Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01016
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness Fla
Publication Date: September 25, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01016

Full Text











FORECAST:
Partly cloudy with
scattered storms
Highs around 90.
PAGE 41


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called 'petty and cruel


SEPTEMBER 25, 2007


RBUJRGLARY:


Stricter law would target felons


Gallery theft
Thieves target a local art
gallery, though some tough
glass makes their job a little
harder./Page 3A
FOR WOMEN:
Get healthy
Local health expo slated for
this Saturday/Page 2A
NOT SO FAST:
Off the ballot?
Judge rules against a pro-
posed property tax amend-
ment that was to be put
before the voters./Page 3A
OPINION:

Moving
water across
watersheds was
a bad idea a
decade ago.
It is a bad idea
today.

EDITORIAL, PAGE IOA
CLIMATE SUMMIT:


Call for action
World'leaders at the first U.N.
climate summit sought to put
neW urgency into global talks
to reduce global-warming
emissions./Page 12A
SECURITY SLIPPING:
Fix needed
The Bush administration said
in a new report that Social
Security is facing a $13.6 tril-
lion shortfall in coming
years./Page 12A
DIABETES DECISION:


Quite a pill
A widely used diabetes pill
appears to lower a patient's
chances of death, heart
attack or stroke./Page 1C
ERA, NOSE & THROAT:
Voice disorders
The identification of an indi-
vidual's vocal needs is the
most important component in
successfully treating vocal dis-
order./Page lC
WHAT'S ONLINE?
Troops at War
Visit www.Chronicle
@ Online.com and
click to Troops at
War to view or
submit photos of
troops in Iraq.


County officials consider strengthening current

zoning rules to keep undesirables in check


MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The idea of a proposed sex-offend-
er community south of Inverness gets
the blood boiling and emotions rising,
but its biggest hurdle might not be


public opinion.
It's zoning.
County officials believe the seven
mobile homes owned by a Pinellas
County company constitute a mobile
home park, and the community isn't
zoned for a mobile home park.
And they're considering the strength-


ening of zoning laws to make it more
difficult for similar communities to
locate in Citrus County.
"This is kind of a wakeup call,"
Development Services Director Gary
Maidhof said, referring to the proposed
sex-offender community.
County officials are expected to dis-
cuss with county commissioners today
an ordinance to regulate communities
that target convicted felons who are
deemed as undesirables.
The ordinance would require that


SU
su<
apa
an
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City discusses golf cart usage on street


Council may allow some street access


MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Crystal River City Council
members believe city residents
shouldn't necessarily have to
hop into their cars to get
through town.


The council agreed Monday
night to consider an ordinance
that would allow golf carts on
some city streets.
Council members also will
ask the Department of
Transportation to consider
allowing golf carts and slow-
moving small vehicles similar


to carts on the new multi-use
paths that the DOT installed
parallel to U.S. 19.
Police Chief Steven Burch
also said some slow-moving
vehicles are now allowed on
city streets where speed limits
do not exceed 35 mph.
Tim Gage, a resident of the
Crystal River Villages, asked
Please see GOLF/Page 5A


BUDGET OK'D
a The Crystal River City
Council unanimously
approved a $4.6 million
general fund budget
Monday night with a tax
rate of 4.3 mills for the
budget year that begins
Oct. 1. The tax rate is a c
from this year's 5.6 mills


WHAT: Citrus County Commission
meeting.
WHEN: 1 p.m. today.
WHERE: Citrus County Courthouse,
110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness.
ch communities be a certain distance
art from schools, child-care centers
d homes, Maidhof said.
The concept is similar to ordinances
Please see STRICTER/Page 5A


Officials

silent


on desal


proposal

Says water supply

authority needs

to provide details
. TERRY WITT
terrywitt@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
A Progress Energy Florida
official said Monday the com-
pany won't comment on
whether it might be willing to
co-locate a future seawater
desalination plant at the
Crystal River Energy Complex
until it hears from the water
supply authority making the
proposal.
The Withlacoochee
Regional Water Supply
Authority last week disclosed
that one of its long-range pro-
posals for a future alternative
water supply source would be
co-locating a
25-million gal-
lon seawater
desalination
plant at the That
Crystal River
complex. was the
But Execti- f
tive Director fiSt
Jack Sullivan we've
acknowledged
that Progress heard
Energy has not
been contact- of it.
ed about the
plan. He said
the authority
must first Wendy
examine the Home
cost, design Progress
factors and Energy Florida
water demand spokeswoman
before it about plans for
eaore it co-locating
begins to look desal plant.
for partners in
development of alternative
water supplies.
He said he anticipates the
authority will begin making
presentations to local govern-
ments in mid-2008 to explain
potential alternative water
S supply projects and receive
input. He said desalination
would be one of those projects.
Progress Energy Florida
spokeswoman Wendy Horne
said the company won't
respond until it hears a formal
proposal from Sullivan's group.
"Certainly we're looking at
all options for water use, but we
can't comment on co-locating a
desalination plant until we
cut know what they are proposing,"
Please see
Please see '~:.,,/Pase 4A


It's placards, picket lines for auto workers i


Annie's Mailbox .
Comics .......
Crossword .....
Editorial ......


....... 7C
. . . . . 8C
. 7C
. . . . 10A


Entertainment . . . .. ... . . 4B
Horoscope .......... . 7C
Lottery Payouts ........ 4B
Movies-.............. 8C
Obituaries ............ 6A
Stocks ............... 8A
Three Sections


Associated Press
DETROIT - The U.S. auto indus-
try is gasping for air under the crush-
ing weight of high labor costs, grow-
ing competition and bloated, aging
infrastructure. At the same time, the
United Auto Workers union is strug-
gling to stay relevant after years of
membership declines.


Caught between these two giants in
this year's contract talks are the auto
workers who built middle-class lives
on the promises of the industry.
Marilyn Coulter, who has built cars in
Lansing for 29 years, said nobody
likes to strike. But she was still hold-
ing a picket sign outside an entrance
to her sprawling plant Monday.
"We do what we have to do. We've


given and we need something back,"
said Coulter, 47. "We want to build
cars, but we don't want to be taken
advantage of, either."
Strikes have sometimes been jubi-
lant affairs, with workers lustily
singing and chanting on the picket
lines. But on Monday, UAW President
Ron Gettelfinger and his bargaining
team looked exhausted and grim.
Gettelfinger said the union called a
strike because it wants promises for
future products at U.S. plants in addi-
tion to standard agreements on wages
Please see PICKET/Page 7A


Associated Press
Workers picket outside the General Motors
plant Monday in Janesville, Wis. Thousands of
United Auto Workers walked off the job at GM
plants around the country, in the first nationwide
strike since contract negotiations in 1976.


4 V V


Welcome

MEXyM TE ME F.2MM


HIGH
91
LOW
70


Crime fighting teen






your doorsI





















To kick-off the Citrus County Sheriff's Office
Lock Out Crime Campaign, the CCSO is unveiling
three billboards with designs created by three
Citrus County school students.
Above, Deborah Harden, right, tells her daugh-
ter Allison, 13, of Crystal River Middle School,
how proud she is of the teen's accomplishment
creating a winning billboard design.
Left. Allison watches the unveiling of the bill-
board.
The CCSO invited all students in the county's
public school system to draw designs illustrating
Lock Out Crime. Three were selected as winners.
The unveiling of the billboards coincides with
National Crime Prevention Month that will kick
off in October: The space on the billboard, as with
the other two in Citrus County. was provided by
Clear Channel at no charge. The billboard is
along the east side of U.S. 19, south of the Crystal
River Harley Dav'idson dealership.
The other two winning designs, one created by a
high school student and the other from a primary
school student, are on U.S. 41 south of Holder.
For more crime prevention tips and programs
offered by the Sheriff's Office visit www.sheriff
citrus.org.
- Photos by Matthew Beck. Chronicle Photo Editor


GM, UAW both struggling to survive

and workers are caught in the middle


*' *'. ** -V







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2AUEDA,_ITEBE Z70, 7 LccJ/


County BRIEFS


Fasano announces
2008 essay contest
State Sen. Mike Fasano
announces the start of his 14th
annual legislative essay contest.
Fasano will appoint two high school
students to serve for one week
each in Tallahassee during the 2008
session of the Florida Legislature as
pages in the Florida Senate.
- Students between the ages of
15 and 18 in public, private or
home school programs are eligible


to participate in the contest.
Students who wish to enter must
submit an essay of at least 100
words answering the question:
"With Florida facing reduced rev-
enues and subsequent reductions
in services, what budget priorities
should the legislature look at when
balancing the state budget now
and in the future?"
All entries must be received by
Fasano's district office no later than
5 p.m. Nov. 9 at 8217
Massachusetts Ave., New Port


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Richey 34653 or via fax (727) 841-
4453. Call Greg Giordano at (727)
848-5885 or (800) 948-5885.
October is Clergy
Appreciation Month
What do you appreciate about
your minister, priest, pastor or cler-
gy? Tell us in no more than 100
words. E-mail your notes of appre-
ciation by Sept. 28 to: nkennedy@
chronicleonline com.
- From staff reports


*


rGLSSROIONIS~


Health and fitness



expo targets women


NANCY KENNEDY
nkennedy@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle


Because women are general-
ly the "chief cooks and bottle
washers" of the family and the
go-to person when it comes to
the family's health care,
women are the focus of the
Women's Health & Fitness
Expo on Saturday.
A joint effort of the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce
Business Women's Alliance
and Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center and sponsored
by the Chronicle, the expo
offers the community - men
and children, too - the oppor-
tunity to gather information
about a wide variety of health
and fitness topics.
The daylong event begins at
9 a.m. and continues until 4
p.m. at Withlacoochee
Technical Institute, 1201 W
Main St., Inverness.
Fifty-two health- and fitness-
related representatives from
the community - pediatri-
cians, chiropractors, Weight
Watchers, health food stores,
clothing and cosmetics, mas-
sage therapists and fitness
trainers to name a few - will
be on hand to talk and answer
questions.
Admission is free.


* WHAT: Women's Health &
Fitness Expo.
N WHEN: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday.
* WHERE: Withlacoochee
Technical Institute, 1201
W. Main St., Inverness.
* COST: Admission is free.
* INFO: Call the Citrus
County Chamber of
Commerce at 726-2801.
Also, the bloodmobile will be
on site and Tampa General
Hospital's Aeromed helicopter
will be outside on display. Plus,
representatives from Citrus
Memorial Health System's
Women's Heart program will
be doing free blood pressure
checks, Body Mass Index read-
ings and heart risk assess-
ments.
Representatives from
SRRMC will be focusing on
mammography and bone den-
sity and a technician will be
available for breast self-exam
instruction.
Keynote speakers through-
out the day will speak about
issues of interest to today's
busy women, such as "How to
Look Better, Be Better and
Feel Better in a Toxic World"
(Roy Horn, DC, FAIMA and
Laura Horn, RN), "Taking Care
of You So You Can Take Care of


Them" (Carlene Wilson, MD),
"The Principles of Good
Health, Healing and Wellness"
(Hanoch Talmor, MD) and
"Passion for Health:
Integrating Mind, Body and
Spirit" (Ed Dodge, MD,
retired).
The emphasis of the expo is
on being proactive in your
health and taking an active
role in your own wellbeing.
"There seems a paradigm
shift in the medical industry,"
said Idona Davis, one of the
event organizers. "Doctors are
taking a more proactive
approach to health care, treat-
ing the causes and not just the
symptoms (of illnesses and dis-
eases)."
Weight control, exercise and
good nutrition are issues doc-
tors have always advocated,
but there's currently a greater
emphasis on these and other
preventative measures to good
health.
"Your health should be the
most important thing you
worry about, but often isn't,"
said Suzanne Clemente,
Chamber of Commerce special
event coordinator. "This is a
'one-stop' opportunity to take
advantage of a full range of
health and fitness profession-
als all in one place. That
should be a powerful motiva-
tion for people to come out"
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POW flag


Special to the Chronicle
Bob Huscher, from Fleet Reserve Association 186, presented the city of Inverness with a
POW/MIA flag last week. From left, are: Linda Murdock, Donna Kilbury, Russ Kreager, Bob
Plaisted, Frank DiGiovanni, Debbie Davis and Dave Pieklik.


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TUESDAY
SEPTEMBER 25, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around

THE STATE

Crystal River

Two boats crash head
on; injuries reported
Two motorboats crashed just
before 4 p.m. Sunday in Crystal
River, according to the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission.
Both boat drivers accused the
other of driving on the wrong
side of a marked channel.
Two children were thrown
from one of the boats when they
collided head-on, according to
FWC. One of the children was
taken to Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center and received
two staples in his head and two
more in a leg, according to FWC
officials. Both boats received
about $12,000 in damages.
'Alcohol was not involved and
both drivers received written
warnings.
No other information was
available Monday.

Tampa

Student dies; bacterial
meningities suspected
A University of South Florida
student has died from a sus-
pected case of bacterial menin-
gitis.
School officials say 19-year-
old Rachel Futterman became ill
Friday and went to the hospital
Saturday, where she was placed
on life-support and later died.
USF spokesman Ken Gullette
says Futterman did not attend
classes late last week, when
she would have been most con-
tagious. Dozens of students
who had direct contact with her
have been treated with a strong
antibiotic, and another 200 stu-
dents will be able to receive the
vaccine if they want.
Bacterial meningitis is a poten-
tially fatal infection that strikes
about 3,000 Americans each
year. It's transmitted via respira-
tory secretions and by direct con-
tact with an infected person.

Deerfield Beach

Propane caused
apartment fire
A propane gas line caused an
explosion and fire in a three
story apartment building that left
more than 100 people home-
less, authorities said Monday.
The explosion was traced to a
stove in a vacant apartment,
according to a statement from
Chief Financial Officer Alex
Sink, who also serves as State
Fire Marshal.
About a dozen people, includ-
ing two firefighters were injured
in the explosion, but none of the
injuries were life threatening.

Miami

Coast Guard:
Six boaters go missing.
U.S. Coast Guard crews have
found two missing boaters, but
continue to search for four oth-
ers whose fishing boat was
found 100 miles south of their
destination in the Bahamas.
Coast Guard Petty Officer
James Judge says Guillerrnmo
Zarabozo and Kirby Archer were
found in a life raft and appear to
be fine.
Still missing are captain Jake
Branam, Kelly Branam, Scott
Campbell and Sammy Cary.
Judge says the 47-foot sports
fisher "Joe Cool" left Miami for
the Bimini islands on Saturday.
The boaters were reported
missing Saturday night.
- From wire reports

Corrections

* An e-mail address in
Sunday's Business section
regarding feedback about the
Chronicle Web site was incor-
rect. The correct address is
webadmin@chronicleonline.com.
* A photo caption on Page


2A on Monday's edition con-
tained a typo. The International
Association of Firefighters Union
Local 4562 competed in the
25th annual river raft race in
Homosassa.
The Chronicle regrets the
errors.


Judge rejects tax cut pi


Explanation of

amendment said

to be 'inaccurate'

Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE - A tax-slashing
amendment is off the Jan. 29 presiden-
tial primary ballot - at least temporar-
ily - after a judge Monday ruled an
accompanying explanation for voters is
unconstitutionally misleading and inac-
curate.
The ballot summary says the amend-
ment would preserve existing property
tax breaks although it actually would
phase them out, wrote Circuit Judge
Charles A Francis of Tallahassee.
Francis, though, upheld a separate
law the Legislature passed as a part of
a two-pronged effort to cut property
taxes.
The law, which does not need voter
approval, requires cities and counties,
but not school districts, to roll back and
cap taxes for all types of property. Local
governing bodies, though, can make


exceptions to those tax limits by votes of
more than a simple majority.
The proposed amendment was tout-
ed as offering even greater tax reduc-
tions - almost entirely to homeowners
- through a "super exemption," and
would have affected all local govern-
ments including school districts.
Gov. Charlie Crist and legislative
leaders issued statements saying their
efforts to cut taxes are not over. No deci-
sion, though, yet has been made on
whether the ruling will be appealed,
said Jill Chamberlin, spokeswoman for
House Speaker Marco Rubio.
"The Legislature smartly put the
power to cut property taxes into the
hands of the people," Crist said. "We
will continue to work to ensure
Florida's homeowners get the relief
they need and deserve."
"One way or another, we will give
Florida taxpayers the relief they
deserve," said Rubio, R-West Miami.
Senate President Ken Pruitt, R-Port St
Lucie, said, "We will explore our options
after reviewing the judge's ruling."
Besides appealing, the options
include rewriting the ballot summary to
meet the judge's objections or deferring
the issue to the constitutional Taxation


and Budget Reform Commission.
A suburban South Florida mayor who
challenged both measures said he
hoped lawmakers will leave it to the


commission, which can
mendations to the
Legislature and put
amendments directly
on the November 2008
ballot.
"I'm hoping that they
will look at this as an
opportunity to fix some-
thing," said Weston
Mayor Eric Hersh.
"Hopefully that's the
tactic they will take
instead of looking at this
as a defeat"
Hersh said he has not
yet decided whether to
appeal the tax rollback
decision. He said he
would be more inclined


to do so, though, if the state appeals the
amendment ruling.
"Not only was it misleading, but it
was terrible legislation," Hersh said.
The Republican-controlled Legis-
lature approved both tax-cutting meas-
ures during as special session in June.


Burglars hit local art gallery


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Tony Ardolino watches Deputy Jim Bouffard dust for fingerprints Monday morning at the Jennifer Ardolino Gallery and Static
Apparel after it was burglarized.

No art taken in heist; sturdy glass makes job tougher for thieves


CRtSTY LOFTIS
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle


Strong glass slowed down burglars
trying to break into a local business, but
didn't prevent them from taking tools, a
digital camera and about $5 from a cash
box.
Jennifer Ardolino Gallery and Static
Apparel on U.S. 44 in Crystal River
were broken into sometime between 3
p.m. Sunday and 7 a.m. Monday morn-
ing. The art gallery and store are in the
same building, gallery owner Tony
Ardolino said.
His wife, Jennifer Ardolino runs the
gallery and his 15-year-old daughter
takes care of the hip clothing store.


When Mrs. Ardolino arrived at the
gallery Monday morning she found the
window to the workshop broken. Broken
bricks lay on the ground near the glass
front entrance, which was scarred with
scratches and marks from the bricks.
Apparently the 200 mph-impact-resist-
ant glass slowed down the burglary.
"They destroyed a brick trying to get it
through the glass," Tony Ardolino said.
Burglars didn't take any of the pricy
artwork or jewelry, but rather a Nikon
camera, socket wrenches and other
tools and about $5 from a cash box in the
clothing store. There was also a mess
where the burglars knocked products
and supplies over.
Citrus County Sheriff's deputy Jim
Buffard worked to get fingerprints from


the site Monday morning. One of the
challenges Buffard ran into was collect-
ing prints from some of the porous sur-
faces; Once the fingerprints are collect-
ed they are sent to the sheriff's identifi-
cation lab where they are run through a
program to match them with prints on
file in a database.
"I've had quite a few cases that have
cleared that way," Buffard said.
The Ardolinos have lived in Citrus
County for about 11 years. The business
opened about three months ago. Much
of Mrs. Ardolino's art is featured in the
gallery, which mostly remained
untouched.
"Fortunately," Mrs. Ardolino said, "it
will only take a few hours to clean
everything up."


proposal

The law passed with bipartisan sup-,
port, but Democrats opposed the:
amendment
That proposal is designed to eventu-
ally get rid of the existing Save Our'
Homes Amendment,:
which limits assess-'
ne way ment increases on pri-'
mary homes, known as:
her, we homesteads, to no more:
than 3 percent a year.
Florida While it protected'
existing homesteaders,.
ers the it shifted tax burden to:
new buyers and owners'
they of other properties'
including second homes:
* and businesses. The:
amendment would have
*. '.c- Rubio offered homesteaders
e speaker, about the one-time choice of
taxes for Florida keeping their existing
homeowners. benefits or accepting
the super exemption -
75 percent off first $200,000 of a home's
value and 15 percent off the next
$300,000.
Save Our Homes benefits, though,
cannot be transferred to new owners, so
they eventually would disappear as
those properties change hands.


Man gets


10 years


for son's


death


Shooting was

an accident

Associated Press
TAMPA - A father whose 21
year-old son fatally shot him-.
self with a handgun was sen-
tenced Monday to nearly 11
years in prison as part of a plea
deal.
Timothy Addison received
10 years and 10 months in
prison for federal firearms and
marijuana charges. As part of
the plea agreement, Addison
cannot be charged with other
crimes related to his son's
death, including manslaugh-
ter.
Addison, 38, and his son,
Timberlan, were playing on a
couch inside their home when
the toddler found a 9mm hand-
gun between the couch cush-
ions Nov. 26. Police said the
boy managed to fire a shot into
his chest before his father
could grab the gun.
The toddler died at a local
hospital. Police said the shoot-
ing was an accident.
According to the federal
indictment, officers who
responded to the shooting
found an additional handgun:
and about five pounds of mari-
juana in Addison's home.
Addison was not allowed toe
own firearms because of two
1990 felony convictions in state
court, according to an indict-
ment.
In June, Addison pleaded:
guilty to possession of a:
firearm during a drug-traffick-:
ing crime, possession of mari-
juana with intent to distribute:
and possession of a firearm by:
a convicted felon.


Jury selection begins for trial in boot camp death case


Associated Press
PANAMA CITY - Most
potential jurors questioned
Monday in the manslaughter
trial of seven juvenile boot
camp guards and a nurse said
they watched a video of the
guards dragging a teenager
around an exercise yard hours
before his death.
Martin Lee Anderson was 14
when he died in January 2006
after the guards roughed him
up at the now-closed Bay
County Juvenile Boot Camp.
The death was divisive in the
conservative community and
chanting protesters showed up
outside the civic center where
jury selection was being held
in a makeshift courtroom to
accommodate the crowd.
More than 1,400 county resi-
dents were summoned for jury
selection, one of every 90


adults in the Florida
Panhandle county. The large
number is needed because the
case has gotten so much media
attention locally If an impar-
tial panel can't be found, the
trial will be moved to another
Florida county.
By midmorning Monday, 50
potential jurors had answered
initial questions from prosecu-
tors and defense attorneys.
Nearly all had seen at least
part of the grainy 30-minute
surveillance video, which
shows the guards hitting
Anderson, who was black They
were not automatically dis-
missed for seeing the video.
Two guards are black and
one is of Asian descent. The
nurse and the other guards are
white.
"I believe one person can
handle a 14-year-old-kid. I
believe that it was uncalled for.


They are guilty for beating up
on a little kid," one younger
white man said.
A middle-aged white woman
said the guards "were doing
their job and it was an acci-
dent" Another said: "I'm also
afraid about being a juror here,
I'm absolutely scared to death."
Another potential juror, a
middle-aged black man, said he
did not believe the guards
"woke up that morning with the
intent to beat or kill that kid."
About 20 demonstrators
stood outside the civic center,
carrying large posters showing
Anderson and bearing slogans
such as "Justice 4 Martin."
Their chants of "What do we
want? Justice. When do we
want it? Now" could be heard
in the second-floor courtroom
throughout the morning ses-
sion. The judge did not address
the issue in court.


Associated Press,
Henry Dickens, center, and Kristin Schmidt, right, enter one of the:
upstairs rooms at the Marina Civic Center Monday in Panama City.,
They are both defendants in the upcoming Martin Lee Anderson.
trial. Dickens and Schmidt were both on duty in January 2006'
when Anderson collapsed after entering the Bay County Sheriff's:
Boot Camp. He died the next day. Jury selection for the trial Is'
under way this week at the Civic Center because of the number of'
people involved in the proceedings. At left is defense attorney:
Robert Sombathy.


make recom-


0
or anotl
will give
taxpay<
relief
deserve


Florida Hous
efforts to cut









4A TUSA.SETME 2.20 Gi IW CONT (F)CROI


For the RECORD


Citrus County Sheriff
DUI arrest
* Anthony L. Khollman, 33, 1498 S. Alto
Verde Terrace, Inverness, at 9:56 p.m. Sunday on
a charge of driving under the influence. An anony-
mous caller reported that Khollman was driving
drunk. Khollman failed some field sobriety tests
and refused a breath test, according to an arrest
report.
Other arrests
* Timothy M. Marasco, 20, 211 S. Barbour
St., Beverly Hills, at 6:31 p.m. Friday on a Citrus
County warrant charge for selling and possessing
marijuana. Bond $5,500.
* Robert Anthony Paty, 19, 115 E. Hartford
St., Hemando, at 1:18 a.m. Sunday on violation of
probation charges in reference to original felony
charges in reference to a burglary and grand
theft. Paty was also charged with burglary of a
conveyance, grand theft and two counts of petit
theft. A 17-year-old boy from Inverness was
arrested with Paty and was charged with burgla-
ry of a conveyance and grand theft. While the
teenager is being charged as an adult, the
Chronicle is withholding his name because of his
age. The arrest happened when Paty was pulled
over during a traffic stop with the 17-year-old in
the car. At first, Paty gave the deputy false infor-
mation and when he finally gave his real name,
he said he had stolen items in his car. Paty said
the teenager stole the items and asked him to sell
them. The teenager said he didn't participate in
the burglary and that Paty had picked him up from
the side of the road only a few moments before


DESAL
Continued from Page 1A
Horne said. "That was the first
we've heard of it"
The proposal for desalination
is contained in the
-Withlacoochee Master Regional
Water Supply Planning and
Implementation Program. A
.draft of the long-range water
supply planning document was
presented at a meeting of the
'water supply authority Sept 19.
Water transfers were the main
-topic at the meeting.
. Authority members were


ON THE NET
* For more information about arrests
made by the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office, go to www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the link to Public
Information, then Arrest Reports.

they were pulled over. The deputy recognized
some of the items in the vehicle as being report-
ed stolen from recent car burglaries. A female
juvenile said Paty had used her as a lookout to
steal items from cars. The property was returned
to owners. The 17-year-old was linked to the case
by fingerprints. The 17-year-old's bond was set at
$3,000. Paty's was set at none.
* Shane Michael Dennis, 25, 8538 W.
Kimberly Court, Homosassa, at 8:20 a.m.
Sunday on Citrus County warrant charge for
aggravated battery on a pregnant person. No
bond.
* Arthur M. Key, 26, 302 Wilda Ave.,
Inverness, at 9:57 a.m. Sunday on a Citrus
County warrant charge of burglary of a business.
Bond $5,000.
* Jacinth Conti Jr., 19, 6064 E. Joyce Lane,
Inverness, at 2:12 p.m. Sunday on a charge of
grand theft. Witness said Conti took seven video
games and an alpha key worth more than $400.
Bond $2,000.
* Lance Aaron Blaylock, 31, of an unknown
address, at 6:30 p.m. Sunday on a charge of
obtaining food/lodging with intent to defraud. A
bartender and deputy said Blaylock refused to
pay a $26.40 restaurant bill. Blaylock also had a


opposed to the possibility of
water transfers from the
Withlacoochee River and Lake
Rousseau to cities in the St
Johns River Water Management
District As part of the discus-
sion, the authority disclosed its
draft long-range planning docu-
ment, which includes mention
of a 25-million gallon desalina-
tion plant at Crystal River.
St. Johns district officials,
however, have since said they
have no formal plan to draw
water from the Withlacoochee
River and Lake Rousseau.
They said the discussion of
transfers from the river and


Manatee County warrant for violation of proba-
tion. Bond $250.
* Steven L. Friedman, 54, 2604 W.
Woodland Ridge Dr., Lecanto, at 10 a.m. Monday
on a Citrus County warrant charge of failing to
register as a sexual offender. Bond $25,000.
Crystal River Police
DUI arrest
* Robert James Stack, 38, 11340 W. Gem.
St., Crystal River, at 11:50 p.m. Saturday on
charges of habitual traffic offender, driving under
the influence, possession of drug paraphernalia
and possession of marijuana. Stack was pulled
over for driving 65 mph in a 45 mph zone. When
the officer checked Stack's license, he learned it
had been revoked for 60 months for being a
habitual traffic offender. The officer said he noted
signs of impairment and Stack failed to satisfac-
torily perform field sobriety tests. The officer found
a marijuana roach and rolling papers on Stack
and later four lorazepam pills and a cigarette pack
with a marijuana roach in Stack's vehicle.'Stack
refused a breath alcohol test. Bond $8,500.

