .-- '- - " - -- -
- .-- " .- " .. -_ --:. . '- o -" -.--- ~ - - -- '-- ----- -" - - r"" ' -- -' - - - .. . " " :- - - ... �-" '
-_-- " =...:! ^ K 's: .r, ,,_.#;-..: , <.: :7: --: .. -- .': ...-^ - . ^:,_:i.--- - ,--*-- - ." � _' --. ....- - -- _ - ..... : ..*. ..
%^^^^^^^%^^^^^- -. - - . **..-.-
- . - 4t.7--._^, - -.. . - - . - .. ...-_ . .-- ..- - _ - .. . _ .. .. . .-. -. - . -
... -.- - .-_

,-"- ,- . _er - : "= . "- '-- - " - - " --s,, . - - -- ",
. : .� ,- -.- . - - --.. .: -., .;- .--:. .-T " . .. . . . . .. '"3


s _ _ =-- --... _ 7. _. _ " . : j _ _ . - - , . . '' _


Lands' End provided this photo of a col-
lection of Rugby Stripe Beach Towels.
> Getting fun gear together for summer
outings takes a little forethought.


�-


Watch for plant fungus


State officials request
public cooperation to
eradicate gladiolus rust
Special to the Chronicle
TALLAHASSEE - Florida Agriculture
and Consumer Services Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson is asking for the pub-
lic's help in his department's ongoing
effort to eradicate gladiolus rust,


Uromyces transversalis, from Florida.
Gladiolus rust (U. transversalis), which
is host specific to gladiolus plants and
other closely related plant species, was
first detected in the United States in 2006
at a floral farm in Manatee County.
Additional surveys found rust on a com-
mercial gladiolus farm 100 miles south-
east in Hendry County. Surveys conduct-
ed around the areas of infestation indi-
cated that gladiolus rust was limited to
the commercial sites in Manatee and
Hendry counties, and four residential
Please see FUNGUS/Page 18E


HomeFront NDEX


Everyday Cheapskate
Sikorski's Attic
Classifieds
Real Estate Digest
Mr. HandyPerson
The Arborist


20E
14E
28E
27E


For current property transactions, use the
search features on the Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Web site, www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Photo: Florida Division of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Typical appearance of gladiolus infected
with U. transversalis. Note the dieback of
foliage due to rust.


E
SUNDAY
JUNE 24, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com







2Ei UNA J 24.. 2 C COUNTY F N


I --


r -1 0 * MOI.
L_ w w~e itr alt lead rs~om t!2LS�7


S"STEAL THIS GORGEOUS
HOME." New 3 or 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths. 1 acre lot in Clearview

this price. Hardwood floors & 18
inch tiles, granite countertops,
stainless steel appliances.
Caged pool with pavers, 3 car
garage. Security system
& sprinklers. #316871.

CALL BRAD POTS
(352) 697-1368


45 N. CRSA MEDWPTH SA


4-3-3 POOL HOME
ON 1 ACRE


Directions. Take 44W front 491
to Crystal Oaks entrance, make a left,
go to Cryslal Meadow Path,
S turn left. go to end

CALL HEATHER COOK
(352) 257-5117


BRAKE SLAMMERI Give SOur I.i�,yl -a trcOOsl'
55+ community w/clubhouse & swimming pool.
This bright & cheery home has 2BR w/luxurious
master suite. Modern kitchen &
p roiected parking impes.:cable
cond.ilon $#3115.48
CALL MARGARET BAKER
(352) 422-0877
baker exitrealtyleaders.com


BRING THE FISHING POLE. This cute 3/2/1 house has
a man-made lake right out your backdoor
Lar.ie r.jay,.T, *i.II. ;ila - .jI h.,, 1 '.*uI
CAU. MARGARET BAKER
(352) 422-0877
bakeriexitrealtyleaders.com


. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... U


CHARMING 3121, CORNER LOT re.?, r,-oir .r..1c-ie
kitchen remodeled 2005. Plenty of counter space, lots of
wood cabinets & hardwood flooring
Cerair lii, iccialid i. : r-. I . -T l . m IiU r.i
CALL JOHN P. MAISEL III
(352) 302-5351
www.flaMlLSonline.com
. . .. . . .... .rT f~ - m i. ^-. r- -�*-J n n m --. - r - .


IT'S A BUYERS MiARKET
& THIS IS THE TIME
TO BUY!!!
I will find you the best home,
condo, villa or lot, at the very
BEAUTIFUL SUGARMILL WOODS. IEN J 25 .'- best possible PRICE!!
4 ACRES )B R b- Lu.:J I.:.T ru, ra,.,:r, n.:.T, 'u,- J .'.-3" u, l * 1 '-�.' ,:,r ,:i .:.:,-,m uri, I i ,'1l2
i,.n),,,-,.,3 0 .. . ,,T,. - .-, r . ,, : .: GREAT DEALS
CALL MARGARET BAKER ,r " - r 4 . 4 E :I :LE !
(352) 422-0877 CALL BARBARA SCHAEFFER CALL BARBARA SCHAEFFER
baker -exiaeatyeaders.com (352) 212-7225 (352) 212-7225


PRIVATE SECLUDED WATERFRONT LOT '.-.
' e ,lr, 6. : , ,, ,t1r,,ll .3.:,:,n m ur.,r, �'~l~a 11 - . P ..
CALL MARY WAGNER
1 (352) 697-0435


GREAT LITTLE 2 BEDROOM. 2 BATH HOME in inrin:
4 iae c �n islp. o,l, .:r 1, r .. ,,rr.;- .:. r; ,.:, , Ir
r,.:..T6a l Ir A r,, lI .T.Il, a iY ,'l 3
CALL NANCY LEWIS
(352) 302-6082
www.nancylitdelewis.com


NICE LOT IN WATERFRONT NEIGHBORHOOD
SR: cRI , I, ,n .
CAl. MARY WAGNER
(352) 697-0435


THIS HOME IS PRICED TO SELL Trn. r,.,,,-, i .,,:e
I . L.;!l.a :. .:,-:-:TI: .LiT.co. ai ; This 3 2 r..:."- r.n3; t- 'A
r. ,:1.] ,:...r .-.'3. a...-.lu'jr ,:.l d. -r.a r...r - .r r .om
- li3.T., .�. -r r i in 1 il1 .:i l ..c-i.;.i-| lu 0
& a-jAiiluA Ir..n.iTi: .ir,(
Srr.... ijA Br.ln. , llI.- ,.r i 12J i
CALL NANCY LEWIS
(352) 302-6082
www.nancyflttelewls.com


--I


ISLAND FOR SALE.
Boat access only on
Crawford's Creek. Per tax
record island measures
700x250 but 221x1000
useable. Priced for quick
sale. Rare offer. #316482
CALL MARY WAGNER
(352) 697-0435


Ai


THIS IS A MUST SEEI 6,auruli r,,TnvM o-, 1.jP C.,Tie,
I.,1 L..dr, . a, -,m , -,-,s-e Flor ar,, Ie De l Oi oe
po.r, Tri runm Ie I r.E s l utal Mij
CALL NANCY LEWIS
(352) 302-6082
www.nancylittlelewLs.com


077


35


i


L_ -


..........................


47M-,�, _- -,, P --,-,N=='-_'�-� 77�:� �-_


SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNrcu


35
Ir










BEST


( r.1 Ial - iver 794-0888 Inver Ress 341-1233 Beverly Hills 527-1112







- " ' . ,.. . . .-LOVELY HOME WITH MANY EXTRAS. INCREDIBLE 251 HOME ra
EXCELLENT 2/2 WITH HUGE BONUS HOME IN MOVE-IN CONDITION. Good tile spI .l .- ..,-,. ,,,: .. .. nJ ,.. rir ,.:.:.,T, .ri pan EXQUISITE 3#201 MEADOWCREST VILLA
ROOM, fully landscaped yard, new roof, new & carpet. Newer central air/heat, water a:-,,,, . I t..ra -,- ap : ... . . -, u,'c,,:.,
paint and carpet throughout. S serious buyers heater and appliances. Extra carport for ilj -.a ,-, ,.::.. -, :.., .- ,..] , : ,: ,. ,-,,3 a,' .... ru ,: , . : .- , ' ,',J a d a I.p.s .-t. -.
# 316945 fru trees#3 0 , .. ',1 1. . CALL BARBARA DEE CALL BARBARA DEE
I CALL DICK HILDEBRANDT CALL DICK HILDEBRANDT CALL BARBARA STONE & ROY CAWLEY & ROY CAWLEY
(352) 586-0478 (352) 586-0478_ (352) 586-3072 ) 22.J206 S-607







PICK AN ORANGE FOR BREAKFAST, then METICULOUSLY MAINTAINED OAKWOOD SUGARMLL iOODS OODS HOME
you w cofe in anihe teat viacen inthiy tu r pekso . Aloor laBhLLcarg e b E e n rd o- I L v, -
wind ow This beautiful Oakwood Village 2/2/2 rw it^1'*inl 3 n n e'_^ 1 n. e applasces , ceram c e plan shelves, forman APPRAISAL. Gorgeous home on 14th tee of customized shelving, rounded wall cowers, niches


CALL BARBARA DEE CALL GEORGE OUELLETTE CALL GEORGE OUELllTTE : ir-'. a, CA STEVE DONOFRIO
& ROY CAWL.EY (352) 586-7041 -J (352) 586-7041 CALL DICK HILDEBRANDT _1(352) 201-1322
(352) 220-1607 wwwel-homebuyhome4u.com J wwwellhomrnebuh mne4u.com (352 586-0478 . 8,.W -x MesaCm

AUTO
.-- .. . ,. ,SALVAGE

" =.I Turnkey business
PICK. AN ORANG FO - t-hen"- �- located on HWY 40
S. ' . BED 2 BATH HATED POOL HOME in Inglis. Great
3i2i2 WITHDEN. . ,,: a.,, .:..: , ,,:.:. I,1 VERY NICE WELL KEPT MOBILE :.-, i.:..:A . ai. H.. ...A i Os.:.:....-i ...i WANT r BE NEAR THE CITYuM .i ,r, O n it al l
. 1, ,,'. fi.:..' a,_ r.,; , 1 .' ,.,1 r.,..i I:,, lr.i .::.,. .:.. .: I ..-., i'..'..a- .:, Views. New Gourmet Kitchen, fireplace, new it? Here's the home for you - 2/1.5/1 w/ pp u i y w s y u
; Iair , .:..:i...; ,,,a.a . , I ..: .. ..ir, ,j . . ....., -,; ., :.. ,-1, i.:,., it,;r.. :, i .:. . ... paint & floors. Beautiful home and location. separate laundry room. This home has been # 3 1 62299Q
--- .:.-.,,i '1''' ar i i'a Se S.d ,,,..r,r.., r,:..i ..: .i . . #315899 renovated and is ready fora
r,.:...._. f.,i ; '.. i- 1J "i 9, .,,,--,3.,,,-. ,:..:,.:r, l.:.l :. new owner Take a ride by and
CALL B GEORGE OUELLLETTE .- .I iCA LL ELo i call me today #316029 CALL MARGARET BAER
& (352) 586-7041 1 CALL SHANNON ADAMS J o CALL. HEATHER COOK IAD (352) 422-0877
www.sellhomebu ome4u.com 352) 220-9209 __ (e0y.-_ oe (352) 257-5117 _ _ a b ehT-jAider.com__
BRAND NEW GREAT

CONSTRUCTION n, c -a,'. .
.n iaullur -H:,n-.,:,-33 r.u,,le , TWO BEDROOM, . . ' ..M
, B.,.aB 3 HT .POL ,M.:. TWO BATH MOBILE i . G
uo,, rJ ,.a ,rl ,, ra, ,eln:. On a half acre in a mnatee play, or enjoy a million dollar sunset while
ILOVELY &f2i2sN THE 12TH TEE an l.ai grilling some steaks or relin on the screened pomh
l-..ria..L.our, l, nLp.= h:,l,; ,:, 1. 1 � ...I I.I" .^ LOVELY 312 20N THE 12TH TEE ,:,] M, ,a.:,'.; & forget the cares of the wold. It doesn't get any
.ree . r DB P p- h r D S1. wonderfully quiet .- .:. r,,T,,-, . better than this wththree bedrooms, two baths,
r.' " "m '* " . _- ... n.r,,,-,. S,,-,n,- ,1 a , a:.i:.,,-,,: ,.i , L.1ar. living room, eat-in kitchen (848sq. ft. oflaminate
sal ".i r,:,, i ,, r,� ru,,, 11- ,r,: se tting .. . ..'-- " . '. ,- . �,,i, ', ar,.ir , .i -,:. ,j,l a r, . . ,i i.r . it,, flooring in living) family room with ftreplaca , den/
loI3r.r1 12n LWO DERFUL 3I TOWTIOUSE %i11 .m . i- . .. . . i ., r,.,.al " office or fourth bedroom & Iwo car garage. A guest
T Aree mTeA I re 311172 .r - e ,,,,E ..Ot, , Ti -lI E r.I I . ped with sprinkler system
C:Lurll rmp #to- , ,O, E, ( ,:,,1 41E4r,,.r c.', rm..',,, " #36L LCAUNA^A. 4 M Ew p el

CALL TAMI SCOTT CALL TAMI SCOTT CALL TAMI SCOTT CALL WENDY HOPKINS SANTO DOVI
(352) 422-7128 (352) 422-7128 (352) 222-7128 - (352) _464-3209 L 352-476-4687







ceilings Tile and carpet, large family room with gas
OLDER MOBILE WITH LOTS OF HUGE TRIPLE DE ON ' 5 ACRES . " , "'- ' . ,plae ,aari.. . .. . - t
CHARACTERI ,,-, ,. , l,,,; ,,I , |.,| .,, L,.,,.. ,:,:i, ,T,,I ,,.,,, ...,, r .,i ,,:,.e BEAUTIFUL i ACRE ISLAND :.i, Ir,, l , .-', . G,-' , .- ..- ..-,.: 4
"I,' ,-.,3 .1', ,,:1:,,,- ^;., .,^ ,.TWO., :..^" , .Ira : MOBI ,T, NIC E MOBILE TH SEVERAL


CALL WENDY HOPKINS j CALL TAMI SCOTT CALl TAMI SCOT CALL WENDY HOPKINS SANTO DOVI
352 464-3209 (352).422-7128 m52a422"7128 4 (3 2 464-3209 L- _35 . f-4 7


SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 3E


RTI US COUNTY (FI) E








4E SUNDAY. JUNE 24. 2007 CTU ONY(L HOIL


, 'U

kA


r or ouying or setting ...
.4 II you need is LOVE!




Reallor, SRES, ABR
352-527-7842

@ www.CitrusCountyDreamnHomes.cornm


$204,000 MLS #316358 I





LOTS OF FRIENDS?
Then you'll want to invite them to this lovely 3 bedroom, 2
bath home. Entertain on the covered lanai and caged pool;
enjoy the fireplace in spacious family room; kitchen centrally
located for great entertaining. Immaculate home with
beautiful curb appeal at a great price!
N .. . - . .


iVIiLO ffa 1Q00 I

7 1-�.


Bring your fishing pole and boat! 3/2 townhouse style
condo on open water. Brand new kitchen and appli-
ances; tile and carpet. Like new. Enjoy community
center, pool, tennis courts in this 1600 sq. ft
home! Call for more details. REDUCED!
tmQ www.CitrusCountvDreamHormes.com


I $334,900 MLS #316278




DEEP WATER CANAL SANCTUARY
You'll feel right at home in this tranquil, quaint 'Key West' style stilt
home. Sit on the beautiful veranda and enjoy the natural Florida
beauty that surrounds you. Double lot offers 110' on deep water
canal to Gulf. 2 docks, RV cover, attached carport, fireplace, brand
new roof and storm panels. Much more in the lovely 2 BR
in very private location.
fa5 www.CitrusCountvDreamHomes.com


$119,000 MLS #314055 $339,900 MLS #313865





JUST THE TWO OF YOU! WATCH THE MANATEE-
Will fit right into this charming 2/2/1 home in Beverty Hills. From your own dock you can fish, relax, and even see Manatee
Quaint front entrance, family room and year round porch are and Dolphins as they swim by in this deep water canal, stilt
just some of the features. Remodeled with newer carpet, tile home! 85' on water with pnvate boat ramp also. Enoy the sun-
andupdtedkiche, Lt yurmony wrk oryou sets from the glassed family mom overlooking water on
S ouab kritc Let your money work for u 3 sides! 2/2 with storage rooms and drive under carport.
Negotiable price of $119,900. ~i~t~~UTo view this home, just call Vicki.
@ www.CitrusCountyDreamHomes.com I l www.CitrusCountyDreamHomes.com

H www.CilusCountvDreamHomes.com N


* 2/2/1 END UNIT
* Split BR Plan
* INVERNESS

"******-


" GODDARD
DIRECT: 476-8536
ELLIE
SUTTON
DIRECT: 287-3997


10 770 Momingstar

. - - .' f -.4.


* OWNER SAYS SELL!!! * 2500 SQ FT LIVING!
* LR plus FR/Enc lanai * Beautiful caged pool
* 1+ ACRES/Citrus Hills * Summer kitchen


____________________ I.


I $179,900 8172 N. Dandelion MLS #316802
-mam mm u e y- , . - illllf l~ ll


* ALL APPLIANCES! * SCREENED LANAI
* Wood cabinets * 3/2/2 Split plan
* Tile Shower + tub * Landscaped, sprinklers
CAC St --__ 1I- Q C d. 11s17Q 1 I


---
* 2/2 DOUBLEWIDE * Nice treed lot
* Front deck * Carport/sheds
* CINNAMON RIDGE * Membrane roof


* Replaced A/C
* Reasonable dues
* Great price!


$158,800 MLS#314355


7-7842 422-3042 . POO

PEGGY WOLF
Take the
Virtual tour on 3400 . Apopka - INVERNESS
S*2/1/1 w/front porch * over-sized RV friendly lot
PeggyWolf.Remax-Florida.com -Tile floors throughout* BRs carpeted
� S* 0POOL with child-proof gate *Newer Roof, A/C
& select Featured properties. security System* 2 lots* 160x1 20
SHome warranty * $158,800


MLS#315738


& Marvia Koroi li
Realtors'

(352) 527-7842
S(352) 422-3875


Pine Ridge
Specialists
e-mail:
petemarvia@aol.com


MLS#314310


2159 W. GRAYWOOD DR., PINE RIDGE
* 3/2/2 Built in 2000 Heated Pool/Spa
* Double pane windows * Nearly 1900 sq. ft.
* Nicely maintained 1 acre lot with shed

$418,900 MLS #312708


nANUIA mIn arIAuu.L - u Ntm unM Ave.
* Duplex * Both sides have 2 Bedrooms & 1 Bath
* All New = Roof; Thermal Pane Windows; &
Exterior Metal Doors.
* Concrete Block Stucco. Public water & sewer
* Crystal River - 2 for the orice of one * $85.000


439 W. Hillwood Path - BEVERLY HILLS
SExquisite Maintenance Free Detached Villa
2/2/1 w/1220 liv sf on the 9th Tee of Twisted Oaks
* Eat in Kitchen & Formal Dining room
Sun room w/ vinyl windows overlooking golf course
* Laurel Ridge * Pool / Clubhouse Community
SA hole in one at S1IRS. 00


FAIRVIEW ESTATES - 4130 N. INDIANHEAD RD.
* 3/2/2 - Nearly 2100 sf living
* Heated Pool & Spa . Enclosed Garden Rm
* Citrus Hills Membership * Home Warranty


3015 W. BRAZILNUT RD., PINE RIDGE
* In Pine Ridge on 1.6 acres * 2003 built 3/3/2+detached shed
* Nearly 2700 sf living area * LR & FR open to pool
* Formal dining room * Great landscaped comer lot


ML#14181[

�POLF


$108,800 MLS#316176


-1-i 1114 1 1 4 "0 Ill


4086 E. Scotty St. - INVERNESS
* Charming 3/2/1 + carport * 1066 liv sf
SLiving room, family room, expanded master suite
* Large screened Lanai with hot tub
*Above ground pool, deck, 2 sheds & fenced yard
* Great Location, private setting * A deal at $149,900


*2/2/1 Priced to sell quickly at $108,800
SLiving rm, Family ram, & Bonus rm
* Large kitchen w/extended Oak cabinets
* New roof, air handler, condenser & duct work
* Irrigation System & Fenced Dog run


TIMBERLANE ESTATES - 2111 W. C
* 3/2/2 * Covered RV
* Built in 2000 * Landscaped
* Tile Roof * 2058 Sq. Ft.


hristine Ln. 5826 N. CALICO DR., PINE RIDGE ESTATES
Pad * 2005 3/2.5/2.5 * Electric gate entry
Acre * Den/Office * One acre
Living * Pool with waterfall * Upgrades galore


Emai - o vwlf~alnabavEu~o~nEmail - petemarvia@aol.com


AWARD-WINNING AGENTS!
Toll Free: 1-877-866-9784
Email - KellyG@remax.net


352-527


Office Cell


hAtI Q 4-CnCc


i 0 www.CitrusCountvDreamHomes.com


.1


0TRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE


^^^^ -- - - --


, I,


rvwolf@tamnabcffv.rr.com


Email - ne




, , ,�


CITrrs Co.rNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 5E


B'
DLIr


VACANT LAND - SUGARMILL WOODS

Lovely deed restricted, homes only community


1 Oak Village Blvd (96 x 150)
20 Iberis Ct (Ig cul-de-sac lot)
130 Pine St (golf course lot)
HOMOSASSA Cindy Pt 1/2 acre lot
3 lots Unnamed St each lot priced at


$50,000
$ 47,900
$136,000
$35,000
$8,500


STEVE ' 7/l f1

VARNADOE
Realtor, GRI

Office: 795-2441

Residence: 795-9661 :


tevevarnadoe.com


$499,900


0in1 I I


ain On An Isssa Where Stars Shine Bright Above The Water
Cabin On An Island In Homosassa River S, on , ur 'de,': and water, Irse rmoouniign glowv
Coz, cedar lInea ca-in sieep- 8 Beauliiui cr.err) genril on Ine Aalr Deignrfuil 2 br 2 5 tain rome
wound asri, l.lE lcr. or, qu'el ::c.e New dO', .aell manlanried Wei de.gred newer KI, arie
ilalirng doc', and ir .rleaninng ilsor. Fuii\ appl,anceP Large O':c., 2 ca, c arad an . wrksnop
furnizri,3' iuil brin. Ire hr.irn.q p'i1ei S'uaied ,3re,:l', on ire Homrn:.a.sa R,.er
$520,000 MLS#311562 I $700,000 MLS#309911




PICTURE CARD FARM! OPPORTUNITY ACRES!
9.7 gently rolling acres, fenced & cross-fenced with If you're searching for exceptional value in a 20+
fabulous 3200' ranch for HER. Filled w/18" tiled firs, acre parcel, don't pass up seeing this property on
wood kit cab, granite counters, stone FP. 3/2.5/2 484 in Marion County. Fenced, with older mobile,
PLUS for HIM 30 x 50 workshop w/1car gar. Priced Zoned AGR1, uses include horse farm, vet. clinic,
to sell at $520 000 plant nursery etc. Poss. owner financing.
I www.buycituscounty.com


M
Multi
BR(


Ce
Offi
Hor
Emai


DIANNE I $475,000 MLS#315897
acDONALD A
-Million Dollar Producer
OKER/REALTORS
ll:(352) 212-9682
ce: (352) 795-2441 WATERFRONT!!
Pelican Cove freestanding condo. 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 1
ne: (352) 628-5354 car garage, newly updated with wood floors, carpet,
il: djmfl@yahoo.com frig, paint and window treatments. 7000 Ib boat lift
and dock, deep canal, and great room.


� 7 , .,"....:


.... .. -"'" ' " - .-.. - -] POOL HOME IN CITRUS SPRINGS!!
REDUCED!! INVERNESS!! 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car garage, block home.
Handyperson special!! 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car ground screen pool, attached oscar carport
garage, block home. Needs TLC, bring your kitchen with breakfast bar, family room and living
imagination. Good solid home, just needs TLC. room, lots of tile, & close to new community center.
$134,900 MLS#314031 $74,900 MLS#316485




HOMOSASSAw!
3 bedroom, 2 bath, doublewide with oversized 2 car HOMOSASSA!!
attached garage. Located on 2.5 acres, fenced and 2 bedroom, 2 bath, Palm Harbor doublewide on
cross-fenced. Large great room with wood-burning corner lot. Open and spacious, large living room
fireplace, separate breakfast nook, formal dining room, with bay window and new carpet, drywall, huge
large screen porch, & split plan. Lecanto schools. master suite with double sinks, & metal roof.


t -.l.


l^^ti tt


ENJOY THE VIEW
Waterfront lot is a perfect setting for your new home.
Nice level lot on a wide canal with easy access to
the Gulf. Beautiful stilt homes in the area. Just a
short drive to town or the local beach too. Natures
paradise awaits! $144,900


7 ACRE ESTATE HOME
Ernitep Inrough ire gale and uip hre wn0,ng drve I0
this ,eauldful execul,.e home or. 7 gcrgeou; acre -
Find a Iranquil waterfall and ,-j pond alo.rng win ":'
lusrt Iandcapr.ng IcO accer ini r ome En1y arrple
paved parking along witn garage parking lor 5 cars.
Magnificent home with huge master suite, private SPACIOUS LOT AND CHARMING HOME
office, ornate dining room and spacious den all This 3 bedroom, 2 bath modern home is located on
accented by high ceilings and modem architecture, a large lot with fencing and custom workshop. It
Beautiful pool, whirlpool and lanai package for even has a small caged pool for cooling off this
summer fun, A one-of-a-kind 3 bedroom, 3 bath summer. Great room floor plan plus laundry room,
home located in prestigious Pine Ridge. A must large 2 car garage and nicely equipped kitchen.
see! $749,900 large 2 car garage and nicely equipped kitchen.
Minutes to shopping. It's a must see! $199,900

E-Mail - stevevamadoe@remax.net


. Office: 7 I $239,000 MLS#310462
r628-7800

I"Y o u r 1 'i" "
Sugarmill Arm,=
Experts"
SALLY VAL
CURE MAHONEY *Southern Woods * 2003 Sweetwater Royal II
BROKERASSOCIATE BROKERASSOCIATE * Maintenance Free Living * Split Plan
* On the Golf Course * 3/2/2
$399,900 MLS#311009 $249,900 MLS#315268






_ _ _..._ ~ Sugarmill Woods Split Plan
* 5/3.5/2 - Homosassa * Two Master Suites * 2003 Lindhorst Home * 3/2.5/2.5
* Waterfront Community * Storaqe Galore * Great Room * Upgrades Galore
$229,000 MLS#311602 $255,000 MLS#316588






* Sugarmill Woods * Meticulous Home * Sugarmill Woods - 3/2/2
* On the Golf Course * Golfer's Delight * New Construction * Gourmet Kitchen
* 3/2/2 * Michael's Custom Homes * Split Plan


www.realestateincitruscounty.com


I


II


S, OUSANDN REULS


NANCY

BOWDISH
(352) 628-7800
Direct:
(352) 422-0296


Visual Tours at www.buycitruscounty.com


I


E-Mail - dimfl@yahoo.com|


TRUS COUNTY (FI) CHRONICLE


MRE


k






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


6E SUNDAY. TUNE 24. 2007


Home]Front
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
It is also distributed to approximately
300 business locations throughout Citrus County.
Display advertising information.......................................................... 563-5592
Classified advertising information............................................... 563-5966
News information.................................................................................. 563-5660
.......................................................................newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listings.......................... www.naturecoasthomefront.com
Sign up for www.naturecoasthomefront.com...................................563-3206
Advertise online...........................................................................563-3206
............................. ................................. NCCsales@chronicleonline.com
"The market leader in real estate information"





To have your news in the Chronicle's HomeFront section, you may mail, fax or email the
information to the Chronicle, 1624 North Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. The
newsroom fax number is 563-3280 and email is newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.
You may also drop off your information at the Meadowcrest office or the newspaper's
Inverness office at 106 W. Main Street.
When submitting information, please make sure it is printed or typed, is concise and includes a
contact telephone number.
If you have any questions or comments, contact the section editor, Mike Arnold, at 563-5660
(email - newsdesk@chronicleonline.com).
HOW TO GET YOUR PHOTOS INTO THE PAPER:
- We accept color and black and white photos. We also accept negatives. We do not accept Polaroid prints.
-All photos need to e cropped tightly. That means no wasted space in your photo.
- Photos need to be in sharp focus. We do not accept photos that are out of focus.
- Be sure that photos or negatives you submit are taken using 35 mm film. Others will not be accepted.
- Please include your address and phone number on any photos or negatives submitted.
- Photos or negatives submitted will be returned if supplied with a return envelope and postage.
- When identifying persons in your photo, please do so from left to right, front to back.
- For more information, please contact Matt Beck, photo team leader, at 563-5660.


Everybody loves cupcakes


G one are the days when cupcakes K
showed up in school classrooms
only because they were trans-
ported easily, and simple to serve.
Nowadays, cupcakes are all the rage for
every kind of celebration - from pic-
nics to parties and even as a lively sub-
stitute for the traditional wedding cake.
That's great news, because cupcakes
are quick and easy to make and deco-
rate. And sometimes they come filled Mary
with surprises. EVER
* HOW MANY?: Scratch recipes with CHEAP
1 cup flour make about 12 to 18 cup-
cakes, depending how you fill the cups with batter.
If your recipe calls for 1 1/2 cups of flour, you can
count on 18 to 24 cupcakes. The batter from an 18
1/4-ounce cake-mix box will make 20 to 24 standard
2-1/2-inch cupcakes, 36 mini 2-inch cupcakes or 12
jumbo 3- to 4-inch cupcakes.
* GET CREATIVE: Decorate cupcakes with
sprinkles; M&Ms; chopped nuts; toffee bits; pep-
permint candies; jelly beans; chopped or shaved
(use a vegetable peeler) light, dark or white choco-
late; cookie crumbs; gumdrops; sifted cocoa pow--
der; fresh fruits; edible fresh flowers; or whatever
else strikes your fancy.
* SURPRISE INSIDE: After you have filled the
cups with batter, tuck a surprise into each by press-
ing a dollop of jam, a chunk of cream cheese, an
unwrapped Hershey's Kiss or even a mini-cookie
into the batter just before popping them into the
oven.


Hunt
YDAY
,SKATE


* EASY TRANSPORT: Need a dis-
posable carrying caddy for a dozen cup-
cakes? Tape the top of a large, empty
cereal box closed. Lay the box on the
counter with the front of the box facing
up.. With scissors, cut out the center of
the box, leaving a 1-inch border on all
four sides. Remove the piece you've cut
out, and you have a handy carrying tray
that will keep the cupcakes upright all
the way to their final destination. Hint:
Chill cupcakes in the freezer for 30 min-
utes before loading up.
* A LA MODE: Make brownie cup-


cakes (below). Allow to cool. To serve, cut off the
top of each cake, and scoop out a bit of the cake
with a spoon. Replace with a scoop of vanilla ice
cream, and replace the cupcake top. Optional: Top
with your choice of chocolate syrup or icing.
Brownie Cupcakes
* 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
* 11 ounces semisweet chocolate chips
* 3 large eggs
E 1 cup granulated sugar
* 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
N 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
* 1/8 teaspoon baking soda
S1 cup coarsely chopped walnuts (optional)
Preheat the oven to 350 F. Line a 12-count muf-
fin tin with paper cupcake liners, and spray each
generously with nonstick cooking spray. Set aside.

Please see s' ':.P/Page 10E


Folding ruler a measure of historical ingenuity


Dear John: It took me seven photos
to show you how this folding
wooden ruler "operates" and I
am not sure I captured all of the positions
at that The wood is positioned with brass
hinges and alignment pins when it is fold-
ed.
I have no idea how old it
may be or even for sure where
it came from, but I suspect it
might have been in my great '.
uncle's Hammondsport, N.Y,
toolbox. Any clues you might
provide on age and any value
will be appreciated. - R.P.,
Internet
Dear R.P.: Rule collecting John S
is a large category of collector SIKO
interest Jointed rulers have SIKO[
been around since the days of AT
ancient Pompeii. According to
record, an architect by the name of
Scammozi made a 2-foot folding scale for
his own use in the late 1500s.
The first commercial center of rule
manufacturing was England. By the 19th
century, there were 250 firms listed in
Birmingham producing rulers. The first
American firm to mass produce them was
in 1822 in New York Automated produc-
tion of folding rulers was achieved in the
1860s.
Large quantities of folding rules were
made of ivory, it was the most expensive


L

"]
i

T


material used. It had drawbacks because
of the tendency toward shrinkage, stain-
ing and cracking with age. Your folding
ruler is made of boxwood, the favorite
lumber of rule makers.
You neglected to mention if your rule
has a maker's name on it In
one of your photographs, the
word boxwood appears.
S There may be a maker's
name, as well. Unless made
. by a notable manufacturer,
the value is less
than $25.
Dear John: I
inherited these .
korski dishes from my ' -
SKI'S husband's stepfa- .
their. The dishes
IC belonged to his
first wife, who I
believe was a German :
descendant Could you please
help me? I would like to know
the value of each piece.
The vase is 6 3/4 inches high "./
and 4 3/4 in diameter. It
weighs 2.2 pounds. The big This vase
dish is 11 3/4 inches long and be press
7 3/4 wide and weighs 4.1 worth $15
pounds. The oblong dish is 10
1/4 inches long and 4 3/4 wide and weighs
2.4 pounds. I sure would appreciate it and
may Iad that I enjoy your articles tremen-


'y' VERITECH

Special to the Chronicle
This folding wooden ruler is positioned
with brass hinges. Unless made by a
notable manufacturer, the value is less
than $25.
dously in the paper - F.F.,
W% . Morriston
Dear F.F.: Cut glass has the
pattern ground into it with a
metal or stone disc. Cut glass
has a sharp touch to one's fin-
ger on the edges of the pat-
P: tern. The three-dimensional
pattern in pressed glass is
created by forcing molten
glass into a patterned mold.
, . - This process leaves a lumpy
'.," - feeling to the inside surface.
Your vase appears to be
appears to pressed glass. I think it was
d glass, made in America prior to
to $20. World War I. If it is pressed
glass, not cut glass, the poten-
tial dollar value is $15 to $20, much more
if cut glass.
The oval glass dish appears to be cut


This oval dish appears to be cut glass,
more valuable than pressed glass and
potentially worth $100 to. $200.
glass. It was made in America circa 1890
to 1910. Potential dollar value, if cut glass,
is $100 to $200.
The celery dish appears to be pressed
glass. I think it was made in the United
States circa 1920 to '40. Potential dollar
value, if pressed glass, is $15 to $20.
Dear John: Several weeks ago, you
had a question in your column in the
newspaper from a correspondent
regarding the radio program "One
Man's Family." I am definitely old
enough to remember it very well. It was
regarded as a family saga which ran in
serial form from 1932 to 1959. It was
written by Carlton E. Morse who wrote
several other radio series, one of which
was "I Love a Mystery."
"One Man's Family" was the continu-
ing story of a white-bread, upper-mid-
dle-class family who lived in the San
Please see ATTIC/Page llE


SUNDAY, JUNE 24 2007


e




, , 4


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 7E


I


L *Go to www.c2Inaturecoast.com to view 360 Virtual Tours.

*Go to www.c21 naturecoast.com to view 3600Virtual Tours.


Carol Scully
REALTOR


Paul Tegen C. L nn Wallace
REALTOR REALTOR
IN~wF


-A1

Mary Oesterle
REALTOR






Kath Tolle
REACTOR




'p


Ken Bell Dave Kaiser Paul Awa Carol Jean Vaunt Glenn Quirk
REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR OFFICE MANAGER






David A. Bramblett Evel n Surrency Janice Holmes-Ray Wae Kin Maria Carter
REALTOR EALTOR REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR


CRYSTAL RIVER HORSE COUNTRY111 10 acres (+/-). Commute
- to Ocala, 2 great homes, 2 bams, 4 paddocks, well maintained.
BEAUTIFUL WATERFRONT. 2/2 plus office/den, 2 car Primary house stucco finish, 2 or 3 bedroom, 2 bath, fireplace, eat-
garage. Easy access to Gulf of Mexico or the Crystal in kitchen, new roof and new A/C in 2006. 2nd home is doublewide
River. Spacious kitchen, formal dining room, Great room manufactured home, 2 bedroom, 2 bath, new roof and 2 year old N
and sunroom. 2 docks and a 6000 lb. boat lift. Well C. Barns w/stalls. Main bam w/RV storage and workshop. Fencing
maintained, nice landscaping. Available for immediate encompasses 4 paddocks. Home warranty included. Must see to
occupancy. #311499. $425,000 appreciate. #314674. $399,900


HOME FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE. This home has
been treasured. Now available to you. Large great room
with fireplace. Well equipped kitchen, grand master bath
with spa and shower and twin sinks, see for yourself.
#313366. $179,900








5569 W. JUSTIN CT., HOMOSASSA
2/2/1 Hills of Avalon home. Well taken care of, it has a
nice open floor plan with two master suites. Double glass
sliders to screen room overlooking fenced yard, perfect for
children or pets. Close to schools, shopping and other
amenities. #308206. $129,900
Directions: Rockcrusher to Justin Ct. Home on left.


READY TO MOVE IN! Features new carpet, paint,
refrigerator. This 3 bedroom, 2 bath home has handicap
equipped bathrooms. Huge backyard. Home is on two lots
with lot next door also for sale. Outside has garage,
carport and shed. #308796. $144,900




- C


-*. _ -- ...;

HOME WARRANTY. Jewel box snug 3 bedroom, 2 bath
home, kitchen bonus-dishwasher, disposal, central water a
plus. Clean as a whistle, just waiting for you. #316903.
$128,800


Doua Wlasiuk
REALTOR


P
K '


GREAT LOCATIONI 2/2/1 with workshop off garage with
HOUSE IS ZONED COMMERCIAL. 2 prime lots. carport on double lot in Connell Heights. Large backyard
Plenty of parking. Located on busy Hwy 44. Good with plenty of room for RV or boat. Home warranty
store or office location. #313303. $199,900 included. #312071. $189,000


R~u LA


L i....... i.......


VERY NICE 4 BEDROOM, r-r, I:,j,-. ,., r,.1.,T,- r,,,[
in 2005, situated on 1 acre (mol). Beautiful kitchen with
lots of cabinets, breakfast bar, wood burning fireplace in
family room. Nice open floor plan. Located on a paved
road and convenient to Hwy 19 and shopping. #316986.
$138,500

,l L-- . -- ,- a J
^M�^ -rffL


RECENTLY REMODELED split level cracker home
BEVERLY HILLS CUTIEt 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car located on .66 acre (mol). Fresh light and bright paint, new
garage home close to park, library and Publix shopping. flooring, 2 new complete a/c units, and updated baths
Freshly painted outside, clean and neat inside. Check out make this home a real pleasure to see. Certainly doesn't
the new refrigerator with water and ice in door! #316351. look its age. Unique floor plan with multiple rooms added
$124,500 on overtime. #312203. $121,000


I-
I LET ME TELL YOU ABOUT THIS HOME. It has a whole
2.49 ACRES OF VERY NICE LAND with a 1991 house generator, large Florida Room. 2 workshops,
singlowide home that has a screened porch and large updated appliances, gas fireplace, vinyl dual pane
carport. Lots of possibilities. Also included Is a very large windows, metal roof, built-in hutch in dining room, built-in
pole barn with workshop, Located in an area of new bookcase and TV stand in living room. It is in great shape
homes. Suncoast Parkway will be very close (a couple and very clean. Located in a quiet neighborhood on a
miles) for easy access. #317029. $89,900 paved road. #317021. $89,900


NICE, WELL-MAINTAINED 2 bedroom, 1 bath home with
carport and 11x15 Florida Room. Central water. Owner
motivated to sell. #316769. $84,900


THIS LITTLE LADY IS DOLLED UP. Iome warranty
included! New A/C unit, fresh paint inside and out, and
new flooring. This 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath home will give
years of wonderful living. Ready for new owner. #312227.
$119,000


I � " a


&


LONG & SHORT TERM RENTALS AVAILABLE.

NATURE C AST PROPERTY MANAGEMENT SERVICES BY C21 NATURE COAST_








aW Q__rn TUEr.s 94 9007 CmsCuv'(L HOIL


LT
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Citrus Ridge Realty


465-3000 746-9000


Lil Alvenus & Hal Steiner Kathy Shaw Cathy Mehl Art Paty Kaye Kerins Dorri Spoto
REALTOR-BROKER REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR, GRI REALTOR
Citrus Springs * 9542 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.


loniNast KIen & Ivcnele Lavlnen lui nuull ul nI ...-...
REALTOR REALTORS REALTOR REALTOR
Beverly Hills * Winn Dixie Plaza


.ITRU . HOMES


19 90 1 S, $350.000 *. POOL


7125 N. Tivoli Terr.
Wonderful 2006 built 4 bed home on an ' 9930 N. Cherry Lake
exceptional 1/4 lot. Home feat 4-2-2. S ntoh s t ar24bilt
Amenitiesinc ea-in kit w/breakfast bar, formal Step this spectacular 2004 built
dining rm, huge great rm & screened lanai. Underwood 3/2/2 pool home and see Florida
312061 living at Its best. 312400
d 9 nhueg am o uedue nerodI/I2I01hm an see Florida


199,0 00

iS a. .

11346 N. Angel Terr.
Beautiful 2004 custom built home in Citrus
Springs on almost 1/3 acre. Home has many
upgrades & amenities including custom wood
kitchen and too much to mention. 316988

111.000




9335 N. Minola Way
NICE 2/2/1 family home with a lot of potential.
Priced to sell, come take a look! 312023


$110000 ,.


1848 W. Freeman
31 HOME that is ready to move into.
S Everything is brand new: carpet, paint,
ceiling, double pane windows, blinds, RS
,fenced yard, stove, refrigerator, water heater.
315848


8914 N. Salina
GREAT 2/2 shows extremely well. Tile floors,
great neighborhood, well manicured interior and
exterior. 316517


PNRIDEIICTUHIL-INENSHILA S - HOIA HEGT 11 QUAI RU - OUNNE


830 E Charleston Ct
3-2-2 POOLIHOME on the Meadows golf course. 5507 W Cisco St
All appl. included, French drs, open to spacious BRAND NEW 3-2-2 HOME w/lotsof upgrades. Tile
lanai and solar heated pool, tile thru-out, updated on the diagonal. Upgraded app, circular dr, attic fan.
kit and baths, fans in all rms, water filters, club Oversized garage, great rm, both ba. & hall, kit, Trane
membership available. 312988 , A/Cw/filtration system Gutters Security system 315263


1121.900 12,900 . 9950


M 7100 N.
541 S School- - Wonderful mini-farm
3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, mobile home 4641 S. Slash Pine cottage-style home v
with new roof, new vinal siding, dbl SUPER 3-2-2 HOME with front porch & Florida fireplace. 10 acres, fe
pane windows & chain link. 316722 room on one acre lot in Green Acres. 314283 detached garage. 3033

WWW.CITRUSRIDGEREALTY.COM


1045 Bluebird Ct.
SPACIOUS 4/2/2 2004 home on an acre +.
Property with pretty landscaping in
charming Quail Run Community with club
house, pool, & lighted tennis courts. Enjoy
the gourmet kitchen with stainless
appliances and wood cabinets. 306111


1,9 90



Caeser Pt. 365 E. Eureka
getaway. Charming 255 W. National, 1 Acre AFFORDABLE GOLF COURSE HOME.
//large upscale kitchen GREAT 3-2-2 HOME, tile in living area, din/rm, Recently painted interior, tile in LR area.
*nced for animals. 2-car kit/ba. Beautiful stone fireplace all on 1 acre in Oversized 2 car gar w/ rm for golf cart.
181 popular Citrus Hills. 314052 Move ri"ht in 313614 $225.000

TOLL FREE (866)465-3500


3878 W Matilda Lane
Wow look at all the upgrades incl. in this gorgeous 3-
2-2 home nearing completion. This home comes
w/great rm, din/rm & eat/kit. Amenities incl. beautiful
ile, a breakfast bar, panty shelves, tray ceiling in
master, walk in closet, plenty of storage and a
complete appliance package. 315611


159.90
27k -1

3448 N. Century Blvd.
STILL TIME TO PICK COLORS. This under
construction 3/2/2 home offers�smooth top
range, microwave, dishwasher, washer, dryer,
alarm system, sprinkler system & much more.
31 1358


Claus Coumy (FL) CHRoNiaE


2 3-9-, il)_09�


1929 W. Golfcart
uper golf course 001 h; 3,/2/,2 is
jh'k�e branl new win.we, Eippl,%T.e.. corins,
u'se Poo' ho - his
cabinet 1, counter tolo5c.1reat oversized I'm"anai
I.. n' out over the p I the 7th Green of
lirCitrus Springs-Golf Course 314889






SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 9E


Citrus Ridge Realty


55-3000 746-9000




renus & Hal Steiner Kathy Shaw Cathy Mehl Art Paty Kaye Kerins Dorri Spoto Toni Nast Ken & Michelle Cavalieri Tom Balfour Amanda & Kirk Johnson

REALTOR - BROKER REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR REACTORS REALTOR REALTOR - REALTOR, GRI
Citrus Springs * 9542 N. Citrus Springs Blvd. Beverly Hills * Winn Dixie Plaza


-$4E90


r A- .*U


4770 W MUSTANG
3/2/2, Pool, 3.1 Acres
I garage detached 312363


1$2 ,0


2020 TALL OAK DR.
3/2/3 Pool 313915


S-L
5725 N LENA 4076 W. Alamo Dr.
3/2/3. Pool 2003 Built 313815 3/2.5/2 Pool Home 316956


. 3A



32 N. ADAMS
2/1/1, Corner lot, Farm Rm 309002


a: .me
rivSiS ;


3U1 b. AUAmw
'1/1,1984 Built, Newer Roof 313466


$BE


Y.'lw,


322 S. ADAMS
/2/2, Florida Room,
Circle Dr. 313381


309 JEFFERSON
2/2/2 314191


4-I


U IS



pw~


6 TRUMAN BLVD
2/1/1, Corner Lot 312259


510 S. BARBOUR
2/2/1, Fain Rm,
Hurricane Windows 305433


5881 N. DECARLO DR.
3/2/2 1,800 Living 316732





2504 W. GARDENIA
on^' znar a


A 1


8165 N. IBSEN DR.
2/2/2 313079


f --- --�-4

9351 W. WISCONSIN CT.
3/2/1 310399






9036 N. ALPINIA DR.
3/2/2 Hot tub 316737

I&


314162


I 9485 BRIAR CT, INVERNESS
3/2/Carnort .5 314864


RMAPLE
ed Imperial,


iymH^h


I 9045 N. TRAVIS
305302 $169,900 Citrus Springs


$165,90


9017 N. MENDOZA
Citrus Springs


1870 W. BEACH PLUM 6975 REPS
2/2/2, Florida Room 311160 4/2, 1 ac


RIDGE POINT
re 315441


3198 N. TYRONE AVE
3/2/2, 1/2 Acre, 2007
D,.1i14. z7/rTtl *


719 iE IT TER.
er ,r,i ,-,.. . 007 built w/2
u.-..[: -. :.r unit w/ private
- ' . TI..- - ,l t rir, & tiled entry.
Flala ir.good location
cle I.:. H ., 44 & Hwy 19
i'n P"', :'l # ,er, Zoned B1
C',fr,: ,' :. . , ,e. Awesome
:-t ,Jt Z ::.rucco work for
. j'i ( .:,jrb appeal.
- - ; 299 900 312477


S ... . CITRUS SPRINGS &
- . . * DELTONA
This Commercial Lot
' - has a prime location
on the SW corner of
.. Deltona Blvd. & W.
' Citrus Springs Blvd.
S' ' This 11.7 MOL has an
alley on the back side
section of this site.
$699,900 312719


7718 N.
HWY.
491 & 200
This parcel
is on a high
traffic cor-
ner. Hwy.
491 & 200.
2.66 acre
lot zoned GNC. $245,000 315393


www.CitrusBestBuy.com * Toll Free 1-888-789-7100


I707731


,JUTUS ~AUJV17 ti 0. ..Ajl~NLL


a


, , �


7 in /1


12 ,0ee


100 N. CRY!
4/3/2, PC


, MEADOW PATH
Family Room


3/2.5/1,,
3-


m


I ..


�5. �O 0 j


/^...... c ., /'> ,r�~,, rCJ \ ,, ,, /^rn jf^l


1$112,9001


r\- rir


F$-232,500








9% Cl ,-' TrU.u 24 2007 CTU ONY(L HOIL


CHEAP
Continued from Page 6E

In a saucepan over low heat,
melt the butter and 1 cup of the
chips. Stir until smooth.
Remove from heat, and set
aside. In a large bowl, whisk
together eggs and sugar. Add
flour, cocoa powder and baking
soda. Stir in the melted choco-
late until combined. Stir in
remaining 3 ounces of choco-
late chips and nuts, if desired.
Fill cupcake liners 3/4 full with
batter. Bake until a firm crust
forms on the cupcakes, about
20 minutes. Remove to a wire
rack to cool, about 10 minutes.
Remove cupcakes from pan,
and continue to cool on a wire
rackl
Yield: 12 cupcakes.