Florida Fish and Wildlife
Arrest
* Louis Steve Pacheco, 42, 9391 E. Tsala
Apopka Drive, Floral City, at 6:35 p.m. Saturday
on a boating under the influence charge. Officers
approached Pacheco's boat because he was
going too fast in an idle zone. When the officer
asked for his registration, he said Pacheco was
unsteady on his feet and had glassy eyes. He
failed some field sobriety tests. Bond $500.


lake occurred at a July 18 meet-
ing of central Florida cities in
Orlando, but the discussion was
conceptual and no project was
developed.
However, Sullivan said the
authority has identified water
transfers from the
Withlacoochee River as . a
potential alternative water
source for member govern-
ments within its boundaries.
He said the authority will
oppose transfers across its dis-
trict boundaries. The water
supply authority includes
Citrus, Hernando and Sumter
counties, and the city of Ocala.


Sullivan said the authority
generally doesn't consider
political sensitivity when plan-
ning for alternative water sup-
ply projects, which is why
transfers from the
Withlacoochee to member gov-
ernments remain a considera-
tion. However, he said desali-
nation could rise to a higher
priority if political sensitivity
becomes an issue.
"That may rise to the top if
does become too politically'
sensitive. Then we will talk to
Progress Energy and see if we
can work something out,"
Sullivan said.


Man, 20, faces three


felony charges after


undercover drug bust


Crystal River

police make arrest

CRISTY LOFTIS
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

A man that police believe
tried to sell crack cocaine to a
Crystal River Police sergeant
was arrested Sunday after-
noon.
Laquon D. Knight, 20, of 946
N.E. Third St., Crystal River
was charged with possession of
crack cocaine, attempted sale
of cocaine and possession of
marijuana.
Sgt Brian Coleman learned
Knight was selling crack
cocaine and Coleman got his
cell phone number from an
undercover source, according
to the Crystal River Police
Department. When Coleman
called Knight, he .arranged to
buy $100 worth of crack cocaine
and meet Knight at a fast food
restaurant for the buy. Knight
changed the meeting place to a
gas station at Citrus Avenue
and Crystal Street


Surveillance was set up in
the area and Coleman watched
as Knight and two others
arrived in a gold Mercury
sedan. The three men went into
the store and when they came
out Coleman, another officer
and a Citrus County Sheriff's
Office deputy made the arrest
Knight was found to have
marijuana on him and
Coleman found a small bag of
crack cocaine - worth about
$100 - near where Knight had
been sitting in the car, accord-
ing to Police Chief Steven
Burch.
One of the passengers,
Anthony Dabney, 22, of Beverly
Hills, was found to have drug
paraphernalia and was later
released with a misdemeanor
citation. The driver of the
sedan denied knowing about
what was going on and was
released at the scene.
Knight's bond was set at
$10,500. According to the Citrus
County Detention Facility,
Knight bonded out Monday
evening.
This was the third felony
drug arrest CRPD officers
made over the weekend.


GET THE WORD OUT
* Nonprofit organizations are invited to submit news releas-
es about upcoming community events.
* Write the name of the event, who sponsors it, when and
where it will take place and other details.
* Include a contact name and phone number to be printed
in the paper
* News releases are subject to editing
* Call 563-5660 for details.


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
ptcldy
tstrm
ptcldy
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


MARINE OUTLOOK


East winds from 10 to 15 knots. Seas 2 to
4 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a
moderate chop. Widespread showers and
thunderstorms today.



LAKE LEVELS


THREE DAY OUTLOOK
Vf- tf. TODAY Exclusive dai
- High: 91 Low: 70
-. Sun and clouds with a 40w
a shower.


ly forecast by:

1% chance of


O - . WEDNESDAY
. . High: 89 Low: 70
Partly cloudy with a 50% chance of
thunderstorms.


THURSDAY
.a "High: 88 Low: 70
Partly cloudy with a 60% chance of
thunderstorms.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday 92/72
Record 95/60
Normal 69/88
Mean temp. 82
Departure from mean +3
PRECIPITATION*
Monday trace
Total for the month 2.27 in.
Total for the year 36.57 in.
Normal for the year 44.48 in.
*As of 6 p.m.from Hernando County Airport
UV INDEX: 9
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder-
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE


DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING)
9/25 TUESDAY 4:37 10:50
9/26 WEDNESDAY 5:24 11:37


Monday at 3 p.m. 30.03 in.
DEW POINT
Monday at 3 p.m. 70
HUMIDITY
Monday at 3 p.m. 52%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees and grasses were light and
weeds were absent.
"Li*Ught - only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Monday was good with pollut-
ants mainly ozone.


MINOR MAJOR
(AFTERNOON)
5:02 11:14
5:49


SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:24 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................7:21 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY........................... 6:42 P.M.
MOONSET TODAY............................5:55 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS

Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES

The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.

TIDES


Tide times are for the mouths of the rivers.
Tuesday Wednesday
High/Low High/Low High/Low High/Low
5:34 a/1:10 a 5:28 p/1:13 p 6:00 a/1:47 a 6:17p/1:57 p
3:55 a/10:35 a 3:49 p/11:09 p 4:21 a/11:19 a 4:38 p/11:44 p
1:42 a/8:23 a 1:36 p/8:57 p 2:08 a/9:07 a 2:25 p/9:32 p
4:44 a/12:09 a 4:38 p/12:12 p 5:10 a/12:46 a 5:27 p/12:56 p


Gulf water
temperature


82�
Taken at Egmont Key


Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder n/a n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.58 34.75 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 35.06 35.11 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.05 37.15 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are baged on 2.33-year flood, the mean--
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


Monday Tuesday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
Albany 77 49 sunny 86 63
Albuquerque 77 58 ptcldy 76 54
Asheville 84 58 sunny 84 56
Atlanta 83 71trace sunny 87 65
Atlantic City 78 53 sunny 81 60
Austin 91 61 ptcldy 94 68
Baltimore 84 51 sunny 88 63
Billings 52 42 ptcldy 65 42
Birmingham 91 70 sunny 90 67
Boise 65 46 sunny 66 44
Boston 82 59 sunny 89 66
Buffalo 80 52 tstrm 84 66
Burlington, VT 79 45 ptcldy 86 65
Charleston, SC 88 71 ptcldy 84 72
Charleston, WV 93 61 sunny 90 65
Charlotte 91 67 sunny 87 62
Chicago 90 68 tstrm 81 58
Cincinnati 96 61 ptcldy 91 69
Cleveland 86 52 ptcldy 86 66
Columbia, SC 95 69 sunny 88 64
Columbus, OH 92 63 ptcldy 91 69
Concord, N.H. 81 42 sunny 87 59
Dallas 90 71 ptcldy 91 72
Denver 58 48 .04 sunny 68 44
Des Moines 85 69 shwrs 66 47
Detroit 85 53 tstrm 84 68
El Paso 85 65 sunny 88 63
Evansville, IN 94 68 tstrm 89 66
Harrisburg 82 49 sunny 86 61
Hartford 84 51 sunny 87 60
Houston 92 70 tstrm 90 73
Indianapolis 92 68 tstrm 88 68
Jackson 89 72 .03 ptcldy 87 68
Las Vegas 77 61 sunny 81 60
Little Rock 84 74 .06 tstrm 84 69
Los Angeles 70 59 sunny 82 60
Louisville 95 71 ptcldy 89 68
Memphis 93 75 ptcldy 88 70
Milwaukee 88 68 tstrm 76 57
Minneapolis 83 69 .36 shwrs 62 44
Mobile 87 72 ptcldy 89 71
Montgomery 92 70 ptcldy 92 67
Nashville 92 71 sunny 91 69
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
@2007 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Monday Tuesday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 83 77 .06 tstrm 88 74
New York City 79 58 sunny 84 67
Norfolk 79 60 sunny 86 66
Oklahoma City 90 67 tstrm 82 63
Omaha 87 70 ptcldy 65 47
Palm Springs 89 63 sunny 97 66
Philadelphia 83 58 sunny 86 64
Phoenix 89 66 sunny 96 68
Pittsburgh 83 47 sunny 87 64
Portland, ME 77 46 sunny 80 62
Portland, Ore 69 45 ptcldy 68 49
Providence, R.I. 81 53 sunny 85 63
Raleigh 86 68 sunny 87 61
Rapid City 60 49 ptcldy 68 41
Reno 63 36 sunny 75 41
Rochester, NY 83 47 ptcldy 88 65
Sacramento 81 51 sunny 87 55
St. Louis 89 73 tstrm 83 63
St. Ste. Marie 80 51 tstrm 69 50
Salt Lake City 56 42 .05 sunny 65 47
San Antonio 89 66 ptcldy 90 71
San Diego 72 60 sunny 77 63
San Francisco 77 52 sunny 76 54
Savannah 88 71 ptcldy 85 68
Seattle 65 46 cldy 63 49
Spokane 63 35 cldy 64 44
Syracuse 83 45 sunny 88 64
Topeka 89 73 tstrm 67 49
Washington 84 58 .01 sunny 89 65
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 97 Laredo, Texas LOW 20 Meacham, Ore.
WORLD CITIES


TUESDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/78/ts
Amsterdam 63/45/sh
Athens 75/56/pc
Beijing 79/60/pc
Berlin 65/45/sh
Bermuda 85/75/pc
Cairo 84/65/s
Calgary 58/41/sh
Havana 89/75/ts
Hong Kong 86/76/ts
Jerusalem 87/66/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


79/61/s
59/47/sh
83/61/s
75/54/pc
84/61/s
68/50/pc
65/47/sh
77/62/sh
75/56/sh
63/42/pc
83/65/s
88/64/pc
68/47/pc


R T Lu


C O U NT Y


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CITRUS COUNTY WEATHER
luI I !n Do I _ IL--' I


cle

3*


3y


SOLUNAR TABLES


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


SEPT. 20


jet
KCT. 3 OCT. I I OT.is


City
Chassahowitzka
Crystal River
Withlacoochee
Homosassa


wunomw�


I-


I I


4ATuESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2007


Cirjus CouN7y (FL) CHRONICLE


9







THSDAY, SI:PTIMIMB-I 25, 2007 5A


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Into the great wide open


STRICTER
Continued from Page 1A

that regulate the location of
adult-entertainment business-
es, he said.
Richard Wesch, the former
county administrator who is
now Sheriff Jeff Dawsy's chief
counsel, is researching similar
ordinances in South Florida
communities,
Maidhof said.
Although the
matter is not on
today's county does
commission
agenda, it is like it's
expected to come
up. to float
H a r- C or
Development
Inc., a Pinellas a z r;
County company, about a zoni
mobile home
bought seven sex offenders
mobile homes off
County Road 581 south of
Inverness and is planning a
community for sex offenders
called the Meadows, Dawsy
said.
The mobile homes are on
South Ember lane, Quiver
Lane and East Archer Lane off
Trail 10, about three miles
south of State Road 44.
Nearly 200 nearby residents
showed up at a town hall meet-
ing Friday night to protest the
company's plans.
The number of mobile
homes places the proposal into
the-maobile. home-park catego-
ry, which would require a zon-


5


ing change, Maidhof said.
Maidhof said he is sending a
letter to the president of Har-
Cor, letting him know that the
area is residential and doesn't
allow mobile home parks with-
out a change in the county's
comprehensive plan. That
change would only occur after
public hearings, he said.
County Attorney Robert
"Butch" Battista said that,
between the zoning change
and environmen-
tal regulations
Thi for mobile home
This parks, he doesn't
t look think Har-Cor
can develop The
s going Meadows.
"This doesn't
look like it's
going to float,"
Battista said.
Battista The other ordi-
g change fora nance officials
park to house
and predators. are considering
would regulate
communities where the popu-
lation makes up one of four cat-
egories of convicted people:
sex offenders, teenage gangs,
felony drug dealers and those
in organized crime.
Maidhof said the county
would need to show that peo-
ple with those certain types of
criminal background cause a
danger to the public if they live
together in residential com-
plexes.
The county could place
restrictions on those communi-
ties that include minimum dis-
tances from homes where chil-
dren live.


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GOLF
Continued from Page 1A
council members to clarify
where people could ride golf
carts.
Gage said residents of his
community want to ride golf
carts to the Sweetbay shopping
center across Southeast Eighth
Avenue.
Burch said golf carts are
allowed in Crystal River
Village because the streets
there are private. They are not
allowed on city streets, though
the council could approve a
cart crossing area on Southeast
Eighth Avenue for village resi-
dents to access the shopping
center.
Burch said the city would
need permission from the
shopping center owner to do
that.
He said other vehicles that


Associated Press
A loggerhead sea turtle surfaces for a breath of air Monday in the Indian River south of
Sebastian Inlet, after being released by volunteers, from left, Trish While, Grace Foley, Nicole
Perna, and Jennifer Bogdan.


look like golf carts are allowed vehicle triangles on the rear
on some city streets so long as and orange flags.
they are registered and have Councilwoman Maureen
equipment similar to regular McNiff suggested the ordinance
vehicles, including wind- restrict golf cart access on city
shields, seat streets during
belts and head- the nighttime..
lights. I would Council
Mayor Ron members said
Kitchen said he personally feel they wanted to
was reluctant to ask the DOT to
support allow- better if people allow slow-
ing golf carts to speed motor-
have the same were driving ized vehicles on
access to city the multi-pur-
streets as slow- vehicles that had pose path.
speed vehicles. brake Although the
"I would per- lights path includes
sonally feel bet- on them several signs
ter if people o that prohibit
were driving motorized vehi-
vehicles that - cles, Burch and
had brake lights about golf carts being City Manager
on them," allowed on city streets. Andy Houston
Kitchen said. said motorists
Burch suggested the ordi- sometimes confuse the paths
nance could require that golf for the actual roadway and
carts be equipped with slow- have driven on them.


savings

exam le









6A TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2007


Rose Aiuto, 76
CITRUS SPRINGS
Rose Aiuto, 76, died Sunday
morning, Sept 23, 2007, at the
Hospice House in Lecanto.
Mrs. Aiuto was currently in
the process of moving to Citrus
Springs from West Palm Beach,
where she had lived for several
years.
She was born Feb. 3, 1931, to
Diego and Florence Guardino
in Brooklyn, N.Y, and came to
Florida from Long Island, N.Y.
She was Catholic.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Steve J. Aiuto of Citrus
Springs; two sons, Stephen M.
Aiuto and wife Mary of Crystal
River and Paul Aiuto and wife
Rosanne of Coram, N.Y; two
sisters, Adeline Peck of Hobe
Sound and Frances Grottini of
Long Island, N.Y; and five
grandchildren.
Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River.

Ernest Cason, 70
INVERNESS
H. Ernest Cason, 70, Inver-
ness, died Saturday, Sept 22,
2007, under hospice care. He
,was a fifth generation Floridian.
Mr. Cason was a cattle ranch-
er and farmer all his adult life
in Citrus County. He was a life-
time member of Eden Baptist
Church in Brooksville.
His father, J. Henry Cason,
and his brother, Carroll E.
Cason, preceded him in death.
Survivors include his moth-
er, Margaret Landrum Cason;
his sister-in-law, Lois Cason of
Inverness; nieces, Diana
Fontane and husband Darrell
of Colorado, Linda Johnson
and husband Paul of Inverness
and Tammy Cason of
Homosassa; great-nieces, Vicki
Zopf and husband Marcus of
Inverness and Sandra Myers of
Gainesville; great-great-niece,
Kaitlyn Zopf, and great-great-
nephew, Riley Zopf.
Turner Funeral Home,
Brooksville.

Martha Denny, 90
FLORAL CITY
Martha Florence Denny, 90,
Floral City, died Sunday, Sept.
23, 2007, at Arbor Trail Nursing
and Rehabilitation Center in
Inverness.


Mrs. Denny was born Aug. 5,
1917, in Remsen Township,
Iowa, to Nick and Kate
(Kentell) Stoos and moved here
more than 10 years ago from
Miami.
Mrs. Denny was a retired
assembler for a factory.
She enjoyed working cross-
word puzzles and gardening.
She was Catholic.
Survivors include her son
and daughter-in-law, John and
Lisa Denny of Floral City; and
two grandchildren, Sara and
Erin.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness.

Virginia Judd, 88
INVERNESS
Virginia S. Judd, 88,
Inverness, died Friday, Sept.
21, 2007, at the Hospice Unit at
Citrus Memorial Health
System.
She was born Sept. 30, 1918,
in Westfield, N:Y., to Ralph W.
and Jennie C. Strickland. She
moved to Citrus County in 1991
from Clearwater after spend-
ing most of her adult life in the
Rochester, N.Y, area.
Mrs. Judd was a teacher,
library assistant, music teacher
and homemaker.
She was a member of First
Presbyterian Church in
Inverness.
Survivors include her hus-
band of 62 years, Charles M.
Judd of Inverness; daughter
and son-in-law, Susan and
William Metcalfe of Inverness;
son and daughter-in-law, Peter
and Lynn Judd of Fairport,
N.Y; and two grandchildren,
David Metcalfe of Columbia,
S.C., and Alex Metcalfe and
wife Erin of St. Augustine.
Neptune Society, Palm
Harbor.

Robert
Stringer, 55
HOMOSASSA
Robert T. Stringer, 55,
Homosassa, died Friday, Sept.
21, 2007.
Born Jan. 28, 1952, in Detroit,


Mich., he came to this area 16
years ago from St. Petersburg.
Mr. Stringer
was a welder,
carpenter and
former manag-
er of Dale's .,
Auto Parts in
Homosassa. g '
He was a
U.S. Army vet- .'
eran and was a Robert
member of the Stringer
Sand Hill
Hunting Club of Taylor County
and the DAV
He was Cath-
olic.
He was pre-
ceded in death
by his parents,
Thomas and
Muriel Stringer, and brother,
Thomas Stringer.
Survivors include his wife of
three years, Fran Stringer of
Homosassa; four sons, Bobby
Stringer and wife Amanda of
Zephyrhills, Chris Zaragoza of
St. Petersburg, Kurt Watson
and wife Sheryl of .Sherwood,
Mich., and Ron Watson and
wife Barb of Union City, Mich.;
three daughters, Nicki Phelps
and husband Ed of Homosassa,
Lisa Dey and husband Tim of
Union City, Mich., and Pam
Rathbun and husband Dan of
Norfolk, Va.; brother, Richard
R. Stringer and wife Jill of
Detroit, Mich.; 18 grandchil-
dren; and two great-grandchil-
dren.
Wilder Funeral Home,
Homosassa Springs.
Click on www.chronicleon-
line.com to view archived local
obituaries.

Funeral



Rose Aiuto. A memorial serv-
ice for Rose Aiuto, 76, of Citrus
Springs, formerly of West Palm
Beach, will be at 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2007, at the
Strickland Funeral Home
Chapel in Crystal River.
Private cremation arrange-


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October 31, 2007. The

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Please join us for an Informational Seminar to
be held at
Cockadoodles Restaurant
1935 SE Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL
at 9:30 am * Wednesday, September 26, 2007
or
Village Inn Restaurant
4401 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL
at 2:00 pm * Wednesday, September 26, 2007
Complimentary meal will be served
TOPICS INCLUDE:


* Cremation Options
* VA Benefits
* Florida Regulations


* What happens to my contract
if I move or die out of area?
* Benefits of pre-planning


ments are under the direction
of Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River.
H. Ernest Cason. Friends
may call from 6 to 8 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2007, at
Turner Funeral Homes
Brooksville Chapel. Graveside
services will be at 10 a.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2007, at
Eden Baptist Church
Cemetery.
Virginia S. Judd. A memorial
service will be at 10 a.m.
Saturday, Sept. 29, 2007, at First
Presbyterian Church of
Inverness, 206 Washington Ave.
Memorials may be given to
Hospice of Citrus County or
First Presbyterian Church of
Inverness.


Deaths



Walt Crowley, 60
HISTORIAN
SEATTLE - Walt Crowley, a
political commentator and
prominent citizen historian
who co-founded an online ency-
clopedia of Washington state
history, died Friday He was 60.


He died after complications
following a stroke. Crowley's
wife, Marie McCaffrey, con-
firmed his death.
Crowley had battled cancer
of the larynx and recently
underwent surgery to remove a
small growth linked to a recur-
rence of the disease when he
suffered a stroke on Thursday
In the late 1990s, Crowley, his
wife, and historian Paul
Dorpat rounded up investors
and launched Historylink.org.
Slow to catch on at first, the
Web site gained traction after a
$100,000 grant from Microsoft
co-founder Paul Allen in 2002
allowed it to broaden its scope
statewide.
Today Historylink.org gets
about 4 million hits a month
and is considered a model for
similar sites across the country
Born in suburban Detroit,
Crowley lived in Washington,
D.C., and Connecticut before his
family moved to Seattle in 1961.
He worked as an illustrator
at Boeing before enrolling at
the University of Washington,
where he became active in
anti-war and civil-rights move-
ments of the late 1960s. He
dropped out in 1967 to work at
The Helix, a left-wing weekly
paper at the school.


Alice
Ghostley, 81.
ACTRESS
LOS ANGELES - Alice
Ghostley, the Tony Award-win-
ning actress best known on tel-
evision for playing Esmeralda
on "Bewitched" and Bernice
on "Designing Women," died
Friday She was 81.
Ghostley died at her home in
Studio City after a long battle
with colon cancer and a series
of strokes, longtime friend Jim
Pinkston said.
Ghostley made her
Broadway debut in "Leonard
Sillman's New Faces of 1952."
She received critical acclaim
for singing "The Boston
Beguine," which became her
signature song.
In the 1960s, Ghostley re-
ceived a Tony nomination for
the Broadway comedy "The
Beauty Part" and eventually
won for best featured actress in
"The Sign in Sidney Brustein's
Window." From 1969 to 1972,
she played the good witch and
ditzy housekeeper Esmeralda
on TV's "Bewitched." She
played Bernice Clifton on
"Designing Women" from 1987
to 1993, for which she earned
an Emmy nomination in 1992.


Who will be the next

Citrus County


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/ Deadline for entries is 5:00 PM, Sept. 26, 2007.
V Voting begins Oct. 1 through Oct. 7, 2007.
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Pictures will not be returned



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TUiSDiAY, Slis'iiMjiR 25, 2007 7A


Associated Press
Workers picket outside the General Motors Saginaw Metal Casting Operations Plant on Monday in Saginaw, Mich. Thousands of United
Auto Workers walked off the job at GM plants around the country Monday.


PICKET
Continued from Page 1A
and benefits.
"Nobody wins in a strike, but
there comes a point in time when
someone can push you offa cliff,"
said Gettelfinger, who represents
73,000 GM workers at about 80
U.S. facilities.
GM acknowledged that the job
security of U.S. workers is on the
line, but so is the long-term viabil-
ity of the company. The two sides
were back at the bargaining table
Monday afternoon.
Several analysts said they
expect the strike will be short and
that the UAW is simply trying to
force GM's hand and bring the
lengthy bargaining to a close. GM
and the UAW had been negotiat-
ing for 21 straight days as of
Monday.
Gary Chaison, a labor special-
ist at Clark University in
Worcester, Mass., said it was a
good sign that the two sides are
still talking. But he added that the
strike isn't all drama.
"There's always theatrics in
bargaining, but the theatrics are
very real," he said. "These are
workers whose jobs are in jeop-
ardy and the company could lose
.-millions and millions of dollars."
The striking workers will
receive $200 a week plus medical
benefits from the UAW's strike


fund. The union had more than
$800 million in that fund as of last
November, according to the
UAW's Web site.
Aaron Bragman, an auto indus-
try analyst for the consulting firm
Global Insight, said the two sides
are at a historic crossroads. GM,
which lost $2 billion in 2006, isn't
in the financial position to make
long-term promises for U.S. man-
ufacturing, and the company
could decide to move products
overseas if the strike lasts longer
than a few days, he said.
Detroit's automakers lost a col-
lective $15 billion last year When
labor talks began in July, all said
they were seeking labor cost par-
ity with their Asian competitors
in order to turn consistent profits.
GM said it pays its workers $73.26
per hour in wages, pension and
health care benefits, while Toyota
Motor Corp. pays an estimated
$48 per hour, according to an esti-
mate from U.S. automakers.
Retiree health costs are a large
part of that gap.
GM also is facing a changing
landscape in which barely half
the vehicles on U.S. roads are
made by the traditional Big
Three. GM controlled 35 percent
of the U.S. market in 1990; that
fell to 24 percent last year. At the
same time, the company is
becoming a global player, with a
significant presence in emerging
markets such as China and Latin
America that will eventually


mean less reliance on the U.S.
market
"What the union is concerned
with is that a more successful GM
results in jobs in the United
States," said Harley Shaiken, a
professor at the University of
California at Berkeley who spe-
cializes in labor issues and has
closely followed the talks.
"Without that, the sacrifices at the
bargaining table, in the minds of
members, are simply subsidizing
GM's global push."
The union also is feeling pres-
sure. UAW membership has fall-
en from a high of 1.5 million
active members in 1979 to around
576,000 today, and the union
already has agreed to, massive
buyout plans and changes to
retiree health care to help the
automakers.
The union also is willing to talk
about taking money from the
company to form a trust that
would be responsible for billions
of dollars in retiree health care
costs, Gettelfinger said Monday.
GM wants the trust, called a
Voluntary Employees
Beneficiary Association, or
VEBA, so it can move much of its
$51 billion in unfunded retiree
health care liabilities off the
books, potentially raising the
stock price and credit ratings. But
the trust could be difficult to sell


to members, who will have to rat-
ify the contract
The UAW has had some suc-
cess in organizing other indus-
tries, such as casino workers. But
so far, efforts to organize workers
at the U.S. plants of Detroit's
Asian competitors have come up
short Nissan Motor Co. workers
in Tennessee voted against UAW
representation in 2001. More
recently, the UAW has been back-
ing an effort to organize workers
at a Toyota plant in Kentucky.
: Chaison said the UAW is taking
a big risk with the GM strike.
Workers at nonunion plants are
watching closely to see if the
UAW's confrontational tone will
get them a stronger contract If it
doesn't, that won't impress
nonunion workers who are on the
fence.
"I think the UAW doesn't really
fully understand the impact of a
strike beyond collective bargain-
ing," Chaison said.
. In the middle of it all are work-
ers like Anita Ahrens, a seven-
year veteran at the Janesville,
Wis., plant who works nights
installing speakers in sport utility
vehicles. Ahrens, 39, a mother of
three, burst into tears Monday as
her co-workers walked off their
jobs at a plant in Wisconsin.
"Oh my God, here they come,"
she said. "This is unreal."


Energy futures fall,
oil production up
NEW YORK - Energy futures
fell Monday after a tropical depres-
sion that moved through the Gulf
of Mexico late last week turned out
to be a dud, and investors tried to
determine if oil futures' recent
record-setting advance above $80
a barrel had run its course.
Many analysts believe much of
oil's recent run can be attributed to
speculators buying and selling
crude futures contracts with no
intention of taking delivery. That
speculative frenzy received a shot
in the arm last week when the
Federal Reserve cut interest rates.
Falling interest rates have driven
the dollar lower against other glob-
al currencies, which makes com-
modities priced in dollars cheaper
for overseas investors.
Data released Friday by the
Commodity Futures Trading
Commission showed speculators
increased their crude futures posi-
tions by 22 percent in the week
ended Sept. 18, according to
Addison Armstrong, an analyst with
TFS Energy Futures LLC in
Stamford, Conn. Investors some-
times view increases in speculative
positions as a sign that the market
is overbought and ripe for a
decline.
Nuke plant application
in early planning
WASHINGTON - Power pro-
ducer NRG Energy Inc. will submit
the first application for a new
nuclear reactor in the U.S. in near-
ly 30 years, the company's chief
executive said Monday.
Nuclear regulators expect
Tuesday morning to receive NRG's
application for two new units at its
facility in Bay City,Texas, about 90
miles southwest of Houston. It will
be the first complete construction
and operating license submission
the government has processed
since before the Three Mile Island
accident in Pennsylvania in 1979.
Constellation Energy Group Inc.
has filed a partial application with
the Nuclear Regulatory
Commission, which expects up to
six more requests this year from
Duke Energy Corp., Dominion
Resources Inc. and others.
Constellation's proposed new reac-
tor would be located in Lusby, Md.
Utilities see in nuclear plants an
opportunity to affordably meet
demand for electricity, which the
Energy Information Administration


is forecasting will grow by 42 per-
cent by 2030. High natural gas
prices and the prospect of taxes or
constraints on greenhouse gases
are making gas- or coal-fired
plants less attractive.
Dollar drops to
new record low
NEW YORK - The dollar failed
to rally Monday, dropping to a new
record low against the euro and a
15-year low against five other
major currencies as investors con-
tinued to act on last week's larger-
than-expected interest rate cut and
economic data on August con-
sumer spending and home sales
expected this week.
The 13-nation euro rose as high
as $1.4130 Monday, its highest
level since its debut in 1999,
before drifting back to $1.4087 in
late New York trading. That com-
pared with a previous peak of
$1.4119 on Friday, and the
$1.4083 it bought in New York late
that day. In other trading Monday,
the British pound edged higher to
$2.0214 from $2.0200.
The Federal Reserve's half-point
interest rate cut last week to 4.75
percent came in response to mar-
ket turbulence in the U.S. and
elsewhere amid the subprime
mortgage crisis. Investors this
week will be looking for signs that
U.S. inflation is under control. The
market is also hoping that readings
this week on demand for U.S.
durable goods, the housing market
and consumer spending power will
show that the U.S. economy isn't
heading for recession.
French officials says
country 'bankrupt'
PARIS - France, its prime min-
ister says, is bankrupt.
The head of the European
Central Bank, Frenchman Jean-
Claude Trichet, is no less damning,
scolding his nation as Europe's
"No. 1 spender."
That the country has been living
beyond its means is hardly news
- the last time France balanced
its books was 1974. But now,
President Nicolas Sarkozy's gov-
ernment insists, the extravagant
spending has to stop.
As eyes turn toward his first
budget, to be announced
Wednesday, economists predict
the job of righting the nation's
finances may be more difficult than
the president expects.
- From wire reports

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Without credit approval, customer will be charged $99.99 for modem. � 2007 Embarq Holdings Company LLC. All rights reserved. The name EMBARQ and the jet logo are trademarks of Embarq Holdings Company LLC. EMB14-7-07480


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE I


Business B R I E FS


vsww HropcrFuncratHococ.coco


I


-


Ka


1


I


I












STOCKS


SA TUFSLAY, Iv1'IlMISIK25, 2007


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


., .MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
EMC Cp 807725 20.51 +1.48
FordM 556634 8.48 +.25
PCntwdFn 419223 18.39 -1.22
GnMotr 405881 34.74 -.20
Pfizer 398300 24.42 -.17

;i' GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
C;Name Last Chg %Chg
.Primewg 26.25 +6.32 +31.7
EnterraE g 2.04 +.31 +17.9
"Yanzhou 107.18 +10.58 +11.0
KrispKrm 3.69 +.33 +9.8
.Jmpac pfB 12.14 +.99 +8.9

:'1 LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
"'lame Last Chg %Chg
vChinaEA 108.00 -23.60 -17.9
,AMR 20.77 -3.49 -14.4
,' StdPac 7.05 -1.05 -13.0
ChinSAir 80.06 -10.77 -11.9
9USAirwy 25.98 -3.41 -11.6
DIARY


Advanced
"'Declined
,%Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
iVolume


2,024
97
3,410
139
51
3,118,402,695


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SPDR 1282534 151.69 -.28
iShR2Knya 850800 80.34 -.62
SPFnd 493646 34.12 -.48
PrUShQQQ 227948 40.77 -.17
SPEngy 176741 75.56 -.14

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
EnovaSys 4.51 +.56 +14.3
TgtMOTO8 7.00 +.76 +12.2
Velocity n 2.35 +.25 +11.9
DejourEgn 2.25 +.22 +10.8
JazzTech 3.30 +.32 +10.7

LOSERS (S2 OR MORs)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ManSang 10.60 -4.54 -30.0
DebtResn 2.50 -.65 -20.6
Protalixn 40.32 -4.68 -10.4
Halifax 2.18 -.22 -9.2
Cubic 41.35 -3.97 -8.8

DIARY


Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


4.1 5
697
116
1,332
44
18
540,118,848


MOST ACTIVE (Sl OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
PwShs QQQ997730 50.59 +.23


Microsoft
SunMicro
Intel
Level3


992060 29.08
528012 5.66
483694 25.98
391632 4.62


GAINERS (52 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
21Cenwt07 2.49 +1.09 +77.9
ChinaPrec n 7.92 +2.64 +50.0
ChinaNRes 14.40 +4.21 +41.3
Bonso 2.88 +.74 +34.6
EuroTech 3.64 +.70 +23.8

LOSERS (52 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
WSB Fnn 12.40 -2.90 -19.0
Mattson 8.69 -1.75 -16.8
Arris 11.98 -2.28 -16.0
ADDvntgT 8.00 -1.28 -13.8
Adtran 22.84 -3.57 -13.5

DIARY


A,'arn.,.di
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


I i'.-'.
1,857
120
3,133
111
60
1,831,365,182


Here are ihe 825 most acivee stocks on the New York Stock Excnarnge, 765 mosl actve on ine
Nastdaq Natonal Mairel and 116 most acti/e on the American Stock Excnange Stocks in bold
are worth at least 5 and changed 5 percent or more in price UnIearning for 50 most active
oar NYSE and Nasdaq and 25 most active on Amex. Tales snho namrre, prica and net change.
and one to two additional field. rotated througjn tie week, as follows


DIv: Current annual dividend rate paid on slock asedai on latest
quarterly or seriiannual declaration unless olherwi e lootnoled
Name: Slocks appear alphabetically by ina company a lull name
(not its aobreviallon) Namei consisting of initials appear al the[
beginning of eacn letter's list
Last: Price Stock was trading al when ex.;nange losesd 1or the day
Chg: Loss or gain tor the day No change indicated byI


NMCe..,.


Sleck IFooletS.'CC - PE gramm mr, yMA,; cr8 Is,-, n64 t~a&A,.Sri.,e mr , by -E --K - .. by

,xahrrpionr. - Sy, '.3x vI. b a . ri - ,oir- alyar Trh C.ryrrrorre I ee,1 B �Ur- ~

jw-1+ cmrn tura ,taebgmnegr4 l tca-iin pi P,6rerrr.1 uCvKI, t.. p
Hvja.rd.&air,OrYaIIm-iaof ,i tru. r, 3ii r,cA q - C.Ie1,r m,o j i r i.:E c ,r 3
, h.j ,l 'C'5 ilW,e xi�fiy i1a .p+i.ied PNC3iamo.;hru.,ray yypi r tyr i iiau240pcr . v V3,~

iituvci Mr-yvarh r liser 3 8 irisu- 'a i "crri, ,, 1,,c .2., r k tU."ii, Jr ,t . :'
incun q Iull. .r.' ri n &ses it-,.n% I Ci:..ritrn-flrri t-ankiup-v city.arsi-.,rip .� 0'. 10
e.,5.,roz10 uc3 ,,Cblir.E ba..r'in p.itv lan . rjwar';,,le .rl i oni 1Tr.E nr, ,'.,
Dividend FootnotEs, a E AMu rtr.1',.ii7 Nrur'. caL Cd ., ,.a ,ir r,..ie.ILi t-Ar.ul ouri'
pl.Ii: et.Mk -: L'4ruilahg d9 &di, ,I-'d . uT,,, je.:Ibr,3 or y..d ,r, l.15t2 ,.,,idl r
cufre,. inalr~iui or., ,.r,:5 nun r-c.a,,,unr~dty mrn,� ..'.d,,j.rd1d .,nO I e
Eum 'r do,,dnd.-.paid aer atcr., nopiar S. rdjepir rwuI+ - . un Ai ..d ~ i 11" p,r i ~i,
lMl...ut S rLII�d-io r .,aC 0, rrnfrd I, k4-053 k LO-niurvC.-opail i1h,, � y,6a ,nTinIlr,.u .:.J .Ct 2-315. 13
i, .a' vu h5,A3.ir.-l. in uariam rn -Cyniritim r~ro,6i i onin r r. ,3: j .i,., ..j cV rr.or i . Cur.,
raurSt if nho rl fo ann-nernri p yinmaI5l .iwel.1r.3 rrvid Siai rov in ti-n,',viai-1i .~
* r Diared Sr ;vaitcir. iA-;.:ed� rors pmotl i otcd ~r0,l~1i mad n t..
ar,6,st.it ~ lou.c, 1 The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


STOC S O OAS ITRS


YTD
Name DIv YId PE Last Chg %Chg


AT&T Inc 1.42
BkofAm 2.56
CapCtyBk .70
Citigrp 2.16
Disney .31
EKodak .50
ExxonMbi 1.40
FPL Grp 1.64
FlaRock .60
FordM
GenElec 1.12
GnMotr 1.00
HomeDp .90
Intel .45
IBM 1.60
Lowes .32
McDnlds 1.50


-.26 +18.2
-.65 -5.2
-.43 -10.9
-.92 -16.4
-.28 +2.3
-.55 +4.6
-.58 +19.7
-1.08 +14.0
+.06 +37.8
+.25 +12.9
-.40 +9.8
-.20 +13.1
-.59 -15.6
+.11 +28.3
-.53 +19.7
-.07 -1.9
+.16 +24.0


Name Div YId


Microsoft .44


Microsoft .44
Motorola .20
Penney .80
ProgrssEn 2.44
RegionsFn1.44
SearsHldgs ..
SprintNex .10
TimeWarn .25
UniFirst .15
VerizonCml.72
Wachovia 2.56
WalMart .88
Walgrn .38


YTD
PE Last Chg %Chg


37 40.01
21 44.12
11 50.39


+.43 -2.6
+.16 -12.2
-.57 -14.8
-.07 -3.0
-.45 -19.6
-2.49 -23.3
-.39 -3.1
+.03 -16.8
-.92 +4.2
-.26 +18.5
-.97 -11.5


15 43.97 -.26 -4.8
22 45.75 +.34 -.3


NDEXES


52-Week
High Low Name


Net % YTD 52-WK
Last Chg Chg % Chg % Chg


NE YRKSTOKECANG


DIv Name Last Chg

r.20e ABBLtd u25.84 +26
1.08 ACELtd 58.80 -.61
AESCorp 20.27 +.69
.82 AFLAC 54.81 -.41
AGCO 47.96 +.56
1.64 AGLRes 39.95 -.09
. AK Steel 42.33 -.65
... AMR d20.77 -3.49
1.00e ASALtd u71.47 +1.11
1.42 AT&Tlnc u42.27 -.26
S06r AUOptron 16.20 +.14
1.42e AXA 43.20 +.31
.06 AaronR d21.47 +.49
S1.30 AbtLab 53.86 -.58
.70 AberFitc 78.27 -1.56
Abitbig 1.76 -.04
.35I Acoenture 39.40 -.30
.90e Adan sEx 14.98 -.08
.24 AdvAuto 33.27 -.31
. AMD 13.48 +.24
S1.80 AdvEngy 12.19 +.65
.04 Aegean n u34.00 +2.30
Aeropstls 20.06 -.05
.04f Aetna 52.74 +.40
2.06t Agilent 36.56 -.35
.121 Agnicog 49,01 -.80
.11 Agriumg u53.11 +.14
1.52 AirProd 92.48 -1.28
... AirTran 9.92 -.44
80 Alcan 99.67 +.16
2e AlcatelLuc 9.03 -.04
.68 Alcoa 37.01 -.39
SAJgEngy 53.48 -.12
52 AllegTch 108.43 +1.60
1.64 Allete 44.10 -.24
SAlliData 77.75 -.79
9 1.02a AlliBGIbHi 13.50 +.15
.60 AlhiBlnco 8.13 +.03
4.42e AlliBem 86.49 +1.51
S . AldWaste 12.98 -.03
1.52 Allstate 55.40 -.48
S .50 Alltel 69.60 +.11
S Alpharma 21.90 -.15
S3.00 AEias 68.44 -.10
.87e AlChina s 66.81 +3.91
.84f AnbacF 63.60 -163
S .. Amdocs 34.55 -.80
2.54 Ameren 53.02 -.29
36e AMovilL 64.06 -.02
S.60 ArnAxle 24.36 -.15
2 .40 AEagleOs 25.75 -.05

.76 AFndRT 8.26 +.06
.80 AmlntGp I 66.76 -.47
AmOrnBio 11.11 +.36
.64 AmStands 35.81 -.34
.90ea AmSIP3 11.13
.6. AmTower 42.18 -.05
. Aroecdt 17.91 -.53
2.44a Arnerigas 35.80 +.06
S.60 Ameriprise 61.54 +.31
.36 Anadarko 53.42 -.13
1.72 AnalogDev 36.68 +.08
1.321 Anheusr 49.98 -.59
AnnTaylr 32.42 -.04
.89e Annaly 16.09 -.20
.60 AonCorp 43.65 -.20
.60 Apache 87.73 -1.07
.17 ApplBio 34.79 +.21
S.501 AquaAn 23.83 -.04
... Aquila 4.03
1.30 ArcelorMit u77.17 +1.06
.28 ArchCoal 33.23 -.17
.46 ArchDan 32.70 -.42




Div Narr.e Last Cng
.42 AdmRsc 26.20 -.25
... ApogeeTch .00 +.10
S ..ApolloGg .52 -.01
... Aurizong 3.92 +.04
... AuroraOG 1.54 +.03
... BPZEgyn u7.52 -.32
... BirchMtg 1.38 -.06
.. CdnSEng 2.56 -.21
.01 CFCdag 9.70 -.02
. ChinaDirn 5.20
.. ClaudeRg 1.44 +.01
.05e ClayBRIC u46.25 +1.19


1.81 ArchstnSm 59.82 +.67
.40 AnvMerit 16.62 +.01
1.10a Ashland 61.30 -.66
.68 AsdEstat 13.37 +.03
1.28 ATMOS 28.32 +.02
... AutoNatn 17.58 -.11
.92b AutoData 45.90 -.45
Avava 1650 -.29
Avnet 41.03 -.51
.74 Avon 34.93 -.21
1.84 BB&TCp 40.68 -.89.
.94e BHP BilLt u75.94 +3.41
.20 BJSvcs 27.67 -.14
BJsWhis 34.50 +.38
BMCSft 31.94 +.44
2.48e BPPLC 71.24 -.17
2.48 BRT 18.97 +.55
.52 BakrHu u90.67 -.06
.40 BallCp 54.40 -.32
.86e BcBilVArg 23.21 -.10
.15i BcBradess 27.08 +.35
.93e Bncoltau 46.33 +.28
2.56f BkofAm 50.59 -.65
.961 BkNYMel 43.41 -.51
.30f BanickG 39.90 -.16
.52 BauschL 63.82 +.04
.67 Baxter 56.27 -.50
2.16 BaytexEg 19.09 +.93
1.28 BearSt 112.99 -4.33
.. -,,y,,i i 4.42 -.03
.40 'evJHrimn 9.06-1.00
.98 BectDck 81.13 -.73
.201 Berkldey 28.86 -.53
.52 BestBuy 46.23 -.53
. BigLots 30.90 -28
1.50 Biovail 17.90 -.01
1.36 BIkHilsCp 42.06 -.16
.45a BIkFL08 14.59
... Blackstnn 24.53 -.79
.571 BlockHR 20.77 +.09
... Blockbstr 5.37 -.08
.58e BlueChp 6.11 +.09
1.40 Boeing 103.05 +.46
.44 Borders d13.37 -.82
... BoslBeer 46.53 +.02
2.72a BosIProp 105.94 +2.13
... BostonSd 14.11 +.36
1.12 BrMvyS 28.79.-.21
.421 BrkddAsgs 38.00 +1.72
.60b Brunswick 22.64 +.27
.68 BungeLt 101.59 -.93
1.281 BudNSF 80.89 -.52
.16 CAInc 25.50 -.45
... CBRElis 28.58 -.43
1.001f CBSB 30.86 -.73
.08 CFInds u70.21 -3.29
2.16 CHEngy 48.62 -.34
.04 CIGNAs 52.54 -.33
1.00 CrrGp 38.55 -1.47
.20 CMSEng 16.59 -.02
.56 CSS Inds 36.26 -.01
.60 CSX 40.49 +.20
.24 CVSCare 38.13 +.30
.. CablvsnNY 34.07 -.43
.12 CabotOs 35.64 -.90
.28 CallGolf 15.81 -.04
.20 Camecogs 45.06 +1.17
. Cameron 92.78 -.76
.80 CampSp 35.62 +.22
.84 CdnNRyg 55.40 +.07
.34 CdnNRsg 76.20 -.39
2.28 Caneticg 14.88 +.69
.11 CapOne 66.77 -2.25
2.40 CapitSrce 19.86 +.56
1.26 CapMpfB 12.62 +.12
.48 CardnlHlth 63.37 +.27
.. CarMaxs 20.84 -.96


1.40 Camrnival 49.19 -.02
1.82 CarolinaGp 77.28 -1.72
.30 CatalMktg 31.49 -.21
1.44f Caterpillar 77.72 -.44
.16 Celanese 37.36 -.38
... Celestig 6.04 -.03
75e Cemex 28.95 -.33
.68 CenterPnt 16.45 -.12
.16 Centex 25.80 -1.37
4.50 CnlLtpf 83.10
.26 CntryTel 44.82 -.50
... ChmpE 11.21 +.04
.01 Checkpnt 27.51 +.20
.20 Chemtura 8.59 -.10
.27 ChesEng 35.15 -.41
2.32 Chevron u94.35 -.49
... Chicos 14.79 +.14
.27i ChinaLle s u78.61 +2.67
1.12e ChlnaMbleu76.23 +3.73
.23e ChinaUni 17.93 +.29
1.16 Chubb 51.43 -.81
1.09r ChungTel 18.76 +.40
.. CindBell 5.02 -.06
.16 CircCity d8.14 -.37
.72a CtadlBr 4.21 -.04
2.16 CiiIro 48.59 -.92
1.00 CitzComm 13.66 -.18
.75 ClearChan 36.76 -.12
.50 ClevCliffs 84.55 -1.73
1.60 Clorox 61.02 -.07
... Coach 47.67 -.61
.24 CocaCE 24.05 -.20
1.36 CocaCI u56.70 +.15
S Coeur 3.87 +.01
1.44 ColgPal 69.67 -.18
.... ColctvBrd 21.31 -.39
2.56 Comerica 52.67 -.96
.52 CmcBNJ 37.49 -.61
.36 CmdMts 30.91 +.73
... ComScop 51.87 -.75
... CrotyHIl 32.70 -.71
.31e CVRDs u31.76 +1,31
.31e CVRDpfs u26.55 +1.20
.40 Con-Way 45.59 -1.01
.72 ConAgra 25.69 -.62
1.64 ConocPhil 89.18 +.24
.. Conseano 15.57 -.26
.401 ConansolEngy 45.49 +.23
2.32 ConEd 47.04 +.06
.. ConstellA 23.60 -.45
. CtlAIr B 30.46 -224
.. Cnvrgys 17.04 -.14
.84 Coopers 48.83 -1.11
.44f ComPdts 47.76 +1.50
.20 Coming 24.07 +.10
... Cosann u12.40 +.15
. CottCp -d7.62 -.38
.60 CntwdFn 18.39 -1.22
.. CovantaH 23.92 +.48
... CovenyH 61.30 +1.41
... Covidienn 41.94 -.56
2.24e CredSuiss 65.95 -.44
... CrwnCstle 39.15 +.16
CrownHold 23.01 -.82
1.001 Cumminss 128.7"7-2.77
.. CypSero u28.24 -.49

.78 DNPSetai 10.67 +.02
1.04 DPL 26.30 -.21
.60 DRHorton 13,56 -.54
2.12 DTE 49.20 -.02
2.00e DalmrnlrC u96.59 +1.21
.12 Danaher 82.39 -.36
.46 Darden 43.08 -.74
15.00e DeanFdss 25.76 -.33
2.001 Deere 145.75 -1.53
,. DeltaAlrn 16.03 -1.53


.56 DevonE 83.20 -1.63
.50a DiaOffs 114.06 -.99
1.87e DianaShip 27.44 +.67
.16 Dillards 21.34 +.28
. DirecTV 24.24 -.46
.. Discover n 22.26 -.14
.311 Disney 34.32 -.28
2.84 DomRes 86.34 +.18
... Domtarglf 7.99 -.22
1.04 DonlleyRR 35.38 +.25
.80f Dover 50.85 +.09
1.68 DowChm 44.00 +.36
1.48 DuPont 49.61 -.08
.88f DukeEgys 18.69 -.07
1.921 DukeRlty 33.90 +.56
Dynegy 9.12 +.26
.. E-Housen 22.91 +.65
... EMCCp u20.51 +1.48


.36 EOG Res 73.76 -.73
1.76 EastChm 66.45 -1.16
.50 EKodak 26.99 -.55
.46 Ecolab 45.87 -.41
.16 EIPasoCp 17.19 -.06
,. Elan 20.16 +.16
.20 EDS 22.03 +.11
.89e EBrasAero 44.89 +.84
1.05 EmersnEls 50.25 +.05
1.28 EmpDist 22.77 -.01
3.70 EnbrEPtrs 49.74 -.26
.80 EnCana 62.09 -.52
2.61e Endesa 56.19 +.07
... EnPro 41.82 -.18
.10 ENSCO 56.27 -.52
3.00f Entergy 109.60 +.01
.72 EnterraEg 2.04 +.31
.16 Equifax 38.45 -.30
1.00 Eqlylnn 22.65 +.15
1.85 EqtyRsd 42.73 +.95
.501 EsteeLdr 42.38 -.20
.80 ExcelM u55.17 +4,50


1.76 Exelon 78.17 +.42
... ExprsJet d3.48 -.14
1.40 ExxonMbI 91.73 -.58
. FMCTchs 55.89 -.85
1.64 FPLGrp 62.02 -1.08
.46 FamilyDIr 27.01 -.12
2.00a FannieM If 61.48 -1.24
.40 FedExCp 102.86 -1.24
.24 FedSignl 14.94 -.27
2.00 Ferrellgs 22.54 -.26
.58 Ferro 19.72 -.25
1.20 FidlNFin 17.46 -.17
.20 FidNInfo 44.28 -.84
.88 FstAmCp d36.02 -.77
.12 FirstDatas u33.97 +.14
1.63e FstRnFd 12.80 -.19
1.80 FstHorizon 28.12 -.89
1.60a FtTrFid 17.05 -.15


2.00 FrstEngy 64.39 -.32
... FleetEn 8.51 -.02
.60 RaRock 59.31 +.06
.80 Fluor 141.26 +.07
.41e FEMSAs 33.90 +.77
.50 FootLockr 15.89 -.45
. FordM 8.48 +.25
. ForestLab 36.79 -.45
1.68f FortuneBr 80.95 +.29
2.00 FredMac 59.50 -.85
1.25 FMCG u107.71 -.96
.48 Fremontif 5.28 -.68
.20 FronberOil 45.58 +.24
7.55e Frondtine 49.48 -.56
.64 FumBrds 9.62 -.53

.96 GATX 42.44 -1.37
.80a GabelliEr 9.53 -.08
. GabHithW 8.20 +.02
.72 GabUtil 9.30 -.05
. GameStopsu56.17 +.89
1.60f Gannett 44.58 -.48


.32 Gap 18.37 -.18
. Gartner 23.87 +.13
. Gateway 1.87
... Genentch 79.30 -.08
GnCable 68.13 -1.52
1.16 GenDynam 81.74 -1.22
1.12 GenElec 40.85 -.40
.1.80 GnGrthPrp 53.19 +1.21
1.56f GenMills 57.88 -.61
1.00 GnMotr 34.74 -.20
1.56 GMdb33 23.53 -.13
.401 Genworth 30.32 -.46
1.50 GaPw8-44 24.88 +.08
.64e Gerdau 25.30 +.30
.90 GlobalSFe 76.05 -1.19
.76e GolUnhas 22.54 -.74
.26e GoldFLId 18.05 -.04
.18 Goldcrpg 30.01 -.23


1.40 GoldmanS 210.43 +.45
.80 Goodrich u67.06 +.79
. Goodyear 28.83 -.32
.. GrantPrde 55.77 -1.43
1.66 GtPlainEn 28.58 -.13
.. Griffon 14.70 -.24
.66e GpTelevisa 24.69 -.17
.52e GuangRy u43,00 +1.30
.321 Guess s 47.52 -.43
.44f HCC Ins 28.00 -.56
1.78 HCPInc 33.22 +.72
.84 HRPTPrp 9.94 +.14
.36 Hallibrtn u38.57 -.38
.91e HanJS 13.61 -.18
.58a HanPtDv2 10.69 -.01
Hanesbrds 27.72 -.05
.301 Hanoverlns 43.07 -.39
1.201 HarleyD 47.18 -.87
.05 Harman d80.31 -4.69
. HarmonyG 12.15 -.16
1.60 HarrahE 86.92 +.22
.601 HarrisCorp 56.84 -1.21


2.88 HontldFn 50.58 -1.19 ldscorp 32.88 +01 MOMMir 85.38 -.40 .80 NovolUt 27.74 +.83


2.00 HartfdFn 90.50 -1.19
4.56 HarvstEng 26.42 +.79
.64 Hasbro 28.29 -.26
1.24 HawaiiEl 21.34 -.15
2.64 HIICrREIT 43.79 +.59
10.00e HItMgts 7.20 -.10
1.54m HIthcrRlty 27.25 +.25
... HeclaM 8.88 -.16
1.52 Heinz 45.63 +.03
.37e HellnTel u17.90 +.21
.80 Herbalife u45.15 +1.21
1.191 Hershey 46.17 -.28
.40 Hess 68.04 +.19
.32 HewlettP u50.24 -.29
1.70 HighwdPrp 37.69 +.39
.16 Hilton 46.33 +.15
.90 HomeDpo 33.88 -.59
1.00 Honwillnti 58.01 -.68


3.04 HospPT 40.85 -.08
.80a HostHotls 22.47 +.15
... HovnanE 11.00 -1.30
.. Humana 67.69 +.54
.40 Huntsmn 26.17 +.17.
.07 IAMGId g 8.75 -.21
.50e ICICIBk 51.21 +1.21.
.87e iShBrazil u70.83 +1.51
.32e IShHK u20.79 +20
.10e iShJapan 13.83 +.05
.33e iShKor 68.10 +.54
.20e iShMalasia 11.82 +.27
.31e iShSing u14.45 +.37
.31e iShTaiwan 16.48 +.13
1.31e iShChin25ul73.44 +4.96
2.53e iShSP500 152.59 -.26
1.58e iShEmMktul46.80 +1.80
1.53e iSh EAFE 80.88 +.18
3.09e iShREst 77.53 +.66
.27e iShDJHomed21.30 -1.10
.49e iShSPSml 70.08 -.60
3.30 iStar 35.81 -.75


Idvsrc n
Imation


Ingvrmd
IntegrysE
IntcotEx
IBM
lInlGawe
IntPap
InthectIff
Interpublic
IronMtn s


32.88 +.01
31.54 -.74
57.74 -.11
d24.34 -.44
22.24 -1.16
16.29 -.52
53.76 -.04
19.15 -.34
51.81 -.42
141.81 +6.35
116.25 -.53
41.86 -.69
35.59 -.27
31.85 -.28
10.66 +.10
29.06 +.41


1.52 JPMoraCh 46.34 -.79
.28 Jabil 24.87 +.13
.04 JanusCap 27.49 -.85
1.66 JohnJn 65.20 +.08
1.32 JohnsnCt 114.97 -2.14
,56 JonesApp 21.18 +.48
1.00 KB Home d25.74 -1.53
.. KBRIncn u38.90 -.04
.601 Kaydon 50.86 -.75
1.24 Kellogg 55.73 -.26
.64 Kellwood 1724 -.34
KemetCp 7.26 -.21
1.46 Keycorp 32.88 -.82
2.12 KImbCIk 69.62 -.34
1.601 Klmo 46.45 +.69
3.401 KindME 50.73 +.01
.. KineticC 56.74 -.30
. KingPhrm d11.58 -.14
... Knross g 15.03 -.45
... Kohls 59.00 -1.27
... KomFer 16.58 +.25
1.081 Kralt 34.71 -.14
.. KdspKnrm 3.69 +.33
.30 Kroger 28.26 -.28
.64e LAN Airs 15.79 -.34
.. LDKSoln u65.19 -352
.09j LLERy 1.40 +.03
...LSICo 6.83 +.04
1.50 LTCPrp 25.30 +.18
.48 LaZBoy 8.74 -28
.,. LaBmch 4.79 -.34
1.46 Ladede 32.95 -.38
... LVSands u139.34 +9.69
.96 LeggMason 81.78 -.21
.72 LeggPlat 19.35 -.23
.60 LehmanBr 61.13 -1.57
.64 LennarA d24.18 -1.14
.25 LeucNas 46.45 +.67
.08 Levitt 2.09 -.22
.59e LbtyASG 5.86 +.03
1.70 UllyEli 57.53 -.09
.60 Umited 23.04 -.06
1.58 UncNat 64.10 -.57
.281 Undsay 43.05 +.11
1.40 LockhdM 102.35 -.85
.25 Loews 47.64 +.02
. .60 LaPac d16.64 -.20
.32 Lowes 30.55 -.07
.60j Luminentlf 1.54 -.05
.. LundinMs 12.68 +.38
.90 Lyondell 46.58 -.02