I knew better. But in a
moment of weakness, I dashed
into the supermarket violating
every rule and principle I
know so well. I was short on
time, I was hungry, I'd had a
particularly stressful day, and I
let my guard down. And, boy,
did I pay for it
I know that everything about
shopping at a supermarket -
from the moment shoppers
approach the door until they
return to their cars - has been
designed to separate them
from their money. But all of
that is no match for savvy shop-
pers who choose to follow sim-
ple rules to make sure they can
get out of there without over-
spending.
m DON'T GO IN HUNGRY:
You believe that you can simply
stop in to pick up the few things


you need. But if you're starv-
ing, you're a dead aim for a
couple of steaks and a load of
snacks. You know what I'm
talking about. This is because
anything can happen when
you're hungry.
* DON'T TRY TO REMEM-
BER: Sure, playing "Brain
Age" on your kid's Game Boy
has revitalized your dead brain
cells, giving you the mental
acuity of a youngster - but
don't push it Without a list of
the items you've come to pur-
chase, who knows what could
happen? It's normal for our
brains to slip into neutral in
the face of fabulous food. A
written list is the crutch you
need to make sure you don't
slip and fall, so to speak
* DON'T TAKE YOUR
PLASTIC OR CHECKBOOK:
Cash - currency, clams, fold-
ing money, smackers, green-
backs - this is how you should
be paying for your supermar-


New Home Available Now!
84 S.Osceola St., Beverly Hills
Call To Schedule A Showing
Pictures Available On Our Website!
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ket purchases. What? Not con-
venient, you say? Of course not,
silly That's the point. Con-
venience is the reason you've
been dropping the equivalent
of a mortgage payment for food
every month. Making the
process a bit less convenient is
an easy way to slow that mind-
less drain on your income.
* DON'T GRAB A SHOP-
PING CART: Most of them
have wobbly wheels anyway, so
just walk on by when all you
need are those few items.
Surely you can carry the "few
things" you need. Or get one of
the hand-held baskets. The
point here is that you won't be
buying more than you can
carry.
* DON'T DAWDLE: Don't
give yourself time to soak in all
the great sights and smells
from the bakery, deli and rotis-
serie chickens. If you weren't
hungry when you arrived, you
will be soon. Get what you need


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with 30 years of experience in the
Construction Industry let us at
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WHERE
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See our web-site for further info.


and get out of there. For every
10 minutes you delay, plan on
spending another $30.
Thankfully, a bad day at the
supermarket is not the end of
the world. Recovery was all but
certain because I picked
myself up and renewed my
commitment to supermarket
sensibility.
MEN
DEAR MARY: The credit-
card companies are calling all
day every day, and they don't
seem interested in working
with me when I tell them I want
to pay them something, but I
can't pay them the full amount
The late fees and the high
interest keep adding up. I don't
know what to do. I keep getting
solicitations from debt-relief
companies, but if they can
lower my debt just by asking
the companies, why can't I do
the same thing by working with
the company myself? Mary,
please give me some advice on


how to handle the credit-card
companies. I find them the
most daunting. They are just so
pushy! I want to pay them all of
the money I owe them. I creat-
ed the debt, and it is my obliga-
tion to repay it. I am not trying
to shun my responsibility, but I
just need a little latitude. Any
help is greatly appreciated. -
Rebecca, South Carolina
DEAR REBECCA: The debt-
relief companies calling you
are sharks. Tell them to beat it
I want you to pick up the phone
and call Consumer Credit
Counseling Service (CCCS) in
Atlanta, Ga. I know these peo-
ple. They are reputable, they
can help you, and you can trust
them. They will deal with your
credit-card companies, and I
guarantee they will stop calling
you. Call right now: (800) 251-
2227. Promise me you will.
To learn more, go to

Please see CHEAP/Page 13E


Ji- I-/- /13/ * oo- /?- ano * sww.rEnelUareaiiv.m u.
Visit Our 1'ebsite To V'iew IMore Properties


* REDUCED - Pine Ridge corner lot, 1.05 acres mol..............-$80,000
* WATERFRONT 2/2 CONDO, boat dock with gulf access.........$225,000


BEVERLY HILLS CITRUS SPRINGS
2/2/2-washer/dryer, office, lanai $750 Beautiful, new 3/2/2- homes
3/2/1-dishwasher, washer/dryer $750 $900- $1000
SUGARMILL WOODS THE ISLANDS
beautiful new 4/2/2- Kilchen w/island Fumished 2/2 condos w/docks $950
& pantry Walk-in closets $1350 Unfumished 2/2 condo w/dock $850
[ .S.T , 1,J* J 1I I ,]1 4 JA I A ,,J-,S-- , ItL


.E Fax: (352) 382-5580 8015 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446
SERYour Sugarmill Woods Specialists H
Office 382-1700 * 1-800-237-1112 NO TRANSACTION FEES



E 111 CAROLYN LISTER EKEv GAIL COOPER
SMulti-Million Dollar Realtor - C.EY1 Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
Cell: 422-4620 OFFICE # 382-1700 E l r 3nEc
SCell: 634-4346 OFFICE# 382-1700






"' " HEATED POOL HOME on 3 rea. c.i1 iSoutnem rEa'
BUILDER'S OWN HOME constructed in 2006. FORGET ABOUT LAWN CARE in Ih".s beaui.Iul 312/2 HAMMOCKS VILLA with privacy plus Vaulted exposure 3 bedrooms, 2 baths & 24x21 garage.
Spacious great room style with large lanai & gorgeous 2/2/2 Oak Leaf Villa. Large great room, island kitchen ceilings, laminated wood floors and a sweeping golf Easement on East side of property. Well for irrigation.
pool. Gourmet kitchen w/breakfast bar, upgraded w/breakfast cove & laundry room, plus pleasant course view Two sided fireplace. Enlarged Master suite Great Room floor plan. All appliances stay. Breakfast nook
appliances & morning room. Tile & carpet. French Florida room. New carpet, tile & garage door. Newer w/garden tub. Corian countertops in kitchen, overlooks nice greenbelt. Wood cabinets. New pool
doors, pocket sliders & glass front doors. Master roof & A/C. Monthly fee covers lawn maintenance & Oversized side entry garage. Fuly maintained yard. heater. A/C new in 2002. Stately Oak trees in front yard.
garden tub & separate shower. #315483. $330,000 trash pickup. #315295. $189,000 Home only occupied 6 months a year! #315383 $269,500 Super Sweetwater home. #310986 $229,799


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




, , ,


SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 11E


ATTIC
Continued from Page 6E
Francisco Bay Area. The fami-
ly's last name was Barbour It
was radio's most popular and
longest running national serial.
The plot lines abounded with
impressive characters who
thought and talked together like
real people. This was unique
for the time and was a drama
rather than a comedy or "sit-
com." The advent of television
killed it, along with all other
radio dramas, comedies, and
revues. I hope this information
is useful. - T.R.M., Internet
Dear T.R.M.: I am glad you
took the time to write your
Remember When about "One
Man's Family"

John Sikorski has been a
professional in the antiques
business for more than 20
years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on
WJUF (90.1 FM) Saturdays
from 11 a.m. to noon. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic,
c/o The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429.


... " OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, June 24th, 12 - 4
" 3118 N. Sheriff Drive
Beverly Hills, FL 34442
B � P| PRICED TO SELL
- MAGNIFICENT AWARD WINNING HOME
From tihe para3e of rnc.mt of zprg 00
S. ..'BEST KITCHEN. BEST EXTERIOR BEST
"; CONSTRUCTION & BEST OVERALL Bu.il
cnr " a r-'_ of larn it haa , I-ep rciorn- plu.
" .' C.-lnl and an ,.er-lzeD pool Come
and see, it you will love It.
Direchons From 466 go into Pne Pidge entrance and make a left on Sheriff Dnve
First street on tile left, and dnie 1 2 miles. the hou.e is located orl your left side
:, -. : , . , ...


Building A Home








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TR UN- Ill L.I


Citrus Ridge Realty
- 9542 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs, FL 34434
Office 352-465-3000
Toll Free 1-866-465-3500

Lil Alenus & Hal Steiner Multi-Million
Realtor� Realtor@/Broker Dollar Producers


PINE RIDGE POOL HOME - 1 ACRE PINE RIDGE HOME ON 1 ACRE



---
3700 W COGWOOD 5507 W CISCO STREET
S2 2 ; n.oO I c-me in Pine Riage 1,3.:re Uno rjvcoa uilt .i."r ' ' nom.-
Fe-3[urej ' Cernmic re ,n iiina r.-.om n ith .:.irular orivie a,' Home :come.
.aininl' room n.:.,l. kit W.ccoa filorir.g *itn ran., upgrade- Ceiling- F3an.
in Tro ororn L3r'De irnji , wtr. 1Jn.;q eanaeoa ljundr, 3rcic fan greit
Do.:I Dimernc ,lon.) r,.. cii anr i- oU jri, rr.crT kitcnen Tranr ; C w i il[r3[icrn
*irI'oOWr irria_ .:[,-,r -,r-m '.. 2'zJ ..,trm Cureer" _,eCuriE .l;i ,
$305.750. S �1;.3 S288.500

CITRUS SPRINGS POOL HOME ON .49 ACRE REDUCED




7909 N. TRIANA DRIVE
Micn unacer*o: : ; noam off-r 9788 N. LORETTA WAY
e.canea acing N Mnrci.fure ;w u Mi[cn unalrooa ; 2 rnom
_re m D0I3mona Bri, f In inea ol 00 rjIc ncl'nlciei anro Ioc 3iOr
l icely l eta ;rr corner icot I. oimenional :roni.ci ci dti, Dpane
Itno.a.'C-o w irrigation The i.rli wicino*W, - Tr'n, A C 3na neat garaqg
,r-ower in m34er D3[n ic J 0."_3U'I onroDjner 9371366 S139.000
n r0- i 6 aooor Ol.ner IS21 ,E6 5139.000


CITRUS SPRINGS POOL HOME CITRUS SPRINGS 2006 HOME





513 N. DUQUET PLACE
Tnio QUO, 2 at:,'1 rni rne- .ice ,,;n i -or 3234 W. CENTURY BOULEVARD
e Oui lh te, m r nh , rh , floor In','.00 orlan new i 2 - nom.- ir, large
l.fn ADOii.rlCc.: inn ,.r.r c , i.'.onl lar, ar',lian _. ce o utlifUl nr-me vwcin
Cl.- Co t trail 2 .git r ur-e -ool i,: icor 0,' tili Don I ric [n'0 ,:,rf'r*
1.~ 2-1i. S219.900 . ,'0227 S169.300

NEW LISTING IN CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS





10031 N BISCAYNE DRIVE 8812 AMBOY DRIVE
Beauliful 2 2 i DOlu a r.n nome on Prin:a CCto Ir 2 2 2. lovely rnome near
co.rnrr loC Wlin Fenc-o re3r v3ra Tn., Cl[ruL SDorngs B81I Home feaiur.;
nc-me na3 I.:.-.i f uOD .race S E .C r C'over-D fr.-,nc[ ntr,; iv 1& F-am rm;
qra0ge n " 20.i12 IneCa orgeous ain.n, 3r3 nanov kit 13na COnle& TI
fjmnlli r.:...m n.:e 13n31 n1 BiS" , i.ocD PM Itni Dvric It *C n t Ia3{ iong
S169.900 B 1U6, 5129.900

CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS





2440 W NAUTILUS DRIVE 2424 W GARDENIA DR.
3 2 1 CLmM- cneck ni ,e Out c l.e very nice 2 1 GIrlni fa-mil room Wiun
corner r ICo rjle range 3an r.oooa new gorgeous golf course view,
3luminujm arena -cr4eiring on i3nai new ADocoIancr,.Iz Ihea Fencea in b;ckyara
aIsnwa3inE-r n no:)[ wa[tr nar3tr i0reai for small Deti rice location in
"10l75 $119.995. rnice neignrornroo �.1276J S154.900.

CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS




7939 N GOLFVIEW VOYAGER - UNDER CONSTRUCTION
IOU Wiii li'0 [nc : c ien flOOr plan ,:.F [his Built in ;007 3'2 2 n- eleg-i antr oeIn ,
e.rrerriei, IeI ll xept :' 2 . witn office Floor plan large screenea ianai aem
Den wnicn COuli DC 3 3ro oeorcom singles aual Dane iwnaows
insuilaea In.an1 ni[n tirteDo ODIcl glas' uograoca caoinets tia3ines s eel
winioo* lDeOal or a .manl Dot - fenceo aoonrnrce: i anciuaio garage Door
aDckvara Close to [nE qoit *c.urce ana opener -Ctone trim and rmuch more
mucn more ai16,.47 5146,750 . S169.300.


/^'1-r.irr /^'^rnil, /!T fn 'Utn/-,\JT/ E







CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'U ~ C. ,,-..~, T.,,..., )A ~)AA7


Paid Advertisement
Sa excited about," states
Where Your Dreams Matter! Bruce. "We arealso
thankful to have Mark
Stone and Scott
Do you have a life dream? Bruce has been able to Bender, founders of the Citrus
According to #1 New York achieve a few dreams of his County Home Team, as
Times bestselling author own. He recently acquired the consultants and mentors.
Bruce Wilkinson, everyone in Citrus County Their extensive
every culture has a dream. Home Team and . experience and
Achieving these merged it with Q expertise in
dreams is part of The Brunk . Citrus County
ourlifejourney. Dream Team is a great asset
Bruce Brunk, forming the both to our
team leader'forthe Citrus County , team and to our
Citrus County Dream Team. customers."
Dream Team Bruce explains, "With over Bruce R Brunk, Team
notes, "Most major 12 million in combined sales in Leader, brings to the team 24
life dreams include some 2006, the Citrus County years of computer software
aspect that involves real Dream Team has more development and
estate - buying, selling, leverage in fulfilling our management experience prior
investing, relocating. Several mission to provide friendly and to his career in real estate. He
years ago we realized that professional service with incorporates his consulting
providing top quality real honesty, integrity, and background into the real
estate service for . a expertise. " estate profession. He and his
our clients and . The Citrus wife Michelle also pastor
customers allowed - County Dream Team Christian Recovery
us to help people currently includes Fellowship Church in
take one more three full time agents, Inverness, Florida.
step in achieving all multimillion dollar Nancy Rushing, Buyer's
theirdreams." producers in 2006, as Specialist, has
Helping people achieve well as three support served clients
their dreams has become the professionals. "Working with since 1987 in
motto for Bruce and his team. such quality people is one various job
In the process of helping aspects of the Citrus County po siti o n s
others achieve their dreams, Dream Team that I am really including medical


and Customer Service
Manager for Wal-mart Stores,
Inc. Her years of experience
provides a background that
enables her to listen carefully
and make sure that your wants
and needs in a home are
satisfied. Tell Nancy what kind
of home you are looking for
and she will go to work for you.
Bob Spaulding, Listing
Specialist, has
operated several
business in Citrus
County over the
last number of
years. When it
comes to selling
your home, Bob
covers all the bases. He
addresses the four major
areas of pricing, presentation,
promotion , and
professionalism. His honest,
straightforward, no pressure
presentation allows you to
have the information and
advice you need to help you
make the best decisions to
achieve your dreams.
Christine Haberle,
Administrative Assistant,
brings years of experience as
a veterinary technician to the
team. Her cheerful and


oll 4% 0 1AO7>nn-


helpful voice may
be your first
contact with the
team as she
directs you to the
appropriate team
member that can
best help you. She also
handles tons of behind the
scenes details.
Michelle I
Brunk, Personal
Assistant, brings
both a Spanish
flair and a banking
background to the
team. She helps
with a number of behind the
support activities as well as
providing Spanish language
translation for Hispanic or
Spanish speaking clients.
George Brunk, Research
Analyst, also works
behind the scenes
tracking market
trends and
mark eating
effectiveness.
In summary, whether you
are buying, selling, or
investing, please call the
Citrus County Dream Team at
352-637-2777 and allow their
team to serve your dream!




. ,� .


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 13E


CHEAP
Continued from Page 10E

www.cccsatl.org. I wish you
well. Please stay in touch,
because I will want to know
how you are doing.

I know someone who owns a
small kitchen appliance but
chooses not to use it because it
is such a pain to clean. Really,
don't you think appliance man-
ufacturers should include a
self-cleaning option with every
product? There is one appli-
ance on your countertop that
has such a feature. Well,
almost. Read on.
* BLENDER CLEANER: I
love that my kids are big
smoothie fans, but I hate clean-
ing up the blender afterward.
The easiest way for me to clean
it is to fill the blender with hot
water, add a few drops of dish-
washing liquid soap, cover and
blend. After a minute or two,
the blender is basically clean.
All I have to do is rinse the
individual parts. - Jocelyn C.,
New Mexico
* CORK REMOVAL: If you
break the cork while trying to
open a bottle of wine, you can
strain out the cork by pouring
the wine through a coffee filter
into a pitcher. The filter should
catch the tiny cork pieces. -
Bob S., South Carolina
* RING OF HAIR BANDS:
Ever wonder what to do with
all the elastic hair bands your
daughter has accumulated? An
inexpensive way to keep them
all together is to use a couple of
plastic shower-curtain rings.
The elastic bands can be


placed on the ring. It is easy to
see all of the colors and take off
the ones you want. - Linda P,
e-mail
* NO-FOG MIRROR: If you
want to keep your bathroom
mirror from fogging up, try
cleaning it with shaving cream.
Just wipe it on, wipe off. Your
mirror won't fog up anymore.
-Jeff B., Kentucky
* SEW ON THE CHEAP: If
you like to sew, you know how
expensive sewing supplies can
be. Before you buy new things
at the craft store, check your
local thrift stores.
Many items of used clothing
yield great buttons, zippers and
yardage at a fraction of what
you would pay at the fabric
store. Old quilts, bedspreads
and bed pads can yield cord-
ing, yardage and padding, too.
Use that imagination and see
what you find. - Carol H.,
California
* OLIVE PITS: If you need to
pit a bunch of olives, it can be
really difficult to use a knife
without making a mess. Try
using a wooden chopstick to
quickly poke the olive pit out of
the olive.


It worked for me and saved a
lot of time. - Vanessa V,
Washington
* FRIDGE SPACE: If baking
pans and food bowls are taking
up too much space in your
refrigerator, take a baking
sheet and slide it on top of the
pan or bowl.
You can then stack more
items on top without harming
the food underneath. -
Brenda T., Wisconsin
* OIL SQUIRTER: I love
buying cooking oil in bulk, but
it was hard to pour the right
amount of oil into the pan from
the large containers. So I took a
clean, pull-top squeeze water
bottle and filled it with some of
the oil.
Now I can just squirt what I
need into the pan without
spilling. - Isabelle U., Georgia


E-mail questions or tips at
cheapskate@unitedmedia.com
or write to: Everyday
Cheapskate, P.O. Box 2135
Paramount, CA 90723. All
correspondence becomes the
property of Cheapskate
Monthly.


., 'Ri1'T Coast 'Reafli, ic.
so e , , (352) 302-3114
Email RIlerco3se3lItV b1asou llun net * aebsile YankeetownwarerirlantCm
THE TIME TO BUY IS NOW
We have lots from $17,000 - Direct Gulf Access Lots for $300,000


Cridland& GMAC

I CrRandRA. Real Estate


Inverness
Beverly Hills
Dunnellon
Crystal River
rn...i


352-344-5535
352-527-8100
352-465-7035
352-564-8331
472-62Q-2020


WEEKLY LINEUP
* Nearly a dozen medical proles,ionals contribute their
e>:pertise to columns in Health & Life. Tuesday
* Plan menus for the week from the ter-rpting recipes in the
Flair tor Food section Thursdays
* Get a lump on weekend enter tainmenrt with the stories in
Scene. Friday
* See what local houses of worship plan to do for the week in
the Religion section. Saturday
* Read about area Lusinesses in the business section.
Sunday
* Charitable organizations are invited to submit news release
es about upcoming community events.
* t'.ews releases are subject to editing.
* Call 563 5660 for dJetails.

gel SUG I W OD *IEDC 35


- ~ ~ OE HOUS 12-6 S O


the link betv

- Dent
State C

GENERA
A TRADIT.
* Consulta
* Architect
* Cost Esti
* Custom
A- 4C k


veen plans and reality

1iS amato
certified CGC-004344

UL CONTRACTOR, INC.
ION OF QUALITY SINCE 1972
tion & Project/Plan Review
tural/Design Services (
mating * Design-Build Construction
Crafted Homes * Waterfront Homes
" ltSl. H. mac &r B i.;ldnnn.gi


* Residential Renovations
* Commercial Construction & Remodeling
* Adaptive Re-Use & Restoration of Buildings *

430 NE 3rd Street,P.O. Box312,CrysalRiver,FL34423-1312
(32 75 I 7


I MARLIN CT E.iaul,ill T.lT-.r.:.r, .,


I lji-g'Xlj . - .


rv.*ITI:iL* 1:"--: 1 N*. C .. .... HOME near desir...able EDib (--N
between you and open water) in the desirable lakefront upgraded 3BD/2BA home /w 2 car NICE 2BR/2BA HOME near desirable El Diablo
community of Riverhaven. PRICE LOWERED detached garage. Screen porch, boat dock and Golf Course. Large great room, open floor plan. | " " "
FOR QUICK SALE $299,000. 158C312/160362 utility bldg. $235,000. 158D459/281014. Call A must see. $215,000. 158B776/314500. Call
Call Jo DeMacus at 352-564-8331. Phil Scorgie at 352-465-7035 Debra Kilbum at (352) 527-8100.
For ALL Citrus & 4OBILEIN
Marion MLS listings
Homes, Vacant land,
Mobile Park Homes & WHAT
* 3 Bedr
TRANQUIL IS THE ONLY WORD to describe go to CLEAN & SHARP. 1998 trailer close to river G * Update
this 3BR/2BA doublewide on 1+ acres. Home fishing. 1BR/1BA. Comes well equipped. | - Month]
has had impeccable care. 1582705/316680. Call Www.Cridland.com $15,900. MH1070. Call Wayne Sawyer at
Jerry Avery at (352) 344-5535. (352) 344-5535.
SERVICE YOU DESERVE;. PEOPLE YOU,,rT. UST nymr.altr
- - - - - - - - -


A NICE GOLF COURSE VIEW
oom / 2 bath "Hammocks" home
enclosed Florida room w / air
d roof shingles
y fee includes lawn care f7
MLS #314329 $220,000
urs;- wi nacyn a~o







14E SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mercedes Homes wins
Mercedes Homes received two
honors from the annual Citrus
County Parade of Homes for its
Jacqueline Palm with study model
home in Pine Ridge Estates. The
model was honored for its out-
standing exterior design, as well as
for the home's remarkable kitchen.
"We're honored to be identified
for our quality craftsmanship and
design," said Gary Moser, division
president for Mercedes Homes in
West Central Florida, including
Citrus, Hernando and Marion coun-
ties. "We're committed to providing
our home buyers with homes that
fit their lifestyles."
The Jacqueline Palm with study
features Mediterranean architec-
ture and design elements, such as
an archway entrance, rounded win-
dows and a courtyard patio. The
architecture continues inside the
split floor plan with arched hall-
ways, accent cut-outs and niches.
Four bedrooms, three full bath-
rooms and an attached three-car
garage are included.
The kitchen features an abun-
dance of cabinets and countertop
space, an island work area and a
built-in desk. A stylish tile back-
splash, stainless steel appliances
and gourmet touches make this
kitchen fit for a chef.
To learn more about Mercedes
Homes' award-winning Jacqueline
Palm with study model home at
Pine Ridge Estates, visit www.
mercedeshomes.com or contact
the model center at 746-3816.
The model center is at 3712
Mustang Blvd. W., Beverly Hills
and is open from noon until 6 p.m.
Monday, from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m.
Tuesday through Saturday and
from noon until 5 p.m. Sunday.
McEvoy
at Exit
Exit Realty
Leaders is proud
to announce that
Ron McEvoy is
Exit's newest
broker associate.
McEvoy can MREvoy
be reached at EicEvoy
586-2663. Exit Realty.
Top associate


David A.
Bramblett, bro-
ker associate
with Century 21
Nature Coast,
was named the
office's top listing
and top produc-
ing sales associ-
ate in the month
of May 2007.
"Century 21


David
Bramblett
Century 21
Natur "Cobat


Real Estate D GEST


.,-,-' '-'- " " r--' " -" . ' . " . -

Special to the Chronicle
The Jacqueline Palm model home in Pine Ridge recently won an
award for its exterior, as well as for the kitchen.