2.80f M&TBk 105.34 -2.26
1.36 MBIA 59.97 -.84
.581 MDU Res 26.95 -.36
.. MEMC 60.83 +1.98
.. MFGtobln 26.94 -.73
.49 MCR 8.40 -.01
1.00 MGIC 33.40 -.65


... MGMMir 85.36 -.40
.52 Macys 32.95 -.17
... Madeco 12.85 -.13
1.44f Magnalg u96.46 +.55
.081 Manitows 43.32 -1.06
.88 Manuligs 40.35 -.03
.96 Marathon s 57.77 -.48
.30 MarintA 44.71 +.06
.76 MarshM 24.80 -.03
1.24 Marshlls 44.47 -.50
... MStewrt 12.42 -.12
.92 Masco 23.58 -.29
.60 MasterCrd 142.26 -4.30
.. MaterialSci 10.31 +.03
.65f Mattel 23.42 -.52
... McDermils u54.70 -.04
1.501 McDnlds 54.96 +.16
.82 McGrwH 49.36 -1.42
24 McKesson 56.23 +.45
... McAfeeIf 33.90 -.67
... MedcoHIth 88.38 -.07
.12 Medids 29.17 -.16
.50 Medlmic 56.94 +.327
1.52 Merck 51.68 -.14
... MedridGkid 33.57 -.70
... Meritage d1515 -1.51
1.40 MenillLyn 73.68 -1.05
.591 MelLife 68.52 -.67
-1.59 MetlUfe un 33.87 -.24
... MetroPCSn 26.71 +.21
MicronT 10.54 -.19
2.42 MidAApt 51.71 +.21
.. Midas 19.38 +.38
... Millipore 76.84 +.28
... Mirant 41.17 -.15
... MitsuUFJ 8.50 +.18
.70f Monsanto 79.14 +.33
.32 Moodys 47.10 -1.24
1.08b MoigStan 62.29 -2.15
6.84e MSEmMkt u30.31 +.35
... Mosaic If u49.46 -.79
.20 Motorola 18.05 +.16
.751 MurphO u70.05 +.47
.24 MyanLab 15.23 -.12
... NCRCp 48.24 +.12
NRGMEgys 41.81 +.61
.40 NYMEX 125.10 +.77
1.00 NYSEEur 77.81 +1.76
... Nabors 31.53 -.14
1.64f NaeCity 25.47 -.56
1.24 NatFuGas 45.42
2.79e NatGrd 77.05 +.17
... NOlVarou142.68 -1.94
.16 NatSemi 26.59 +.16
1.64 NatwHP 30.90 +.37
.27 NavSos 13.30 +.50
... Navteq 70.00 +.33
.21a NewAmn 1.93
1.52 J NJRscs 48.99 -.16
1.00 NYCmtyB 18.95 -.14
.92 NYlimes 19.55 -.26
.84 NewelRub 28.62 -.21
... NewfidExp 47.07 -.98
.40 NewmtM u48.26 +.70
S NwpkRsIf 5.498 +.07
.12 NewsCpA 21.75 -.40
.10 NewsCpB 23.13 -.42
.10 Nexengs 30.28 -.14
.92 NiSource 19.43 +.03
1.88 Nicer 42.59 -.38
.74 NikeBs 57.81 +.55
.161 NobleCps 50.26 -.48
.48 NobleEn u68.72 +1.71
.56e NolaCp 36.56 -.49
.54 Nordsurm 50.71 -.03
1.04f NorfikSo 50.54 -.71
... Nortellfrs d15.89 -.54


A E IA N S OCK EXC ANG


.481 comr , 10.51 -.39
... CovadCm .67 -.02
.. Crsshairgn 1.90 +.17
.. Clystallxg 2.76 +.04
.18 Cubic 41.35 -3.97
. Cytomed 2.86 +.23
2.70e DJIADiam 137.55 -.35
.. Darling 9.84 +01
... Diomed .78 +.09
.74 EVInMu2 14.55 +.10
... EldorGldg 5.91 -.19
.66e BswthFd 9.15 +.14
EvgmEnya 5.27 +.06


.45 FimIPu l II.4- -.I'
... Floteks u46.25 +1.80
... FrontrDg 10.60 +.35
.. GamGldg 11.49 +.33
. GascoEngy 1.92 +.03
. GoldRsvg 3.97 -.16
... GoldStra 4.02 -.26
... GreyWollf 6.72 -.22
.72 Hersha 10.32 +.03
1.10e iSAstlanyau30.53 +.33
.28e iSCannya u32.17 +.01
.51e iShGernya 33.83 -.14
.46e iShMexnya 58.12 +.20


1., i;,i-: . li'). :. I ,) -. i.
4.05e iSh2OTnya 88.14 +.25
.58e iSRMCGnya114.90 -.51
.09p iShNqBio 82.60 -.16
2.11e iShC&SRIlnya94.22 +1.70
1.83e iSR1KVnya 86.30 -.39
.53e iSRIKGnyva 61.21 +.11
1.29e iSRuslKnya82.68 -.26
1.49e iSR2KVnva 77.47 -.63
.33e iSR2KG nva 85.47 -.25
.87e iShR2K nva 80.34 -.62
... IdaGenMn 6.90 +.09
... InfoSvcsn 7.55 -.06


i,'Ii .in , II)''' -I ll',
.. Invemss 51,87 +.82
... MadCatzg 1.17 -.03
.25p ManSang 10.60 -4.54
.12e MktVGokI 45.10 -.38
... Medicureg 1.14 +.03
.. Metalico 8.22 +.36
.. MetroHIth 2.04 +.01
.. Miramar 4.76 -.03
... NDynMng 11.55 +.10
.. NOrion u6.57 +.16
... NthgtMg 2.82 +.01
... NovaGIdg 16.10 -.48


1 ', ,.Il'. .HT i . .K . - I18
.. Oilsandsg 4.61 -.15
.. On2Tech 1.18 -.11
. Paladn .48 +.02
2.85e PhmHTr 79.99 -.35
. PSAgrin 28.83 +.06
.24e PwShChinau32.01 +73
.04e PwSCInEn 22.39 ...
.15e PwSWtr 21.84 +.02
... ProPhrmh .68 +.12
1.50e PrUShS&P 51.65 +.34
1.52e PrUIShDow 47.76 +.36
2.02e PrUShMC 53.74 +.45


.: - 4 .; i.i'a. W i :.o7 .1 1)
1.32e PrUShQQQd40.77 -.17
4.32e ProUltSP 94.80 -.20
.48e ProUSR2Kn66.01 +.84
1.24e RetailHT 101.40 -.59
... Rubicongs 1.83 +.14
.59e RdxSPEW 49.72 -.26
.28e SpdrHome d22.09 -1.18
2.29e SpdrKbwBk 52.53 -.74
.48e SpdrKbwCM 64.60 -.26
1.52e SpdrKbwRB44.37 -.89
.14e SpdrRed 39.28 -.38
.44e SemiHTr 38.37 -.21


,g iljl, r., 1 ,,4 *P 1
... Sinovac 4.50 -.33
2.74e SPDR 151.69 -.28
1.99e SPMid 159.40 -.50
.81e SPMatis 41.62 +.05
.55e SPHithC 35.38 -.07
.58e SP CnSt 27.64 -.02
.35e SP Consum 36.79 -.31
.77e SP Enqv 75.56 -.14
.88e SPFnd 34.12 -.48
.66e SPInds 40.24 -.39
.22e SPTech 26.65 -.07
1.11e SPUtil 40.47 +.15


SulphCo 8.00 .4j
.. TanzRyg 6.00 +.17
.. Taseko 5.44 +.39
... TmsmrEx 2.25 -.02
... US Gold n 6.44 -.20
. USNGFdn 39.95 +1.40
.. USOilFd 61.82 -.32
... Uranerz 4.17 +.23
... VCGHoldh 8.84 +.40
2.53e VangTSM 150.15 -.42
1.34e VangEmg u102.00 +1.25
... Westmind 19.87 -.13
... WilshrEnt 4.15 -.19


NASDA NAIONL MRKE


SDiv Name Last Chg

. ACMoore 16.39 -.81
.. ACIWwde 22.80 -.81
ADCTelr 19.38 -1.35
. AMISHid 9.52 -.07
.. ASETsl 14.30 -.05
.. ASMLHId u32.18 +.20
.. ATSMed 1.80 -.05
. AXTInc u5.93 +.24
.. Aastoro 1.13 +.01
.. AbraxisBio 23.23 +.28
S ... AccHmewl 11.68 +.05
.. Accurayn 14.99 +.41
;20p Acergy u30.66 +.98
S .. AcmePcktn 15.64 +.51
... Acivisn 20.75 -.18
... Actuate 6.38 -.22
.24 Acxiom d20.55 -1.63
.. AdamsResp 39.72 -.11
Adaptec 3.81 +.01
... ADDvntgT 8.00 -1.28
. AdobeSv 41.50 -.45
... AdoelorCp 3.45 -.10
.36 Adtran 22.84 -3.57
. AdvATech 10.50 -.19
.. AdvEnld 15.22 -.10
.71 AdvantaAs 23.80 -.14
.85 AdvantaB s 27.08 -.07
S ... Affymetrix 24.75 +.42
. AirspanNet 2.16 +.11
... AkarnmaT 29.66 -.50
... AkeenaS n 7.30
.86 AlaskCom 14.31 -.69
.60 Aldila 16.61 -.39
1.16 AlexBId 48.44 -1.06
. Alexion 65.36 +1.97
. AlignTech 25.59 +.03
. Alkerm 16.76 -.23
Allscripts 27.54 -.26
AInylnamP u33.55 -.02
AltairNano 3.28 +.07
.16 AlteraCpll 24.67 -.47
. Alvarion 14.03 +.11
. Amarin h .47 -.01
. Amazon u92.59 +1.29
S .. AmerBio 1.02 +.03
Am3.68 ACapSr 40.90 -.16
... AmerMed 17.45 -.26
.12 AmRailcar 23.40 -1.14
. AmSupr 17.94 -.33
Amerisafe 17.69 -.31
Amqen 55.29 -.13
.. AmkorTIf 11.04 -.06
.. Amylin 48.97 -.63
. Anadigc 17.47 -.05
.40 Anlogic 69.25 -5.61
Analysts 1.59 -.04
Andrew 13.80 -.08
.57e AngloAm 33.04 +1.29
. Ansyss u34.20 -.71
.27 ApogeeE 27.99 +.90
.. ApolloGrp 58.92 +.20
2.08f Apololnv 20.32 -.13
. Apple Inc u148.28 +4.13
.24 ApldMad 21.04 -.26
. AMCC 3.16 -.02
. ArchCap 70.84 -.73
. ArenaPhm 11.72 -.31
1.68f AresCap 16.20 -.15
.. AradP 4.99 +.11
.. ArlbaInc u10.85 +.63
.60 ArkBest d32.37-1.15
... ArrayBio 11.85 -.70
... Arris 11.98 -2.28
.84 Arrowint 45.35 -.04
. ArtTech 3.03 +.23
.. ArubaNetn 17.87 -.33
. AscentSol u16.45 -.05
.. AscntSlwtB u6.19 -.01
. AspenTech 14.90 -.10
. Asprevag 21.28 +.33
2.45e AssetAcc 10.95 -.04
1.24 AsscdBanc 29.46 -.66
. athenahltn 34.25 -1.25
. AthrGnc 1.76 +.02


... Atheros 29.89 -.57
. Atmel 5.14 -.05
.. AudCodes 5.01 +.04
... Audvox 10.28 -.08
... Autodesk 48.41 -.31
.. Avanex 1.63 -.04
... Avatar d50.91 -2.09
... Aware 4.29 -.02
.. AxcanPh 20.07 +.23
... Axcelis 5.09 -.15
... BEAero 40.51 -1.33
. BEASysf ' 13.27 -.32
.. Baldu.comu303.41+18.81
SBallardPw 4.54 +.11
.02 BnkUtd 17.22 -.38
. Bankrate 46.30 -.12
... BareEscn 23.76 -.24
.. BasinWtr 12.29 -.01
. BeaconPw 1.87 +.10
.25 BeasleyB 7.11 +.11
.20 BebeStrs 15.09 +.02
. BedBath 34.67 +1.24
... Bldz.comnu11.89 +1.39
... BgBandn 9.51 +.35
. Biocryst 7.60 -.38
. Bioenvisn 5.33
.. Biogenldc 68.45 +1.06
. BioMarin u23.42 +.43
. Biomet 45.93 +.04
. Biopure .54 +.01
. BioScrip 6.18 -.19
.34 Blckbaud 25.44 -.35
... Blkboard 44.07 +1.59
... BlueCoat u83.57 -.91
. BlueNile 100.23 +.25
. BluPhoenx u17.78 -.43
.56 BobEvn 31.59 -.43
... Bodrland 4.45 -.19
... Brightpnt 14.68 +.09
Broadcom 36.52 +.40
... BrcdeCm 8.08 +.27
... BrooksAuto 14.04 -.58
.20 Bucyrus 69.44 -.54
. BuffWWs 36.50 +1.33
... BldrFslSrc 11.33 +.07
... BusnOb 45.03 -.21
.. C-COR 12.02 +2.14
.72f CBRLGrp 40.12 -1.12
. CDCCpA 7.01 -.15
CDWCorp 86.58 -.24
.72 CH Robins 53.97 +.02
... CMGI 1.59 -.03
... CNET 7.39 -.06
... CSGSys 22.15 -.16
.. CTC Media 23.00 -.46
... CVThera 9.25 -.22
... Cadence 21.91 -.08
... CdnSolarn 8.69 +1.11
. Candela 8.01 -.06
.70 CapCtyBk 31.48 -.43
... CpstnTrb 1.17 +.02
... Cardica 8.81 -.48
... CareerEd 27.14 -.16
.401 CarverBcp 15.75 +.43
.. CatlSeml u7.11 +.82
... Celgene u72.20 +1.57
... CellGens 3.44 -.05
... CentEuro 47.89 -.81
.. CnGardAn 9.69 -.16
... CentAl 48.17 -1.82
Cephln 73.43 +.18
Cepheid 21.40 +.32
Ceradyne 72.82 -1.76
... CeragonN 16.65 +1.36
... Cemer 58.97 -1.13
... ChrmSh 8.73 -.17
... Chartllnds u32.32 +.94
ChartCm 2.55 -.01
... Chattem u68.64 +1.54
... ChkPoint 24.13 -.06
ChkFree 46.66 -.16
... Cheesecake 23.51 -.81
... ChildPlcif d24.79 -.29
... ChinaBAK 4.55 +.19
... ChiFnOnl u26.23 +3.00
.40p ChinaMed 39.15 -.40
... ChlnaNResul4.40 +4.21


... ChinaPrec n 7.92 +2.64
... ChinaSunn 7.03 +.06
... ChlnaTcF 5.48 +.26
... ChlnaTDvHf 6.38 +.63
.. ChipMOS 5.92 -.12
.50 ChrchIlD 50.41 -1.56
. CienaCp rs 37.42 -.36
1.42 CinnFin 42.56 -.74
.391 Cintas 36.43 -.72
... Cirrus d6.30 -.22
... Cisco 31.88 -.42
1.16 CitzRep 16.81 -.55
... CitrixSys 38.72 -.10
... CleanEnn 15.52 -.75
.. CleanH 45.15 -.81
... Clearwiren 24.48 +.39
... CogentC 22.65 -1.40
... Cogent 15.24 +.25
... CogTech 74.83 -1.04
... Cognosg 41.52 -1.04
. ColdwtrCrk 11.43 -.37
1.00e Comarco 5.53 -.39
.. Comcasts 23.67 -.20
... Comcsps 23.45 -.25
... Compuwre 7.86 -.18
... Comtech u52,99 +.22
... Concepts 19.61 +.92
... ConcurTch 29.54 +.26
... ConcCm 1.28 -.03
Conexant 1.21 -.03
... Conmed 29.26 -.19
..CorinthC 15.31 -.26
1.00a CorusBksh 13.28 -1.01
... CostPlus 4.07 -.45
.58 Costco 60.25 -.47
... CredSys 3.07 -.18
.. Cree Inc 30.76 -1.39
... Crocs u61.98 +5.12
... Ctrip.comsu48.70 -1.00
... CubistPh 21.50 +.22
... CumMed 10.40 -.04
. CuraGen 1.35 -.14
. Cymer 38.82 -.98
.. Cynosure 37.34 +1.85
CyprsBio 14.60 -.40
. CytRx 3.46 -.10
Cytogen .99 -.05
. Cytyclf u45.16 +.55

. Dankah .78 +.01
... DayStar 4.89 -.31
... DealrTrk u40.56 +.30
DeckOut 109.86 +1.41
... Dell Incif 27.87 +.11
... DtaPr 16.84 -.23
... Dndreon 7.94 +.04
... Dennys 4.06 -.11
.181 Dentsply 41.35 -.14
... Depomed 2.05 -.23
. DigRiver 44.01 -.18
... DiscHoldA 27.28 -.35
. DiscvLabs 2.74 -.11
.. DobsonCm 12.71 -.01
... DIrTree 41.20 -.41
.. DressBam 17.23 -.09
. drugstore 3.23 +.12
.80 DryShips u85.45 +3.80
... Dynavax 4.30 -.11
... e-Futuren 15.83 -1.31
... ETrade 12.54 -.99
... eBav 38.58 -.42
.. ECITel 9.51 -.13
.. eHealth n 26.89 -.20
. ev3Inc 16.05 -.15
... EZEM 15.62 +.57
1.88m EagleBulk 25.94 +.04
... EdhUnk 8.09 -.10
EchelonC 30.15 +1.36
EchoStar 41.32 -.41
Eclipsys 23.62 +.49
. EdBauern 8.60 -.35
.221 EduDv 6.34 +.06
... ectEnh d.36 -.05
... FectSci 24.80 +.01
... Ectrgs 2.4 -.05
ElectArts 55.9 -.89


... EFII 27.43 -.07
... Emcorelf 8.67 +.03
4.00e EmmisCs d5.55 -.52
.08 EncorW 25.51 +.14
EncysiveP 1.57 -.03
... EndoPhrrn 31.22 +.48
EngyConv 24.23 +.09
Entegris 9.13 -.34
... EnzonPhar 8.58 -.05
.. Equinlx 89.95 +4.63
.74e EnicsnTI 38.64 -.51
. EuroTech 3.64 +.70
... EvrgrSIr 8.85 +.26
... Exelids 10.84 -.25
... Expediah 30.17 +.15
.28f Expdlnti 45.18 +.38
.. ExpScdps 53.27 -.61
... ExtrmNet 3.77 -.16
... Ezcorps 13.43 +.11
... F5Netwks 38.00 -1.37
... FCStone n 43.85-4.25
... FEICo 31.32 +.37
. FLIRSys 53.63 -.93
.461 Fastenal 44.60 -.27
... FiberTowr 3.80 -.15
1.68 RtFifthThird 34.61 -.62
... Fnisarlf 2.86 -.08
.05j Finne 5.04 -.25
.78 FstCharter 30.26 -.09
.56f FstNiagara 14.13 -.20
... FstSolarn 112.80 +.25
1.16 FstMerit 19.80 -.36
... Rserv 49.65 +.32
... FamelT 9.44 -.37
... Rextm 11.49 -.11
... FocusMdlf 48.50 +.79
... ForcePron 18.46 +.74
.. FormFac 45.64 -1.20
... Fossil Inc 36.88 -.56
... FosterWh 129.28 -1.48
. FoundryN 17.90 -.65
... FmtrAir 6.02 -.04
. FuelTech 24.09 -.27
. FuelCell 10.07 +.10
.60 FultonFnd 14.75 -.24
... Ftrmdiahrs .53 -.03
... FuweiFn 8.36 +.39

. GMarket 22.17 +.50
... Gaiam u23.18 +.46
.75f Garmin u115.03 +6.33
... Gemstar 6.60 -.20
... GenBiotc 1.54 +.01
. GenesMcr 7.85 +.21
. Gentars 1.35 -.07
.42f Gentex 19.90 -.40
... Genzyme 62.50 +.33
... GeronCp 7.41 +.05
... GigaMed u16.28 -.48
... GileadS is 39.77 -.36
... GlobCrsg 20.86 +1.28
... Globlnd 25.22 -.34
2.00a GolarLNG u22.50 +.43
... Google u568.02 +7.92
... GreenMts 34.39 +.82
.. GreenfldOn 15.36 -.89
... GuitarC 56.18 -1.58
... Gymbree 37.83 -.48
... HLTH 14.03 -.28
1.00 HMNFn 29.81
... Halozyme 9.05 -.07
... HanaBosci 1.18 -.09
... HandhEnt 2.39 -.29
... HansenMnu28.36 +1.91
... HansenNat u53.99 +2.09
... Harmonic 10.35 -.20
... HayesLm 4.46 -.05
... Healthwys 56.02 +.81
.08a HrlndEx 14.41 -.45
.52 HeidrkStr 35.61 -.10
... HSchein 59.23 -.25
. HercOffsh 27.27 -.61
. Hibbett 27.99 +.75
.20p HimaxTch 3.80 -.04
... HokuSci 9.99 +.01
... Hologic 56.12 +1.09


... Home Inns n29.89' +.24
... HomeSol 3.22 +.19
... HoriznOff 16.94 -.36
... HorsehdH nu23.36+1.78
., HotTopic 7.73 -.38
HubGroup 29.94 -.13
.341 HudsCty 15.05 +.09
. HumGen 10.39 +.03
.36 HuntJB 25.78 -.57
1.06 HuntBnk 17.36 -.28
. IAC Inter 28.14 +.10
... ICOInc 14.65 +.36
... IRobot 18.90 +1.15
... Illumina 52.47 -.31
. Imdone 43.21 +.80
. Immersn 14.74 +.02
. Immucor 36.04 -.65
... InPhonic 2.66 +.03
... Incyte 6.38 -.14
.IndevusPh 6.67 -.12
6.30e InfoSpces 17.41 -.27
... Informal 15.23 +.15
.27e InfosysT 45.97 -.65
... Insight 26.00 -.02
. Insmed h .69 -.01
... IntgDv 15.47 +.22
.45 Intel 25.98 +.11
... InterDig 20.84 -.36
... InterMune 19.36 -.50
.. InterNAP 14.70 -.40
.101 IntlSpdw d46.37 -.46
.40 Intersil 33.22 -.26
... Intut 29.32 -.38
. IntSurg 223.88 +1.97
.. Inventure d2.10
... Investools 11.76 -.38
.. Invirogn 82.75 -.06
. IsilonSysn 8.29 +.05
.. Isis u14.55 -.36
... IvanhoeEn 1.96 +.03

JASolarn u45.10 -.64
... JDSUnirs 13.94 -.15
.26 JackHenry 25.77 -.57
JkksPac 22.67 -1.09
JamesRiv 6.10 +.27
JetBlue 9.24 -.21
.. JonesSoda 9.44 +.09
. JosphBnk 36.10 -.38
.60 JoyGlbl 48.78 -.81
... JnprNtwk 35854 -.37
.60f KLATnc 56.28 -.88
Kenexa 30.82 +.57
... KeryxBio 9.78 -.27
... KnghtCap 12.13 -.45
... KongZhg 5.32 +.26
... Kulicke 8.54 -.12
.. Kyphon 69.79 -.01
.72 LCAVis 31.36 -.96
UlInll 3.99 -.14
... LKQCp 34.80 +.36
.72f LSIInds 21.00 +.26
LTX 3.80 -.12
... LamRsch 53.45 -.36
3.25e LamarAdv 49.00 -1.08
.15f Landstar 41.90 +.12
. Lattice 4.81 -.12
LawsnSft 9.78 -.06
. LeapWirels 79.45 +.12
. Level 4.62 -.01
... UbGlobA 42.20 -.13
UbGIobC 40.04 -.12
. UbtyMIntA 18.44 +.16
. UbtMCapA 122.57 -.43
... Ufecell 37.10
... LiePtH 30.32 +.46
2.50e UgandPhm 5.60 -.28
... Limelight n 9.00 +.53
.72 UnearTch 34.77 -.25
Loca.com 6.06 +.22
. LodgEnt 25.22 -.26
. Logitech 27.81 -.21
LookSmart 2.71 +.11
u... lulemngn 39.37 -.52

1.76 MCGCap 14.05 -.24


. MDlInc .90 -.11
1.42f MGE 33.76 -.42
MGIPhr 24.60 -.56
... MIVA 4.90 +.28
... MKSInst 19.82 -.12
. MRVCm 2.42 -.01
.601 MTS 42.78 -2.14
... Macrvsn 23.44
MagelnHI 40.39 -.64
.36 Manntch 7.23 +.57
... Martek u28.30 -.49
... Marvell 15.80 -.14
.. MatixSv 21.62 +.56
.. Mattson 8.69 -1.75
.75f Maxim hlf 28.98 -.73
... MaxwlrT 11.71 -.56
... Medarex 14.09 -.27
... Mediacm 7.38 +.11
... MedicActs 23.15 -.32
... MediCo 17.11 +.10
... MelcoPBLnl16.93 +1.42
... MentGr 14.49 -.08
... MesaAir 4.76 -.14
.56 Methanx 22.50 -.16
.20 Methode 15.56 -.41
1.181 Microchp 36.50 -.16
. MicrosSys 62.15 +.18
MicroSemi u26.31 -.08
.44f Microsoft 29.08 +.43
... Micrvisn 4.67 -.14
... MillCellh .65 +.04
.. MillPhar 10.20 -.03
.35 MillerHer 27.46 -.87
... Millicomh 77.27 -1.44
. Mindspeed 1.70
. Misonix 4.77 -.21
.45f Molex 27.15 +.01
. Monogrm 1.53 +.06
.. MonPwSys 25.00 -.06
. Monstrtw 33.47 -.50
. Move Inc 2.86 -.10
. MovieGal h .51 -.01
... MyrladGn u49.50 +3.13
.. NETgear 28.33 -.22
.. NICESys 35.75 +.75
. NilHklg 76.19 -1.62
NPSPhm 4.93 +.29
. Nanegen 1.02 -.05
SNapster 3.22 -.10
.. Nasdaq 35.87 +.27
. Nastech 13.50 -.18
. NatAtH 8.92 -.21
. NatusMed 14.23 -.53
. NektarTh 9.06 +.04
.05e NetServic 15.33 +.14
. Netease 17.50 +.14
.. Neatix 19.29 +.10
. NetSolTch 2.65 +.49
. NetwkAp 27.27 +.33
. Neurcine 10.32 -.14
. NexCen 7.26 -.18
.50f NobltyH 19.13 +.07
1.00 NorTrst 64.42 -1.07
. NthfldLb 2.16 +.13
. NovaMed 4.80 +.21
. NvtWds 22.98 -.33
Novavax 3.53 -.19
. Novell 7.54 -.15
. Novlus 26.56 -.99
. NuHoriz 9.45 +.23
. NuVasive 36.35 +.08
. NuanceCm 18.64 -.11
. NutiSys 49.50 +1.16
. Nvidias 35.37 +.88
. 02Micro u15.57 +30
. OSIPhrm 34.43 -.16
.39p OceanFrtn 23.36 +.79
. OldDomF 24.68 -.14
. Ornicell 27.14 -.22
. Omniture 28,05 -.47
... OmniVisn u21.80 +.10
... OnAssign 9.64 -.14
. OnSmcnd 12.47 -.25
OnyxPh 43.90 +2.55
1.20e OprnwSy 4.34 -.12
. Opnextn 11.00 +16
.25 optXprs 24.48 -.94


... Optlumn 9.88 +.61
... Oracle 21.79 -.19
... Orthfx 47.00 -.45
... Orthovta 3.00 +.19
1.17 OtterTail 36.22 +.06

PC Mall 14.21 +.35
.. PDLBio 20.54 +.19
PFChng 31.28 -1.07
. PMCSra 8.14 -.05
.. PSSWild 19.54 +.07
1.08f Paccar 87.96-2.01
.60 Pacerlntl 19.20 -.31
.88 PacCapB 26.08 -.78
... PacEthan d9.20 -.74
. PacSunwr 15.47 -.38
... Packebt 7.76 +.20
... PaetecHn 12.50 -.17
Palm Inc 15.49 -.41
... PanASiv 28.56 -,20
.. PaneraBrd 43.00 -.28
Pantry 28.83 -.14
ParagShpnu16.79 +.20
.. ParPet 17.43 -.99
... ParamTch 16.39 -.16
Patterson 38.43 +.07
.48 PattUTI 22.87 +.14
1.20f Paychex 43.26 -.18
... PnnNGm 58.68 -.50
... Penwest 10.87 +.06
.53 PeopUtdF 17.25 -.05
.Peregrine h .65 -.01
... PerfectWn 28.88 -.62
Perficient 22.94
.18 Perrgo 21.81 +.06
PelroDev 43.37 -1.31
.12 PetsMart 32.59 -.35
.12 PharmPdt 36.29 -.28
PhilCons 39.00 +1.06
... Photrin 11.88 -.27
... Pxlwrks .96 +.07
... Plexus 26.54 +.62
.. PlugPower 2.81 -.15
. PointTherh .04 +.01
Polycom 26.93 -.65
.60 Polymed 52.22 -,16
.48 Pool Corp d24.56 -.24
.64 Popular 12.02 -.19
. Power-One 4.90 +.23
.14e PwShsQQQ50.59 +.23
... Powrwav 6.16 -.15
... Pozen 10.67 -.35
.. PremExhlb 15.58 -1.00
Presstek 6.44 -.05
.68 PdceTR 53.82 -.05
... peine 87.58-1.74
ProgPh 22.67 -.12
ProgrsSoft 29.79 +.06
O... QIAGEN 17.89 -.20
QLT 5.94 +.18
SQlaoXIng 10.58 -.69
SQlgic 12.65 -.08
.56 Qualom 41.64 +.81
QuanFuel 1.04 +.03
. QuestSfhlf 16.64 -.14
1.24f QuintMari 19.45 +.20
... RFMicD 6.45 +.23
RackSys 12.80 -.30
RadioOneD 3.80 -.12
. Rambuslf 18.57 +.38
.10e Randgold 30.90 +.40
. RealNwk 6.64 -.08
. RedRobin 43.64 -.36
Rdiff.cm 17.00 +1.16
. Regenrnm 18.64 -.25
. RentACt 17.68 -.48
. RschMots u94.50 +1.32
1.25e ResConn 29.23 -.61
... Riverbed 43.50 -.51
.30 RossStrs 25.98 -.56
.26 RoyGld 33.41 -.23
.. Ryanairs 39.09 -.60

... SCorp 9.02 -.07
. SBACom 35.42 +.39
... SCOGrp .18 +.02


., SEIInvs 26.08 -.02
SVB FnGp 46.62 -.43
... SalixPhm 12.97 -.03
SanDisk 51.90 -1.66
... SangBio u13.90 +.71
. Sanmina 2.13 -.05
Sapient 7.04 +.10
... SavientPh 14.95 +.86
. Sawis 36.14 +.72
.07 Schnitzer u69.74 +3.30
. Scholastic 34.87 -.08
.20a Schwab 20.61 -.26
.. ScielePh 25.86 +.36
... SdGames 36.56 +.25
SearsHIdgs 128.83 -2.49
.. SeattGen 11.60 -.20
.. SecureCmp 9.20 -.17
. SelCmfrtt 15.26 -.33
.48 Selctlnss 21.12 -.21
. Semtech 19.30 -.37
.. Sepracor 27.58 -.89
Sequenom 5.30 +.10
.. Shanda u36.40 +2.02
... ShengdaTn 5.70 +.45
.22e Shire 73.02 +.70
. ShuffiMstr 14.22 -.08
. SiRFTch 19.40 +.70
. SierraWr 22.13 -.40
Sify 8.06 +28
SigmaDsg 50.50 -.52
.46 SigmAls 47.74 +.60
Silicnlmg 5.55 +.03
. SicnLab 41.56 -.03
... SilicnMotn 23.03 -.45
.51r SIcnware u12.04 +.22
... SilvStdg 36.52 +.06
.. Silverstar 2.57 -.05
.. Sina 49.53 +.39
.60 Sinclair 12.50 -.57
.. Sirenza u16.70 +237
. SiriusS 3.30 -.06
.12 SkyWest 24.75 -.39
.. SkywksSol 9.19 -.15
... SmarBaln 12.30 +.25
.. SmartM 7.02 -.20
. SmithWes 18.14 -.92
... SmithMro 16.20 -.50
... SmrSne 10.84 +.13
... Sohu.cmn u40.47 +.46
... Solarlunn 12.21 +1.08
... SonlcSolhI 8.89 -.81
. Sonus 5.96 +.16
... SonusPh d.70 -3.65
.40f SouMoBc 15.00
SourceFrg 2.49 -.04
.72 SouthFnd 23.41 -.54
. SpansionA 8.04 -.06
.20 SprinStr 22.29 +85
. Spectranet 13.80 -.30
... Spire u13.70 +1.53
.29f Staples 22.32 -.15
... Starbucks 27.15 -.32
.40a StDynas 45.11 -1.17
. StemCells 2.08 -.01
. Stricycles 55.24 +2.14
.21 SterdBcss 11.58 -.16
1.00e SMaddenh 19.02 +.09
.10 StewEnt 7.29 -.21
. SumTotal 6.00 +.11
. SunHIthGp u16.70 +.08
. SunMicro 5.66 -.01
. SunOpta 13.99 +.06
. SunPower u81.12 -2.75
. SupTech 5.89 +.09
. SuperGen 4.05 -.11
1.041 SusqBnc 20.36 -.51
. Sycamore 3.78 -.04
S... antec 19.01 -.27
. Symetric d4.75 -.13
. Synaphcs 46.86 +.05
... Synchron 42.73 +3.53
. Synopsys 26.20 -.23
. Synovis 22.31 +.14
.SyntaxBil 4.11 -.15
... SyntroCp 1.95 +.04
T. TBSIntlA 40.71 +.71
... TDAmeritr 17.87 -.40


... THQ 26.18 -.17
... TOPTank 6.57 +.55
... TXCORes 8.86 -.15
TakeTwo 17.07 -.43
.. TaleoA 24.73 +.70
.. Tarragn 2.80 -.17
.. TASER 15.23 -.07
... TechData 39.27 -.38
.. Tekelec 11.60 -.18
TeleTech 23.83 -.34
... Tellabs d9.46 -.40
TetraTc 21.65 -.42
.37e TevaPhrm 43.98 +.72
TexRdhsA 12.22 -.03
.. ThrdWve u8.96 +.60
3Com 3.34 -.24
... boSft 7.38 -.13
... TWTele 22.40 -.41
... TIVo nc 6.04 -.04
.16 Topps 9.61 -.03
... TowerS 1.65 -.03
... TrdeStatn 11.35 -.38
.. TriadGly 19.29 -.31
.. TridentMh 14.80 -.36
... TrimbleNs 37.79 +.86
... TriQuint 4.75 +.01
..TrumpEnt 6.48 -.10
.64 TrstNY 10.94 -.10
.88 Trustmk 28.71 -.48
... UAL 43.23 -2.78
.90 UAPHIdg 30.82 -.08
.12 UCBHHId 17.02 -.56
. USBioEnn d8.93 -.28
. USEnSyst .58 -.08
.24f USGIobals 19.53 -.55
.. USANAH 41.97 +1.62
.06 UTiWridwd 22.30 -.40
. UTStrom 3.66 -.07
. Ultpetin 16.53 -.37
.80 UtdOnin 14.14 -.11
.10e USEnr 4.42 -.09
.. UtdThrp 65.90 -1.11
.11 UnrvFor d33.00 -.66
.. UrbanOut 22.07 -.23

... ValVisA d7.02 -.49
.. ValueClick 22.00 +1.52
.. VandaPhm 13.95 -1.07
... VarianSms 52.07 -2.03
.. VascoDta 34.98 +.42
SVentanaM 84.00 +.25
... Verisign 33.40 -.18
... VertxPh 38.65 +.41
.16f VirgnMdah 23.61 +.26
. ViroPhrm 8.80 -.18
... VtaPrt 37.08 -1.19
... Vus 5.05 +.03
. Volcom 41.56 +.30
.72e Volvos 17.87 -.51
... Wamaco 37.92 -1.43
... WamerChil 17.15 -.67
.84f WashFed 25.80 -.59
.. Websense 19.81 +.12
.20 WemerEnt d17.19 -.44
... WetSeal '3.92 -.03
1.16 WhitneyH 26.54-1.19
.72 WholeFd 45.06 +.03
.. WmsScots 27.76
WindRvr 10.83 -.41
. WinnDixn 18.33 -.05
6.00e Wynn u156.01+12.46
XMSat 13.69 -.52
... XOMA 3.59 +.39
.48 Xinx 26.46 -.41
n... huaFn 6.48 -.03
... YRCWwde 27.79 -.50
... Yahoo 25.73 -.32
... ZhoneTch 1.22 -.03
1.72 ZonBcp 70.02 -1.91
... ZxCorp 1.99 +.09
. Zoltek 43.06 +2.00
.. Zoran 20.02 +.01
... Zumrez 48.51 -.51


.80 NoestUt 27.74 +.03
1.48 NorthropG 78.69 -.86
... NwstAIrn 16.07 -.88
... NovaStrrs 9.12 +.45
1.30 NSTAR 34.11 -.05
.44a Nucor 59.25 -.25
.96 Nuveenlnv 61.60 -.81
.69 NvFL 13.18 +.04
.74a NvIMO 14.01 -.01
1.14 NvMulSI&G 11.88 -.03
1.03a NuvQPf2 12.63
1.36 OGEEngy 33.62 -.03
1.001 OcciPet 63.69 -.72
... OffcDpt 19.45 -.11
.60 OfficeMax 33.03 +1.18
.80 Olin 21.86 -.23
.09 Omncre 31.02 +.18
.30 Omnicrn s 48.55 -.94
4.001 ONEOKPt 61.50 +.24
.40 OshkoshT 57.38 +1.49
1.251 OvShip 78.49 +2.75


1.44 PG&ECp 47.75 -.45
.. PHHCorp 25.51 +1.12
.21 PMI Grp 32.91 -.21
2.52 PNC 69.65 -.61
.92 PNMRes 22.15 -.10
2.081 PPG 74.59 -.41
1.22 PPLCorp 49.37 +.23
... Pac[e 27.97 -.32
... ParPhnrml 22.93 +.53
... ParkD 8.40 -26
1.26f ParkHan 110.31 -3.65
.24 PeabdyE 47.56 -.54
2.70m Pengrthg 17.90 +.69
1.681 PennVaRs 27.43 +.41
4.08 PennWstg 30.43 +1.24
.80 Penney 65.91 -.57
.27 PepBoy 14.72 +.03
1.50 PepsiCo 71.25 -.19
.52 PepsiAmer 31.87 +.34
1.28e Prmnnin 15.30 +.15
4.74e PetChlna u181.12+13.90
2.29e PetrbrsAs u64.07 +1.75
229e Petrobrss u74.73 +1.63
1.16 Pfizer 2442 -.17
.15 PhlVH 52.91 -.17
1.00 PiedNG 25.40 -.04
... Peri1 d5.43 -.65
.78 PinoStrat 10.20 +.13
1.32 PitoyBw 45.07 -.85
PlaytoPd 18.23
1.68 PlurnCrk 44.11 -.90
1.36 Polaris 44.38 -.61
.20 Polo RL 75.60 -2.85
1.80 PostPrp 39.79 +.02
.40 Potash s u100.69 -2.10
1.20 Praxalr 80.68 -.03
.12 PrecCastpto144.32 -2.12
... Pridelnt 35.80 -.59
3.00 Prlmewa u26.28 5+&.32
1.40 ProctGa n u69.80 +.41
2.44 ProgrssEn 47.80 -.07
.04a ProgsyCp 19.31
1.84 ProLogis 66.62 +1.69


28 ProsStHiln 3.03 +02
1.44 ProvETg 12.33 +25
.95f Prudent] 92.23 -2.70
2.34 PSEG 89.96 +.93
1.00 PueEngy 24.34 -.07
.16 PeH 15.10 -1.06
.39 PHYM 7.03 +.01
.49 PIGM 9.57
.36 PPrIT 6.38 +03
.. QimodaAG 11.06 -.23
.56 Quanex 46.47 -1.31
.. QuantaSvc 26.65 -.90
.. QtmDSS u3.49 +.03
.40 QstDiag 56.64 -.02
.49 Questars 50.57 +.05
. Quiksikr 14.44 -.18
.. QwestCm 9.38 +.01
1.84m RAITFin 9.51 -.05
.70 RPM 23.59 -.08
.08 Radian 22.45 -.81
.25 RadioShk 21.10 -.84
... Ralcorp 54.37 -.94
.40 RJamesFn 33.97 -.74
2.001 Rayonier 48.77 +.42
1.02 Raytheon u63.20 -24
1.63 Riylnco 28.79 +.54
... RedHat 19.00 -.77
1.44 RegionsFn 30.06 -.45
.32 RelStIAl 54.71 -.96
... ReliantEn 26.18 +.26
.98e Repsol 35.50 -.07
... RetaVent 10.86 -.26
... Revlon 1.21 -.02
... RiteAid 5.07 +.13
1.16 RockwlAut 68.05 -1.93
1.48 RoHaas 54.83 -1.53
.40 Rowan 37.20 -.78
.60 RylCarb 39.45 +.19
2.72e RoyDShIA 83.70 +.08
1.88e Royce 19.45 +.01
1.47 Royce pfB 22.73 +.02
.48 d22.64 -1.34

1.76 SCANA 38.49 -.19
... SKcm 28.94
1.00 SLMCp 47.79 -.52
.30e STMicro 16.54 +20
.28 Safeway 33.35 +.33
.64 ShUoe 34.13 -1.26
... Sude 44.59 -.68
4.00e Sake 16.55 -.03
.. Salesfore 48.47 +2.22
2.44e SJuanB 33.20 +.43
.40 SaraLee 16.55 +.11
.17e Satyams 23.60 -1.14
.26 SchergPl 31.75 -.50
.70 Schlmrbrg 104.92 -1.28
.40 SeagateT 25.91 .53
.40 SealAirs 25.43 "-.69
1.24 SempraEn 59.25 -.59
1.36 SenHous 22.09 -.14
.72f Sensient 27.87 -.09
1.26 Sherwin 64.66 -1,21
1.31e SiderNac a u65.364+1.91
.32- SirrPac . 15.51 .-,.-07


Tre remainder of the New York

Slock Exchange lihsings can De

tcound on the nexi page





Request stocks or mutual funds by
writing Ihe Chronicle Ann: Stock
Requests. 1624 N. Meaoowcresi
Blvd . Crystal River. FL 34429: or
phoning 563-5660. For stocks. include
ire name of thie stock. IS market and
its TIcer symbol For mutual lunds. list
the parent company arid the exact
name 3o1 he lund.





Yesterday Pvs Day
Australia 1.1527 1.1551
Brazil 1.8703 1.8675
Britain 2.0214 2.0200
Canada 1.0011 1.0005
China 7.5100 7.5040
Euro .7099 .7101
Hong Kongq 7.7731 7.7833
Hungary 177.40 177.24
India 39.519 39.719
Indnsia 9174.31 9174.31
Israel 4.0325 4.0535
Japan 114.88 115.39
Jordan .7095 .7095
Malaysia 3.4285 3.4445
Mexico 10.9493 10.9614
Pakistan 60.69 60.70
Poland 2.67 2.67
Russia 25.0225 25.0520
Singapore 1.5003 1.5054
Slovak Rep 24.18 24.19
So. Africa 6.9646 7.0045
So. Korea 920.81 920.81
Sweden 6.5127 6.5259
Switzerind 1.1730 1.1726
Taiwan 33.06 33.06
U.A.E. 3.6690 3.6693
Venzuel 2145.92 2145.92
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All others show
dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day
Prime Rate 7.75 8.25
Discount Rate 5.25 5.75
Federal Funds Rate 4.70 5.31
Treasuries
3-month 3.82 4.05
6-month 4.00 4.13
5-year 4.29 4.20
10-year 4.62 4.47
30-year 4.87 4.71



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Nov07 80.95 -.67
Corn CBOT Dec 07 373V2 -3
Wheat CBOT Dec 07 877/% +33/4
Soybeans CBOT Nov 07 978%/4 -V4
Cattle CME Dec07 100.77 +.60
Pork Bellies CME Feb08 87.50 +.80
Sugar (world) NYBT Mar08 10.14 +.06
Orange Juice NYBT Nov07 130.75 +2.70

SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $732.10 $715.80
Silver (troy oz., spot) $13.497 $12.739

Copper (pound) $3.6i/u $3.41/lb
NMER = New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT = Chicago
Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Exchange.
NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Exchange.
NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


f A -.


14,021.95 11,474.56 Dow Jones Industrials 13,759.06 -61.13 -.44 +10.40 +18.86
5,487.05 4,262.78 Dow Jones Transportation 4,767.75 -59.61 -1.23 +4.55 +9.77
537.12 421.87 Dow Jones Utilities 509.16 +.90 +.18 +11.47 +18.78
10,238.25 8,302.68 NYSE Composite 9,946.42 -35.41 -.35 +8.83 +18.43
2,398.11 1,116.16 Amex Index 2,371.00 -11.02 -.46 +15.30 +24.86
2,724.74 2,202.93 Nasdaq Composite 2,667.95 -3.27 -.12 +10.46 +18.62
1,555.90 1,310.94 S&P500 1,517.73 -8.02 -.53 +7.01 +14.43
856.48 712.17 Russell 2000 805.80 -7.31 -.90 +2.30 +10.83
15,730.39 13,092.65 DJ Wilshire 5000 15,262.88 -76.05 -.50 +7.05 +15.19


I


I










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25. 2007 9A


MTAL FND


4-wk
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
AIM Investments A:
BasValAp 38.09 -.34 40.4
ChartAp 16.84 -.06 43.0
Constp 29.63 -.09 +4.3
HYdAp 4.40 +.01 +2.5
IntiGrow 34.22 -.05 +4.9
SelEqtyr 21.82 -.16 +1.7
AIM Investments B:
CapDvBt 18.64 -.09 +3.3
AIM Investor Cl:
Energy 50.69 -.34+10.3
SummiP p14.89-.01 +5.1
Utiities 19.21 -.07 +3.5
Advance Capital I:
Balancp 19.56 -.08 +23
Retnc 9.46 +.01 +0.7
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGr 16.77 -.04 +3.0
AlllanceBern A:
BalanAp 18.45 -.08 +1.4
GIbTchAp 76.97+.06 +6.2
IntlValAp 24.23 -.02 +2.5
SmCpGrA31.25 -.20 +4.5
AlllanceBemrn Adv:
IntValAdv 24.64 -.01 +2.5
LgCpGrAd 23.76+.02 +4.9
AlllanceBernm B:
CoipBdBp 11.79+.02 +0.5
GlbTchBt68.32 +.05 +6.1
Growths 128.48 ... +4.8
SCpGrBt 25.85 -.17 +4.4
USGovtB p6.74 ... +0.5
AllianceBern C:
SCpGriC 125.95 -.16 +4.5
AllIanz Funds A:
NFJDvVlt 18.13 -.13 +2.0
Allianz Funds C:
GrowthCt 24.75 ... +5.1
TargetCt 22.29 -.01 +5.3
Amer Beacon Plan:
LgCpPIn 24.53 -.18 +2.2
Amer Century Adv:
EqGroAp26.86 -.20 +2.4
Amer Century Inv:
Balanced n17.25 -.07 +1.8
EqGrol n 26.88 -.20 +2.5
Eqlnc n 8.97 -.06 +1.7
Growthlvn 25.49 -.09 +5.6
Heritagel n21.03 -.05 +6.3
IncGron 34.23 -.30 +1.8
IntDiscrn17.92 +.15 +8.1
InOGrol n 14.48 +.06 +6.4
LifeSci n 5.86 -.01 +3.5
NewOpprn8.16-.04 +5.3
OneChAg n14.34-.02 +4.2
RealEstI n29.33 +.49 +6.4
Ultra n 31.07 -.03 +5.1
Valuelnv n 7.86 -.07 +0.7
American Funds A:
AmrcpAp 22.03 -.12 +2.3
AMutlAp 31.12 -.20 +1.2
BalAp 20.17 -.06 +2.2
BondAp 13.20 +.02 +1.0
CapWAp 19.96 +.04 +2.9
CaplBA p 66.05 ... +3.3
CapWGA p 47.44+.07 +5.0
EupacAp 53.52 +.20 +4.9
FdlnvAp 45.02 -.19 +4.0
GwthAp 37.22 -.07 +4.4
HITrAp 12.37 +.03 +2.6
IncoAp 21.16 -.06 +2.1
IntBdAp 13.41 +.01 +0.6
ICAAp 36.50 -.17 +2.8
NEcoAp 30.15 +.04 +4.5
N PerA p 36.24 +.04 +5.2
NwWrldA 59.21 +.29 +8.5
SmCpAp 46.57 -.03 +5.3
TxExAp 12.28 ... +2.1
WshAp 37.64 -.25 +2.2
American Funds B:
BalBt 20.11 -.06 +2.1
CaplBBt 66.05 ... +3.2
CpWGrBt 47.22 +.06 +4.9
GrwthBt 35.86 -.07 +4.3
IncoBt 21.04 -.05 +2.1
ICABt 36.35 -.18 +2.7
WashBt 37.43 -.25 +2.1
Ariel Mutual Fds:
Apprec 50.26 -.51 -0.2
Ariel 54.46 -.56 -2.3
Artisan Funds:
Intl 32.80 +.26 +5.4
MidCap 36.38 -.07 +3.2
MidCapVal 21.58 -.17 +0.2
Baron Funds:
Asset 65.41 +.02 +3.2
Growth 54.28 -.32 +2.2
Partners p 25.99 +.18 +5.7
SmCap 25.29 -.11 +4.6
Bernstein Fds:
IntDur 13.09 +.01 +0.9
DivMu 13.99 ... +1.4
TxMgdlntl 28.86 ... +3.4
IntlPort 28.60 +.02 +3.9
EmMkts 4921 +.45 +9.6
BlackRock A:
AuroraA 28.49 -.11 +0.7
BaVIAp 33.11 -.30 +1.5
CapDevA p17.21 ... +5.3
GIAIAr 20.21 +.04 +4.2
HiYlnvA 7.94 +.02 +1.9
BlackRock B&C:
GIAIC t 19.06 .-+.04'+4.2
BlackRock Insti:
BaVll 33.31 -.29 +1.6
GIbAllocr 20.29 +.04 +4.2
Brandywine Fds:
BlueFd n 37.68 +.02 +4.3
Bmdywnn40.47 -.05 +4.1
Brinson Funds Y:
HiYdIlYn 6.84 +.01 +2.2
CGM Funds:
CapDvn 34.14 -.15 +5.9
Focus n 55.25 +.47+20.0
Mutin 35.22 +.05+11.0
SCRM Funds:
MdCpVM I 33.07 -.11 +0.6
Calamos Funds:
Gr&IncAp 34.21 -.03 +4.0
GrwthAp 64.52 +.26 +6.6
GrowthCt 60.68 +.24 +6.5
Calvert Group:
Incop 16.69 ... +0.8
InflEqAp 25.08 -.03+3.3
MunInt 10.51 +.01 +1.6
SocialAp 31.29 -.12 +1.5
SocBdp 15.91 +.01 +0.9
SocEqAp 40.34 -.22 +3.1
TxFLt 10.12 +.01 +0.5
TxFyLgtp 16.25 +.01 +2.2
TxFVT 15.58 ... +1.8
Causeway Intl:
Insttutnlrn21.46 -.05 +2.1
Clipper 92.21 -.48 -0.1
Cohen & Steers;:
RltyShrs 84.06 +1.53 +5.2
Columbia Class A:
Acomt 31.47 -.11 +1.7
FocEqAt 24.62 +.18 +8.5
21 CntryAt 16.32 +.05 +6.3
MarsGrA 22.80 +.09 +6.3
Columbia Class Z:
AcomZ 32.29 -.11 +1.8
AcomntZ 46.85 +.32 +5.7
IntEqZ 18.87 +.06 +5.4
LgCpldxZ29.63 -.16 +2.7
DFA Funds:
USCorEq2n12.33-.10 +1.3
DWS Scudder CI A:
CommASp 26.64 -.10 +3.7

CorPISlnca2.47 +.02 +0.9
EmMkIn 12.12 +.02 +4.7
EmLroMkGr r 27.89 +.25+11.0
EuroEq 41.00 -.26 +3.0
GIbBdSr 9.82 +.01 +1.4
GIbOpp 45.35 -.09 +2.5
Giblthem 36.36 -.18 +2.8
Gold&Prc 24.02 -.09+21.9
GrolncS 22.84 -.15 +2.8
HiYldTx 12.75 +.01 +1.9
IntTxAMT 11.03 ... +1.5
InU FdS 7028 +.06 +5.5
LgCoGro 30.36 -.10 +4.5
LalAmrEq 76.10 +.88+10.4
MgdMuni S8.99 ... +2.0
MATFS 14.09 ... +1.9
Davis Funds A:
NYVenA 40.81 -.19 +1.5
Davis Funds B:
NIVenB 38.90 -.18 +1.5
Davis Funds C &Y:
NYVenY 41.35 -.19 +1.5
NYVenC 39.16 -.18 +1.5
Delaware Invest A:
TrendAp 20.55 -.06 +2.5
TxUSAp 11.31 +.01 +2.2
Delaware Invest B:
DeldhB 3.33 ... +1.8
SelGrB t 26.56 -.07 +3.5
Dimensional Fds:
EmMktV 43.60 +,19 +9.7
lntSmVan22.70 +.01 +1.2
USLgCo n44.54 -.23 +2.8
US Micro n15.95 -.14 +1.3
USnSmalln21.89 -.21 +0.8
InlSrnCon20.87 +.01 +1.3
Faxdn 10.21 ... +0.4


IntVan 25.23 -.07 +2.6
Glb5Fxlncn10.74 ... +0.4
TM USTgtV24.88-.31 -0.5
TM IntVa 21.58 -.06 +2.7
TMMktwV 18.47 -.19 +0.9
2YGIFxdnlO.30 +.01 +0.5
DFARIE n30.18 +.52 +5.2
Dodge&Cox:
Balanced 88.94 -.33 +1.3
Income 12.63 +.01 +1.0
IntlStk 48.20 -.02 +2.6
Stock 157.87 -.95 +1.4
Dreyfus:
Aprec 47.29 -25 +3.4
Dreyf 11.09 -.06 +3.8
Dr500n t 43.24 -.23 +2.7
EmgLd 33.89 -.38 -1.5
FLIntr 12.81 ... +1.5
InsMut 17.37 ... 0.0
Dreyfus Founders:
GrowthB 12.05 ... 0.0
GiwthFp 12.85 .. 0.0
Dreyfus Premier:
CorVivp 33.26 -27 +2.6
UdHYdAp7.14 +.02 +2.8
SWaIAr 34.84 -.30 +3.1
TchGroA 27.88 +.07 +3.9