Nature Coast is pleased to recog-
nize David with this honor. He is a
leader and innovator, empowering
local homebuyers and sellers with
valuable information, helping them
to make informed real estate deci-
sions," said Hugh Tolle,
broker/owner of Century 21 Nature
Coast.
Bramblett can be reached at
302-2675.
Yuelling on top
Inverness
Horizon Realty,
856 U.S. 41 S.,
Inverness, con-
gratulates
Beverly
Yuelling as both
the top selling
sales associate Beverly
and top listing Yuelling
sales associate Inverness
for the month of Horizon.
May. Call her at
212-0416 or 637-4280.
Shields on board
Lisa VanDeBoe would like to
congratulate Gisele "Gigi" Shields
as Plantation Realty's newest


inductee into the
Board of
Realtors.
Shields comes
to Citrus County
from East
Brunswick, N.J.,
to enjoy the natu-
ral beauty and
tranquility that
the area has to
offer. With a
background in


Gigi
Shields
Plantation
Realty.


the computer real estate market of
New York City, she lives by her
motto "The customer always
comes first."
She can be reached at 422-
6948 or at the Plantation Realty


office, open seven days a week, at
795-0784.


Karen
Baxley
ERA American
Realty.


Rob Ash
ERAAmerican
Realty.


Wayne
HeMrnerich
RE/MAX.


Barbara

RE/MAX.


Multi-million club
Realtors Wayne Hemmerich
and Barbara Mills passed the $2
million mark in sales volume this
week.
Both RE/MAX agents have more
than a decade of experience in the
real estate profession and consis-
tently place in the top percentage
of agents locally.
Hemmerich is an agent in the
Crystal River office on U.S. 19.
Mills works in the Inverness


Gary
Baxley
ERAAmerican
Realty.


Lar Lopez
ERAAmerican
Realty.


Production milestones
ERA American Realty & In-
vestments is proud to announce
the latest production levels
achieved by sev-
eral of its agents
through June
2007.


In the compa-
ny's Inverness
office, Karen
Baxley and Gary
Baxley have
achieved the $1
million mark, as
has Lauretta
Hajik of the
Homosassa
office.


Lauretta

ERAAmerican
Realty.


Rob Ash and Lar Lopez,
Beverly Hills office, together have
reached the $2 million dollar mark
through June.20.07,,'' , ...


office on Main Street.
New team member
Charlotte G Realty & Invest-
ments LLC is proud to welcome
Realtor Kathi
Anderson-
Moore to its
sales team.
Anderson-Moore
is a native
Floridian. She
holds an A.A.
degree, A.S.
degree, Insur- Kathi
ance Adjuster Anderson-
license and has
her U.S. Coast Charlotte G
Guard Captain's Realty.
License.
She has always been heavily
involved in community service,
coaching for the Brooksville U.S.
Soccer Association, foster parent,
and still found time to serve as a
Cub Scout den leader and cub

Please see DIGEST/Page 26E


14E SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007


Cmus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FLORE


JO ANN CONDIT MARCIA (UNhINGhAI BILL DECKER


E


LEO SMITH BARRY COOK DIK ROCKW1EI[1 r.O"A Rfl


tmr


KATHY DAGUE HLEN FORTEIJ PAULA IIIIRIFI U UNDI Al


$476,000
Beautiful 3/3/3 Meadows Golf
Course home w/den or 4th BR,
family rm w/FP & htd pool w/spa.
Expanded Diplomat II has many
upgrades: volume ceilings, tile,
fused windows & Corian count.
Lg cir. drive.


I


$94,900
Nice & clean, well maintained 2/2/
1 w/carport. Large rooms, formal
living & dining room, family room,
furnished garage w/new door.
Beautiful Pergo wood floors. Very
nice home. Backs up to park.
352-527-1820 #316566







$449,900
Custom 3/2/2 Richmond model,
tile (except bedrooms) island
gourmet kit. w/top of the line
cabinets, Corian counters &
upgraded ss apple. Sitting rm off MA
for office/exercise area.
Membership Required.
352-746-0744 #312093


$422,000
Beautiful 4 or 3BR w/a den/office,
15x30 pool w/waterfall & brick
pavers. Kit. & BA have Corian
count., wood cab. Kit. w/stained
glass drs. Cent. vac, secur. sys., 2
car detached garage & cir. drive.
352-527-1820 #316879








$595,000
Spectacular 3/3/2 on 2.75 acres
w/a 40x40 barn, 3 board fence, 2
paddocks, w/plenty of cleared
property. Home has tiled arches,
neutral colors & beautiful kitchen
w/SS appl. New home
ready for horses.
352-527-1820 #316350








$389,900
Spectacular custom home w/great
view on the Oaks Golf Course.
Pool, 3 BR, library/den, living rm,
family rm, sitting or exercise area
off master BR. 2 fireplaces, wet
bar & surround sound.
Come & see.
Ir%7 74a-n7Aa *1 tisi qiA


$339,000
Absolutely Stunning! 3/2/2
Sweetwater Driftwood II w/
upgrades galore. Formal living,
dining & family rms, bright & airy
kit. w/granite counters, 24x12 self
cleaning pool, oversized garage &
much more.
352-527-1820 #316980


$229,900
Great home 3/2/2 w/heated pool.
Over 2000 Sq Ft of living area.
Large lanai with private
landscaped yard. Must See Today!!
352-746-0744 #316072


$279,900
3/2/2 pool home in mint condition.
Lots of upgrades & heated pool w/
spa. Security system, intercom w/
CD player & much more. Extra rm
off lanai for office/storage. Citrus
Hills Membership Required.
352-746-0744 #310463


$268,000
Bright & airy 3/2/2 features
ceramic tile & Pergo/hard wood
firing. Sec. system, cent. vac,
plant shelves & lots of storage.
Garage/shed has overhead
storage. Horse trail at the rear
of property.
352-527-1820 #312634








$199,000
3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage
home w/heated pool on 1/4 acre
available for immediate occupancy.
12 x 24 pool overlooks pristine,
intimate back yard. Low
maintenance and low price. Nice
curb appeal.
352-74fi6-0744 &311141


---.7.


$120,000
Lovely well maintained 2/2/1 55+
community. Popular floor plan with
porch in front & back. Close to
Beverly Hills Community Center,
pool & tennis.
352-527-1820 3f3mi3Ran


For a Visual Tour or Multiple Photos,


Go to: www floridashowcaseDronerties .com


, ,� .


SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 15E


r
.. 7 �


Open 7
Days
For your
convenience


IT






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Better than a beach blanket


Pack your cool

lifestyle to take

to the beach

JOAN BRUNSKILL
Associated Press writer

Getting fun gear together for
summer outings takes a little
forethought But count on car-
rying your cool lifestyle along
with you. It can be done: You'll
find plenty of lightweight
portables once you start look-
ing.
Often you'll be heading to
the beach, but many nifty com-
fort items now available are
equally useful for country pic-
nics or hikes in the woods.
Please do not forget to take
enough sunscreen for every-
one in the party. As for other
accessories, here are sugges-
tions for smart, colorful stuff
to check out:
First off, something in which
to stash your gear and roll it
away. A beach or sports-utility
pushcart can do it for you, and
the Wonder Wheeler by Rio
Beach (about $55 at-4the-
beach.com) is a good exam-
ple. These carts come in sim-
ple to deluxe versions. They're
all-terrain carts with wide
wheels, weighing about 11
pounds, that function like a
baby stroller; load them up
with coolers, sunshades, per-
sonal items and up to four
chairs. When they're empty,
they fold up easily to stow
away in a trunk or closet
How about an airy
screened-in room, big enough
for a few of you, that folds into
a bag to take to the beach?
Done.
There really are such con-
veniences, ranging from basic
to rather baronial:
* Basic: Playhut Large
Screen Room, 6 feet high with
36 square feet of floor space,
becomes your own instant
porch or patio. Its bug-protect-
ed but breezy space has mesh
sides and shade top. It weighs
about 14 pounds and comes in
a carrying case. Priced at
about $52.
* Baronial: Hammacher
Schlemmer's Instant Portable
Gazebo, which looks a bit like
a medieval knightly pavilion,
stands 9 3/4 feet high, with 10-
by-10-foot floor space, giving
you 100 square feet of shel-


AP Photo/Swimways
The Kelsyus reclining backpack beach chair and canopy by Swimways is one way to help keep cool
on the sands.


tered lounging or dining on
the beach or back yard. It has
mesh walls you can tie back
under'a vented roof; it weighs
52 pounds, folds into a neat 4-
foot by 8-inch wheeled carry-
ing bag, and is priced at about
$300.
Let's say you don't want to
be walled in at all, but you still
need a bit of cover. Whether
your beach is bounded by tall
palm trees or just a cement
wall will not matter if you
equip the gang with flirty hot-
pink or turquoise beach


umbrellas trimmed with raffia
fringe. They flash instant exot-
ic charm, have a very practical
function. Country Originals
carried by Home Depot,
priced at $45 each.
Now, having taken care of
shelter, under the umbrellas
you can invite people to
sprawl on beach towels or,
more ambitiously, on actual
furniture which may be basic
or elegant or both.
E Very cheery: generously
sized (78 by 39 inches), vertical
rugby-stripe beach towels,.in a,


choice of bright, stylish color
combinations, made of com-
fortably thick cotton. Priced at
$17.50, or $31 for two, from
Land's End.
* Very elegant: a portable
chaise lounge with a flowing
line that's one suave curve,
weighing in at 7 pounds on its
aluminum frame. Folds in half
for easy carrying. About $100
from Hammacher Schlemmer.
* Very nifty: a portable sling
hammock made of polyester
on a steel frame that needs no
tools to put up and can sup-


AP Photo/Home Depot
Home Depot provided this
photo of Country Originals
beach umbrellas trimmed with
raffia fringe.
port up to 250 pounds in
weight About $70 from Target
* Very basic: The full-length
Rio padded beach mat-
lounger with backrest and
waterproof bottom folds flat
and has a strap to make carry-
ing easy, plus a zipped pocket
for sunscreen or paperback It
is made of polyester and
weighs just over 5 pounds.
About $20 from
beachstore.com.
* Very new-wave: an inflat-
able hammock water-lounge,
chair-size rather than full-
length hammock. Made of
heavy-duty vinyl, from Target,
about $20.
E If someone wants to be
alone, between the umbrella
group and the pool lounger,
there's individual comfort and
shade to be had with the self-
contained, all-purpose Kelsyus
reclining backpack beach
chair and canopy.
The sitter adjusts the chair
to the desired angle, then
reclines in the shade of the
canopy The armrests convert
to backpack straps for hands-
free carrying; there's an
adjustable foam pillow and a
mesh cup holder. About $50
from The Comfort Store.
For more creature comfort,
there are other handy options.
* The Cooladio Picnic Pak
is more than just a cooler-pic-
nic set for two - it packs on-
the-go entertainment with a
detachable radio and an audio
input jack for your iPod/MP3
/CD player. It has an insulated
compartment, and space for
plates, cups, knives and forks,
stowed in the orange or lime
Please see BEACH/Page 17E


IRE STINnAY TIJNI~ 24 2007







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICI.E


BEACH
Continued from Page 16E

colored bag with its shoulder
strap and carry handles. About
$50 from picnicfun.com.
* The Cool Blast 2.5-ounce
Mister is a refillable canister 8
1/2 inches tall, about 11/2 inch-
es diameter that, with a push of
a button, whooshes out a very
fine, cooling, spray of water
over whomever or whatever
you aim it at Use distilled or
purified water for best contin-
ued function, a Misty Mate
spokeswoman said. Price $20.
* Two other heat-relievers Hammac
from Misty Mate are the Arctic Gazebo.
Cooling Cap, which looks a bit
like a rakish pirate head wrap, the corn
priced at $20; and the Arctic 1,000 tin
Tie Cooling Bandana, a pack of water.
two 41-inch-long bandanas, The w
priced at $17.50. bandana
Both are made of cotton minutes
loaded with crystals, which, head or


SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 17E


AP Photo/Hammacher Schlemmer
;her Schlemmer provided this photo of the Instant Portable


pany says, absorb up to
ies their own weight in

earer soaks the cap or
in water for about 20
, then wears it on the
around the neck to


benefit from hours of cooling
evaporation.
Both come in color choices of
blue, red, or stars and stripes, a
great fit for the Fourth of July
category of best-dressed beach-
wear division.


VACATIONING?
* Remember to take photos during the trip, to submit to the
Dream Vacation Photo Contest.
* Send in a photo with a brief description of the trip. Include
the names of anyone pictured, and include a contact name
and phone number on the back.
* Weekly winners will be published in the Sunday Chronicle.
* At the end of the year, a panel of judges will select the best
photo during the year and that photographer will win a prize.
* Submit photos to the Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River, FL 34429.


WE HAVE THE POWER TO SAVE YOU MONEY www.mysticrealty.net


3850 E. GULF TO LAKE HWY., INVERNESS, FLORIDA




�rer a n ...n vernes. of land almost on Rte. 41 b' ut
maintenance included, lawn, trash p/u, to Ola but serene enough to make at Looks like new. Has fairly new
roof, painting. H om e justre furbished - private and com fortable. H om e in | l-"'' ,, ,. ,i . : ,- , ' _: ,,,r, .;-*
carpet, f poo ls, painting. EUED FOR great shape except for a little interior mpesT, ,:t,'h "'. ' i."..i.".eI. :' �"
QUICK SA E$109,900 pait ASKI NG$85,000 asking price ofo Nf$94,900


11145 W. Bentbow Path, Crystal River, FL 34428


F_


- .-< . . - -


GRAr'?


.4 f


i I
U.AWAM


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I I ,, I
- I A, 4 - .


GARAGE,


S' 1 ..... ,j 12 1 .iI

... I ........ . . . ... ...........................
. . . .. .............................. .


Rose

I


1.4 , :r,1 i




GARAGE
18'8X20


.$ .4
1: ATH CEILING i|


KITCHEN l- - M
14 X 13 :

r, n^


* .+


Orchid


I









CFCC. Realtors offer courses in Lecanto
CFCC, Realtors offer courses in Lecanto


Special to the Chronicle


Central Florida Community College
and the Realtors Institute of Citrus
County are accepting registration for
real estate courses that are offered dur-
ing the day or in the evening to fit your
schedule.
The classes will meet at the Realtors


Association of Citrus County, 714 S.
Scarboro Ave., Lecanto.
Real Estate Principles and Practices,
which is the required course for the
new practitioner, will meet 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. in nine weekday sessions between
July 3 and 25.
The evening section will meet 6 to 10
p.m. in 14 sessions between Aug. 27 and


Oct 2. The course fee is $285 and
includes books.
The 45-hour Post-license Sales
Associate course will meet from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. in seven sessions between July
30 and Aug. 15, or from 6 to 10 p.m. in 11
sessions from June 19 to Aug. 2.
The course fee is $180 and includes
books.


The 14-hour Continuing Education
class required for license renewal will
be from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 20 and 21,
or 6 to 10 p.m. Aug. 14 through 16.
The course fee is $59 and includes
books. 1
For information or to register, call
249-1210. Classes are contingent upon
minimum enrollment of 10 students.


FUNGUS
Continued from Page 1E

gardens in the urban areas
around the Manatee County
farm. After the infestations
were confirmed, all infected
plant material was voluntarily
destroyed.
A technical committee was
formed to develop eradication
techniques that include host-
free fallow periods (time
frames when no host material
is planted), fungicide applica-
tions, and frequent scouting of
production and fallow fields
and surrounding neighbor-
hoods.
Of the six rust fungi that can
infect gladiolus, U. transver-
salis is the most economically
important. If uncontrolled,
total yield losses can occur.
Pustules form mostly on
foliage, but can also form on
flower spikes. Rust spores are
spread by wind, water, on peo-
ple and garden tools, and long
distances by movement of
infected plants. It is not harm-
ful to humans or animals.
In 2007, there was a recur-
rence of the infestation in the
two commercial areas and the

�r 7i


Department and the iUnited
States Department of Agri-
culture are working closely
with growers to clean up infes-
tations. In addition, the De-
partment is surveying all prop-
erties within a two-mile radius
of the commercial farms to
make sure no gladiolus rust is
present in residential gladiolus
plantings.
Because this rust disease is
very damaging to gladiolus


plants, and has impacts on
commercial flower shipments,
the Department is making
every effort to eliminate it from
Florida. The disease has also
been detected in California,
where similar action is being
taken.
Florida agriculture officials
are asking anyone with gladio-
lus plants in their landscape to
be on the lookout for and
report any suspect gladiolus


REGENCY PARK CONDO FORMER MODEL HOME
Very motivated seller for this 2BR/2BA/ Never lived in 3 BR/2BA/2 Car Garage. New carpet!
1 car garage! $120,000. MLS #312985 Central water/sewer.$212,000 MLS#317058


". ., _ . .,

HAMPTON POINT MOORINGS AT POINT O' WOODS!
Brand new 3 BR/2 BA, 1800 sq. ft. living. Enjoy carefree living in this waterfront villa.
Waterview. $239,900 MLS#300593 3 BR/2 BA/garage.End unit.Great price! $119,900

CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 1352302-6714 =


rust symptoms to the
Department's helpline at (888)
397-1517, and, if requested,
state plant inspectors will
examine suspect gladiolus
rust-infected plants reported


by, concerned parties at no cost
or penalty to the reporting
party. For more information on
gladiolus rust or other plant
pests and diseases, visit
www.doacs.state.fl.us/pi.


0 0


.- 2- '2-01OF LIVING SPICE, - ND
ENTRY FOYER, LR OPENS TO READY FOR ENTERTAINING AT
SCREENED PORCH, DINING AREA IT'S BEST.
OPENS TO PRIVATE GARDEN Mr. and Mrs. Clean live here and they
This villa is more open than many homes enjoy Ig.LR,Fl.rm, 2BR, 2 baths,
without yard work. $137,500 MLS 2 car screened gar. MLS #313086
#314465 $178,000
Dir: Cypress Blvd. to Golfriiew, left on Dir: Cypress Blvd. becomes Cypress Cir.
Dogwood #21 left on Seagrape and left on Woodmill #1




BOW DISH .............
H (352) 628-7800 m i -c REALTY ONE
Direct 5460 S. Suncoast Blvd.
(352) 422-0296 Homosassa, FL 34446


T' Lou Me/e, Realo 2 AMERICAN
S4511 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, FL 34465 E REALTY & INVESTMENTS

Cel s 5 69E R6 ALWAYS THERE FOR YOUr


.~ .If you're looking or a.
S secluded place to get ..
BEAUTIFUL PINE RIDGE POOL Wil ', Iis is it. Mostly -.
HOME. TII: n I- t, :5 Imii THIS HOME HAS OVER 2900 SQ. wooded, wilh a few small ."." -.... .,.
is sure to please. With over 2400 sf elegant FT. of living area, a huge master suite w/ creeks, fields, and a. .E . S
sitting room or nursery, huge master bath, BEVERLY HILLS - P-..',I .:. :," i
oversized 3 car garage, new roof, new 5 ton Small pond. Roads cut on well maintained 2/2/2 has new carpet & paint, INVERNESS - 2BR mobile on landlocked
granite countertops, upgraded appliances heat pump. Diamond Brite pool, a fabulous property. On a well- newer range w/microwave hood & newer canal has an additional office/den and sits on
oads of tie, beautiful landscaping, this is a kitchen with granite countertops, upgraded . refrigerator, air conditioned FL room overlooking over an acre. With covered parking for 4,
home that shows prde of ownership. Come appliances & far too many other upgrades to maintained private dirt backyard with Citrus & Fig trees. A must see!! screened porch with view of beautiful trees,
see for yourself, you'll be glad you did. MLS list here. This is a home to see. $374,900 road. Lots of wildlife! MLS#310189 $109,900. See More at newer siding & roof, this home is a must see!!!
#314773. $369,900 MLS#311242 " www.visualtour.com tour #0085-4408 MLS#309248 $75,000.
- .. _.. , . _.,.~ . .d...4.5 ACRES 1 S S


,- IN CRYSTAL RIVER
pus on gadls leaves withf trees. 1 . on 3 lOriS ce r 4 . - Tr,$129,900.
a; l , rrir
CRYSTAL RIVER has buillir, ia,,r, ER
. . c2., . .... L''r''..' . -":', ,,, ir,,- e.,, ,,, ., tiJrniture Th- land ha. 2
A !.._._____...__ _-_.._.._�_. ... ,, , *,,,I ,' r ..,' , 1,1.1,n,1 POINTOW OODS T.r. ir c r.. ir i
Photo: Florida Division ofAgriculture and . ......
Consumer Services upgrades. This Michelle model has beautiful double insulated windows; bay windows. purchase also includes an additional lot. Close Needs some work but the land and
Closer view of fresh Uredinial wood cabinets in kitchen & a huge 25x10 screen Updated kitchen, oversized garage. Shed, large to boat ramp with access to Inverness chain of building possibilities are worth the
room. Fully landscaped with a fenced backyard lanai. Home Warranty provided. MLS#315402 lakes Take a look , today., tIncludes home
pustules on gladiolusl leaves. , with fruit trees MLS#310547 $189,900. , $239,900 1 warranty! MLS #3130344$174,900.. price. MLS#315475$129,900.


REDUCED
4.88 ACRES
DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE in
need of extensive repair. The
value is in this beautiful 4.88
acres. Build your dream home
here, located behind Citrus
Hills. $130,000 MLS#302538
2.3 ACRES on well-maintained
road in mini farms. Quiet &
private. $49,000 MLS#312555


CiTwus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





. 4� 4


rCrrrrc Crsrar-rv y rT1 frs.nrnrrr r


SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 19E


10846 N. KOMENT PT. 1520 W. DDIG
tni, pssib o fia c fo di , f- 1520 W. REDDING
.41' 1 Tri I t, , jlll .i.r u p,,6I I, ,.- , ,,TAj .. I " j,-,, ji %rj Al- :lRr- . 111

of potential, possible owner financing, call for details. $489,000 foraworkshop. $340,000


.9. :5

~'5.* .~,..


3645 W. BRAZILNUT 671 w. COLBERT CT.
Buyers opportunity (14 rooms), this is your chance town a huge home Nice 3 bedroom home in Oakwood Village. Close to the golf course
featuring 4/5 bedrooms, 4.5 baths with indoor pool w/changing shopping, and recreation center. This home has been well cared for and
room Separate out buildingwith additional garage and workshop/loft. shows pride of ownership. Don't miss out on this exceptional value. Call
Don't wait call today. $499,900 today for your personal showing. $174,900
HilliilM[ lllilliiailli T . 7Eli .. t-.- ..-- - .. E ' :.', . . W-l - . 72 " am


923 RUSSELL 8253 N. RONDA
Light, bnght and open completely remodeled 3BR/2BA with bonus Set on .75 acre is this Custom Built Goldcrest Home complete with
room! Oversized fenced lot. LEASE OPTION AVAILABLE. 3BR 2 BA & a beautiful solar heated pool. Enjoy the custom granite and
$114,900 beautiful tile floors. $269,900


2750 MERCURY
Great square footage for the price! Nrice dOuolevvide
in great condition. Decorator colors already in place.
Large yard, close to Walmart, Lowes, and other
ln van on A6o0 Cahi


24 E. MURRAY
2 bedroom home for sale in Beverly Hills. This home is a must see, call todc
Pnced to sell at $89,000


352 N. MANOR WAY
36 W.DF DL..... 6215 N. PUEBLO TERRACE.
I *W1, .. D.r r o ifiL ....... ,-,~r..- 5 r. . .'..:.. i.:... 1 ,.1 i,'" I" .... .. r-,, IS,,'1.,1 , t i . ,',. 1 ,C I' I.. . "C,',: , 5i. . ... 11 ".r,," H.15 , ...... E I

eaulU maser sue & an increile master Dain see i oay. $279,900 most o nome $229,000. usd as ade or formal dining room SEE IT TODAYI $319 900 ala:. u ala. $249,900.





2913 N. PAGE AVE
aN .pate lot.with beautiful oaks and lots of great character This home has 4 5366 E. SOUTH CROSSING
Owner built home with upgrades. Open/split floor plan. Great room, dining 6535 E. GURLEY bedrooms, 2 baths, a large master suite, a formal dining room and a great Your home awaits you! Great potential with this
room, island kitchen wth breakfast nook, laundry room 3 bedrooms bath Ve ry nice 2 B 2BA home in the Inverness Highlands Enjoy a private large fireplace living room. Set back from a paved road is this gem complete affordable newer mobile home. Open and inviting split
SwithGrea MasterBath, screened porches-entry andana s threesets setting Tis home has a spa room large Florida room and has an with largecovered porches front and back anda large detached garage bedrooms bth ith cious alk-in
and rear 6 person hot tub included with thisloelyhome. $198,00 - additional. buildable lot avallabl Just $119,900 $91,000wor p This hme is ped sell. Cunt'lg a affordab closets. Home sits on pretty wooded lot. 99,000


__ __ Y,-J








































IBR unfurn $400; 1BR RV
Park Model, turn., $325;
IBR, scr.rm, crprt $525
NoPets/Smoke628-4441
CR Riv./HERNANDO
1,2, & 3BR, $350-5575.
No Pets (352) 795-5410
CRYSTAL RIVER
Beautiful 3BR SW
$425mo. 352-621-5309
HERNANDO
1/1, like new, no smok-
ing/ pets, $550./mo., 1st.
Ist. sec. (352) 746-6477
HERNANDO
2/1, fenced, quiet
area, 1st, last sec. $500
mo. (352) 344-2335
HERNANDO
2/1, fenced, quiet
area, 1st, last sec. $500.
mo. (352) 344-2335
HERNANDO 2/11/2
Lg. mobile, w/FP, $495,
Ist/lst/sec Day 344-3444
Eves 344-3084
HOMOSASSA
2/1, convenient to US19
$450 mo. 1st, last, sec.
(352) 634-2368
HOMOSASSA 3/2
2 mi. S. of Home Depot,
No pets, $750. mo. .
352-637-1142 220-1341
HOMOSASSA 3/2
DW sits on 1.5 priv.ac.
Quiet, nice neighbors.
$600, 1st, last, sec.
Walter, (561) 248-4200
HOMOSASSA
Nice, 3/1, new cabi-
nets, $600 mo. 1st, last
& Sec. (305) 896-3375
HWY 488/Dunnellon
2/1, Ig. prvt. lot.$425. No
pets. (352) 795-6970
INVERNESS 2/1
Furn., crnr lot. $550/mo.
352-201-1222
INVERNESS
2/1,$425/mo $400. sec.,
ref., 352-422-5661
INVERNESS
3 Vacancies. Starting @
$450./mo. Ist/last/sec.
352-302-8210
INVERNESS
3/1, $550, 1st, last,
sec. No Pets
(352) 287-9268
LECANTO 2/1 SW
Rent or sell $560/mo.
1 pet. (352) 564-0856
or 628-3090
LECANTO 4/2
New Carpet, Flooring &
Paint. $800/month +
deposit. 352-613-7670
NE Citrus Cty.
2/1 near St. Rd 200 &
CR39, paved St. quiet
area. No smoking/ pets.
$450/mo,1st/ Ist /sec.
(352) 447-5998


Chronicl


To place an ad, call 563-5966



k .Classifieds

In Print



and


NA . . .. . .Online


All


The Time


C= fo Ren Cf for Sal 4hadLn hanLad C iPak 0 frR tfoRetF rnise


Great 1.25 Acre
$91,500
352-726-7533
www.Reliance-RE.com
Reliance Realty
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5 SW mobile home
in+55 Park. Good
condition, furnished,
CHA, $13,000 OBO
Priced to sell
352-527-6521
Floral City - 2005 MH on
Canal 2/3 acre many
upgrades $199,000, For
more Info. Call Patti
Prudential Tropical
Realty, 1-800-682-8767
Cell (727) 858-5992
HOME ON 1/2 ACRE
Must sell 3/2, 28x52
on end of road,
quite; home has
deck. Sacrifice
$3,000 down,
$745/mo.
Call 352-621-9182
INVERNESS
55+ Lakefront park
Exciting opportunity! 1
or 2BR Mobiles for sale.
Scr. porches, appl.,
water incl. Fishing piers.
Community center.
Leeson's 352-476-4964
NEW 3BR /2BA

Nicely treed,private
lot. With driveway
carport, shed and
covered deck with
sun room. Located in
55+ park just walking
distance from pool
and clubhouse.

SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
(352) 794-7308
RARE OPPORTUNITY! 200
ft. Frontage w/ mobile
on Homosassa Trail
zoned MDRM Ron Egnot
1st Choice Coldwell
Banker. 352-287-9219
Singlewide mobile
home, like new & road
worthy. New carpets,
counter tops, paint.
A/C, 12'x35' $5,500 obo
(352) 628-2769
Small Park 55+, 2/1,
completely furnished
Leaving Country
Just Bring Your Tooth-
brush & clothes
(352) 228-2239

-----



r RENTAL FINDER
| www.chronlcle
rentalflnder.com _


joins Sweetwater Pt. on
the western boundary
then south to the
waters of Lake Tsala
Apopka.4300 S. Owens
Trail, (352) 637-3207
3/2 MH on 1/4 Ac.
Handyman Special.
$55K OBO
(352) 746-4596
3/2 Huge DW 27 X 52
Garden Tub, Sky Light, 2
Decks, Citrus Trees, New
Roof & AC Maint. free.
$78,900 Neg.
352-563-6591
4/2 Palm Harbor Triple
Wide. Loaded w/tile &
all appll's. Huge cvr'd
porch. New in-ground
pool. Lg. site built block
3 car grg. Fenced 2.45
ac. lot w/solar pwr'd
gate. Many extras.
Asking $189,900. Poss.
Owner fin. Call
Crawford 352-212-7613
60x27 DW 1600 sq.ft.
3/2, built in 2001 on 3.86
acres, paved roads
8Ox80 fenced back
yard, 16x12 workshop
2-car carport, fieplace.
Asking $159,900
(352) 726-2286
Beautiful Lake
Panasofkkee, 1998,
DW.3/2 on dbl lots,
master suite has walk in
closet w/ dressing area,
garden tub & shower,
spacious vaulted
ceilings, eat in kit w/
indoor utility rm, near
boat launch & lake, 2
decks & fenced yard,
$240,000
(352) 793-2586
BEST OF BEST
5 yrs. in a row
TAYLOR MADE HOMES
Clearance sale- all
models on sale
2008 models are
arriving. All 2007's
must gol Come by and
save, homes starting
@ $32,900.
Used-New- Repo's
Call 352-621-9181
CRYSTAL RIVER 5/2
Bonus room, FP, wood
floors & tile, /2" drywall
thruout, 9x42 scrn.
country prch. on lac.
$125,000 (352) 442-9603
CRYSTAL RIVER 5AC.
3/2 1600sqft. w/office
Very private, paved Rd.
Deck, shed, workshop
Call for email pictures
352-795-3026 $169K
HERNANDO-$39,90011 .
Nice 2/2 on 1/3 Ac.,
Won't Lastl Great Rental
Oaoortunitvl Beautiful
Areal 352- 400-5367


FINANCED?
2007 FACTORY CLOSE
OUT!

Give us a try
5 new homes 2,3 & 4
bedrooms.

All sizes All prices

SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
352-794-7308
HERNANDO, 2/11/2
2 scrn. porches, 1 wood
deck, all new inside,
quick sale $43,900.
at 3199 E Buffalo Ln.
West side of Hwy 200,
Daytime 352-344-3444
Evening 352-344-3084
HOMOSASSA -
NEW HOME
3/2 1550 sq. ft. on 1/2
acre. Garage, fenced
yard, nice trees,
grassed yard. Don't
miss out! $119,900,
financing available.
Call 352-621-3807
HOMOSASSA 3/2.5
On Gorgeous lac.
Pool/huge kitchen.
Home Warr.$136,500
Sharon Levins. Rhema
Realty (352) 228-1301
INVERNESS
Newly Renovated.
Ready for Occupancy!
2/1 on /2 Ac. 0% Down
$415/mo. 352-746-5912
MOVE IN NOW!
Beautiful homes
ready for you now.
$500 down or no
closing cost or
as low as
5.75% interest rates.
Call for a free credit
approval and come
see your new home.
352-621-9183




14 x 56, 2/1/
w/ 10 x 17 addition,
Carport, roofover, cor-
ner lot, senior park,
C/H/A $21,500.
352-302-2824
Crystal River, 2/1,
14x48 1985, close to all
convenience. Sm. Park
Low lot rent. $8,900
(352) 795-0640
9am-3pm
FORESTVIEW
DW 2/2/carport, semi
furn. new water heater,
all appliances, lots of
extras. $37,500.
(352) 795-3549


Patio & Shed,
Remodeled , 55+
$25,000. (352) 628-1171
Melody Mobile Pk. 55+
2/1, Lg. Laundry, Scrnd
Prch, Carport. Part.
Furn, $10K 352-726-0018
NEW & USED DW's & SW's
Starting at $15,000
Quiet 55+ Homosassa
Park. 352-628-5977

NEW HOMES
ARRIVING IN JUNE
$79K - $128K
Resales Available
$30K-$1 15K
Excellent Amenities!
5 * , 55+
Gated Community
Phone 352-795-7161

OPEN SUNDAY 2-4
$$$32,900.$$$
LOVELY 2/1, Open Fl.
plan, master walk in,
AC, apple's, new rf. 55+
gated comm. w/ pool
clubhouse & activities
5405 S. Stoneridge Dr.
Inverness 352-344-5805
SPACIOUS 2/2
Utility Shed. Own
your own land.
$40K (352) 422-4496




r sss s--Iss-- Isi s
r MENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com







RESIDENTIAL
BLACK DIAMOND. 3W/22.. sI2o wIO
BEVERLY IILLS. 2/2/2. ......... 850/MO
BEVERLYIIIILLS 1L5/1 ... . 5625/MO
BEVERLY1IL.L l 1 ....... ... - ( .)/MO
CRYSTAL RIVER. 312.W/,... .S100/MO
nOnLcrn'.r ,W . .. -51350/MO
HOMOSASSA.2/2 DUPLEX,.. 0$550/MO
INVERNESS 2// .W/i. .. . ... K/M0 O
INVERNESS .../2/2. ....... 120(/MO
LECANTO 3/22.ACRIAGE 3..150M/MO
LECANTO, 3/2/2
RNISI ..ED ..... . ,$ISu(/MO
SUGARMILL WOODS.






HOMOSASSA
Prime comm. office
space directly across
Hwy. 19 frm. Sugarmill
Woods. $15/sf. No CAM
(352) 302-0764


FAIRVIEW ESTATES -

3/2/2 -4030 Indianhead Rd.-
..............$1000 incl. lawn care
BEVERLY HILLS- OAKWOOD VILLAGE
3/2/2 - 1 yr new - 786 W.
Colbert Ln.................... $850
BEVERLY HILLS - LAUREL RIDGE
2 possible 3/2/2 - on golf course,
incl lawn care. 469 W. HILLWOOD
PAT ............... .. .... ........ $875
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1- 73 S. Fillmore St..........$575
2/2/2 - w/family room. 3411
Sunrose Path.........................$775
2/2 - w/ sceen porch. 27 E. Murray
St ................................... -$500
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 New in '06 -1958 W.
Andromedae ............. $800
3/2/2 new in '06 - 1431
W. Jocelynne St.............$800
4/2/2 Brand New 2081 W.
Paragon Ln..................$1100
4/2/2 Brand New 7320 N.
Deborah Terrace.........$1000
3/2/2 new in '06
658 N. Savary St...........$850
3/2/2 new in '05 3880 E.
Byrd St..........................$850
2/2 duplex units 3354 E.
Crown Dr...................... $600
2/2/1 House, 3 acres......$800

2/2/1 waterfront pool home -
5675 S. Sandalwood Way.....$625
PINE RoIDGE
3/2/2 2 Acres w/pool - 5015 W.
Ranger St .................... $1400
Includes Pool and lawn care.









AVAIAUEUE RENTAlS
JUNE 23 2 24,2007
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Bed, 1 Bath Apts .................. $00
: --"T F.. . ...i. 't y00
HOMOSASSA
2Bed, 1Bath
Mobile Home............. ...$. 525
SUGAAIULL WOODS
3 Bed, 2 Bath ............................. $900
CiRUS SPRINGS
3 Bed, 2 Bath.. ............. ..... $900
STORAGE UNITS
12x12x20 .............. $100.70



INVERNESS 3/2/2
House,Scrn Rm No Pets
$1,050/mo + Sec.& App
Don Crigger Real Estate
(352) 746-4056


RENTALS
BEVERLY HILLS
3670 LAURELWOOD LP... $825
2/12/ Lakeside Village
Over 55 Comm. Pool, Priv.
79 S. TYLER ST .................$700
2/2/1, Family Room
38 S. MONROE ST ........... $650
2/1/1, Family Room
37 S. MONROE ST ....... $575
2/1 /1, Screened Patio
PINE RIDGE
3751 N. STIRRUP DR.......$1500
3/2/2, Pool, Lanai
inc. lawn and Pool Service
CITRUS SPRINGS
9269 N. ALPINIA DR........$850
3/2/2, Split Plan






CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Apt. W/D Hookup ..................... 500
2/2 Spacious Condo ...................... $700
2/2/1 Cute House .............. ...... $775
2/2/27 Rivers Golf Area ..............$800
312/2 North of City ................ $8....... $800
313/11 Waterfront .................. $1150
INVERNESS

CITRUS SPRINGS
412/2 New House ......... ........ $100
3022 Super Cute .. ....................... $900
SUGARMILL WOODS
4/2/2 New ................................. $975



Mane E. Hager
Broker-Realtor-Property Manager
417NE2ndlS, C ystatRiver,FL
(352) 79s-RENT * (800) 795-6855
Renta sl@lnfionllne.net

Property
Management &
Investment
Group, Inc.
Licensed R.E. Broker

)>- Property & Comm.
Assoc. Mgmt. is our
only Business
)- Res.& Vac.
Rental Specialists
)- Condo & Home
owner Assoc. Mgmt.
Rabbie Anderson
LCAM, Realtor
352-628-5600
info@oroDertv
manaamentarouo.


RENTAL FINDER
S www.chronicle
rentalflnder.com
----- ag - .


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 $600/month
(352) 228-7328


Newly Renovated
1 bedrm efficiencies w/
fully equip kitchens.
No contracts
necessary. Next to
park/ Kings Bay
Starting @ $40
a day for a week or
more.(includes all
utilities & Full Service
Housekeeping)
(352) 586-1813
FLORAL CITY
Lakefront 1BR, Wkly/Mo
No Pets. (352) 344-1025





S2BD, 1 BA, w/Iaundry
Room, Cracker I
100% Remodeled. I
Deeded, access to
River, on Jungle
Camp Rd. Inverness.
Very quite & safe
I area, cute, cozy, I
clean. I need good
Tenants here. 525.
I mo,. plus dep. I
(352) 257-9658

Apts./Studios Inglis
$350-$600 All utilities.
(352) 447-2240

CANDLEWOOD
COURT
APARTMENTS
2 BR Apartments
now available.
Starting @ $530/mo.
Please call
(352) 344-1010
307 Washington Ave.
Wed., & Fri.
8am to 5pm
Equal Housing
Opportunity





Crystal Palms Apts.
1 & 2 Bdrm Easy Terms.
Crystal River. 634-0595

"CRYSTAL RIVER
& INVERNESS
ONE MONTH FREE I
1, 2 & 3 Bdrm/Studio
(352) 795-2626


CRYSTAL RIVER
1 BR, special rate,
laundry on premises
LAKE LUCY
APARTMENTS
(352) 489-5075
leave message and
phone number


,- 'I., . . . .. ..





, ,� .


Cr(rITrr Cnrnvrv (F.) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 21E


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2.5, $650 mo,
(352) 563-1588
CRYSTAL RIVER
Seven Rivers Apts.
1 & 2 bedrooms,
clean, quiet. Close to
mall & hospital.
Complete laundry
facilities.
No application fees.
(352) 795-1588
Equal Housing
Opportunity
HERNANDO
2/1 Very clean,
$550/mo. Sec. dep.
352-527-0033
HOMOSASSA
Studio, Full Kit, Ig. bath,
priv. entrance, pool,
no pets $600mo/all.
ref./sec. (631) 745-4624

SKNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOUSES I
Corner of Druid Rd.
&581. 7 & 2 BR
available starting
@ $485. For more
Information call
(352) 344-1010
Or apply @
307 Washington Ave.
Wed. & Fri. 8 to 5
Equal Housing
Opportunity



.--- --/
LECANTO
1 Bedroom Apartment
352-613-2989/746-5238
Rent-to-Own
Brand New Home 3/2/2
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (352)875-5645
RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS
Accepting
\applications for 1
Bedroom Wheelchair
accessible units
Rental Assistance
Available.
to those who qualify
Laundry facility and
on-site management.
(352) 795-8024
TDD 1-800-955-8771








Crystal Palms Apts.
1 & 2 Bdrm Easy Terms.
Crystal River. 634-0595
CRYSTAL RIVER
2BR & 1 BR, all Util. + HBO
inc. $800./$700. No dogs
(352) 422-3261


- U H

LANDMARK
REALTY

We have different
type rentals for
different situa-
tions. Some with
pets allowed.

Ask for Kathy
or Janet
352-726-9136
311 W Main St.
Inverness


2700+ sq ft Bldg.
Can divide into
Med/Prof/Retall Pine
Ridge. Your floor plan.
(352) 527-9013
CRYSTAL RIVER
REDUCEDII
Newly remodeled
OFFICE & RETAIL UNITS
VARIOUS SIZES Hwy 19.
Waybright Real Estate
Inc.352-795-1600
CRYSTAL RIVER
Zoned Comm.-
Approx. 400 sq ft.
$600.moContact Lisa
(Broker/Owner) @
(352) 422-7925
HERNANDO
ALESCI'S CORNER
Office 1,500 Sq. Ft.
1-800-557-4044
INVERNESS
1.000 sf. Office/Retail.
Rent negotiable, ample
parking. Busy corners.
Appt. (352) 726-6640
INVERNESS
Plaza West Stores,
Busy corners, 1,000 sf.
suitable for pizzeria
Appt. (352) 726-6640




$$ SUMMER RATE $$
2/2/1 pl WF, dock From
$850 River Links Realty
628-1616/800-488-5184
CITRUS HILLS 2/2
Furn. Short/Long Term
352-527-8002/476-4242
CITRUS HILLS 2/2.5
W/D, CHA, Pool, Quiet
$880/mo. Ist/last/sec.
(352) 697-1883
CITRUS HILLS
Greenbriar Condo, new
carpet & tile, 2BR, 2BA,
Fl. Rm. Pool, Tennis Only
$695. mo. 352 527-0593
CRYSTAL RIVER
ISLANDS waterfront
villa w/ dock. Great
view overlooking canal.
Pool & tennis, 2/2,
newly turn & decorated
(352) 382-1422
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sm. condo w/pool,
$450/mo. 352-628-5977
CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront Complex
Furnished 1/1 /2 near
beach. Pool & dock.
$650/mo/1st/Ist/sec.
No Pets. 863-256-1016
Immaculate 2/2 Condo
Furn., upstairs. Newer
AC, $850/mo. or Poss.
Purch. (352)726-7543
Inv. Townhouse
2/2-V2, waterfront,
community pool & boat
ramp, All appliances,
$750 mo. (352) 400-0731
INVERNESS 2/2
Unfurn., Upstairs, scrn,
balc., W/D, nice. No
smoke/pets. $750. mo.
1st. last $350. sec.
352-302-8231
INVERNESS 2/2
W/D, New carpet,
appl.'s, comm. pool.
garb. incl. $750.mo.
1st, Ist. $500. sec.
352-746-4611
SUGARMILL WOODS
Villa, near golf course.
2/2/1 No pets. $800 mo.
1st & last, sec.. Lawn
Maint. Included
(352) 382-0741




CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1, $660/mo + dep
9187 Mendoza Way
(352) 726-4058


CITRUS SPRINGS
New, 2/2, all appl.,
W/D $650.-$700.
(954) 557-6211
Cry Rvr/Homosassa
2/1 Nice, W/D h.up,
CHA, water/garb Incl.
$200 refund @ move-in
$550/mo. 352-228-7033

CRYSTAL RIVER
& INVERNESS
| ONE MONTH FREE |
* 1,2 & 3 Bdrm/Studlo
* (352) 795-2626 I
L- -- - - J
CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, utll. Included
$600. mo.
Broker/Owner:
352-634-0129
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Beach Ln. $650/mo.
(352) 634-4336
HOMOSASSA
New, 2/2, Rent or w/
opt. to buy, fans, blinds,
refr., stove, microwave,
tile carpet. $750. mo.
(352) 592-0893
INVERNESS 2/1
W/D, garb. incl.
$575.mo. 1st., last $300
sec. (352) 746-4611
INVERNESS
Brand New 2/2, w/ W/D
$725.mo, 352-563-5165
Inverness/Lecanto
2/2/1 New Clean Quiet
$675/mo (352) 527-9733
LECANTO 2/2
Newer, tile, clean. $650
st/list/sec352-697-2068




CRYSTAL RIVER
Mini MH $425 rent Incl's
ele, cable, quiet 55+
park, bingo, card night,
pot luck dinners, walk
to bank, church &
stores. 352-795-9049
CRYSTALRIVER
LANDINGS.COM
8 - 1BR Suites, 795-1795
FLORAL CITY 1/I
$450/mo. $600 sec.
Cable, City water. No
pets. (352) 344-5628
VALUE INN HERNANDO
Renovated Efficiencies,
Phone, Pool, fish pond
AC, $50. daily, $300. wk
Trailers $225 wk.
(352) 726-4744




FLORAL CITY
Newer 3/2/2, No pets or
smoking. $1000 mo.
(352) 344-2500


County Wide
View ALL at:
www.chooseaar.com
*Luxury homes &
Townhomes For Rent
*Citrus Hills: 3 bdrm
*Beverly Hills: 3Bdrm
*Inverness: 2&3 Bdrm
*Inverness 2/2 Apts
Great American
Realty (352) 422-6129
INVERNESS
3/2, $700/mo, $700 1st.
last. $300 sec. dep.
(352) 860-2055
o- NO CREDIT CHECKII
Rent to Own I-2-3 BR's
352-484-0866
visit lademission.com

r RENTAL FINDER
| www.chronicle
Srentalflndercom




CITRUS HILLS, 2/2
Villa, Pool, All amenities.
Furn./ Unfurn. Avail
Aug. 1, (352) 637-5662
SUGARMILL WOODS
2/2/2 +Lanai, cul de
sac. turn. 1600 sq.ft.
$1,100mo + util. Owner/
agent Seas or Annual
(727) 804-9772




BEV/ HILLS 1/1/1
Fam. Rm.2 E. Golden St.
$600/mo IST/LAST/SEC.
(352) 795-8888
BEVERLY HILLS 1/1
$550/mo Fl. Rm. appl's,,
Carport, Remodeled!
352-563-0447/678-8874
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 & carport
352-746-0689, 464-2514
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 NICE AREA
Clean CT firs. $650 1st/
sec. 352-527-7119
Beverly Hills 2/1 V2
Remodeled on crnr lot.
$800/mo. 352-527-8352
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2 , no pets, $650mo
+ Sec. Ref. Check.
11 N. Harrison St
352-489-3584
BEVERLY HILLS 2/2
2 to choose, From $700
mo. (352) 201-0658
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2, furn/unfurn, over-
sized fenced Lot, Call
for Appt. (727)237-4051
BEVERLY HILLS 3/2
Laurel Ridge, oversized
garage, pool & spa
$1,300mo.352-527-1051


BEVERLY HILLS
3/2, CHA, Fam. Rm.,
new appl. $800/mo +
$600 Dep. 1 yr. Is. No
pets. 23 N. Wadsworth
Ave. (813) 205-8705
(352) 794-0211
Beverly Hills
3/2/Carport new
everything $800./mo
Hernando
3/2/Carport big yard
remodeled $750./mo
Inverness
2/2/Carport fenced
yard $750./mo
352-637-2973
BEVERLY HILLS
45S. Monroe, 2+1
$685/mo Sec. neg.
352-726-9046
BEVERLY HILLS
Great Homes for Rent
or Sale (954) 536-0353
BEVERLY HILLS
Oakwood Village
Beautiful 2/2/2 on
cul-de-sac, Immacu-
late w/ spacious rms.,
$850. mo. 352-476-4687


BLACK DIAMOND
3/2/2, like new,
Immaculate, all
appliances. 24hr gate
guarded community.
Deluxe cable TV & lawn
maintenance included
In rent. $1500 mo. Call
Paul (352) 746-9585






Brentwood
2/2/2 w/den
$950.00
Please Call:
(352) 341-3330
For more info. or
citrusvillages
visit the web at:


CITRUS HILLS
Unfurnished Homes &
Furnished Condos
www.greenbrilar
rental.com
Greenbriar Rentals, Inc.
(352) 746-5921


CITRUS SPRGS 3/2/2
New, W/D, Pet friendly,
$925/mo.352-812-1414
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 Brand new, dogs
ok 2000 sqft under air.
$1000/mo. lease option
to buy. (352) 522-0247
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, New Home, All.
amenities, Lawn service
Incl.. $895. m., .1st, last,
sec. (954) 415-2056
CITRUS SPRINGS
4/2/2, W/D $975/mo.
Inc. lawn & pest serve.
No pets (352) 697-1525

CITRUS SPRINGS
Lovely 3/2/1 w/large
screen porch, terrazzo
floors, large closets.
$850 rent. 1st, last and
security to move in.
Avail now. Call
352-489-1411.