Driehaus Funds:
EMktGr 51.11 +.48+11.0
Eaton Vance Cl A:
ChinaAp 36.41 +.54+16.8
AMTFMB110.64 +.01 +5.1
MultiCGrA 11.25 +.03 +6.1
InBosA 6.37 +.01 +1.9
LgCpVal 22.78 -.14 +3.7
NatMun 11.43 +.01 +5.4
SpEqtA 15.88 -.12 +3.3
TradGvA 7.14 ... +0.2
Eaton Vance Cl B:
FLMBt 10.83 ... +3.4
HIthSBt 12.78 +.02 +3.7
NatlMBt 11.43 +.01 +5.5
Eaton Vance Cl C:
GovtCp 7.13 ... +0.1
NaStMCt 11.43 +.01 +5.5
Evergreen A:
AstAlJp 15.51 ... +2.5
Evergreen C:
AstAIICt 14.98 ... +24
Evergreen I:
CorBdI 10.36 +.02 +1.0
SIMunil 9.85 ... +1.1
Excelsior Funds:
Energy 27.58 -.14 +7.7
HiYieldp 4.63 +.01 +1.7
ValRestr 58.02 -.39 +3.2
FPA Funds:
Nwlnc 11.01 ... +0.6
Fairholme 32.65 -.01 +2.9
Fiderated A:
idGrStA 43.54 -.23 +2.8
KauFmAp 6.55 +.01 +4.0
MuSecA 10.34 +.01 +2.5
Federated InstI:
KaufmnK 6.55 ... +4.0
Fidelity Adv Foc T:
EnergyT 51.79 -.44 +9.3
HItCarT 22.13 -.04 +3.7
Fidelity Advisor A:
DivlntlAr 24.99 +.07 +3.8
Fidelity Advisor I:
DivIntin 25.39 +.07 +3.8
EqGrI n 66.59 +.20 +6.5
Eqlnin 3249 -.24 +2.2
IntBdln 10.67 ... +0.9
Fidelity Advisor T:
BalancT 17.92 -.07 +2.6
DivlntTp 24.70 +.07 +3.7
DivGrTp 14.21 -.06 +1.2
DynCATp 20.32 -.21 +4.0
EqGrTp 62.68 +.19 +6.5
EqInT 32.02 -24 +2.1
GrOppT 40.97 -.08 +5.9
HilnAdTp10.62 +.01 +3.6
IntBdT 10.66 +.01 +0.9
MidCpTp27.46 -.24 +1.6
MulncTp 12.69 ... +2.1
CvrseaT 25.31 +.05 +5.1
STFiT 9.29 ... +0.9
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2010n 15.29 -.02 +2.5
FF2015n 12.86 -.02 +2.7
FF2020n 16.40 -.03 +3.1
FF2025 n 13.60 -.02 +3.1
FF2030n 17.08 -.04 +3.3
FF2035 n 14.15 -.04 +3.3
FF2040n 10.12 -.02 +3.4
Fidelity Invest:
AggrGrrn23.25 -.11 +5.3
AMgr50 n 16.96 -.03 +2.3
AMgr70 n 17.61 -.04 +2.8
AMgr20 rn12.84 -.01 +1.3
Balancn 21.17 -.08 +2.6
BlueChGrn45.08-.14 +3.7
CAMunn 12.15 ... +2.3
Canadan 62.87 -.10 +8.0
CapApn 30.19 -.32 +4.0
CapDevOn14.16-.04 +3.1
Cplncrn 8.92 +.01 +2.3
ChinaRg n35.17 +.82+17.5
CngS n 509.68-2.53 +3.8
CTMunrn11.23 ... +1.9
Contra n 74.58 +.01 +52
CnvScn 29.44 -.12 +4.8
DisEq n 31.83 -.20 +3.2
DivMntln 42.07 +.11 +5.5
DivSkOn17.26 -.06 +3.2
DivGthn 31.86 -.14 +1.3
EmrMkn 32.39 +.36+12.2
Eqlncn 61.41 -.44 +1.5
EQIIn 25.11 -.19 +22
ECapAp 30.67 +.04 +6.9
Europe 43.92 -.04 +6.4
Exch n 358.66-2.32 +3.3
Export n 25.99 -.06 +4.8
Fideln 39.77 -.10 +4.4
Fiftyrn 23.36 -.16 +2.4
FItRateHirn9.71 +.01 +1.7
FLMurn 11.30 +.01 +1.9
FrlnOnen31.73 -.11 +25
GNMAn 10.72 +.01 +0.6
Govfinc 10.10 ... +0.9
GroCon 81.76 +.07 +6.1
Grolncn 30.03 -.24 +2.5
Grolnclln 11.88 -.07 +4.0
Highlnc rn 8.87 +.02 +2.5
Indepn n 26.66 -.09 +7.3
IntBdn 10.13 ... +0.9
IntGovn 10.07 +.01 +1.0
IntlDiscn 43.76 +.22 +6.2
lnIlSCprn28.11 +.13 +3.1
InvGB n 7.20 ... +1.0
Japan n i- 11 +.04 -2.0
JpnSmn 11 ". +.02 -1.8
LatAmn 59.19 +.75+10.9
LevCoStk n33.37 -.20 +4.8
LowPrn 43.89 -.17 +2.3
Magellnn 97.39 -.37 +5.0
MDMurn10.73 ... +2.1
MA Mun n11.72 ... +2.1
MIMunn 11.69 ... +1.8
MidCapn31.58 -.13 +2.9
MN Munn11.21 ... +1.8
MtgSecn 10.61 ... +1.0
Munilncn 12.56 +.01 +2.1
NJMunrnH1.39 ... +2.0
NwMktrnl4.65 -.01 +3.5
NwMill n 3293 ... +4.1
NYMunn 1261 ... +21
OTCn 50.22 +.05 +5.4
Oh Munn 11.42 ... +2.1
100lndex 11.03 -.05 +3.2
Ovrsean 52.81 +28 +6.5
PcBasn 33.03 +.22 +6.7
PAMunrnlO.66 ... +1.7
Puritn n 20.98 -.08 +2.0
RealEn 31.21 +.50 +4.6
StIntMu n 10.22 ... +0.9
STBFn 8.69 ... +1.0
SmCaplnd r23.54-.13+2.9
Sml]CpSrnl9.63-.14 +0.9
SEAsian 42.21 +.62+13.3
StkSIcn 31.19 -.18 +4.0
Stratlncn 10.57 +.01 +1.9
StrReRIr 10.23 +.03 +3.8
TotalBd n 10.29 ... +1.0
Trendn 72.71 -.10 +5.1
USBIn 10.77 ... +0.8
Utilityn 21.14 -.04 +2.5
ValSlratn35.35 -.22 +2.0
Value n 87.84 -.50 +1.7
WrIdwn 23.21 +.02 +5.3
Fidelity Selects:
Airn 51.77 -.72 +0.7
Banking n31.10 -.42 -1.2
Biotchn 69.88 +.10 +6.2
Brokrn 69.95-1.00 +2.6
Chem n 82.52 -.47 +4.8
ComEquip n24.06-.07 +4.9
Compn 47.19 +.58 +42
ConDisn 25.32 -.13 +1.4




EngSvn 100.47-1.36+11.8
Envirn 18.74 -.01 +6.4
FinSvn 113.39-1.37 -0.2
Goldrn 41.93-.20+24.1
Health n 133.38 -.23 +3.7
HoroF n 40.32 -.82 -25
Insurn 71.10 -.69 +0.6
Lelesrn 83.50 -.01 +4.2
Material n 58.74 -.24 +6.7
MedDilnv 51.30 +.01 +1.1
MdEqSysn26.28 -.02 +52
MultmAd n 43.32 -.37 -0.6
NtGasn 46.07 -.33 +8.2
Paper n 33.51 -.25 +0.2
Pharmn 11.73 -.05 +2.3
Retail n 51.37 -.32 +1.4
Softwrn 72.48 -.03 +4.1
Techn 81.50 +10 +5.7
Tealcn 58.85 +.19 +3.5
Trans n 52.43 -.72 -2.5
UtilGrn 62.27 +.23 +3.1
Wireless n 9.41 +.05 +7.7
Fdelity Spartan:
Eqldxlnvn53.93 -.29 +2.8
500lnxlnv r n105.66-.55+2.8
lntalnxlnvn48.76 +.05 +4.0
TotMktlnv n42.79-.23 +2.6
Fidelity Spart Adv:
EqldxAd n53.94 -.28 +2.8
500Ad r n105.67 -.55 +2.8
TotMklAd r n42.80-.22 +2.8
First Eagle:
GIbIA 49.11 +.07 +2.2
OverseasA 27.14 +.09 +2.5
First Investors A
BIChpAp 25.52 -.14 +2.4
GloblAp 8.69 +.03 +6.4


GovtAp 10.63 -.01 +0.4
GrolnAp 16.82 -.14 +1.8
IncoAp 3.00 +.01 +1.6
MATFAp 11.54 +.01 +2.0
MITFAp 11.97 ... +1.9
MidCpAp31.10 -.31 +2.1
NJTFAp 12.62 ... +1.9
NYTFAp 14.07 ... +1.9
PATFAp 12.63 ... +1.7
SpSitAp 24.18 -.23 -0.5
TxExA p 9.68 ... +1.7
TotRtAp 15.90 -.07 +1.3
ValueBp 8.15 -.05 +1.0
Firsthand Funds:
GIbTech 5.10 +.01 +2.8
Tech Val 43.57 -.02 +4.4
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUS p 8.87 ... +0.5
ALTFAp 11.29 ... +1.9
AZTFAp 10.86 ... +2.0
Ballnvp 68.41 -.50 +0.8
CallnsAp 12.50 ... +2.0
CA IntA p 11.40 ... +1.8
CarTFAp 7.21 ... +2.1
CapGrA 13.21 -.05 +3.5
COTFAp11.80 +.01 +2.3
CTTFAp 10.87 ... +1.8


Ho6T RADTH UTALFUD ABE


Here are the 1 000 Oiggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq Tables
show Ihe tund name sell price or Net Assel Value (NAV) and dailt
net charge, as well as one total return figure as follows

Tues: 4-wk loial return |(:)
Wed: 12-mo total return (%:I
Thu: 3-yr cumulative olal return P'i
Fri: 5-yr cumulative Ictal return 0=.l

Name: Name ol mulual fund and I~armily
NAV: Net asser salue
Chg: Net cnange in price ot NAV
Total return: Peicent change in NAV for ihe tirme period srownr. with
dividends reinvesied if period longer than 1 year, return is Cumula
live
Data oased or, NAVs reported to Lipper oy 6 p m Eastern
Footnotes: e - Ex-capital gains dslriunion I - Previous days quole
n - No-load fund p - Fund assets used to pay. dsrinDution cosis r -
Redemption tee or contingent referredd sales load may apply s -
Stoc divid - Bnd spil - Both d r x - Ex-cash dvvidend NA
No inlormarion available NE � Daisa in, questions NN � Fund does not
wasrh o oe racked NS - Fund did not exist at slart dale Source:
Lipper, Inc. and The Associated Press


CvtScAp 16.99 -.05 +2.1
DblTFA 11.76 +.01 +1.9
DynTchA 31.84 +.05 +6.5
EqlncAp 22.65 -.17 +1.7
Fedintp 11.33 +.01 +2.0
FedTFAp 11.92 ... +1.9
FLTFA p 11.67 ... +1.6
FoundAlIp 14.42 -.02 +1.7
GATFAp 11.91 ... +1.8
GoldPrM A 38.27 -.02+22.9
GrwthA p 45.65 -.21 +2.4
HYTFAp 10.63 ... +2.1
IncomAp 2.74 -.01 +2.3
InsTFAp 12.09 +.01 +2.0
NYITFp 10.77 ... +1.6
LATFAp 11.38 +.01 +1.7
LMGvScA 9.97 ... +0.8
MDTFA p11.51 ... +2.5
MATFAp 11.68 ... +2.0
MITFAp 12.06 +.01 +1.6
MNInsA 11.92 ... +1.9
MOTFAp 12.05 ... +2.0
NJTFAp 11.96 ... +2.1
NYInsAp 11.32 +.01 +2.3
NYTFAp 11.62 +.01 +1.7
NCTFAp 12.06 +.01 +2.1
OhiolAp 12.40 ... +2.1
ORTFAp 11.70 +.01 +2.0
PATFAp 10.25 ... +1.8
ReEScAp21.50 +.12 +0.6
RisDvAp 37.19 -.25 +0.7
SMCpGrA44.10 -.19 +3.9
USGovA p 6.38 -.01 +0.4
UtilsAp 14.71 -.02 +2.7
VATFAp 11.60 +.01 +1.7
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
IncrmeAd 2.73 ... +2.3
Frank/Temp Frnk B:
IncomeBt 2.73 -.01 +2.3
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
FoundA p 14.15 -.02 +1.6
IncomrCt 2.76 ... +2.3
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
BeacnA 17.24 -.08 +0.5
DiscA 33.22 -.02 +2.2
QualfdAt 23.53 -.01 +0.7
SharesA 27.03 -.10 +1.0
Frank/Temp Mtl C:
DiscC t 32.84 -.02 +2.1
SharesCt26.62 -.10 +0.9
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 34.20 +.64+13.5
ForgnAp 15.23 +.10 +6.3
GIBdAp 11.56 +.02 +4.1
GrwthAp 26.56 -.05 +1.7
IntxEMp 21.39 ... 0.0
WordA p 20.80 +.02 +3.8
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 26.63 -.05 +1.7
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 33.33 +.62+13.4
ForgnCp 14.94 +.10 +6.3
GrwthCp 25.78 -.05 +1.7
GE Elfun S&S:
S&S PM 50.85 -.25 +3.1
GMOTrust III:
EmMkr 25.65 +.17 +92
For 19.60 -.04 +3.2
IntlnrtV 37.83 -.05 +4.0
GMO Trust IV:
EmrMkt 25.58 +.17 +9.3
Foreign 19.61 -.04 +3.2
IntlGrEq 33.91 +.03 +4.7
IntlIntrVi 37.82 -.05 +4.0
GMO Trust VI:
EmgMktsr25.60 +.17 +9.2
InfllndxPi 25.14 -.06 0.0
IntlCorEq 42.81 -.03 +4.0
USQItyEq 22.72 -.08 +2.4
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 53.48 -.32 +2.8
Gateway Funds:
Gateway 28.78 -.07 +1.2
Goldman Sachs A:
HYMuAp 10.76 ... +2.4
MdCVA p 40.93 -.20 +2.2
Goldman Sachs Inst:
HYMuni n 10.76 ... +2.4
MidCapV 41.35 -.21 +2.2
Struint 16.79 -.02 +3.7
Harbor Funds:
Bond 11.74 ... +1.6
CapAplnst 36.64 -.06 +5.0
Int r 72.73 +.48 +6.0
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 43.77 -.02 +6.9
DivGthAp 23.03 -.13 +2.8
Hartford Fds C:
CapApC 139.75 -.02 +6.8
Hartford Fds L:
GrwOppL 36.22 -.05 +6.9
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 60.35 ... +7.0
Div&Gr 25.03 -.16 +2.8
Advisers 24.11 -.07 +2.2
Stock 56.86 -.29 +2.8
TotRetBd 11.52 +.01 +1.3
Hartford HLS IB:
CapAppp59.91 -.01 +6.9
Hennessy Funds:
CorGroll 29.93 -.12 +4.6
HollBalFdn17.28 -.06 +1.6
Hotchkis & Wiley:
LgCpVIAp24.59 -.22 -1.4
MldCpVal 27.85 -.28 -1.6
HussmnStrGr 16.33+.04+0.6
ICON Fds:
Energy 41.76 -.32 +9.5
Hlthcare 17.57 -.01 +3.3
ISI Funds:
NoArmp 7.43 ... +1.1
Ivy Funds:
GINatRsA p 39.94-.02+11.7
JPMorgan A Class:
MCpValp27.08 -.12 +0.9
JPMorgan Select:
InEq n 40.32 -.06 +3.1
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
IntrdAmer n29.74-.22 +2.1
Janusa:
Balanced 26.21 -.03 +2.4
Contrarian 19.86 +.09 +4.9
Enterpr 55.59 -.16 +3.7
FedTE 6.49 ... +1.9
FlxBnd 9.39 ... +0.9
Fund 32.11 ... +4.4
FundaEq 28.98 -.06 +4.2
GI UleSdc 23.05 +.04 +4.1
GiTechdr 15.01 ... +3.9
Grlnc 42.39 +.01 +4.3
MdCpVal 26.02 -.13 +1.8
Orion 1244 +.05 +5.4
Ovrseasr 57.06 +.34+10.0
Research 30.18 -.02 +4.6
ShTmBd 2.88 ... +1.1
Twenty 67.46 +.18 +9.4
Ventur 71.47 -.24 +3.9
WrldW r 56.72 -.25 +2.4
Janus Adv S Shrs:
Forty 38.27 +.22 +9.7
JennisonDryden A:
BlendA 21.11 -.07 +4.3
HiYndAp 5.67 +.01 +2.3
InsuredA 10.55 ... +2.1
UtiityA 16.18 -.02 +3.8
JennisonDryden B:
GrowthB 16.31 -.03 +4.9
HiYldBt 5.66 +.01 +2.2
InsuredB 10.57 ... +2.1
John Hancock A:
BondAp 14.67 +.01 +0.8
ClassicVl p 27.29 -.28 -2.1
RgBkA 35.18 -.49 -1.4
StrMnAp 6.56 +.01 +1.7
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.56 +.01 +1.6
John Hancock ClI1:
LSAggr 16.20 ... NA
LSBaanc 15.18 -.01 +2.8
LSGrwth 15.94 ... NA
Julius Baer Funds:
IntEql r 49.25 -.03+4.8
IntlEqA 48.186 -.02 +4.8
IntEqll r 17.01 -.01 +5.1
KeelSmCpp29.12 ... NA
LSWalEqn19.88 -.20 +1.0
Lazard Insth:
EmgMk6l 25.56 +.20+10.0
Legg Mason: Fd
OpporTr 120.45 -.32 +2.6
Splnvp 40.07 -.43 +1.4
ValTrp 73.06 -.41 +2.6
Legg Mason Instl:
ValTrinst 81.97 -.46 +2.6
Legg Mason Ptrs A:
AgGrA p119.74-1.03 +3.8
ApprAp 16.55 -.06 +2.3
HilncAt 6.67 ... NA
InAlCGAp 15.24 +.03 +3.0
LgCpGA p26.04 -.05 +4.9
MgMuAp15.52 ... +1.5
Legg Mason Ptrs B:
CaplncB 117.73 ... NA
LgCpGBt24.17 -.05 +4.8
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 37.41 -.20 +1.8
[nst 21.60 -.05 +2.0
SmCap 33.44 -.26 +0.7


Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.68 +.04 +2.7
StrIncC 15.20 +.03 +2.6
LSBondR 14.63 +.03 +2.6
StrincA 15.15 +.04 +2.7
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 16.16 -.10 +3.3
BdDebAp 8.07 +.01 +2.2
MidCpAp 23.33 -.16 +0.1
MFS Funds A:
MITA 22.55 -.10 +3.4
MIGA 15.25 -.04 +3.2
HilnA 3.80 +.01 +2.6
IntNwDA 30.06 -.05 +3.1
MFLA 9.88 ... +1.7
TotRA 16.79 -.08 +1.2
ValueA 28.92 -.21 +2.2
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 13.77 -.04 +3.2
GvScB n 9.43 ... +0.9
HilnBn 3.81 +.01 +2.6
MulnB n 8.43 ... +1.9
ToIRBn 16.78 -.07 +1.2
MFS Funds Insti:
IntlEq n 21.65 -.06 +2.1
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 6.33 +.01 +1.9
MainStay Funds B:
CapApB 133.69 -.05 +4.4
ConvBt 16.71 -.01 +4.6
GovtBt 8.17 ... +0.5
HYIdBBt 6.29 ... +1.7
IntlEqB 16.44 -.05 +1.5
SmCGB p 16.06 -.16 +2.6
TotRtBt 19.85 -.05 +2.2
Mairs & Power:
Growth 83.76 -.54 +2.4
Marsico Funds:
Focus p 21.64 +.19 +8.7
Growp 22.83 +.09 +6.8
Msatthews Asian:
India r 20.37 +.29+17.2
PacTiger 29.57 +.22 +8.6
Mellon Funds:
IntiFd 17.77 +.01 +1.4
Midas Funds:
Midas Fd 5.34 +.05+22.8
Monetta Funds:
Monetta n15.66 ... +7.0
Morgan Stanley A:
DivGthA 21.54 -.10 +3.1
Morgan Stanley B:
DivGtB 21.69 -.10 +3.1
GIbDivB 16.87 -.08 +1.9
StratB 21.15 -.05 +2.7
MorganStanley Inst:
EmMktn 37.75 +.44+13.5
GIVaIEqA n21.54-.09 +1.9
In/Eq n 22.26 -.03 +2.0
Munder Funds A:
IntemtA 23.94 -.01 +5.6
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 17.38 -.08 +0.5
DiscZ 33.63 -.02 +2.2
GQualfdZ 23.72 -.01 +0.8
SharesZ 27.28 -.09 +1.0
Neuberger&Berm Inv:
Focus 33.72 -.30 +3.2
Geneslnst 52.95 -.41 +2.3
Int r 26.08 -.06 +2.7
Partner 33.54 -.21 +4.0
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 55.17 -.43 +2.3
Nicholas Group:
Hilncin 10.65 +.02 +2.0
Nich n 57.03 -21 +0.3
Northern Funds:
SmCpldxn11.03 -.10 +0.9
Technlyn 14.14 -.05 +4.3
Nuveen Cl A:
HYMuBd p 2147 +.02 +2.7
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG n37.97-.07 +4.2
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncrn28.32 -.13 +2.5
Global n 27.69 -.10 +1.6
Intlirn 26.17 -.08 -0.6
Oakmark r n47.22-.40 +1.5
Select r n 32.93 -.31 +0.6
Old Mutual Adv II:
Tc&ComZn16.35+.04 +5.3
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 9.47 ... +3.4
AMTFrNY 12.61 +.01 +3.5
CAMuniAp 10.81 ... +2.8
CapApAp 53.05 -.05 +5.4
CaplncAp13.07-.07 +0.6
ChmplncA p9.36 +.03 +3.1
DvMktA p51.98 +.28+10.3
Discp 56.20 -.17 +5.9
EquityA 12.44 -.06 +4.3
GlobAp 79.70 -.33 +3.6
GIbOppA 40.51 +.01 +3.7
Gold p 36.79 +.17+21.4
IntBdAp 6.35 +.01 +2.9
MnStFdA 44.44 -.22 +2.7
MnStOAp 16.06 -.09 +2.5
MSSCAp22.96 -.25 +0.1
MidCapA 20.80 ... +4.6
PAMun'Ap12.52 ... +3.4
S&MdCpVI 41.60-.24 +1.7
StrlnAp 4.39 ... +2.3
USGv p 9.42 +.01 +0.7
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 9.43 ... +3.3
AMTFrNY12.62 +.02 +3.4
CplncBt 12.93 -.07 +0.5
ChmplncB 19.35 +.04 +3.0
EquityB 11.75 -.06 +4.3
StrlncBt 4.41 +.01 +2.5
Oppenheim Quest:
QBalA 19.35 -.12 +0.8
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.32 ... +1.9
RoMuAp17.97 +.01 +3.3
RcNIMuA 11.63 ... +2.8
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
TotRIAd 10.45 ... +2.0
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AllAsset 12.96 ... +3.5
ComodRR 15.12 +.03+10.2
DevLcMkr 11.25 +.01 +3.6
Fltlncr 10.27 +.01 +2.5
HiYd 9.66 +.01 +2.5
LowDu 10.02 ... +1.7
RealRtnl 10.84 -.01 +1.7
TotRt 10.45 ... +2.0
PIMCO Funds A:
RealRtAp 10.84-.01 +1.7
TotRtA 10.45 ... +2.0
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtn p 10.45 ... +2.0
PhoenixFunds A:
BalanA 15.17 -.06 +1.8
CapGrA 17.35 -.06 +3.6
Pioneer Funds A:
BondA p 9.06 ... +0.6
EurSelEqA 43.12 -.32 -0.4
GrwthAp 15.18 -.05 +2.2
IntlValA 27.54 +.06 +4.4
MdCpGrA 17.13 -.08 +2.2
PionFdA p52.06 -.38 +3.0
TxFreAp 11.24 +.01 +3.4
ValueAp 18.25 -.17 +2.2
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 11.43 -.02 +2.2
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYdCt 11.54 -.02 +2.2
Price Funds Adv:
EqIncp 30.64 -.19 +1.6
Growth p n34.78 -.08 +4.1
Price Funds:
Balance n22.43 -.07 +2.4
BlChipn 40,65 .10 +4.9
CABondnlO.82 ... +2.1
CapAppn21.84 -.07 +1.3
DivGron 27.19 -.15 +2.3
EmEurp 36.21 +.09 +7.8
EmMktS n42.60 +.39+13.2
Eqlncn 30.72 -.19 +1.6
Eqlndexn40.84 -.22 +2.7
Europe n 22.69 -.07 +4.4
GNMA n 9.32 -.01 +0.6
Growth 35.10 -.08 +4.1
Gr&ln n 23.32 -.08 +2.9
HlthSdn 29.64 ... +3.4
HiYield n 6.93 +.02 +2.4
In/lBondn 10.01 +.02 +2.6
IntDisn 54.66 +.10 +5.1
IntlStkn 18.58 +.03 +5.1

MDShrtn 5.13 ... +0.7
MDBond nlO.39 ... +2.1
MCapVal n26.54 -.20 +0.8
N Amer n 35.68 -.22 +4.0
New Eran61.21 -.12+10.5
NHonzn 35.71 -22 +2.6
N Incn 8.87 ... +0.8
NYBondnl1.11 ... +2.0
ReulEstun 23.61 +.38 +5.0


R2025n 13.93 -.04 +2.7


R2030n 20.19 -.07 +2.8
SciTec n 24.34 -.03 +3.8
ShtBd n 4.70 ... +0.8
SmCpStk n35.86 -.30 +1.0
SroCapVal n43.11-.31 +0.6
SpecGrn 22.48 -.08 +3.5
Specln n 12.24 ... +1.5
TFIncn 9.82 ... +2.1
TxFrHn 11.67 ... +2.1
TxFrSI n 5.33 ... +1.0
USTIntn 5.32 ... +0.7
USTLgn 1133 +.02 +0.5
VABondn11.40 +.01 +21
Value n 28.77 -.19 +1.9
Principal Inv:
DiscLCInst l17.43 -.10 +3.3
LgGriN 9.18 -.02 +5.8
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 8.97 +.01 +0.6
AZTE 9.03 ... +1.6
Convpx 20.68 -.17 +2.6
DiscGr 22_48 -.18 +1.6
DvrlnAp 9.86 +.01 +0.7
EqlnApx 18.70 -.23 +1.7
EuEq 32.86 -.18 +3.0
GeoAp 18.41 -.10 +0.7
GIbEqtyp 12.55 -.10 +4.2
GrInA p 20.29 -.22 +0.8
HIthAp 60.12 -.02 +2.6
HiYdAp 7.96 +.03 +2.6
HYAdAp 6.18 +.02 +2.5
IncmAp 6.72 +.01 +0.4
IntlEq p 34.58 -.07 +3.7
IntGrln p 17.16 -.06 +2.8
InvA p 15.52 -.17 +2.4
NJTxAp 9.12 ... +1.8
NwOpAp 53.06 -.23 +3.8
OTCAp 10.20 -.09 +1.0
PATE 8.99 +.01 +1.8
TxExAp 8.62 ... +1.7
TFInAp 14.62 ... +1.8
TFHYA 12.71 +.01 +1.6
USGvA p 13.12 .. +0.4
UtilApx 15.23 -.04 +3.7
VslaAp 12.05 -.06 +3.0
VoyAp 19.14 -.11 +2.9
Putnam Funds B:
CapAprt 21.13 -.23 +1.3
DiscGr 20.43 -.18 +1.4
DvrinBt 9.78 +.01 +0.6
Eqlnctx 18.54 -.20 +1.6
EuEq 31.70 -.17 +3.0
GeoBt 18.23 -.69 +0.7
GIbEqt 11.41 -.08 +4.2
GINtRst 35.66 -.20 +9.3
GrlnBt 19.99 -.21 +0.7
HIthBt 53.07 -.02 +2.5
HiYIdBt 7.93 +.03 +2.5
HYAdBt 6.09 +.02 +2.5
IncmBt 6.67 +.01 +0.3
IntGrlnt 16.81 -.06 +2.8
IntlNopt 17.97 -.03 +4.5
nvBt 14.13 -.14 +2.4
NJTxBt 9.11 ... +1.7
NwOpBt 46.96 -.22 +3.7
NwValp 19.55 -.23 +1.1
OTCBt 8.88 -.08 +0.9
TxExBt 8.62 ... +1.7
TFHYBt 12.73 +.01 +1.6
TFInBt 14.64 ... +1.8
USGvBt 13.05 ... +0.3
UtilBx 15.16 -.02 +3.6
VistaBt 10.36 -.05 +2.9
VoyBt 16.53 -.10 +2.9
RS Funds:
CoreEqA 42.23 -.24 +3.4
IntGrA 20.80 ... +4.5
RSPart 35.08 -.23 +1.2
Value 28.78 -.13 +1.6
Rainier Inv Mgt:
SmMCap 45.41 ... NA
RiverSource A:
BalanceAx 11.40-13 +1.4
DEIx 14.23 -.14 +2.6
DvOppAx 9.59 -.12 +2.1
Growth 34.05 +.04 +3.6
HiYdTEA 4.30 ... +2.0
LgCpEq p 6.28 -.03 +2.6
MCpGrA 12.21 -.11 +2.6
MidCpVlp 10.04 -.06 +2.3
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSv r 17.83-.11 +2.9
MicroCapl 18.77 -.05 +3.9
PennMul r 12.29 -.09 +1.2
Premier r20.20 -.17 +3.1
TotRetIr 14.40 -.11 +0.8
VIPISvc 15.52 -.12 +2.8
Russell Funds S:
DivEq 53.70 -.18 +4.1
IntlSec 84.72 +.06 +4.3
MStratBd 10.32 +.01 +1.4
QuantEqS 42.86 -26 +2.2
Rydex Advisor:
OTCn 13.06 +.05 +4.8
SEI Portfolios:
CoreFxAn10.16 ... +0.9
IntlEqAn 15.81 +.06 +4.2
LgCGroA n23.46 -.04 +4.0
LgCValAn23.88 -.20 +1.5
TxMgLCn14.58 -.07 +2.9
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 31.35 +.38+12.5
IntlStock 15.11 ... +3.7
STI Classic:
LCpVIEqA16.06 -.11 +2.1
LCGrStkA p 13.57-.02'+4.9
LCGrStkC p12.60-02 +4.8
SelLCStkC I 28.24-.08+4.6.
SelLCpStki 30.64-.09 +4.6
Schwab Funds:
HIltCare 16.56 -.07 +1.3
1000lnvr 44.70 -.23 +2.7
10OOSel 44.72 -.23 +2.7
S&PIlnv 23.66 -.13 +2.7
S&PSel 23.76 -.13 +2.7
S&PlnslSI12.13 -.06 +2.8
SmCplnv 24.61 -.22 +0.8
YIdPIsSI 9.44 +.01 +0.5
Selected Funds:
AmrShD 48.72 -.22 +1.4
AmShSp 48.60 -.23 +1.4
Seligman Group:
CormunAt 38.06 -.10 +2.7
FrontrAt 14.81 -.11 +2.9
FrontrDt 1254 -.09 +2.9
GIbSmA 18.42 -.05 +2.0
GIbTchA 18.53 -.01 +3.7
HYdBA p 3.31 ... +22
Sentinel Group:
CornS A p 36.62-.21 +3.8
Sequoia n158.63 +14 -0.9
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 45.73 -.14 +4.5
SoundSh 41.70 -.12 +2.6
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 63.16 -.23 +3.4
Stratton Funds:
Dividend 34.05 +.34 +5.1
Multi-Cap 44.79 -.34 +3.2
SmCap 50.11 -.31 +0.8
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvB t 9.21 ... +0.5
Tamarack Funds:
EntSmCp 31.91 -.33 +1.2
Value 42.93 -.23 +3.0
Templeton Instilt:
EmMSp 25.16 +.49+14.2
ForEqS 30.19 +.07 +4.5
Third Avenue Fds:
Intl r 23.50 +.21 +0.3
RIEstVl r 33.96 +.17 +3.5
Value 65.17 +.13 +5.0
Thornburg Fds:
IntValA p 35.51 +.20 +7.0
InlValue I 36.21 +.21 +7.0
Thrivent FdsI A:
HiYId 5.03 +.01 +2.2
Income 8.47 +.02 +1.0
LgCpStk 30.34 -.21 +2.8
TA IDEX A:
TempGlbA p33.36+.02+3.7
TmCHYBp 9.13 +.03 +2.4
TAFiRsln p 9.09 +.01 +0.7
Turner Funds:
SrlCpGr n32.52 -.23 +3.7
Tweedy Browne:
GlobVal 33.86 -.07 +1.4
UBS Funds Cl A:
GlobAlot 15.02 -.03 +2.3
UMB Scout Funds:
Intl 37.28 -.02 +4.6
US Global Investors:
AJIAm 29.86 +.26 +8.7
GIbRs 19.12 +.15+13.7
GIdShr 17.58 -.12+24.0
USChina 16.19 +.42+22.0
WIdPrcMn 31.10 -.11+20.7
USAA Group:
AgvGt 37.54 +.11 +6.3
CABd 10.73 +.01 +3.2
CmstStr 28.55 -.05 +3.2
GNMA 9.47 -.01 +0.5
GrTxSIr 14.63 -.03 +2.7
Giwlth 17.18 +.02 +5.9
Gr&lnc 19.97 -.11 +2.5
IncStk 17.24 -.14 +1.4
Inco 12.03 +.01 +0.7
Intl 29.30 -.05 +2.1