CRYSTAL RIVER 3/1
$775 Near hospital.
(727) 631-2680


County Wide
View ALL at:
www.choosegar.com
*Luxury Homes &
Townhomes For Rent
*Citrus Hills: 3 bdrm
*Beverlv Hills: 3Bdrm
*Inverness 2&3 Bdrm
*Inverness: 2/2 Apts
Great American
Realty (352) 422-6129
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/11/2. bring horses, 2ac.
Ig. barn,15 mln. to Pwr.
Plant $850/ mo.
352-563-1033
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 + Bonus Rm., CHA,
new kit., carpet, paint.
Fncd. yrd. Pets negot.
$825/mo. (240)994-8765
CRYSTAL RIVER 3/2
Nice, clean, $800 mo
352-795-6299/697-1240
FLORAL CITY 1/1
Lakefront Beautiful
wooded acre, scrn.
patio, No smoking. Util.
Inc. $675,1st/last/sec.
(813) 241-7117 Kristi


PEN!







COME SEE OUR NESE


COME SEE OUR NEW MODEL


-I~-de


THIS BEAUTIFUL 212 MANUFACTURED HOME r.a all
i-r., g.:,:1 .lun o'ClJ -I: urr.n. firepl .ace calheral l.: lr.._:-
.islar.a kI[.:n.-r. .'...b,'c .. bir anrd panr r, al3k-,r, :.i.:-, l_:
newer A/C. Spectacular open water view on fresn water
canal with Gulf access. Call 795-0784 to see MLS #311345
now offered at $355,900.


RETAIL STORES IN CRYSTAL RIVER in the ,iean
of Ihe rede.'elopment area Three .%ell established
businesses, 2 separate buildings. $239,000 each.
Call Lisa at 422-7925 or the office at 795-0784.


CITRUS COUNTY 4'FQ CHRONICLE








To0x U IUrru 24 2007 CTu ONY(L HOIL


Dunn./Goldie Pt.
River Garden Subdv. 2/1
could be a 3/1 Conc.
Block Home, Lg. Yrd,
Red. to $599/mo.
(352)669-2253
OTHER HOMES AVAIL.
FLORAL CITY 3/1
Remodeled. All util. Incl
City water. $850/mo
352-422-3670/860-0899
HOMOSASSA
2/1 $600. mo. Call
Robin (239) 530-0418
HOMOSASSA 4/3/2
Free 1st mo. rent to
qualified applicants
Pool, $1,000/mo.
(561) 790-5621
HOMOSASSA
MEADOWS 3/2/2 From
$750; SMW 2/2/1 Villa,
$725. River Links Realty
628-1616/800-488-5184
INVERNESS 2/1
Canal front F&R deck,
new kitchen, DW, MW.
jacuzzi tub, W/D, gas
firepl., new Heat & Air,
$775 mo., 1st, + 2 mo.,
352-637-1441 or
727-510-0210
INVERNESS 2/1
Pet OK $700. mo 1st,
last, sec. (352) 344-0505
INVERNESS
2/1/1, w/ large yard,
S. Apopka $700.1st,&
last, (352) 726-9593
INVERNESS 2/1'/2
Canal front, DW, LR, DR,
office. C/H/A, W &D
H.U. quiet area, very
nice, $600/mo, 1st, last
Sec. Ref. (352) 212-2022
INVERNESS 2/2
Very Nice $750/mo +
352-726-7486/726-5588
INVERNESS 3/2/2
Lake Area, $860/mo.
(352)341-1142
INVERNESS
Cozy 2/1/1, canal front
home. Gospel Island
area. Remodeled, on
quiet street with pretty
view. Lawn service Incl.
W & D, no pets/smoke
$500. (727) 415-1572
Inverness
Custom Home
Brand New 3/2/2
over 1900 sq ft. Open
floor plan. Stone
accents, Inside Laun-
dry, Orig. $179,900
Now $169,900. Move
In Todayl Rent To
Own. $1080 Mo.
Debbie Fischer
727-251-4013
INVERNESS Wtrfrnt.
Pritchard Is. Townhouse
3/2, Pool, boat dock,
$895/ mo. No dogs.
(352) 697-1907
(508) 672-8413
Land Contract Wanted?
A unique way to buy
my home. 3/2 OR 4/2
(352) 613-6943

LANDMARK
REALTY


We have different
type rentals for
different situa-
tions. Some with
pets allowed.


Ask for Kathy
or Janet
352-726-9136
311 W Main St.
Inverness

R.L.E. Dunnellon
3/2, Inside laund.
$950/mo.. lst-lst. sec. -


*.CITRUS SPRGS *
Why Rent?I? Lease
w/optlon to buy. New
3/2/2 DREAM HOUSE
on Elkcam Blvd.
Move in w/$2,150.
2nd & Last Mo.
are FREE with a
2 yr. lease.
Dave Kaiser, C21
Nafurecoast Realty
* (352) 220-8967 *
PRITCHARD ISLAND
3/2.5 $180K, $950/mo.
2/2 $165K, $800/mo.
Dock, Comun. Pool, all
App's,, scrn prch. more
352-237-7436/812-3213
RAINBOW SPRGS.
County Club Est. 3/2,
garage, yard. $825/mo.
For info:
(352) 489-5928
Rent-to-Own
Brand New Home 3/2/2
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (352)875-5645



SUGARMILL WOODS
New 2,665 sqft 4/2/2+
ac-3 min Sncst Pkwy.
$1195/mo. lst+sec, Incls
lawn svc. 813-748-5206




3/2/1 LAKEHOUSE
Tsala Apk. Lake, comp,
remodeled. $995/mo.
$195K (727) 277-3713
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, priv. dock. $1500.
Mo.lst, last sec., For
details (352) 795-1988
CRYSTAL RIVER
4bd/3ba Indian River
deep canal/dock
$1600/mo 352-422-3698
HERNANDO
3/2/2 Open Lake Front
garb. pickup, lawn
maint & homeowner
Ins. incld. 352-400-2079
HOMOSASSA
3/2 On Mason Creek
Dep., 1st. mo., 2 ref.'s
$1,200. (352) 628-5358
HOMOSASSA Canal
1BR w/boat dock, scrn.
porch, util. Incl. $700/
mo.+ sec.(352)628-6537
HOMOSASSA
Waterview w/private
Dock 2/2 CHA, wrap
around scrn. porch
Only $850/mo. Trash/
water, lawn serve. incl.
352-628-9329
INVERNESS 1/1
NICE & QUIET Util. ncl,
$495/mo. $200 refund @
move-in 352-228-7033
INVERNESS 2/1/2
LKFRNT, $750/Mo+
(612) 392-7520
PRITCHARD ISLAND
3/2.5 $180K, $950/mo.
2/2 $165K, $800/mo.
Dock, Comun. Pool, all
Appl's., scrn prch. more
352-237-7436/812-3213




3/2/1 LAKEHOUSE
Tsala Apk. Lake, comp.
remodeled. $995/mo.
$195K (352) 238-6364
MEADOWCREST
3/2/2 Falrmont Village,
fully turn., (all new
furniture) $1,.500/mo.
+ elec., phone, water.
Poss. partial ownr finan.
(352) 746-1792
Rent-to-Own
Brand New Home 3/2/2
Low Down, Easy Terms
,'. Pcnrity'(352)875-5645


HOMOSASSA
Priv. Bdrm & bath. new
home. Credit check-
pers. ref. 352-503-3819
HOMOSASSA
Private, clean. UtI. $400
mo, Cell (848)667-1959
INVERNESS
Furn. room, internet,
phone, cable, Inc. Pool
& kitch, privileges $500,
lst/$300 dep. 560-3237


C"-

RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com
VALUE INN HERNANDO
Renovated Efficiencies,
Phone, Pool, fish pond
AC, $50. daily, $300. wk
Trailers $225wk.
(352) 726-4744




BEVERLY HILLS
Diplomat 2 bedroom, 1
and 1/2 bath , Florida
room, eat in kitchen,
must see. $139,500
neg. 352-527-1259




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
Intention, to make
such preference, limi-
tation or discrimina-
tion." Familial status
Includes children un-
der the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings
advertised in this
newspaper are avail-
able on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




: .,, , , ,


YoLWr World

Oj4J 9Cd-ye 4.e




CHKONicLE

.,s.obrCol.~, vT-d.


MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
BUYERS AGENT
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.CQOM





9033 E SANDPIPER DR
INV. OPEN HOUSE
SAT. SUN 12-4
2 Pass. 3/2/2, 2,194SF
Caomp. updated $148k
352-601-3863

OPEN SUNDAY 2-4
$$$32,900.$$$
LOVELY 2/1, Open Fl.
plan, master walk in,
AC, appl's, new rf. 55+
gated comm. w/ pool
clubhouse & activities
5405 S. Stoneridge Dr.
Inverness 352-344-5805





HOM./ Would make
perfect office! Near
town, zoned GNC, 1.3
Ac, Poss. ownr fin,
$189,900 Ron McEvoy,
EXIT (352) 586-2663

LECANTO
Office Space, Retail &
Warehouse for rent.
(352) 795-0800


INVERNESS 3 LOTS,
2 trailers, income prop.
Was $85K now $50K;
(352) 422-5661
INVESTORS PROPERTIES
for Sale, MH, Duplexes,
Quadplexes. Sin. Fam.
Vac. Lots, 352-795-0367
INVESTORS: Builder
will sell NEW 3/2/2
homes for $135K w/lo
in Citrus or $120K on
your lot. Home w/lot
will appraise for
$155K. No payments
up to 2 yrs.
(352) 686-7595 ext 21
mvsuncoastbuilder
@vahoo.com





2005 4/2/2 $156K
New on market!!
For info go to:
www.mvfsbo.com/
2349n or call
352-601-2585 btwn 8-8
3/2, Block Home,
newly remodeled kit.,
new appl's, Ig. Fam.
Rm. w/ FP, must sell
Asking $109,900.
(352) 322-0615
3/2/2 REDUCED $43,5001
New const. Ascot 3
Model! 1,995 SF.
$189,500 Greg Younger,
Coldwell Banker Ist
Choice. (352)220-9188
4/2/2, New, Split Plan,
Fam. Rm. , Cathedral
Ceilings 1800 sq. ft, liv.
$142,900. 352-489-8415

Citrus Springs
NEW 3 BEDROOM & FAMILY ROOM




S134,900
REDUCED FOR QUICK SAWE
ADJACENT 4BR (8138 MiALTESE) $144,900
U.S. 41 3.5 mi. N of SR 491,
from main entrance fountain
W. on Citrus Spgs. Blvd., left @
Elkeam, stop, rt. @ Century,
left on Pickinz, rt. to 8132 N.
Maltese Dr.
www.peterpav.com
PETER PAVJ


I COSRUTO HS BEUI


AT MEADOWCREST
Please pardon our dust as we build Crystal
River's premier Resort-Style Community.
Our sales center will remain open daily.
1875 N. Macvicar Road
Crystal River, FL 34429
352-563-5657
www.mysummerhill.com
Ne Luur Twhms an Flas
fro th high10'


BEAUTIFUL NEW 4/2/2
223&5SFLA, Spit plan, CT,
Ig. Lanai, must sell
$197.000. 407-468-2179

BY OWNER
2005 Home 3/2/2 Nice
area in Citrus Springs
Reduced to $151,000.
(352)257-1355
Remodeled 2/1 Block
Home, Cen. Ht/Air,
Tile flrs,, new appl.'s
$95,000. By Owner
(609) 457-9349
Rent-to-Own
Brand New Home 3/2/2
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (352)875-5645


-C



3.9%
LISTING

Full service/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
25+Yrs. Experience

$150+Million SOLDII!
Please Call for Details
& Market Analysis
RON & KARNA NEITZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060
3+- BEAUTIFUL ACRES
Close to equestrian
center, tall oaks & pine.
$157K FSBO 527-8739
Adj. to Golf Course
FSBO 3/25/2 . Corner
Lot, Pool, Gas FP, Well,
Granite, Huge Shed,
Updated Everythina!
myhome4sale.net
$299K (352) 746-1175
BEAUTIFUL POOL HOME
3/2/2 On 1 acre
Sell/lease opt.
$249,900. Must seel
352-302-5535

Equestrian Trail Home
New, 2004,3/2/3 Pool
home w/fenced yard.
on Equestrian Trail,
4577 W PINTO LOOP
$279,000/ OBO
(352) 746-9813


-BETY MORTON


Lic. Real Estate Agent
20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission

RelfitY'ect

(352) 795-1555

FIXER

UPPER
These homes
need work.
Free Computerized
list of properties
Free Recorded
Message

1-800-597-5259
www.freecitruscoun-
tvhomeinfo.com
ID# 1048 -
ERA American
Realty &
Investments
NEW 4/3/2+ Pool Home
Over 1 Acre I 3,600 sf.
Awesome]! $399,900
(352) 746-6161
r C i T ? q
Sat. & Sun. 1 -4 I
3/2/2, Pool Home
3186W. Birds Nest Dr U
| $299,800. |
352-586-1558

PINERIDGE 3/2/2
Pool Hm. w/ FP
$247K Obo, Must Sell!
MLS #314040
352-302-7045
407-566-8637


Your' 'woIrld first


C Ei

-III







PINE RIDGE
1 /2 story. 4BR/3BA
pool home on
landscaped 1.25 ac.
corner rot. $299,900
(352) 634-2373





BEVERLY HILLS
Great Homes for Sale
or Rent (954) 536-0353





LEASE OPTION
Sale $108,00 Rent $700.
mo. 2/1, New carpet,
ceramic tile, corner lot,
67 Beverly Hills Blvd.
(352) 613-4050

- NO CREDIT CHECKII
Rent to Own 1-2-3 BR's
352-484-0866
visit jademission.com


BONNIE PETERSON
Realtor, GRI

Your SATISFACTION
Is My Futurel!
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC


BEach Office Is Independently Owned and Operated
J. W. MORTON REAL ESTATE, INC.
Property Management
645 W. Main Street Inverness, FL 34450
(352) 726-9010

55 & OVER APARTMENT IN INVERNESS
New paint, New appliances, New cabinets in the kitchen. 2 bedroom, 1 bath upstairs
unit. C om m unity laundry ................................................................................... 550
THIS WEEK'S FEATURED RENTALS
NICE LOCATION: 2 bedroom, 2 bath, screen room, covered parking
condo $700
Large 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage, corner lot, lake access......$900
INVERNESS
NEW PAINT, NEW CARPET, 2 bedroom, 1 bath apartments
conveniently located....................................................................... $550
2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car garage villa, community pool..................$650
Corner lot, 2 bedroom, 1 bath, 1 car garage, fenced-in yard............$650
Nice 2 bedroom, 1 bath, front porch, 1 car garage......................... $675
4 bedroom, 2 bath, family room, 1 car garage................................ $725
NEW PAINT THROUGHOUT 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage
ho m e ............ .................................................................................... $ 850
POOL HOMES 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage..........................$1000
FLORAL CITY
3 bedroom , 2 bath on a nice lot....................... ........................ ....$700
WE STILL HAVE FURNISHED UNITS AVAILABLE FROM $800 TO
$1500

STORAGE UNITS: SECURITY DEPOSIT--
$84.80/PER MO, Includes tax.


Cimus CouNTY (FL) CHRomcm





, ,� .


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 23E


BY OWNER 3/2/2, .5 Ac.
Over 1,600 sf. l.a., fncd.,
w/work shed w/elec.
Built 2000, quiet
cul-de-sac off 486.
Great family home
w/playroomsl $165K
(352) 422-3137










CITRUS HILLS ON
GOLF COURSE
Beautiful 3-way spilt
w/2642 living sq ft
3BR/3bath/Den, New
A/C+ Roof Gourmet
Kitchen w/granite
wood & tile upgrades
galore & Standby
power Generator.
Large caged pool
overlooks 13th water
hole green of
Meadow golf course.
$424K. 352-560-6130

CUSTOM 2002
3/2/3 Pool, Over 5000
sq ft / roof. Huge
outdoor living,
granite/maple
* $370K +
352-527-2749/212-7534
Immaculate New 3/2+
Den on 1 Ac. Reduced
to $291KI By Owner
352-726-7543/201-0991
NEW LISTING
Tastefully furnished
Meadowvlew Villa with
Country Club Mem.
2BR/2BA, Lanai and
Pool In perfect cond.
$179,000.
Tom @ 302-423-0541










TERRA VISTA 2/2/2+Den
40K In upgrdsl Wooded
viewl With Expanded
lanai, master bdrm &
garage. $257,900
(352) 746-1673
TERRA VISTA/HILLSIDE
SOUTH - 1800sq ft. 3/2/2
10,000sf lot. Brand new.
$289,900. 617-816-1230


-S
CHARMING COTTAGE
1 BR Cottage w/Water
views, /4 AC. $62K
(631) 334-8444




100% Finan. Reduced,
must relocate 2100
sq.ft. 3/2 2 car garage
new roof, firepl., corner
lot, Buyowner 61665
352-586-7685
3/2 Renovated
New paint, carpet,
landscaping, fncd yrd.
$126,500 (352)362-1555
DS


Affordable Mobile
Great 1.25 Acre
$91,500
352-726-7533
www.Rellance-RE.com
Reliance Realty

BETTY MORTON


Lic. Real Estate Agent
20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission

R earty'eect

(352) 795-1555

CHARMING 2BR/2BATH
HIGHLANDS, corner lot,
circular driveway,
prequallifled only
Must See. $124,900
(352) 201-1663
CUSTOM BUILT 2/2/2
Energy efficient, new
roof & appli's. Open fir.
plan, close to shopping
& hospital, $129,000.
Must see! 352-344-8519

Custom Home
Brand New 3/2/2
over 1900 sq ft. Open
floor plan. Stone
accents, Inside Laun-
dry, Orig. $179,900
Now $169,900. Move
In Today Rent To
Own. $1080 Mo.
Debbie Fischer
727-251-4013

FSBO Riverfront home
with panoramic view
directly on
WIthlacoochee 1,850
sq.ft. on 1.25 acres with
boat house & separate
dock. Best view on River
and fishing's great!
$399,000 For virtual tour
visit ByownerCitrus.com
or call Don at
(352) 344-1613
Furnished Villa, 2/2, ca-
thedral ceiling in LR
Newly tiled including
screen rm., $130,000
elkurz@yahoo.de
(352) 613-6496
HOME FOR SALE
On Your Lot, $110,900.
3/2/1 w/ Laundry
Atkinson Construction
352-637-4138
Uc.# CBC059685

How to Sell
Your House
By Yourself
Free Report Reveal.
10 Inside tips to
Selling Your House
By Yourself.
Free Recorded
Message
1-800-597-5259
www.freecltruscountv-
hominfo.com
ID# 1017
ERA American
Really &
Investments

INVERNESS LOT
80 x 120, surveyed,
house plans, 1,500 sq ft
LA, Total 2,750 sq ft.
3/2/2 Bldg. cost
- $3123,000. Lotcost, ,
S$30,00.'352-382-7888 .


Move Right In
Foxwood Estates
Immaculate 3/2/2,
fenced overszd Lot Lg.
lanal, everything new,
$152,000 firm
417-273-0020
352-400-5906
SELL YOUR HOME
Place a Chronicle
Classified ad
6 lines, 30 days
$51.95"
Call
726-1441
563-5966
Non-Refundable
Private Party Only
"S5 per addii.na, line
(Some Pesicftions
May apply)
Veteran, Must Sell
House because of
Health. 3/2/2,
Upgraded, many
extras., water, sewer,
lawncare & garb.
pickup Included for
small fee. Ideal for
Retired Couple,
RV Free Storage,
Call (352) 637-0321
For appointment
WINDERMERE!!
2/2, Immaculate!
Ceiling Fans, Screen
Lanai, WID, Plant
shelves, Vaulted
Ceilings, Blinds,
Remarkable
Community Amenities!
$180K,(352)726-4763
or 344-3567




CATTLE/HORSE FARM
FSBO Custom Cedar
Home 2/2/2 on 11 acs.
Barn/Workshop,Tools.
IN FLORAL CITY
$425K Call 344-1558
GREAT HOME ON 1 AC.!
2/2/2, new roof, renov.
in 2004. Open floor,
w/spllt plan $179,900
Terri Haorman Crossland
Realty (352)726-6644




775 N. Lyle Ave FSBQ
3/2/2,1,850 sf. w/den
$160K For details:
205-746-9812/901-5246
3/1 CRACKER, 1/2 ac.
Crnr lot. Completely
Renovated! Must Seel
$109Kobo 352-209-2118
3/2 ON 10.8 ACRESII
Detached 14 X 28
office, pool, fncd.
$295K (352)621-3135
4/2/2, 2,100 SF. $154K
Beautifully remodeled.
New oak cabs, wood
floors, timberline roof,
fireplace, 2 min. from
water. (352) 688-8040


$50K BELOW
APPRAISAL! Like new
3500 sf, Country Ranch
Near Hospital. 2.4 acre
corner lot, w/ attached
2 story garage apt.
Reduced to $360K.
Contact owner
352-220-8310
I BETTY MORTON


LIC. Kewa israre Agenr
20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission



(352) 795-1555








BONNIE PETERSON
Realtor, GRI
Your SATISFACTION

(352) 586-6921
or(352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC
FSBO 3/3/2 Sunken LR,
fireplace, Lg. Kit., DR, FL
Rm, fenced. Extra lots
avail- Horses ok. $185K
6825 W Avocado St. Off
Dunkenfleld 795-5285


REDUCED




OPEN HOUSE
1470NW 21st St
Crystal River
June 30 & July I
1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
352-628-1062 or
352-464-1368

Your World


6" ^ewedf&


CHJrme naCL- E


1 and 2 Bedroom
Unfurnished Apartments
Call Monday Through Friday
8:00am - 5:00pm

(352) 489^021O1 O


SPRING RUN
10080 Pamondeho Cir
3/2 split floor plan, triple
carport, sunroom,
completely, renovated
In last 2V2 yrs. New ap-
pliances, tile, carpet,
lights, fans, counter-
tops, sinks, nicely land-
scaped 1/2 acre lot.
12X16 workshop with air
cond. & attic. Com-
pare with other homes
in neighborhood get a
bigger and better
house for $20,000 -
$30,000 less. Quick sale.
$140,000. 352-220-6663




2/1 on V1/2 Ac. Fenced
Great Locl W/Alum.
Crprt, Wood Frame Hm.
Fam. Rm, Eat-In Kitch.
New AC & drainfleld.
102.900 (352)628-1669
A GREAT STARTER
HOME! 3/2/1 Nice lot w/
Fenced back yard.
Priced Right $134,900
Harley Hough, EXIT
Realty 352-400-0051
BY OWNER
3/2 singlewide On 2 half
acre lots $46K
1592 S Lookout Pt 2
blocks off US19
352-503-4142




FOR SALE BY OWNER
High & Dry-Homes Only
Quaint 3/2/2 with Pool
extra lot & workshop
Must See! @ $158,500.
(352) 621-0802
HOMOSASSA 3/2.5/2
Must see home on 5
AcreslPlenty of Land &
Privacy. $279K Alex
Choto, Fl. Realty &
Auction. (352) 628-0968


-Umoa
i^'shBB Hoe


Riverhaven
SUNDAY 1PM - 4PM
3/2/2 , 3080 sf $269,900.
11799 Valley Spring Ln.
352-585-0282




KEY WEST Style Cottage
3BR, Fully Upgraded.
Conv. Locat. Must See!
352-621-9227 or
hoflocalprQperties.com




3/2/2 Cul-de-sac
Sweetwater Elegance
Open Plan $199,000
Charlene & Peggy,
EXIT REALTY
(352) 464-4179








100% FINANCING
EZ qualify. 3/2 & 2/1
avail. Call Gerry
Owner/Realtor
(352) 816-0010


3.9%
LISTING
Full service/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
25+Yrs. Experience
$150+Milllon SOLDIII
Please Call for Details
& Market Analysis
RON & KARNA NEITZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060


CRYSTAL RIVER 5/2.5/2.5
BEAUTIFUL New Cape
Cod on A/2 Ac. Over
2,800 SF. MUST SEE!
$249K or $1,600/mo.
352-746-5912





HOME FOR SALE
On Your Lot, $110,900.
3/2/1 w/ Laundry
Atkinson Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685


BONNIE PETERSON
Realtor, GRI

Your SATISFACTION
Is Mv Futurell
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC


BUYING OR
SELLING? CALL ME
FOR RESULTS!










Call Me
PHYLUS STRICKLAND
(352) 613-3503
Keller Williams
Realty


ENJOY NATURE AT IT'S
BEST CRYSTAL MANOR
Beautiful setting. Private
w/ mature trees. 2002
home, with all the
extras, on 5.9 acres
(5 lots). $360K
Wonderful home
and great investment.
(352) 795-1454


jRAND









FOOD ENING
FOOD * DRINKS * PRIZES


CITTUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


itrus County
C.

c= Homes


Aercedes
H 0 M E S







CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FSBO Riverfront home
with panoramic view
directly on
Withlacoochee 1,850
sq.ft. on 1.25 acres with
boat house & separate
dock. Best view on River
and fishing's great!
$399,000 For virtual tour
visit ByownerCitrus.com
or call Don at
(352) 344-1613


Michele Rose
REALTOR
"Simply Put-
I'll Work Harder"
352-212-5097
thorn@atlantic.net
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515
NEW! 2 Story Cape Cod
5/3, 2,850 SF. w/8' X 32'
Covered Porch, Opt.
Garage. Come see us
@ Impressive Home
pilders (352)746-5912

Over 3,000
Homes and
Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com

SELL YOUR HOME!
Place a Chronicle
Classified aod
6 lines, 30 days
$51.95t
Call
726-1441
563-5966
Non-Refundable
Private Party Only
*S5 p r adjoitionaoi Ii.
(Some Rest.,:lirnr
M.., .ppl, '

Vic McDonald
(352) 637-6200








Realtor
My Goal Is Satisfied
Customers
MAW
REALTY ONE .�
( ufiu, llng . ,ni
I 1,ltmllpg R%-, l01
(352) 637-6200

MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY







ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
BUYERS AGENT


uNc ur M -M- Ui
Bring your horse! 312/2 on
2 ac. 2 paddocks, FP Ig.
cgd pool, fiberoptic lights,
spa, many extras! $255K
(352) 726-8348
RIDE GOETHEII
10.08 Ac. Fully fncd, 3
paddocks, 30 X 30 barn
w/overhang & 2 Ig.
12X12 stalls, riding ring,
wash rack. Sep. 12X12
Shed/Tack Rm. 2/2 MH
w/ranch style porch &
gorgeous hill-top views!
$229,900
Well < mkt. value!
352-239-7788/465-2427



Gulf Hammock Retreat
Sac on River in preserve
5/3/4 Cedar, bunk house
RV grg. (352) 597-5109



CITRUS HILLS
Greenbriar Condo, new
carpet & tile, 2BR, 2BA,
Fl. Rm. Pool, Tennis Only
$114,900. 352 527-0593






3 BR/2BA Old Town
w/double garage, All
Cypress on 1 acre w/
canopy of hardwoods,
1 mi. to boat ramp
$165,000. (352)542-1182
NORTH CAROLINA
Mountain Log Cabin,
$99,900. New on Shell
on private 1 acre sight.
828-652-8700



3/2/1 LAKEHOUSE
Tsala Apk. Lake, comp.
remodeled. $995/mo.
$195K (727) 277-3713
4/3.5/2 In YANKEETOWN
3,514 sf. Formal areas,
French Drs. gazebo &
guesthouse. 1,285,000
Nancy Lewis, EXIT
REALTY(352) 302-6082
CRYSTAL
RIVER
3/3/2, 2600 sq.
ft. Loaded with
upgrades. Just
off Kings Bay. 2
fresh water spgs,
10k boat lift.
$479,000
(302-6924)
Dianna McNally
REALTOR
Exit Realty
352-302-6924 707745

BUY NOW
Bargains
Everywhere!


I BETTY MORTON


20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission

Reay elect

(352) 795-1555

CRYSTAL RIVER
4/3/1 split-plan on
deep water canal. Gulf
access. Many updates.
$299,500. 352-422-1550.
FSBO Riverfront home
with panoramic view
directly on
Withlacoochee 1,850
sq.ft. on 1.25 acres with
boat house & separate
dock. Best view on River
and fishing's great!
$399,000 For virtual tour
visit ByownerCitrus.com
or call Don at
(352) 344-1613
HERNANDO
Open lake, 2/2, Furn or
Unfurn, Sale or Rent
Possible Owner Finance
OPEN HOUSE
Sun June 24th
Noon-4pm
Apache Shores
3531 Flying Arrow Path
(727) 542-9511
HOMOSASSA 3/2/2
Home has Upgrades
Galore! Peaceful &
Serene. $349K
John Maisel III Exit
(352)794-0888
INVERNESS 3000 sf.
Beautiful Country Home
4/3, FP, fish pond,
1 /2 Ac. Adj. 3/4 Ac.
Lot avail. Prvt. Nature
Preserve. $339K
631-334-8444
INVERNESS
Pritchard Island 2/2
condo, 2 story end unit.
Open water by dock
$185,000 352-400-0053

LET OUR OFFICE
GUIDE YOU!


Plantation Realty. Inc.
(352) 795-0784
Cell 422-7925
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner
See all of the listings in
Citrus County at
www.olantaton


PRITCHARD ISLAND
3/2.5 $180K, $950/mo.
2/2 $165K, $800/mo.
Dock, Comun. Pool, all
Appl's., scrn prch, more
352-237-7436/812-3213

Spacious HER-
MA AMflr%


-E
1-15 HOUSES WANTED
Cash or Terms
John (352) 228-7523
www.FastFloridaHouse
hBuer .com
WE BUY HOUSES
Ca$h.......Fast !
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WE BUY HOUSES
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352-637-2973
Ihomesold.com



GOLF COURSE LOT #9
HILLSIDE IN TERRA VISTA
Skyview CC, $88,500
Call (352) 638-0905



(2) Pine Ridge I Ac. Lots
Buy now, build later!
Great Investment!!
j59900(352)746-6161
INVERNESS HIGHLANDS
Maxwell PI. & Savory
Ave. 8 parcels for
$44,900. (727) 457-6595



HOT SPRINGS, AR
1/4 acre lot $20,000
(352) 344-1215
Near Asheville, NC
20 mins to downtown.
1600 sq.ft. manufac-
tured home on 2 acre
lot, 3/2-1/2, LR. DR. full
kitchen, scr. porch, car-
port. paved drive. 2
storage sheds, $150,000
(828) 254-8754 or
(828) 683-2007



Bring a fishing pole &
enjoy this waterfront lot
w/older mobile home
$52K (352) 860-2636
HERNANDO LAKE
1 Beautiful Acre! Lg.
Oaks & Sunsets $150K
(631) 334-8444
LAKEFRONT
Crystal River $45K
www.JohnsFIorida
Lots. cam 352-228-7523
Agent Owned
WITHLACOOCHEE
21/4 AC, 230' on main
river/ very priv. beautiful
bldg. site w/ez access.
Below Market. $275,000
(352)422-0199.




MENTAL FINDER
Swww.chronicle
rentalfinder.com
S--- --- J



Your World








CH QNIlE
O II dj
I*~~ Ia fe.


Women put the



hammer down on home



improvement industry


ARA content


Men have traditionally taken the lead
on home improvement projects - in
many cases at the insistence of the
women in their lives. But today, women
are not only involved in the decision-
making process of what needs to be
done and whether to do-it-yourself or
hire it done, but are also making the
actual purchases. Women account for
more than $70 billion worth of purchas-
es in the home improvement industry,
up from approximately $55 billion in
1995.
According to a recent survey by the
Home Improvement Research
Institute, within the first year of home
ownership, women will authorize
almost $9,000 on home improvement
projects. A growing number of manu-
facturers and retailers have focused
more marketing efforts on women and
are capitalizing on this trend.
Women are also looking for women-
owned construction companies for
their home improvement projects. The
National Association of Women in
Construction (NAWIC) gets requests
from across the country on a regular
basis for local women-owned construc-
tion companies to do home improve-
ment projects. Women make up about
12 percent of the construction industry,
according to the Bureau of Labor
Statistics.
Women represent 44 percent of do-it-
yourselfers and 51 percent of those who
usually hire professionals for home
improvement projects. Women account
for more than half the sales of storage
and organization products and almost
half the sales of lighting, paint,
kitchen/bath, lawn/garden, flooring and
safety products.
Men still dominate when it comes to
purchasing tools and power equipment,
but the number of men who are looking
to hire women-owned construction
companies for home improvement proj-
ects has increased.
"The perception is that a woman
would be easier to work with on a home
improvement project," says Sandy Fite,
membership director for NAWIC.
"Some feel that women would be more
organized and perhaps 'tuned-in' to the
way the project should be done." This is
especially true when a woman is mak-
ing the home improvement project
decisions.
These projects provide a way for
women to express their creativity, as
well as their construction skills.
According to a study conducted by
Yankalovich Partners, a surprising 37
percent of women said they would


Special to the Chronicle
Nancy Godfrey is a member of the
National Association of Women in
Construction. According to the Bureau of
Labor Statistics, women make up about
12 percent of the construction industry.

rather work on a home improvement
project than hit the malls, while 28 per-
cent said they would rather work on
their home than cook
"I find," says Jodi Bagwell, a member
of the Simi-Conejo, Calif., chapter of
NAWIC and co-owner of Bagwell Con-
struction Services Inc., "that women
tend to be a little more sympathetic to
the concerns another woman might have
when inviting a stranger into her home."
Bagwell has participated three times in
the very popular "Extreme Makeover:
Home Edition" television show by help-
ing people with special needs make
improvements to their homes.
She adds, "Home remodeling can
sometimes be painful to the homeown-
er. I enjoy a special camaraderie when
I have the opportunity to work with
another woman. They also appear to
appreciate being able to talk to me a lit-
tle easier about the technical terms and
aspects of the project"
Founded in 1953 by 16 women work-
ing in the construction industry,
NAWIC's sole purpose is to be a support
network for, and to develop the success
of women in the construction industry.
With membership numbers at more
than 5,500 in 179 chapters in nearly
every state, NAWIC continues to grow
internationally and has affiliation
agreements with Australia, Canada,
New Zealand, South Africa and the
United Kingdom.
To learn more about NAWIC, visit
www.nawic.org.


,a C '),A ->nn-7
UNDAY, JUNE I




* , .


SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 25E


/ AJUIr I r


Call Dorothy Fowler
Today! (352) 628-4116

SELECTED FEATURES:
* Full decorative masonry
finish exterior
* Shingle upgrade
* Knock down ceilings
* Ceramic in all vinyl areas
* Coach & Flood lights
* 10' x 18' patio slab
* Full sod and irrigation system


*Elevation may vary.


Maronda Homes
74 iF O6W-IV044 %rW_ VAW4 k4.'


CIMiRUCOLJNffCHRONIClESi
-BUST
OF Tfif
MfST
glNN
2 _


Financing incentives available!
Homes available for immediate move-in!
Stop by our model today!
Model Hours: Mon. 12-7
Tues., Wed., & Sat. 10-7 * Sun. 11-5
For more homes available visit 12
www.maronda.com 000600496 =


cms come a HRONICLE






C26 SUNDAY, JUNE 24. 2007 Cnu ONY(L HOIL


DIGEST master.
D IG EST Visit her at the office in down-
town Crystal River at 425 N. Citrus
Continued from Page 14E Ave.


RE/MAX donates
The associates and staff of
RE/MAX Realty One recently com-
pleted a major fundraising event to
assist the Susan G Komen Breast
Cancer Foundation.
The agents in the Crystal River


and Homosassa offices conducted
a hot air balloon event at the
Crystal River Mall on June 9,
where they also had a large bake
sale, luncheon and games.
The event raised nearly $1,000
for the charity.
The associates of RE/MAX


would like to thank all of those who
participated and supported the
event.
Realtor Melanie Gray will partici-
pate in the annual "Breast Cancer
3 Day" walk in Tampa in the fall
and will deliver the proceeds to the
charity.


% I Betty Morton
CASH BACK REALTOR
0. - So \ mS 19 Yrs. Experience

Reant Select (352) 795-1555
478 NE 3rd St., Crystal River FL


I - a

mEN ,KEA i4 '


COME IN AND FALL IN LOVE with
THIS BEAUTIFULLY DECORATED Oakwood charming and immaculate 2/2/1. Cui
Village 2/2/2 with split plan has a large enclosed decorated with tiled Florida room, pri
porch with built-in Jacuzzi and sliding glass windows,
eat-in kitchen with all new appliances and ceramic courtyard, fully landscaped, large pr
tile floor. Enjoy the spacious living/dining area and backyard, vinyl siding and extra parking.


IDEAL HOME IDEAL LOCATION.
Immaculate 2BR, 2BA, 2 car garage, with city INVERNESS HIGHLANDS WEST
services and conveniently located. 1,396 sq f Attractive 3 B'R 2 BA 2 car garage, split
living area, family rm, screen porch, Aitraciv 3edR, 2iA, i car garage, spitm
outbuilding, beautiful landscaping, 9 citrus plan, cathedral ceiling in great room,
trees & much more! Must see to appreciate! screen porch, privacy fence in rear, near
113-503 NOW r129.900 #?11 g, shoppir.g $139.900 #317034


INVERNESS HIGHLANDS WEST PRICED FOR FAST SALE
2BR, 2BA, garage, interior freshly painted, Spacious Royal Oaks Villa. 2 BR, 2 BA,
central H/A, Florida room, screen porch, 1 car garage, FL room, 1459 sq. ft.
Nicely landscaped lot, 2 outbuildings, living area, central H/A, clubhouse &
immediate occupancy! 2 adjacent lots pool. Lots of amenities. $119,900


LAKEFRONT HOME
QUAIL RUN BEAUTY 3BR, 2BA, 2 car garage, open split floor
Very Nice 3/2/2 split plan, 1756 sq. ft. living plan, family room/fireplace, screen porch
area, screen porch, on beautifully ith vinyl inserts, dead end street. The lake
landscaped lot. Low Homeowners Assoc. is low and so is the price. HURRYI
fee includes cable, clubhouse, pool, tennis $229,900. #315368
courts, and more. $179,900 #311682 $229,900. #315368


MINI FARMS - HOMOSASSA - ... nu . .:,
2.5 Acre Lot Well, Septic, SUGARMILL WOODS POOL HOME 32/2, nice deck, storage shed, play house. 2031 sq. ft. living, rear
Impact Paid. $45 000 bright interior. Split plan. Kitchen w/nook overlooks caged screened patio. 1.33 acres in homes only area of mostly
m pool.Hugecomerlot. $179,900.RS131. new homes. $239,500. 317182.


CuRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNrcLE




, , .


CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 27E


Trees, turf can compete for precious water resources


In urban landscapes, we
attempt to manage an un-
natural ecosystem by forc-
ing two somewhat incompatible
plant types together and expect
high performance from both.
Tree and turf both
need water, oxygen,
sunlight and the
same basic nutrients.
These needs lead to
competition. To com-
pound the problem,
the maintenance .
needs for each can
be detrimental to the
other
Much of the com- Kerry
petition between TH
trees and turf take ARBO
place underground.
It is believed that tree roots are
much deeper than turf roots.
This is a misconception.
Although some tree roots can be
found well below grade, it is the
fine roots that absorb water and
minerals that are in the upper 6
to 12 inches of the soil.


A given volume of soil can sup-
port only a finite root popula-
tion. The number of roots varies
with the soil type and conditions.
The turf roots tend to respond
more quickly to resource avail-
ability and to colo-
nize faster So they
usually have the
V.J advantage over tree
roots.
Studies show that
: turf roots take up the
S" majority of nitrogen
fertilizer when shar-
ing soil space with
K .ed tree roots. Trees, on
Kreider the other hand, have
E tremendous absorp-
RIST tive power, which
allows them to draw
large quantities of water from
the soil.
In fact, on a hot summer day, a
stand of mature trees can easily
pull hundreds of gallons of water
from the surrounding soil.
Competition for soil moisture
can lead to stress in both trees


and turf. Stressed plants may be
predisposed to other problems
with pests and diseases, and
while trees and turf are strug-
gling to get by, weeds with low
moisture requirements are like-
ly to become established.
Shades from trees also play a
part in a turf's density and
health problems. Shade reduces
the quality of light availability.
Tree leaves absorb the
violet/blue and the orange/red
wavelengths of light from the
spectrum (the blue wave length
is important to turf growth.)
The remaining light that pass-
es through is rich in the
green/yellow wavelengths, some-
times called "green shade."
In effect, trees "mine" the sun-
light as it passes through their
canopies, leaving less photo syn-
thetically active wavelengths in
the light that reaches the turf
below.
There are many other factors
concerning the incompatibility
of shared space between trees


and turf. A qualified arborist can
offer suggestions to give your
trees and turf an equal opportu-
nity for optimal growth.
Did you know ... The Laurel
tree protects against illness?
-- il -


Kerry Kreider is a
professional arborist, a
member of International
Society ofArboriculture and a
tree preservationist He can be
reached at 302-2815 or
actionproarborist@yahoo.com.


P&R lVid-Florida
Realty Services, Inc.
746-9770 *- 1-800-329-7002
3 W. LEMON ST., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465
Visit us on the Web at: p-rrealty.com * E-mail: pandr639@earthlink.net
Crystal River BEVERLY HILLS BEVERLY HILLS
2 bedrooms 2 baths 2 bedrooms 1 bath 2 bedrooms. 1 bath,
mobile. Great starter Tiled Kitchen & Family Screened Pato. Car Port
home.This is a turn key Room Large back Near shopping & across
home ready for you. yard price to sell the street to church.
MLS #163737 $72,900 .ML~,1:,:.i'-> $79,500 MLS #316534 s89,900
Rose Leone 634-0570 Elaine Brightman 228-9314 Gloria Bonner 697-0375
CELINA HILLS PINE RIDGE Beverly Hills
;' bedrooms 2 baths 2 Car 3 Bedrooms 2 Baths " Car 2 bedrooms. 2 baths. 2
Garage Screened Pool Garage. Vheel Chair car garage Screened
Bullt in 199'5 Jevi Carpets Accessible Formal DR 8 LR, heated pool Front patio
5 paint Reduced to sell Fireplace, 14.'28 nealed pool On Meadowdale
MLS a i:.,'411 $214,000 MLS#315942 $359,000 r1MLLB1.: 61 4 $145,000
Gloria Bonner 607-0375 Rose Leone 634-0570 Gloria Bonner 697-0375
PINE RIDGE LOTS STARTING AT S67,900
CALL. FOR MiOORAM ON ON OUR OTHER LISTINGS
*~e Mr WRM T, M. - *4.4s I I MP, M,


1 s s5569 w. GULF TO LAKE Hwy.
^ CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
REAL ESTATE, INC. OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
X5 WWW.ALEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM


s (2), 3 bedrm, 2 baths, part fumished, PINE RIDGE 3 bedrm, 2.5 bath house w/caged
kitchen, dining rm, 3 tier rear deck, inground pool, 2 car garage on 1 acre. 12 x 24
iced back yard, 2 acres. 2 car gar. insulated metal shed w/220 electric. #305989
0 $175,000 $279,500


IHOMOSASSA 2 mobiles; 2 separate lots. OFF FOREST RIDGE IN BEVERLY HILLS
#6911 is a 1977 d/w, 2 bdrm, 2 ba, shed & lovely 2 bedrm, 2 bath, 2 car gar, block home
garage. #6919 is a 1985 s/w, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 2 w/stone accent, split fir plan, spacious kitchen
carports and 2 sheds. Both rented $550 & w/ lots of cabinets, fam rm, 2006 carpet, hot
$600/mo #307550 $150,000 water recovery sys. #312189 $144,900


� %N i . ,^




1 Choice Really * 352-794-SELL (7355)

7394 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River









WELL MAINTAINED 3BD/2BA doublewide on A CHARMING MUST SEE 3BD/2BA beauty in a
2.4 acres. What a location! Beautiful, flat acreage quaint neighborhood of nice homes. Freshly painted,
centrally located just off a busy Hwy. Zoned MDR split plan, great rm. w/open kitchen, kitchen/bath
w/many land uses. Best water in the county. Fully updated, covered patio, nicely treed cul-de-sac, close
fenced. $129,900 317007 to amenities & boat ramps. $149,900 314641









HANDSOME RENOVATIONS In this 2BD/2BA SUPERBLY MAINTAINED. Lovely 3/2 on a
waterfront home! Remodeled thru-out, kitchen/bath 1/2 acre landscaped lot in adult only park. Open/
updated, freshly painted, new carpet/vinyl, water split plan, eat-in kitchen, formal dining, master
heater & custom wet bar. Open plan, Ig. screen suite, Ig. screened porch, 1-car carport, ext. bldg.
porch, boat dock, open water view. Priced to sell w/ w/220V wiring for workshop, close to amenities &
owner financing available. $75,900 315332 boat ramps. $132,500 315482

www.firstchoiceinrealestate.com T

_ OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK! E
E-mail - lstchoice@coldwellbanker.com
707733


I

f
a









Neighbors and toilets and ladders - oh my!


D ear Mr.
HandyPer-
son: I have a
funny accident to
relate for you, *,
though it was a time
before we could
laugh about it. Five
years ago in De- -
cember our neigh-
bor, a single mother, Mar
asked for my hus- IV
band's help with the HANDY
holiday lights on her
house. I said OK, provided he
not go up on a ladder because
he was on meds from a previ-
ous accident. "No, no," she
assured me. "I just want him to
hold the ladder."
I went for a walk and came
back to find my husband about
to pass out Of course, he'd
been up on the ladder and


F


"rode it down"
when it fell. He tore
up his hands, need-
S" ed stitches and X-
rays, and he broke
two ribs and a fin-
ger.
We're still friends
with the neighbor,
Hetts though.
Hetts I'm also writing
R. about a home prob-
PERSON lem. We bought a
new toilet last year,
which my husband installed.
There's a small leak around
the base of the toilet He has
removed it twice, replacing the
wax ring each time, but it still
leaks. He is ready to take a
sledgehammer to it - Sigrid,
Raleigh, N.C.
Dear Sigrid: First, Sigrid, if
you really cared for your hus-


band, you'd buy another toilet
on the sly, put a nice ribbon on
a sledgehammer, give it to him,
and let him take that toilet out
for the last time. Venting his
frustration with a little wanton
destruction could be the best
gift he's had in years (provided
he avoids further major
injuries).
Seriously, Sigrid, Mr.
HandyPerson is confident that
with careful investigation, the
leak will have one of a small
number of logical explanations
and solutions, some easier
than others.
First, check the bolts that
hold the tank to the base. They
should be dry, tight and uncor-
roded. If they are loose, wet or
corroded, gently tighten them a
small amount (so as not to
crack the porcelain). This may


solve the problem. Just
because the moisture appears
at the base of the toilet doesn't
mean it originates there.
There could be a design or
manufacturing flaw in the
porcelain at the base of the toi-
let that prevents it from setting
firmly. You can confirm or
eliminate this possibility by
taking up the toilet again,
removing all the wax ring
residue, and looking closely for


a lump or gap on the base of the
toilet This is unusual, but it
happens (twice to Mr HP, creat-
ing his own personal sledge-
hammer fantasies). The solu-
tion, if you find such a flaw, is
to return the toilet to the place
of purchase and get one with-
out the flaw. Don't leave the
store until you have thoroughly
examined - out of the carton

Please see HANDY/Page 29E


*Home Finder* *Home Finder* *Home Finder*

%1W- - SSB0SB y.4


7418 N. Maltese Dr. 3156 W. Fairbanks
$189,900 Citrus Springs $184,900 Citrus Springs
309191 315304


$91500


(352) 795-6811 Office
(352) 563-1756 Home
(352) 697-1613 Cell


IMPRESSIVE HOME IN PINE RIDGE
Granite countertops in kitchen, lots of tile, wood
floors, formal living & dining, family room w/
fireplace & wetbar, 3 or 4 bedrooms, and 3.5
baths. Chlorinator heated pool w/overflow
Jacuzzi and summer kitchen on lanai. Regulation
size lighted basketball court. Home set up for
whole house generator w/inground propane tank.
Lots on each side of home can be purchased
separately or with the home for additional money
at a bargain price. MLS #302894 $419,900


SIT BACK AND RELAX ON THE NEW DOCK
of this spacious, comfortable, 3 large
bedroom, 2 bath, waterfront home. You
can relax because all the work is done.
New roof last year, complete kitchen
remodel in 2005, lots of gorgeous tile and
best of all this waterfront gem with easy
access to the Gulf has never flooded.
MLS #314421 $334,900


DIRECTLY ON THE INDIAN RIVER!
baths has 159' directly on the beautiful Indian
River. Sit on the seawall or relax on the new dock DELIGHT THE FAMILY...
and enjoy bald eagles & hawks overhead and
manatee and dolphin at your feet. Can't get any Modern 3 BR, 2 bath, split plan home.
better than this! Features living room, dining DB garage w/opener, eat-in kitchen,
room, well organized kitchen, den/office along inside laundry & more. Corner lot, over
with a wonderful back yard overlooking the river& 1.15 acres, with fencing & 2 sheds &
wild state lands on the other side. This is not a
canal home. Comes with your own boat ramp in above ground pool. Priced for quick
your back yard! MLS #312018 $349,000 sale at $184,900. #315104


$119,0001


28E SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007


Cimus CouNTY (FL) CimoivicLE




. <4 *�


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 29E


HANDY
Continued from Page 28E

- the replacement toilet.
Another explanation (with
the same solution) is to exam-
ine every inch of the toilet to
see if there are any hairline
cracks in hard-to-see parts of
the porcelain tank or base. You
can put a teaspoon of blue food
coloring in the tank, let it stand
for a few hours, then flush.
This will often (but not
always) help reveal cracks.
Another simple search tech-
nique is to wipe down all sur-
faces of the toilet with a dry
paper towel. If or when it picks
up moisture, you've probably
found the leak
If the toilet itself is "inno-
cent," the problem is almost
certainly in how it is mounted
to the floor or the floor itself. In
some older homes, bathroom


Put a teaspoon of

blue food coloring
in the tank, let it

stand for a few
hours, then flush.

floor coverings can sometimes
be laid on top of each other,
raising the floor enough that a
wax ring alone can't seal the
toilet to the waste pipe.
Thicker wax rings with an
extension are usually sold
alongside the standard ones.
Finally, if the subflooring is
wood or plywood, which by
now has gotten wet repeatedly,
there could simply be enough
"give" in the damp floor to
make the toilet move, separate
from the wax ring, and leak.
Mr. HP hopes not, because
the "fix" may involve ripping


up and rebuilding part of the
bathroom floor. If that is the
case, he hopes you have a sec-
ond toilet.
If not, ask to use your neigh-
bor's toilet during the repairs.
Considering that she helped
nearly kill your spouse a few
years back, she certainly owes
you and your poor husband
this minor courtesy in such an
emergency.