- Nfl N

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NYBd 11.69 ... +2.5
PrecMM 33.22 -.21+22.2
SciTech 13.24 -.01 +3.5
ShtTBnd 8.88 +.01 +0.7
SmCpStk 15.67 -.13 +0.2
TxElt 12.94 +.01 +2.5
TxELT 13.53 +.01 +3.1
TxESh 10.55 .. +0.9
VABd 11.20 ... +2.8
WIdGr 21.62 -.08 +2.5
VALIC:
MdCpldx 25.50 -.19 +1.4
SIkldx 39.65 -.21 +2.7
Value Line Fd:
LrgCo n 24.59 -.03 +4.5
Van Kamp Funds A:
CATFAp 17.74 ... +3.2
CmstAp 19.62 -.16 +0.4
CpBdAp 6.47 +.01 +0.7
EqlncAp 9.36 -.04 +1.1
Exch 489.95-2.80 +4.6
GrInAp 22.87 -.15 +1.2
HarbAp 16.49 -.02 +2.9
HiYIdA 10.54 +.02 +2.1
HYMuAp 10.71 ... +2.1
InTFAp 17.64 +.01 +3.4
MunlAp 14.22 +.01 +2.8
PATFAp 16.78 ... +2.7
StrGrwth 49.05 +.05 +6.5
StrMunlnc 12.89 ... +2.6
US MtgeA13.14 -.01 +0.7
UtilAp 24.53 -.02 +2.5
Van Kamp Funds B:
EnterpBt 14.47 -.02 +4.6
EqlncBt 9.20 -.04 +1.1
HYMuBt 10.71 ... +2.0
MulB 14.20 +.01 +2.7
PATFBt 16.73 +.01 +2.7
StrGwth 41.27 +.05 +6.4
StrMunlnc 12.89 +.01 +2.6
USMtge 13.08 -.01 +0.6
UtilB 24.43 -.01 +2.5
Vanguard Admiral:
CAITAdmnlO.87 ... +1.8
CpOpAdl n97.48 -.04 +4.7
Energy n152.88 -.18+10.0
EuroAdml n95.63-.34 +3.9
ExplAdmln75.61 -.51 +1.8
ExtdAdm n41.80 -.27 +2.0
500Adml n139.76-.73 +2.8
GNMAAd n10.16-.01 +0.6
GrolncAd n62.69-.40 +3.6
GrwAdmnro 32.96 -.07 +3.7
HIthCrn 64.38 -.10 +1.9
HiYOdCpn 6.06 +.02 +2.5
InfProAd n23.35 -.02 +1.2
ITBdAdmlnl10.22+.01 +0.9
lTsryAdml n10.90+.01 +0.9
IntGrAdm n86.44 +.11 +4.8
ITAdml n 13.16 +.01 +1.8
ITGrAdm n 9.63 +.01 +0.7
LtdTrAdn 10.71 ... +0.9
MCpAdml n97.49-.52 +1.5
MorgAdm n66.02-.22 +3.7
MuHYAdm n10.60+.01 +2.4
PrmCap r n80.08 -.34 +3.8
ReitAdm rn102.36+1.73
+5.8
STBdAdml n9.97 ... +0.8
ShtTrAd n15.61 ... +0.6
STIGrAd n10.57 ... +0.7
SroCAdm n34.65 -.28 +1.4
TxMCap r n73.64-.40 +2.7
TtlBAdmln 9.96 ... +0.8
TStkAdm n36.52 -.20 +2.6
ValAdml n27.77 -.23 +1.9
WellslAdm n53.87-.11 +1.4
WelltnAdm n59.54-.19 +2.6
Windsorn64.64 -.57 +0.7
WdsrilAd n66.10 -.47 +1.7
Vanguard Fds:
AssetA n 30.74 -.13 +2.3
CALTn 11.44 ... +2.6
CapOppn42.17 -.02 +4.7
Convitn 14.56 -.04 +2.9
DivdGro n15.60 -.07 +2.5
Energyn 81.37 -.09+10.0
Eqlncn 26.94 -.20 +2.5
Explrn 81.12 -.55 +1.8
FLLTn 11.43 ... +1.9
GNMAn 10.16 -.01 +0.6
GlobEqn 26.11 -.12 +3.9
Grolnc n 38.38 -.25 +3.6
GrthEq n 12.95 +.03 +6.7
HYCorp n 6.06 +.02 +2.5
HlthCren152.45 -.26 +1.9
InflaPron 11.89 -.01 +1.3
IntlExpirn 22.96 -.05 +1.9
IntlGrn 27.13 +.04 +4.8
IntsValn 45.22 +.01 +3.8
ITIGraden 9.63 +.01 +0.7
ITTsryn 10.90 +.01 +0.9
LifeConn 17.25 -.03 +1.8
UfeGro n 25.72 -.09 +2.7
Lifelncn 1422 -.01 +1.3
LifeModn21.63 -.06 +2.2
LTIGrade n8.89 +.02 +0.8
LTrsryn 11.01 +.01 +0.7
Morg n 21.27 -.07 +3.7
MuHYn 10.60 +.01 +2.4
MulnsLgn12.34 ... +2.3
Muintn 13.16 +.01 +1.8
MuLtdn 10.71 ... +0.9
MuLongn11.05 +.01 +2.4
MuShrtn 15.61 ... +0.5
NJLTn 11.63 +.01 +2.4
NYLTn 11.03 +.01 +2.2
OHLTTEnl1.78 ... +2.0
PALTn 11.11 ... +2.1
PrecMtlsrn35.11+.14+13.8
PrmcpCor n13.95-.05 +3.5
Prmcprn77.10 -.33 +3.8
SelValu r n21.71 -.12 -0.8
STARn 22.17 -.06 +2.0
STIGrade n10.57 ... +0.7
STFedn 10.38 ... +1.0
STTsryn 10.41 ... +0.8
StralEq n 24.79 -.27 +0.6
TgtRe2025 n14.13-.05 +2.5
TgtRe215 n13.39-.04+2.2
TgtRe235n15.11-.06 +2.8
USGron 20.15 -.01 +4.3
USValue n15.36 -.12 +1.5
Wellslyn 22.23 -.05 +1.4
Welltnn 34.47 -.12 +2.6
Wndsrn 19.15 -.17 +0.7
Wndsll n 37.23 -.27 +1.7
Vanguard Idx Fds:
500 n 139.75 -.74 +2.7
Balanced n22.27 -.07 +1.9
DevMktn 13.95 -.01 +3.5
EMktn 31.95 +.29+11.4
Europe n 40.69 -.14 +3.9
Extend n 41.74 -.26 +2.0
Growth n 32.96 -.07 +3.7
ITBndn 10.22 +.01 +0.9
LgCaplxn27.36 -.14 +2.8
MidCapn21.47 -.11 +1.5
Pacific n 13.23 +.08 +2.6
REFTrn 23.99 +.41 +5.7
SmCap n 34.61 -.28 +1.4
SmlCpGth n20.64-.15 +2.4
SmICpVln17.00 -.16 +0.2
STBnd n 9.97 ... +0.8

TotStk n 36.52 -.20 +2.6
Value n 27.77 -.23 +1.9
Vanguard InstI Fds:
Ballnstn 22.27 -.07 +1.9
DvMktlnst n13.83-.01 +3.4
Eurolnst n40.76 -.14 +3.9
Extlnn 41.82 -.27 +2.0
Grwthlstn32.96 -.07 +3.7

TotlBdldx n50.21 ... +0.8
InsTStPlus n32.94-.17 +2.7

TBIstn 9.96 ... +0.8

Vanguard Signal:
Vantagepolnt Fds:
Victory Funds:
WM Blair Mtl Fds:
IntlGulIr 32.59 +.15 +6.5
Waddell & Reed Adv:
CorelnvA 6.93 -.04 +4.7
ScTechA 13.17 ... +4.3
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 40.05 -.08 +4.4
Weltz Funds:
Value 36.64 -.24 -1.5
Wells Fargo Adv:
Opptylnv 45.22 -.31 +2.1
SCApValZ p35.39-.28+3.4
Western Asset:
CorePlus 10.25 ... +1.1
Core 11.05 -.01 +0.9
WIlliam Blair N:
GrowthN 12.98 -.04 +4.2
IntlGthN 32.05 +.15 +6.5


Stocks finish lower


Associated Press


NEW YORK - Wall Street
retreated Monday, taking a
break from last week's big
advances, as financial stocks
fell amid fresh concerns about
soured loans.
With little fresh data to go on
Monday, investor enthusiasm
weakened by midsession and
sectors from banks to home-
builders showed declines,
while technology stocks fared
better
Stocks began to give up their
gains after the International
Monetary Fund warned the
credit upheaval hurting inter-
national financial markets
would likely be "protracted"
and dampen growth of the
global economy.
While its stock didn't fall
sharply, General Motors Corp.
shares lost ground after the
United Auto Workers began its
first nationwide strike during
auto contract negotiations
since 1976.
In addition, the stock mar-
ket's pullback might have
been expected following
gains last week of more than
2.5 percent in the major stock


Market watch
September 24, 2007

Dow Jones -61.13
industrials 13,759.06


Nasdaq -3.27
composite 2,667.95

Standard & -8.02
Poor's 500 1,517.73


Russell
2000


-7.31

805.80


NYSE diary
Advanced: 1,279
Declined: 2,008
Unchanged: 100

Volume: 1,350,207,470

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 938
Declined: 1,631
Unchanged: 82
Volume: 1,840,073,896

SOURCE: SunGard AP

market averages.
"I think you're seeing some
profit taking after last week's
rally," said Scott Fullman,
director of investment strategy
at Israel A Englander & Co.


Rates at auction fall


Six-month bills


reach lowest


level in a month


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Interest
rates on short-term Treasury
bills fell in Monday's auction
with the rate on six-month bills
dropping to the lowest level in
a month.
The Treasury Department
auctioned $16 billion in three-
month bills at a discount rate
of 3.820 percent, down from
4.050 percent last week.
Another $13 billion in six-
month bills was auctioned at a
discount rate of 4.000 percent,
down from 4.130 percent last
week.
The three-month rate was
the lowest since these bills



Airport


Transportation

637-5909


R SEE



WEHVETE IH


averaged 3.800 percent two
weeks ago. The six-month rate
was the lowest since 3.950 per-
cent on Aug. 20.
The discount rates reflect
that the bills sell for less than
face value. For a $10,000 bill,
the three-month price was
$9,903.44 while a six-month bill
sold for $9,797.78.
Separately, the Federal
Reserve said the average yield
for one-year Treasury bills fell
to 4.11 percent last week from
4.15 percent the previous
week.


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"You have consumer confi-
dence that is something being
closely watched, and you''e
seeing a general end of quarter
nervousness."
According to preliminary
calculations, the Dow Jones
industrials fell 61.13, or 0.44
percent, to 13,759.06.
Broader indicators fell, with
the Standard & Poor's 500
index declining 8.02, or 0.53
percent, to 1,517.73, while the
Nasdaq composite index lost
3.27, or 0.12 percent, to 2,667.95.
Bonds edged higher, with the
yield on the benchmark 10-
year Treasury note falling to
4.62 percent from 4.63 percent
late Friday. Treasury prices
have fallen since last week's
rate cut as investors moved
back into stocks.
The dollar fell against major
currencies, hitting a fresh low
against the euro, and gold
prices rose.
Oil prices fell as a tropical
depression in the Gulf of
Mexico dissipated without
causing damage to key oil arid
gas infrastructure. A barrel of
light, sweet crude settled down
67 cents at $80.95 on the New
York Mercantile Exchange.


NEYOK TOKXCANG


Div Name Last Chg
... SivWhtng 13.80 -.12
3.36 SimonProp 101.93 +2.06
Sirra .76 +.06
.721 SmithAO 44.83 -1.42
.40 Smilnfl 72.34 -1.66
Solectdm 3.90
.60f Sothebys 47.97 +.49
.98 SoJerlnd 35.58 -.39
1.61 SouthnCo 36.87 -.17
6.18e SthnCoppsul23.64+3.68
.02 SwstAidr 14.99 -.35
.. SwslnEngy 42.97 -.86
.32 SovrgnBcp 17.54 -.43
.88 SpectraEn 25.54 -.18
... SpritAer n 37.61 +2.36
.10 SorlnlNex 18.30 -.39
.12i StdPac d7.05 -1.05
.84 Standex 22.47 -.15
.42e StarwdHIl 58.92 +.17
.88 StateStr 66.52 -.40
.241 Steds 26.60 -.43
... Sterliten 18.00 +.24
.sTGold 72.28 -.06
.221 Sryker 67.28 -.73
SturmRug 18.66 -.65
2.85f SubPpne 45.06 +.06
2.52 SunCmts 29.79 +.01
.40 Suncorg 95.49 -.43
1.10 Sunoco 76.87 -.09
Suntech 42.19 +.71
2.92 SunTrst 76.75 -1.09


.68f Supvalu 39.70 -.15
.82 Synovus 27.81 -.57
.76 Sysco 34.41 -.21
.97 TCFFncI 26.07 +1.27
.78 TECO 16.22 +.06
.36 TJX 30.29 +.20
1.73 TXUCorp 68.00 +.01
.45 TaiwSemi 10.27 +.02
.181 TalismEgs 18.98 +.12
.56 Target 64.30 -1.35
.24 Tektronx 28.87 -.74
.40e TeiNorL 22.04 +37
4.40e TelcNZ 22.68 -.28
.79e TelMexL 32.24 -.49
.60e Tenaris 52.80 +.95
. TenetHIth 3.56 +.01
2.74 Teppco 39.15 -.13
Teradyn 14.01 -.25
... Terex 84.45 +.86
Terra u29.46 -.57
6.54e TerraNitro 117.39 -2.94
.40 Tesoros 49.64 -1.15
. TetraTech 2201 -.25
.401 Texlnst 36.46 -.16
.921 Textrons 61.48 -.85
. Theragen 4.20 -.23
. ThermoFis 5699 -.43
. ThmBet 57.55 -.13
2.72 Thombg 12.57 -.81
1.92 3MCo u91.81 +.13
.601 Tilfany 52.44 +.54
. TWCablen 31.76 +.19
.251 TimeWarn 18.12 +.03


.68f Timken 35.07 +.86
... TianMet 34.08 +.30
.60 ToddShp u23.55 -.32
. TollBros 20.07 -.89
.42e TorchEn u9.34 +19
.52 Trchmrk 61.35 -.63
2.28f TorDBkg u73.98 +.40
2.71e TotalSA 81.65 +.21
.28 TotalSys 27.79 -.24
... Transoon 112.48 -1.71
1.16 Travelers 49.58 -1.43
.16 Tredgar 17.44 -.14
1.79e TriConl 23.98 -.07
.. TrinaSol n 56.16 +427
.47e Turkcell u21.07 -.33
... TycoEec n 33.39 -.06
.60 Tycolniln 44.40 -.10
.16 Tyson 18.74 -.07
1.83e UBSAG 53.13 -.92
1.32 UDR 24.67 +.33
1.73 UILHold 32.28 -.33
...US Alrwy 25.98 -3.41
... USEC 9.76 -.64
... USG 37.46 +.61
... UltraPg 58.40 +.53
... UndrArmr 64.72 +1.61
.15 UniFrst 40.01 -.92
1.40 UnionPac 111.39 -1.48
... Unisys 6.85 -.29
I .11e UtdMicro 3.58 +.05
1.68 UPSB 75.46 -.29
... UtdRentals 30.88 -.57
1.60 USBancrp 32.92 -.18


.80 USSteel 104.06 -1.01
1.28f UtdTech 78.69 -.74
.03 UtdhltGp 49.56 -.35
.30 UnuimGrp 24.18 -.31

ValeantPh 16.52 -24
.48 ValeroE 70.87 -.18
1.26 Vectren 26.64 -.23
1.90 Ventas 42.97 +1.10
2.67e VeoiaEnv 84.25 +.95
1.72f VerizonCm 44.12 -.26
. ViacomB 37.74 -1.45
.33e VimpelCs 27.64 +.12
. Vishay 12.54 -.09
. Visteon 5.16 -.08
.Ole VivoPart 4.60 -.20
... VMware n u83.83 +4.52
1.36e Vodalone u35.16 +.01
3.601 Vomado 108.70 +2.16
1.84 VulcanM 88.02 -.80
... WCICmts 6.45 -.51
.18 Wabash 11.95 -.57
2.561 Wachovia 50.39 -.97
.88 WalMart 43.97 -.26
.381 Walgm 45.75 +.34
2.24f WAMutl 35.63 -1.16
.96 WsleMInc 37.87 -.23
.. Weathfdlnt 66.93 -2.44
1.98 WeinRIt 41.98 +58
.08 Welmn 2.37 +.02
. WellPoint 80.73 +.84
1.24f WellsFaroo 35.96 -.28


.50 Wendyss 33.64 -.07
1.08 WestarEn 24.88 -.22
1.16f WAEMInc2 12.82 +.04
.54 WstAMgdHi 6.19 +03
.66 WAstInKpp 11.68 +.03
... WDigjtIf u24.70 +.38
.24 WstnRefin 44.78 -1.96
.01e WstnUnn 21.16 +.74
.08 WestwOne 2.98 +.23
2.40 Weyerh 71.13 -.74
1.72 Whrplo 91.30 -.91
.97e WiImCS 9.63 +.34
.40 WmsCos 33.57 +.08
.46 WmsSon 31.13 +.13
1.00 Windstrm 14.31 -.14
.48f Winnbgo d24.00 -1.02
1.00 WiscEn 45.14 -27
.68 Wonngtn 21.46 -.21
1.16 Wrdgey 63.06 +.13
1.04 Wyeth 44.68 -.53
.16 Wyndham 31.32 -.78
1.52 XLCap 77.63 +1.01
.48 XTOEngy 61.77 -1.10
.92 XcelEngy 21.85 -.17
. Xerox 16.94 -.08
.04 Yamanaq 12.17 -.44
-. YInglln u24.72 +1.29
.60 YumBrdss 34.13 -.15
. ZaleCp 23.55 +.10
... Zimmer 81.49 -2.21
.49 ZweigT1 4.84 +.01


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--- -,", k-j - --l-l-, -.-. .." I


LARGE SELECTION
SHORTTERM RENTALS
PICK UP & DELIVERY









1 "I wouldn't want to belong to
any club that would accept
me as a member."

Groucho Marx


T U E vlVAl
SFPTIF.'FBLH R2 5, 200)7


M ike Arnold ........................... managing editor
Founded in 1891 Curt Ebitz ............................... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Mac Harris ... .. ............... citizen member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

PROTECT RESOURCES




Local sources




first must be




maintained


A decade ago, plans to
transfer water from Citrus
and other rural counties
into the metropolitan Tampa
Bay area led to the "local
sources first" legislation that
requires a region to utilize all
their water supplies first before
looking to other areas for water.
* The legislation also mandates
that the impacts of such trans-
fers on the environment be con-
sidered as part of any proposal
to transfer water.
While the issue at the time was
transfers to Tampa Bay, the 1998
legislation also appeared to
head off other
potential "water
wars" between THE I
rural counties and Transfer
metropolitan areas from Citri
of the state.
Now, actions by OUR 01
the St. Johns River
Water Management Bad ioea
District (SJRWMD) ago, b
are threatening to to
once again ignite
water wars that cOUR.:.,,e.:.O
would pit northern ,:.:.rmment ,
and western Flor- ,hrirr.:l
ida counties against
the rapidly growing
central Florida region that
includes Orlando and The
Villages.
The issue is transfer of surface
waters from rivers in the north
and west to cities in central
VFlorida. SJRWMD has taken the
position that the "local sources
first" legislation applies only to
groundwater and not to surface
water - a position disputed by
former state senator Nancy
Argenziano, a sponsor of the
"local sources first" legislation.
While SJRWMD says it has no
plans to move water from the

Invisible worker S
I'm calling about a thing
that was in the paper
about General Motors and
the union. Well, I'll tell you
anybody that belongs to an
automobile workers union
is crazy ... I worked there
for 10 years. I tried to get AILL
my retirement (they said),
',We don't have any record 5
Of you working here" ... I
worked in inspection, I
worked in plating and all of that ...
Paid to work
It appears after reading Sound
Off, the people of Citrus County are
going to stand up and be counted.
,-commissioner makes a huge
salary. We don't need a part-time
commissioner. If they have a busi-
ness or another job, we can't afford
them. We want and need a fulltime
Commission that works for us.
That's what they get paid for.
Moving insurance
I would like to thank my insurance
company for increasing my policy
about 65 percent from $1,700 to
over $2,800. I've been with them for
over seven years, had no claims,
always paid in full before the due
date. Time to start shopping for a
new policy. Yes, I'll be moving my
insurance on my auto, also.
Squad car use
This is in reply to people who are
constantly criticizing the sheriff's


S

u

P

a
d

N
n1
b


Withlacoochee River, during a
July 18 meeting with 37 central
Florida Cities, the river was
included among possible future
water sources for central
Florida, according to Jack
Sullivan, executive director of
the Withlacoochee Regional
Water Supply Authority.
It is irrelevant whether the
water authority has a specific
plan today, or if it is just floating
an idea. The idea is a bad one
that ought to die - quickly.
State Sen. Charlie Dean, R-
Inverness, and Rep. Ron Schultz,
R-Homosassa, have both ex-
pressed opposition
to movement of
SSUE: water across water-
of water shed boundaries
s County. and have said any
such plan would get
|INION: the legislature in-
a decade volved.
a decade We encourage our
d idea county commission-
ay. ers to also make
1ON: Go t clear their opposi-
;ne.co ,to, tion to such a plan,
)out t.:.aa 'a: and to follow the
edtorial. advice of Argen-
ziano and develop a
plan for water use
in Citrus County that makes
clear we have plans for our
water, and we don't believe it
should be siphoned off to sup-
port growth in neighboring coun-
ties.
Moving water across water-
sheds was a bad idea a decade
ago. It is a bad idea today. Our
rivers and lakes and aquifer are
all part of an interrelated eco-
logical system. We cannot tamp-
er with one part of this system
without affecting the others. Our
elected officials need to just say
no to water transfers.


0579


(office). I think criticism is
good, but I think it should
be based on facts.
The sheriff's (office) has
a very strict protocol with
regards to driving their
squad cars on personal
business. It's very, very
limited. It even requires a
dress code and it requires
that they stop if there is
an accident that they see.


And if they're near a call,
they have to answer that call. And
the cars are GPS equipped, so
there's no argument there.
We have one of the finest agen-
cies in the state. And most of the
agencies in the state - except for
the very little small ones, which
have only a few cars - let their offi-
cers take the cars home. The
response time, as noted in the
paper, is very, very low - a very,
very few minutes for a very rural
community that has great dis-
tances. The accreditations that the
agency has received and the com-
missions that the agency has
received are very laudable. Crime
rate is down and burglaries are
down. We have an agency - one of
the few in the county - that is
working for us, the people. Unlike
the county commissioners and
other agencies, or the mosquito
control with their exorbitant helicop-
ter payment of $65,000 a year for
less than 12 hours flying time. If
you're going to criticize, look at the
facts...