Mr. HandyPerson wants to
hear of home repair matters
that are troubling you, inter-
esting questions, funny experi-
ences and useful tips you
might want to share with other
readers. Write to: Mr.
HandyPerson, c/o Universal
Press Syndicate, 4520Main St.,
Kansas City, MO 64111.


SOUND OFF: 0 Call the Scrund Ott line at 563-05 9.


JENNIFER LEHMAN


(3521422-1642 %.ntr.inrs
1675 S.Suncoasi RBId. Homo;assa ,", & I LnuL
SjlenniferJehman@eraxcom \ Nr, Grneraliin I Rrkal Ri1r"
NO STRESS OR WORRIES WITH
THIS EXCEPTIONALLY WELL
MAINTAINED HOME. tr ,r cnr.r,
f,-.. lu,.. plni' , . A,: ,r ,r,,I s 3C . l:,r , -
.plhl oeoro'orn plan utt.r: pr. ft c.,
,:Irni,:, n Irnt , t-riani m a..ler sod,-'. "'-�
t..ne s a ris ,r,n 3 gar . . ir. lu' , '*,u I.. "
r , '-,, If ha.., 1-.: o -uf I er, " -. ,
, i, a.:'.u :' it h. u A' I.,n
.'~ iI, ,0u ,l,.i- nunQ.r id a , l l ec
,.r3,,uh>A, ',3.a. :i .;-" 2irhe,3.:.A'ehec A.-"L Aa? i,.*
ari. ,.:.,r h.:e una r ... .. .- - -
and a lull, Iand,.., ,d a 3rd L Ct nic .l
-cho.Ca ,ltr,wl OWNERS OFFERING
1 YR. HOME WARRANTY & UP TO
1.5'". TOWARD BUYERS CLOSING


STO


SELLER TO PAY $5000 OF BUYERS COSTS
Newer 3/2/2 situated on a beautifully wooded 12 acre GOOD GRAVY ONLY $59,90011
comer lot. Room for a detached garage/workshop or 1985 3/2 doublewide on fenced corner lot
RV parking w/ entrance off side street, Privacy fence, partially remodeled and ready for immediate
gazebo & hot tub off the master suite. All appliances occupancy. City water, covered porch & 1 Year
Included, water softener, sprinkler system. Asking Home Warranty to top it off. MLS#308338. Call
$189,900 Call Janet. 352-726-5263 MLS# 311714 Tomika 352-586-6598


2096 sq. ft. LA
jCCwg, 0 ,C. $185.000
2271 South Olympic Hills Terrace, Inverness ON YOUR LOT
(352) 726-2179 Mon-Fri 10-4 3 Bed, Den, 2 Bath



I i - gmill

E p -p '










Kids gardening photo contest set


Special to the Chronicle
SOUTH BURLINGTON, Vt
- Attention shutterbugs: It's
time to. bring out your great
images of kids in gardens and,
share them with the world! The
National Gardening Associ-
ation (NGA) has revived its
popular photo contest for folks
who garden with kids at home,
at school and in the communi-
ty, and is looking for colorful
shots of children and teens


engaged with gardens, plants
and nature.
There are two contest cate-
gories: one for photos taken in
the home garden, and another
for those taken in school and
community gardens. A first-,
second- and third-place prize
will be awarded in each cate-
gory. These prizes will consist
of gift certificates to NGA's
Gardening with Kids catalog
(first prize: a $250 certificate;
second prize: a $100 certifi-


cate; third prize: a $50 certifi-
cate.) The deadline for submis-
sions is Sept 15. Winning pho-
tos and runners-up will be dis-
played in an online gallery.
. For, full contest rules and
guidelines, visit www.kidsgar
dening.org.
NGA uses photos submitted
to the contest to illustrate its
award-winning Web sites,
books, the Gardening with Kids
catalog and other print publi-
cations.
Founded in 1972, the
National Gardening Associ-
ation is a national nonprofit


leader in plant-based educa-
tion, respected for its award-
winning Web sites and newslet-
ters, grants and curricula for
youth gardens,� and research
for the lawn and garden indus-
try NGA's mission is to advance


the personal, community, and
educational benefits of garden-
ing by supporting gardeners
and teachers with information
and resources.
To learn more, visit the Web
site at www.garden.org.


SUGARMILL WOODS


The Royal Chelsea
3 Bedrooms * 2 Baths * 2 Car Garage


Ile .-rr Ci.5rol,, HO.n-b~idi~idc
It-I/ Build onYup fVowbni )sgc or Ciar..
):iir Floorplan or Our Q
4 /Pe r/ c h

7 . . ...


N

(352)
.*.382-5700


Ar~a� and Porch
* 12 1-11,1 reilir.. al Fr.'r Eiri -
maid Fc -er
* 8 High Ai~dijug 1c1,� Doors
* irr:, Roou l-e~atre4 Double Trav


7~ ~~~SA1 * Liphi. F, \iuR A Ii 11Cr~'
I Ni;crin- ,il Vi,: 1iii chck*n Cabn er
ard b.id Hear Fronrii.
" xm Hi soi, and He kir nrichiun
Ballk In Li WrIl Sei%


*Sprinkler svtem up io c,11' X 1211

*L -idsc ipe P,ckage
* ' S',m -'d .AIIc" anje tip to


irs =w.nackowI o I


National deadline in September


Cmus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE





, , ,


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2007 31E


Multi-Million Dollar Sales Team Bob&D Dawya Hedkk Ellen Aroneo Dea Kershaw Lynn Davis Jason Morgan Pat Wadsworth Steve George
Broker/Owne Realli� leihlgeS ds5pdat PrPperty M1gemet Lxery Houe Spdais Rl� IiHmet&d BSUler

(800) 874-9322 * (352) 746-3390 (352) 634-4286 (352) 634-2345 (352) 270-2015 (352) 422-2522 (352) 422-8095 (352)634-2209 (352422-4012








CL B St - A- 634 428



- A3 A3


3627 N. GRAYHAWK LOOP
Ft.uC,. t . r , h ..e .th i. r,
Architectural uniqueness sets this home
apart from the ordinary. This Pete Morey
constructed masterpiece is situated on a
gorgeous homesite overlooking #6 of the
.,.:.11 - ..Ou Q . C.ur. .ilU I'M"
$1,040.00o


3399 W. PEBBLE BEACH CT,
TRADITIONAL ELEGANCE .-, ... ,-,.
~..j r :a~,T I .,I....L ,:T . jl ] :.' * 1

features large spacious rooms including scparaLe


, M.r . r.:- . . ,000
11-i:. MC li-15,


3180 N. PINELAKE VIllAGE PT.
COMPLETELY REMODELED! New
roof. Gorgeous granite countertops!
Ceramic tile throughout! Tiled
0.. r.Ihro Irr ,. '-,r . .nl .. : ; .lc,;1 . 1. I, -i,:.:..':
L .! , ._. r No m. ciier.,p $ 6 rc-0, -
...:.-.r, MLSin3 0i 72 $360, 00


3628 N. PINE VALLEY LOOP
FABULOUS VIEW cI R.- rj r,ie .:r
tr .:.-ld rr-r.;ui Q.0,.r' , :-ur-. T%
t.e rI7,7 i i r're 7 .:.v.e . *wr7.ut ."
Storage galore!" Second kitchen in very
large oversized 3-car garage. Security
system w/sensors in the screens. Come
sit by the pool on your very large lanai
with the tranquil sounds of the fountain
. rc.. eh .: l I Current
appraisal at $790.000. MLS a3-jEr.
$609.,000


3069 W. BERMUDA DUNES
WONDERFUL BLACK DIAMOND
HOME! SpI.:LC..ul-r 3 b.rro:,rr. ,:ill
.4Lc5tC. G:re.:u: iI.,r 'I1, lid I1A
throughout, stainless steel appliances
and custom window treatments.
Brand new roof Newer carpeting and
p-_intr Beiutiful mature lndscping
N O n-i_ lbOerjiv- purcr.aLe r, ci li3r,'
MLS3i13I'6 ' 217,500


BREATHTAKING HOME .n B1i,6
OD.lr,.:,r.'.1 L:..- t, .:,fE . p'-*. ,*, t 1r .
ti . 3 c..'. t .ii'. m t-'lrF , Tr.- e .'.
garage plus golf cart. Gourmet kitchen ana
lots of extras! Come enjoy the understated
'r.i t i:- h,-r. u: .ir ..ir, in

.-..r,1 , , .,. t. , .-.. ,o . r er . MLS
n I _s'69 $699,000


3118 N. BARTON CREEK CIRCLE
THIS BEAUTIFUL LANDSCAPED
Barton Creek home has many extras.
Wooden Plantation Shutters, Corian counters
C.I -, r,:i,.-. ,:.t.' , .,.... lb;.. ,l i.f:
u.,-,:h, rc.ls,,-. MLS u(it,34 1 $212,500


4200 N. PINE VALLEY LOOP
BEAUTIFUL ESTATE HOME on
the 5th hole of World Famous
Quarry 3 bedroom. 2 5 bahi with
in office House shovs like a
model MLS #163041 $595,000



THINKING

OF SELLING?

YOUR HOME
SHOULD BE
HERE!

A$K ABOUT
OUR SPECIAL
COMMISSION RATE$


CITRUS S 3INGS


I PI E I


3520 W. COGWOOD
LOVELY SWEETWATER BUILT h.rr,. air
i A-C-.g [O �.tr-li3re- 11i6 X 32 :olr hi',r.d po i
Lt rL tr.glht ci-ree-r kl.:he, p:. ii..lo.:r . Ma, '
P...- 6i.- ,jr h.M:,,-. it.:dl, $-, , 0r,3 , 0 p.-:.
,,,d: qu ,et - ,.ell l i 4u.:Lr.'ri |.-i.; : r, c.r,m >.jr..i ,
.r.[.er ict.... ML 31 C 4 37$269,000


NATURE LOVERS PARADISE. s . ,:... :.... .
'.-'.l ... l' -.*, r 'k:F -J . l 'I I . . :.. Ti ... .i , , i

- ~ ~ ~ ~ 3 -. ., . .- ..

1--: I 000


HINS 3 BEDROOM, 2 bich 2 car gjriigE home
IOC~lsd in' Ctuu. Spr~ri I; pricttci5! brand nei,,,

ceighborh...:d ..Izni'e -1 conder re.tE6 ic.o~n or
live0 api.orn Corer. ci Es r~e. h.:,mEI MIS
It3 12 181 $159,900


77 IEW H>MECC>PSTRCT1C0P4


� CELIN


1102 N. NASHUA TERRACE
CEUNA HILLS! Four bedroom. rao
bath pool home' Vacant' Immediate
occupancy' Workshop' MLS #308925
$199,900


4387 IN SADDLEIUEE
THIS CUSTOM HOME er i,--
c7,..7.i7ir.1 .P...'lt15. Tr,.r.71,11,77 4 AE .,596~4 N.SUNMER�RFIEL
i,7 hs .L4,R .u*y..r-.- -. i.:V.mUW THIS BRAND NEW SPLIT PLAN in
l~i, . 11 7 .AI .. ce.~..,t.. IM CO11PLTEl -..r, qijAk3 rorstru-:Ior 311i2 JUSTCOHPLETD - i CIra! sprnp ris. n 3q..i7e ti de atc vr
r -ni, I .1.1'. 7,1,,,.77 .5. -3.�-,InliW rr .1 hnliv~ CslhAdral ..-lir.gi. lot -)I1 ri oo 3120 ma V 5 hi Eslin, Cib ,I co t. Pre Rid5 ch Youje Iib forpri, edi at

t.,, i.,: Ti-r, , .... i, i t. i 7. Fo~h .j5 ~iit ..tr.inl Ir3. :S ar 00u 'EtlI a I-C -Ei,1. ire ro-irc.n Er-10 Ere. -E,1 irdc plienrf o pr.. ,
.77., nil rIS3i,3 18 ,0 ihm&; I,77'ihio MLS '31046 $1i 91111110 lot I 100xI25) MLS =i3 12594
M[ ai.1 iS469.000 InsiiIM#12l 1290g. u nM 346$7,0


SPOTLESSI 11'4NACURATEI 7i..., r.. ... I., w.o




al n7. -...l.. 1u I tvl I'.c S224.900


..... . ...... .... r--- i








99F STTNThAY Trrsmr 24 2007


OPEN WATERFRONT-FLORAL CITY
LAKE----.322 Splin Plan Large living room
winh cathedral lingig Kilchen wi1h sunr.,
Breakfail NoI r. Inn;ide Ulilily Scr-ee. Por-rh
CIra Waler Asking $329,000 Call Pal
Davi,.s .:352-212-7280 10 preve* 3147.54


IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY. Ne Clear WATERFRONT CONDO WITH BOAT
ii,'i u, . Reir-mTnri H.-,, Tr,,i 2' 1 i ,iua..e DOCKING.... Overlo.7.king e,ui Lak.e
,-, , b, auDul Il,, la', ' :,aed :'1l= I n ,a ,k "ard ,'. i end r- , -n i1-1 21* 'j'- j I li -e u*- i ll1
a Iue pak i, e :ien.n, 10.20 :-..- n roo i r, Hendersn hi 2/2 villa s beautifully
.E .~~lT,,, ,e ioor l- r,:.. .l plu- man, oii decoraled ad i.mtiarulale Hard cud i-u1.mrn
Tl,,n,,e-rrne ri- Tnr ri-.T, , in, mu.c-r,,gri,,r, ,,in main lh.",ng aisa Trulv mor.n,,-n C.')ni.lOn
cundli.:r, 'i.ir 'I .. all ohilrs ser.ous Commujndiv Pool & Tennis Couris Gel Ihe
C.1n.aEraino,:.n Asking $124.900 Pat Da..: Momr For Your Money $148.900 Par Ds."s
Aqeni 316139 Ageqr, 314.,61


KENSINGTON ESTATES Vnal are ,uu waling
.--."" Tn.- - rc-i-.n rr ir.ree rbdioo.T. rwu
barn; r,,'. car anacherj q.'aqage lenced-.r.
tackyaria wah rno:i lut and sheJ 3and one a.:re 101
Cl':s�e I., ho.-cicririg iu' vel .a Coinir, TIenrig Trs
rnim rrIuI lar Ire m..iy Park yur DoSI
cr mor.:.r nome on ,our propierTy Ju.i reduced it.
$175,900 II.ILS Z30303.50 C.al Det Tr.omp-r.:or. lr
,ou, _h,:,inr..g Ce a-,J34E-2656


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


QUIET NEIGHBORHOOD! Thn,: 2,'22 .
conerenill ir lcalead i a ,3er, peacelu] .iseel
ir, Irivernes Be aullul irortil yard includes nice
:-ai1, Ireess arid old ,oak Home has a family ,
roo-m AND ar.irer rc:om ort Ire back i",al
COuld na.e man., use; $114,900.00 MLS
#"S12i8 Call 3Wall Pulc:in 352-228-70'20


INVERNESS - NEW LISTINGII! L. dr..E r, lull
wor.. I d or. * r..- one Ti.:. bDd.:.orr, r. 31. air.
g.'i, l rI,,.T, k.l.:r . 11i .3i ii . ..:,r ul .*-A', .
li.i.. lari. r.:..�., o .rin l'',pia:. e i"reenr, po.r.:r a
i nrie..r, ic:k. ri, Thii-- are .-:, iTar., ujiradce
.r. lh. r.l-.u'e I Car i pul InE, .r. Ir.e 3.i Call mre l..r
all ir.- *r[.:.i-.mai.rr 4-'Fp r'..u ..l e Turpr..:cd
r..,.:.u :.:orr.e r.:.u,-r. ir.- .:.i.r S129.900 ll.ILS
S1r.8 Ii C . 311Ir Di . Tr.oT i .r, i:.r ,.:.ur :r..-.,r.,ng3
.'-l e334. -c.t;.':


CRYSTAL RIVER VILLAGE 55- GATED
COMMUNITY LI--. 5in 2 Ereiro.m , r-ar. 'ili0
Home; ,.', *r.l ...ae T i r,,li r-,nIT-,e ,/.,ir.
,araiEc p.i.: i, a.,p l $47.000 i-4 i rilHFP ur L1I
#1..9 19 'F. "_,un. 2 2 t rco.m 2 rt. r i lull
iurr.,iiini *ei.:,arle.a- , ir. .: rpLc.n rA rh. 565.000
nli'.14r.lHF Ii , a w T,:,,Tj 3, I... P_ h, a mT.bil r,,:.Te
ir a CparF .:.11 u I WeV r.a., m ni, i:..:r:.. Irrom
�"=- i,:,r ,r..r,i *:,:rugg! 1"2. 9. 910









MIDWAY BETWEEN FLORAL CITY AND BROOKSViLLE

4t 1. . I .. ' l * l 1 . i.-:' . . 11 1.... r ., -,: r,
1. C.. .rI.. E.:1 . i



R aucria to .S199 ,' , ' . , .-
I , e.: ., -.-


I - -, -._. ,
MAKE US AN OFFER!!I! L.Ke r.,e a-id ready
ior immredil1e c 3i:rupancy' "3 bedrc.;m 2 Cain,
2 car garage &.od &e ncorirg nrc pair.l
nre, c abinreli irn kicricer & Dalh new A/C r.ew
hinr.rles. t.3, . ,aro1 pain and all y:ri a iree-
'raded Corner 101 Cice ru 311 C.fl-Aernern.e5
REDUCED NOW TO $130.000 n? 15264 Call
Creryl Scrugg;, .;2.269"'2910


THIS FOUR-BEDROOM HOME r.as I.le floors
a 1;..J2 c'2 tried pc.rcn plus 3 12,12
co-.eri- pa,'u I'r ihe BBE There a3 2-c.ar
.:rp,.r allac:nhed .: me r.c.me rad ,Snoirier 2-
,a: r .:arp:,ri .in a.rl ' .vork.-rhc t: e ba':1 ar
Fericl-in I.1LS, #31-JJ86 VV1 Pulr.n ,35i.-

5159.90000


PERFECT TREE HOUSE Si.H Hl.:.ms cr, ., ,-1...
. r.:. Tr. i-er-1 'C.ai c -Jicei, ar i.nT in -.3 i n
r . a , c:r a n3 -. -:.r.c-. 2 tP ' t.1 lr. -p-la.i'
.r: l p .i--. ..pi d.-.A El "- 2 a.: o ar .' o
, i'd I:o.IT.-IInI, l n.: ,3 Pi,. arc .rc-a iri .a.
_ -:r -.d p-.',, :r, i l.lIu' i E i, : aP, .'.':,, e b.'nd
JE'.'.' al 1471A 5159.000 %As: For i.-ar.-..
or Vlara13 P..:ari Aen.r H-IRS 130-21i.-3J 10


BREATHTAKING CUSTOM BUILT HOME .ii,
E P ". fi *.:r, irb . .,: ;.: ,i- *'.' ri .:..:..: n - ...r
A.ir1., de p ,. a.1 , 1. :, ir . ,_'.ui ,:,1 I.1 : ,,.:, U .:,.'. p...: ,'
al $852.900 M.1 i a. ,ri.r ,:u m.gra c.
'urc'"E.- Bj li i i ll E.Ti i.:4.. r. .:.ir,]iT... '0 -
-' i


FISH FROM YOUR OWN DOCKI Er,,.:, ir,6 uQJ.
c.: ur.l r, aimo': r, -r,- ,- r :l: i e li I.' is. c.; Ir. , ,. iJ ulr.'ji
.'. , *'c E ' C.-' ':"rm .2 3 r, ._ a,. i 3lari ,'I r,.:.iTi-
'. r , . . 3,l- na r . arpl l.: i. .lar Jun.i, : ,i.aepl 3,
.aT.i r -_,:i.Ti E - .'ai -i.r:lU, . : r , .:.' - r.tr' el .
-:, 'J' I ' ': r l : LSr i.1 - ;6
Lil-,_ h:. , $235.900 . * i,:," r .,,n, H, -II,T,, _ : 2 - ,l
JI "


GREAT LOCATION IN PINE GROVE
COMMUNITY jusl mrnnuiec i-T, sir a"meni., il ha
ClIu" Count, na . i, offie Ths p re.oric,, 2 tbar
S a, . : ,,a, Iie, .nT .:.r..n Mio ell a tuil i. 200511
.ir.r mar., Cup a' ne c- R31 i,:..:.m,'S:i Ci c. -r. lu:.r:
plan wiri ljg-e pOC ir. ri..ale tr..:I ,3r.id Iue
iTmu .I se At- 11r .l" r..,: I LS i 3'lJ .J4 Lil i C ,r
$ 185.900 A R .1f- F.:.,r .r.e H ellTie ! 3: 52-.2 1; -11 4


VERY PRIVATE COUNTRY STYLE 3 Dearoom 2
tair. 2 .:ar garage .n a n.celiy reed lenced
c'.er 'zead corner i.:rl .n Inern-mes1 H.ghlan',ds Wesl
Bricr ,od.-burr.ip. fireplace Im.i. room Florda
rc,.:.m lourrral d.rnr.hi.,ir.,i room i r. i3 e panlra 2
larg�re Iern ,loelr' 'n mar, hail an3'd more Llliiity
hr, c MILS# 316,.7.3 Lined Ic.r $169.900 Ask lor
K.m,.Dr-, Mines 352-5.6-95-19


REDUCED! CLASSY WATERFRONT
COMMUNITY. Til- Ro.r anr .gr, lna per .:,n
L.ille L .e H-rn.. ri; r. fi.r.ulr Iro.,m
d,.:.,r I.i.rn ..larnier,ncr..:e i e ar. iparc ou'
Tr.c much i.:. m-niul..n $50.000.00 BELOW
APPRAISAL PRICEI $184.900.00 Call ,Val
Pulc-r .35c.22. .702i 0


UULF CUURSI L UMMUNIIY ir..:,,T-. ..
a.:.1 l.i. -a ljr .: -,,',. l-c 5 r,. ric . ',.r, I-,I- f. ,. tI "..: I-i,
b in r, . 5.: . r ,'l... .: . r '-. -i, -_' r: i r ,. l

.-.., ._- -: ... --' REDUCED to
f229.000 3i i:, 1i F.:., .i.: I- - - i ,....i
L ljI HF I- Q . :. 1.. 11


BRAND NEW 3 Bedro,-omn 2 Baih nome localed
c-r. a prr.nrg led i'T'311 lake Juiui CuoTmpl-�Ed
,ipl 'l.:".:.' plan ..,Ir. lar a inieid- launldr,
KicnIer. Ipen IC, larmaly roirom For'msl l.r.n
afsa .:,', orl e 1, ie irar, Boauaciul ,.c cof
lac. ,-mI . T lani,.l., rom B-137,t2 $259,900
Z,-. F.-. .l earner. or Willar. P.CKrel Wfier HRS
3..- _ 12- i34Li


MAKE OFFERI Th.i 2,212 rom o ins a nice
area of Ihe lrIerness City Lim.ia C-ry wale.
and sewer is ,ou answer for nol worrying
aboui a well and sepir Spill plan w.in a
lenced-in back yara Vour good lassie in
'oo-:.if arnd looringj aill updale Ir is into a
wonderful home MLS a 314437 Call Wall
Puic.r. 352-226-7020 $114.900.00


mar


I
IA SUN- JUNE 24 2007


JAW. MORTON M


OkjLJY 0 REAL ESTATE, INC. I

1 1645 W. MAIN ST., INVERNESS, FL



2.1(. SALES: (352) 726-6668


Email: cent21@infionline.net www. wmortonrealestate.com 1-800-543-9163
I__ IEl ElI-- . _-- -




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