Attacking an honorable man


EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .............. ..............publisher
Charlie Brennan ...............................editor
Neale Brennan ...... promotions/community affairs
Kathie Stewart ..................circulation director


h

H
(


it, instead of the standard
rate of $181,000.
Both MoveOn.org and the
Times knew, or would have
known if they had given it a
moment's thought, how
false and unfair to Gen.
Petraeus the ad was. But
they calculated, correctly,
that rotten eggs of this sort,
thrown by the Left at an
Rusher honorable public figure in
IER the course of a political
CES debate, would not, today,
rouse public anger to any
effective extent. We are
simply too numb to say "Ouch!"
At that, MoveOn.org's ad was simply
the most over-the-top of the whole
series of attacks on Gen. Petraeus
launched by the Democrats, and by
leftists in general. When he agreed to
return to the United States and testify
under oath before Congress to the
progress of the war in Iraq, the
Democrats in Congress evidently
made a command decision not only to
attack and discredit him, if possible,
but to do so in advance of his testimo-
ny The barrage they thereupon laid
down was awesome to behold. Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.)
charged that Gen. Petraeus had a long
record of making erroneous state-
ments. Presidential candidate Sen.
Hillary Clinton (D-N.Y.) told him to his
face that his views required "a willing
suspension of disbelief" - or, in other
words, that he was a liar. The "General
Petraeus or General Betray Us?" ad
was right in step.
The Democrats' response was a nec-


LETTERS to


Dark night of soul
Re: "Media misunderstands religion"
The headline for Kathryn Lopez's
commentary in the Sept 7 edition of
the Chronicle is pretty much on target.
The media certainly does not under-
stand religion. But, it appears that not
understanding something never keeps
the media from pontificating on it
In typical style, a secular publica-
tion, here, specifically, Time magazine,
has made a story out of whole cloth,
and one that was 4 years old by its
publication date to boot In its Aug. 23
issue, the Time article shrugs off the
deep theological term "dark night of
the soul" in a passing sentence, but
spends an entire paragraph on an
atheist's view of Mother Teresa's pub-
lished letters. In which paragraph,
Mother Teresa is compared to a coun-
try singer who is waiting for her errant
husband to come home after 30 years.
Father Owen Kearns, publisher of
the National Catholic Register, com-
mented on this very subject in the
September 9-15, 2007 issue:
"The story of Mother Teresa's 'dark
night of the soul' is a story that
Register readers have been acquaint-
ed with for years. We first broke the
story in January 2003, in an interview
with Father Brian Kolodiejchuk, the
Missionary of Charity priest who is
the postulator for Mother Teresa's
cause for canonization.
Our interview got much attention at
the time, but only from religious publi-
cations. We have to smile now when we
see the news media reporting that Time
magazine broke the story in August
2007 - more than four years after it
was in the Register, and only after the


publication of Father Koldi<
excellent book, 'Come, Be M
A more in-depth article c
the Time effort can be foul
same Register issue. It was
Capuchin Father Raniero
messa, who is the preache:
papal household. Somehow
believe that this article has
understanding of religion
gy in it than does the Time
Caro


Salute to vete
This letter is in memory
Heisner, a veteran, I mean
eran, who lived for his cou


essary consequence of a mistaken con-
clusion they reached several months
ago. Early this year, they decided that
the war in Iraq was hopelessly lost
Not unreasonably, they felt entitled to
wrap the defeat around President
Bush's neck and benefit by the politi-
cal consequences. Sen. Reid ratified
this conclusion by stating, in just so
many words, that "the war is lost"
That was all very well as long as
reports from the battlefield remained
uniformly negative. But, beginning
with the "surge," the military outlook
unexpectedly (at least to the
Democrats) began to improve. It was
plain that Gen. Petraeus would say
exactly that when he reported to
Congress, and that put the Democrats
in a very tight spot indeed. They
resolved it in the only way they could:
by blackguarding Gen. Petraeus. Their
position, therefore, remains today
what it was before, and has at least the
merit of consistency: The war in Iraq is
irretrievably lost, and any evidence to
the contrary, let alone any inconven-
ient statements by military experts,
will simply be denounced as false.
Most Congressional Democrats
haven't even been willing to condemn
MoveOn.org for its filthy ad. The best
Sen. Richard Durbin of Illinois could
do was concede that it had been "a
poor choice of words." What an exqui-
site sense of taste he has!

William Rusher is a Distinguished
Fellow of the Claremont Institute for
the Study of Statesmanship and
Political Philosophy.


the Editor


ejchuk's
y Light"'
concerning
nd in the
s written by
0- +In--


served in Korea in the U.S. Air
Force, and lived the rest of his life
fighting for veterans' rights. He was a
member of the American Legion,
VFW, KWVA and founded the Citrus
County Veterans Coalition, and
worked very hard with each organi-
zation trying to keep the rights all
veterans deserve.
I moved here six years ago and met
Ken at the first Citrus County
Veterans Coalition meeting and we
became friends immediately, and
have always been very proud to call
him a friend. He mentored me
through about four years of CCVC, giv-
ing me excellent advise, or anyone
who asked for help about veterans'
needs. If he didn't know at that
moment, he would have an answer for
you shortly. He was always ready to
talk to you on any subject and had a
great sense of humor. What is a shame
is a lot of veterans wanting things, but
will not join in at helping to find the
source of needed to get them. They
join or pay their dues, but that is it
Ken was there ready to help. What a
great loss, and what a great friend I
lost.


uantaa- Ken died like a soldier, head up,
r to the shoulders back, and proud of his life
w, I have to as a veteran. What he did for veterans
s more and what he wished he could have
and theolo- done, but even more, what a friend he
article, was to all who knew him, including
i Swiderski myself.
Homosassa God bless Ken. I salute you and
those who knew you will salute you.
ran May God look after you for the man
, rn you are.


'of Ken
1 a real vet-
intry. He


Joel Smoyer
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions on any subject. You do not need to leave your name and have up to 30 seconds to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


W whatever cretin at
MoveOn.org hit on
the idea of running
a full-page ad in The New
York Times describing
General Petraeus as
"General Betray Us" proba-
bly never gave a moment's
thought to the implication
of that expression. And that
tells us something sad
about the level to which Williamr
political debate in this OTI
country has sunk VOI
To portray a decorated
war hero and four-star gen-
eral as willing to betray his country to
"cook the books" on behalf of
President Bush must have seemed a
trivial price to pay to smear someone
who was preparing to give Congress a
more favorable review of the war in
Iraq than American leftists who run
MoveOn.org are willing to permit The
words "betray us" happened to rhyme
with "Petraeus" - a felicitous coinci-
dence if there ever was one. (Perhaps
we should count ourselves lucky that
the general's name isn't "Season," or
something else that rhymes with "trea-
son.") The general had no means of
retaliating effectively; he could only
ignore the attack, and hope that most
Americans would dismiss it - as, hap-
pily, they did.
And one mustn't overlook the
appalling complicity of The New York
Times, which not only accepted the ad,
and as a highly literate publication
surely cannot plead ignorance of its
implication, but cheerfully charged
MoveOn.org only $65,000 for running


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chronicle edi-
torials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
M Viewpoints depicted in political car-
toons, columns or letters do not neces-
sarily represent the opinion of the edito-
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M Groups or individuals are invited to
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UC I NU3 Ior JIY F~l kITT) IVP~lI E INATTC- N/ - --T-DASPTMER2,207h


Nation/World BRIEFS


Violent crimes
nearing 5-year peak
WASHINGTON - Violent crime
rose nearly 2 percent last year, the
FBI reported Monday in nationwide
data that show a slightly higher
increase than expected.
The number of big-city murders
also increased, by 1.8 percent -
the same rate as homicides
nationwide. Robberies and arson
also rose in large population cen-
ters, but the number of rapes and
car thefts dropped, FBI data show.
The new numbers confirm that
crime rates continued on a two-
year upward trend after a relative


lull in violence between 2002 and
2004.
Justice Department spokesman
Brian Roehrkasse cast the report
as a good news in the effort to
combat gangs, guns and violence,
pointing out that the rate of crimes
per 100,000 people had declined
to its lowest level in 30. years.
Putin names
new government
MOSCOW - President
Vladimir Putin named a new gov-
ernment Monday, tapping new
economics and health ministers
and retaining his foreign and
defense ministers in an expected


but largely cosmetic shuffle before
parliamentary and presidential
elections.
The new government's naming
comes just over a week after
Viktor Zubkov, an obscure Cabinet
official who had overseen money
laundering investigations, became
prime minister in a move that sur-
prised most Kremlin experts and
stoked speculation who would be
Putin's successor.
The changes were largely
superficial and observers said
major policy shifts of any sort
were unlikely before parliamentary
elections in December and presi-
dential vote in March.


Bush, Democrats
quarrel on spending
WASHINGTON - President
Bush on Monday criticized the
Democratic-led Congress for failing
to pass spending bills on time, say-
ing they might be trying to "sneak in
all kinds of special projects."
Democrats said Bush has no
room to talk. "After running up $3
trillion in new debt including more
than half a trillion dollars for his
flawed Iraq policy it is astounding
that the president is once again lec-
turing Congress about fiscal respon-
sibility and fiscal priorities," said
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid.


The charges and counter-
charges came as Congress faces
a weekend deadline for approving
12 appropriation bills to keep the
government operating in the new
fiscal year, which begins on Oct.
1. Congress regularly fails to meet
the deadline, but keeps the gov-
ernment running by passing tem-
porary spending bills known as
continuing resolutions.
Israel's PM to be
investigated
JERUSALEM - Israel's attor-
ney general on Monday ordered
police to open a criminal investi-
gation into allegations that Prime


Minister Ehud Olmert fraudulently
purchased a Jerusalem home
well below market value.
The move dealt a blow to the
Israeli leader at a time when he
has begun to rehabilitate his
image following a series of scan-
dals and missteps.
It also came at a sensitive time
for Mideast peace efforts. Olmert
has been holding talks with
Palestinian President Mahmoud
Abbas aimed at agreeing on the
framework for a future peace deal
ahead of a U.S.-sponsored
Mideast conference later this
year.
- From wire reports


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www.chronicleonline.com
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS


Summit hears calls for action


- -. -,1 ---

Associated Press
This caution sign, set out by
Columbia Gas of Ohio on
Sunday along West Home
Road in Springfield, Ohio,
shows the misspelled word
"steal" as it warns drivers of
steel plates across the road
while new gas lines are put in
place.
Homeland's deputy
secretary quits
WASHINGTON -The
Homeland Security Department's
second-in-command resigned
Monday, citing personal financial
reasons.
Michael P. Jackson, the
department's deputy secretary,
has had a major hand in running
the large department.
In an e-mail to staff Monday,
Jackson said, 'The simple truth,
however, is that after over five
years of serving with the presi-
dent's team, I am compelled to
depart for financial reasons that I
can no longer ignore."
Jackson makes $168,000 a
year. His resignation is effective
Oct. 26.
2 inmates kill guard
in prison escape
HUNTSVILLE, Texas - Two
inmates working in a prison gar-
den wrested guns from two
guards Monday, exchanged gun-
fireWith other officers and stole a
pickup truck, running over and
killing one of the guards as she
tried to stop them, prison officials
said.
One inmate was captured
within ari hour, soon after police
say the pair committed a carjack-
ing. The other was caught a few
hours later, after a manhunt that
included a police helicopter,
bloodhounds and Stetson-hatted
lawmen on horseback.

World -

Ole


Associated Press
A man performs a pass at a
bullfight during the National
Festival of the Mejorana on
Sunday in Guarar6, some 124
hniles west of Panama City.
The festival includes musical
presentations, contests, folk
dances and songs, bullfights,
oxen wagons parade, popular
dances and many other folk
art expressions.

Japan's PM,
Cabinet resigns
STOKYO - Japanese Prime
Minister Shinzo Abe and his
Cabinet resigned en masse
TUesday morning, clearing the
"vay for parliament to choose a
npw prime minister, a Cabinet
minister said.
Abe, 53, stunned the nation
When he announced on Sept.
12 that he wanted to quit, and
checked into a hospital the fol-
lowing day for stress-related
intestinal ailments. He was criti-
cized for not fully explaining his
decision, and for creating a polit-
ical vacuum.
, The outgoing premier told
reporters Monday that his ailing
health lay behind his surprise
decision to resign, though he did
not mention his condition at the
time of his announcement.

- From wire reports


Some express concerns

over separate

U. S. -led meetings

Associated Press

UNITED NATIONS - With tales of ris-
ing seas and talk of human solidarity,
world leaders at the first United Nations
climate summit sought Monday to put new
urgency into global talks to reduce global-
warming emissions.
What's needed is "action, action,
action," California's environmentalist gov-
ernor, Arnold Schwarzenegger, told the
assembled presidents and premiers.
The Bush administration showed no
sign, however, that it would reverse its
stand against mandatory emission cuts
endorsed by 175 other nations. Some


expressed fears the White House, with its
own forum later this week, would launch
talks rivaling the U.N. climate treaty nego-
tiations.
President Bush didn't take part in the
day's sessions, which drew more than 80
national leaders, but planned to attend a
small dinner Monday evening, a gathering
of key climate players hosted by
Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon,
Ban set the day's theme in his opening
speech, declaring that "the time for doubt
has passed" on the issue of global warm-
ing and calling the U.N. climate talks "the
appropriate forum for negotiating global
action."
He organized the one-day summit to
build momentum for December's annual
climate treaty conference in Bali,
Indonesia, when Europe, Japan and oth-
ers hope to initiate talks for an emissions-
reduction agreement to succeed the Kyoto
Protocol in 2012.
The 175-nation Kyoto pact, which the


U.S. rejects, requires 36
industrial nations to
reduce carbon dioxide
and other heat-trapping
gases. It set an average
target of a 5 percent cut
below 1990 levels by 2012
for emissions from power
plants and other industri- Arnold
al, agricultural and trans- Schwarzen
portation sources. egger
Advocates for emis- says world
sions reductions say a needs action
breakthrough is needed to combat
at Bali to ensure an unin- global
terrupted transition from warming.
the 1997 Kyoto pact to a
new, deeper-cutting regime, something
that almost certainly would require a
change in the U.S. position.
The chief U.N. climate scientist,
Rajendra Pachauri, told the summit of the
mounting evidence of global warming's
impact, including the accelerating rise in


Ahmaditiejad questions 9/11, Holocausi


Associated F
Jacob Sabat, right, argues with Gidon Freidfertig, left, over Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's invitation to speak
Columbia University on Monday in New York. Sabat defended the University's decision, and Freidfertig said it should have ne
been made.

Iran's president receives blistering reception from Columbia president


Associated Press

NEW YORK - Iranian
leader Mahmoud
Ahmadinejad defended
Holocaust deniers and raised
questions about who carried
out the Sept 11 attacks in a
tense showdown Monday at
Columbia University where
the school's head introduced
the visitor by calling him a
"petty and cruel dictator"
Ahmadinejad, appearing
shaken by what he called
"insults" from his host, sought
to portray himself as an intel-
lectual and argued that his
regime had respect for reason
and science. But the former
engineering professor soon
. found himself drawn into the
type of rhetoric that has alien-


ated American audiences in
the past
At times, however, he drew
audience applause but his first
stab was at Columbia's presi-
dent, Lee Bollinger, who said
in his introduction of
Ahmadinejad: "Mr President,
you exhibit all the signs of a
petty and cruel dictator."
Ahmadinejad said
Bollinger's opening was "an
insult to information and the
knowledge of the audience
here."
"There were insults and
claims that were incorrect,
regretfully," Ahmadinejad
added, accusing Bollinger of
falling under the influence of
the hostile U.S. press and
politicians.
Appearing agitated at


times, Iran's president often
declined to offer the simple
answers the audience sought,
responding instead with his
own questions or long discur-
sions about history and jus-
tice.
Bollinger opened by aggres-
sively taking on
Ahmadinejad's past state-
ments about the Holocaust
"In a December 2005 state
television broadcast, you
described the Holocaust as the
fabricated legend," he said.
"One year later, you held a two-
day conference of Holocaust
deniers."
Bollinger said that might
fool the illiterate and igno-
rant.
"When you come to a place
like this, it makes you simply


ridiculous. The truth is t
the Holocaust is the mi
documented event in hum
history," he said.
Ahmadinejad denied
had questioned the existe:
of the Holocaust
Then he appeared to qu
tion whether al-Qaida
responsible, saying m
research was needed.
"If the root causes of I
are examined properly
why it happened, w
caused it, what were the c
editions that led to it, \
truly was involved, who
really involved - and pu
all together to understand
how to prevent the crisis
Iraq, fix the problem
Afghanistan and Iraq co
bined," Ahmadinejad said


Study: Money can motivate employees to lose weigh


Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. - People
will lose weight for money, even
a little money, suggests a study
that offers another option for
employers looking for ways to
cut health care costs.
The research published in
the September issue of the
Journal of Occupational and
Environmental Medicine found
that cash incentives can be a
success even when the payout is
as little as $7 for dropping just a
few pounds in three months.
Unlike providing onsite fit-
ness centers or improving offer-
ings in the company cafeteria,
cash rewards provide a compa-
ny with a guaranteed return.
"They really can't be a bad
investment because you don't
pay people unless they lose


It's clear that one of the biggest
challenges is to help people who lose
weight keep the weight off.

Laura Linnan
Co-author and professor at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's
School of Public Health.


weight," said Eric A.
Finkelstein, the study's lead
author and a health economist
at RTI International, a research
institute.
The study involved about 200
overweight employees at sever-
al colleges in North Carolina,
divided into three groups. One
group received no incentives
while the other two groups
received $7 or $14 for each per-


centage point of weight lost
Participants didn't get any
help on how to lose weight In
the end, employees who
received the most incentives
lost the most weight, an average
of nearly 5 pounds after three
months. Those offered no
incentives lost 2 pounds; those
in the $7 group lost about 3
pounds.
Those in the $14 group were


more than five times as l
lose 5 percent of their w
Finkelstein and co-s
Laura Linnan and D
Tate, professors at
University of North Car
Chapel Hill's School of
Health, are currently an
data from a follow-up stu
observed about 1,000
pants for a year. In tha
financial incentives wer
against a Web-based weil
program and changes
office environment
Linnan said more rese
needed to determine th
dollar amount and w
incentives work in th
term.
"It's clear that one
biggest challenges is t
people who lose weigh
the weight off," she said.


sea levels as oceans expand from heat and
the runoff of melting land ice.
'"The time is up for inaction," he said.
A Pacific islander, President Emanuel
Mori of the Federated States of
Micronesia, told the summit that
encroaching seas are already destroying
crops, contaminating wells and eating
away at his islands' beaches.
"How does one explain to the inhabi-
tants that their plight is caused by human
activities done in faraway lands?" he
asked.
The United States has long been the
world's biggest emitter of greenhouse
gases.
Bush objects that Kyoto-style mandates
would damage the U.S. economy and says
they should be imposed on fast-growing
poorer countries like China and India in
addition to developed nations. He instead
is urging industry to cut emissions volun-
tarily and is emphasizing research on
clean-energy technology as one answer


t Report:


-Social


Security


fix needed

Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Bush
administration said in a new
report Monday that Social
Security is facing a $13.6 trillion
shortfall in coming years and
that delaying reforms is not fair
to younger workers.
A report issued by the
Treasury Department said that
some combination of benefit
cuts and tax increases will need
to be considered to permanently
fix the funding shortfall. But
White House officials stressed
. that President Bush remains
opposed to raising taxes.
Treasury Secretary Henry
Paulson said he hoped the new
report would help find common
ground on the politically divi-
sive issue, but a key Democrat
charged that the administration
will still try to fix Social Security
by imposing sharp benefit
reductions.
"The administration's new
report is a reminder of
Press President Bush's determination
k at to not only privatize Social
Dver Security but to make deep cuts
in the benefits that American
workers have earned," said
t Senate Majority Leader Harry
Reid, D-Nev. "Nobody should be
that fooled into believing that the
lost only way to save Social Security
nan is to destroy it with privatization
or deep benefit cuts."
he Bush had hoped to make
nece Social Security refbrmirhe top
domestic priority of his second
ues- term. He put forward a Social
was Security plan in 2005 that
ore focused on creation of private
accounts for younger workers,
9/11 but that proposal never came up
- for a vote in Congress with
*hat Democrats heavily opposed and
con- few Republicans embracing the
who idea.
was The Treasury report put the
it it cost of the gap between v hat
and Social Security is expected to
s in need to pay out in benefits and
in what it will raise in payroll taxes
om- at $13.6 trillion "over the indefi-
1. nite future."
. It said delaying necessary
changes reduces the number of
people available to share in the
ht burden of those changes and is
unfair to younger workers. "Not
taking action is thus unfair to
future generations. This is a sig-
ikely to nificant cost of delay," the report
eight said.
authors In another key finding, the
eborah report said: "Social Security can
t the be made permanently solvent
alina at only by reducing the present
Public value of scheduled benefits
Lalyzing and/or increasing the present
idy that value of scheduled tax increas-
partici- es."
t study, The paper went on to say:
e tested "Other changes to the program
ght-loss might be desirable, but only
in the these changes can restore sol-
vency permanently"
search is While the language of the
.e ideal Treasury report seemed to
whetherr indicate that the administra-
.e long tion would consider raising
taxes along with reducing ben-
of the efits as a way to deal with the
to help funding shortfall, the White


it keep House was quick to reject that
possibility.


AINva










* MLB/2B
* Local Tennis/3B
8 Football Statistics/3B
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- /


B
TUESDAY
SEPTEMBER 25, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


Doe Batson


wins Street


Stock 50


Citrus County

Speedway spared

bad weather

Special to the Chronicle
Despite very threatening weather
over the entire west coast of Florida,
the Citrus County Speedway was able
to get the full program of eight divi-
sions in without a hitch. Street Stocks
were the highlight of the evening as
they blasted off for a 50-lap non-
points special event.
Late Models finally got a race in
after a couple of rainouts that really
spoiled their championship run for
the season. Mini Cup cars were also
there to get their season back on track
and the Sportsman, Mini Stocks, Pure
Stocks, 4-Cylinder Bombers and the
V8 Thunder Stock Rookies topped off
the excitement.
Twenty of 21 Street Stocks went on
the clocks to open up the evening of
action with Jeff Stalnaker turning a
16.191 to set the fast time in early
qualifying, only to see his brother
Mike follow him with a 16.183. The
balance of the field ran in the mid 16
and 17 second bracket before Richie
Smith, the winningest driver at
Citrus, came out as the next to last
qualifier and turned a 16.105 second
run. He pulled the 12 pill to invert the
top 12 qualifiers and make an inter-
esting starting order with the heavy
hitters having a lot of traffic to deal
with to get to the front.
Tom Martone shot from the outside
pole when the green flag flew with
pole sitter Tim Nocella sliding into
second followed by Artie Hewitt. The
fast qualifiers all took to the outside
lanes in pursuit of the leader and
started picking off cars on each lap.
Ninth starter and fourth fastest quali-
fier Doc Batson borrowed daughter
Crystal's car and then worked his xway
to the front in the first 15 laps.
Chasing him were Mike Stalnaker,
Richie Smith and Jeff Stalnaker all
using that outside lane to get around
traffic then it was a battle royal for
position when Mike Stalnaker and
Richie Smith worked their way
around Doc Batson and got hooked
up in a battle for the lead. The restart
put Batson back in the lead for the
final 15 laps of the race checking out

Please see ' /Page 3B


Titans defeat Saints


Associated Press
Tennessee quarterback Vince Young (10) scrambles away from Saints defender Brian Young (66) as Titans offensive lineman Jacob Bell (60) blocks
Monday in New Orleans. The Saints' Reggie Bush eludes the tackle of Titans linebacker David Thornton on Monday night.

Vince Young passes for two touchdowns as Tennessee leaves Superdome with 31-14 win


Associated Press


NEW ORLEANS - Vince Young
got the best of Reggie Bush again,
and the NFEs feel-good team from
last season isott'to a dismal stait.
Young threw a pair oftouchdown
passes and the Tennessee Titans
kept New Orleans winless on the
year, beating the Saints :31-14
Monday night before a Superdome
crowd that showered boos on the
same players who provided such a
pick-me-up to the devastated city a
year ago.
The Saints (0-3) rallied from an
early 10-0 deficit, going ahead 14-10
midway through the third quarter


on Bush's second touchdown run.
But Young, just as he did when
leading Texas to an epic win over
Bush and Southern Cal at the 2006
Rose Bowl, brought his team back
While running backs LenDale
White and Chris Brown handled the
bulk of the workload on the go-
ahead drive, it was Young who
threaded a key 10-yard pass to Eric
Moulds, who was shoved out of
bounds at the Saints 1. White, a
teammate of Bush's at USC, pow-
ered over on the next play to put the
Titans (2-1) ahead to stay.
Drew Brees, who had another

Please see NFL/Page 3B


Garcia leads refreshed Buccaneers


Associated Press


TAMPA - Eight-plus years in the
NFL and five more in the Canadian
Football League have taught Jeff
Garcia to measure his words when he
talks about progress three games into
a season.
The Tampa Bay quarterback likes
the direction the Buccaneers are
headed on offense. He's just not ready
to say the unit has arrived after solid
performances during lopsided victo-
ries over New Orleans and St Louis.
After being limited to a pair of field
goals in a season-opening loss to
Tampa Bay quarterback Jeff Garcia (7)
throws against the Seattle Seahawks
on Sept. 9. Garcia has led a revival of
the Buccaneers' offense.
Associated Press


Seattle, the Bucs scored seven touch-
downs while outscoring the Saints
and Rams 55-24.
"We can still be better," said Garcia,
who has completed 66 percent of his
passes for 595 yards, two touchdowns
and no interceptions.
"I think from my standpoint, it is
about efficiency. It's about not putting
us in bad situations, bad positions, not
forcing the issue. I think we have
enough good plays, good opportuni-
ties, good looks, where I can make the
right decision to give our guys oppor-
tunities to make plays."
Tampa Bay (2-1) has a winning
record for the first time since 2005,
and the 37-year-old's mobility and
knack for turning potentially negative
plays into big gainers are a big part of
the encouraging start


' offense
"He's unbelievable. I just wish y6io
guys could see the look in his eyes on
the field. I know he's taking that outto
our huddle. I know he's putting those
eyes on those guys in the huddle, and
I know it has something to do with tho
way they're playing," coach Jon
Gruden said.
"That's what this franchise needed.
We needed a guy that has that kind of
grit, that kind of determination. And
he has talent to go with it You see the
great competitor in him. He's never
going to quit on a play ... That's one of
the reasons that we have a chance."
Garcia, signed as a free agent in
March after spending last season with
the Philadelphia Eagles, threw for
243 yards on just 10 completions in


Please see BUCS/Page 3B


UF's defense still needs work


Associated Press


GAINESVILLE - Florida's
defense got lots of credit for last week-
end's rout over Tennessee. The unit
gave up 13 points, allowed 37 yards
rushing and stopped 12 of 17 third-
down conversions.
Maybe it was too much credit.
"I do believe that," coach Urban
Meyer said Sunday, a day after Gators
held on for a 30-24 win at Mississippi.
"You play a good game and maybe you
really didn't play as good as the other
team didn't play well. Regardless,
everyone's a hero and you have all the
answers."
Florida (4-0, 2-0 Southeastern
Conference) showed it still has plenty
of defensive questions against the
Rebels. The Gators - who dropped
one spot to fourth in the latest
Associated Press college football poll


a For the updated ESPN and AP
Top 25 college football polls,
please see:
PAGE 3B
- surrendered 390 yards, allowed 18
points in the third quarter and felt
fortunate to escape the state of
Mississippi with a win for the first
time since 1994.
"We did not play very well on
defense," Meyer said. 'Just to get out
of there, I don't want to say relieved,
but relieved."
Florida led 27-9 late in the third
quarter and looked like it would pull
away after Tim Tebow's 37-yard pass
to Louis Murphy.
But Seth Adams completed five
consecutive passes, two of them for
touchdowns, to get Ole Miss back in
the game. He connected with Shay


Hodge for a 19-yard score, a play in
which safety Kyle Jackson took the
wrong angle and failed to knock down
the pass or make the tackle.
Jackson was on the bench for the
next possession, watching Adams
hook up with Mike Wallace for a 77-
yard touchdown. Wallace beat two
freshmen, cornerback Joe Haden and
safety Major Wright, on the play.
"Our free safety position has to play
much better than it is right now,"
Meyer said.
The defensive line is an even bigger
concern.
Although the Gators held the
Rebels to 80 yards rushing, they man-
aged little pressure on the quarter-
back - a continuing problem that
Meyer said will "cost us a game."
Derrick Harvey and Jermaine
Please see . /Page 3B


A force to be reckoned with


Associated Press
Florida sophomore quarterback Tim Tebow (15) was named the SEC's offen-
sive player of the week after accounting for 427 yards of total offense in the
Gators' 30-24 win over Mississippi in Oxford on Saturday.










2B TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2007


East Division


z-Boston
New York
Toronto
Baltimore
Tampa Bay


New York
Philadelphia
Atlanta
Washington
wk I MFlorida


WILD CARD GLANCE
American League
W L Pct GB
New York 90 66 .577 -
Detroit 85 72 .541 5
National League
W L Pct GB
San Diego 85 70 .548 -
,Philadelphia 85 71 .545
Colorado 84 72 .538 11 /
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Toronto 4, N.Y Yankees 1
Minnesota 2, Detroit 0
;Baltimore 3, Kansas City 2
,Texas 8, LA. Angels 7
Today's Games
,Oakland (Gaudin 11-12) at Boston
'(Schilling 8-8), 7:05 p.m.
'Minnesota (Garza 4-6) at Detroit (Bazardo
'1-1), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Burnett 9-7) at Baltimore (Burres
,6-6), 7:05 p.m.
,N.Y. Yankees (Clemens 6-6) at Tampa Bay
-(Hammel 2-5), 7:10 p.m.
,L.A. Angels (Escobar 17-7) at Texas
'(McCarthy 5-10 or Wright 3-5), 8:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Bannister 12-9) at Chicago
White Sox (Contreras 10-16), 8:11 p.m.
,Cleveland (Laffey 3-2) at Seattle
(F.Hernandez 13-7), 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
'L.A Angels at Texas, 2:05 p.m.
'Oakland at Boston, 5:05 p.m.
'Minnesota at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
'Cleveland at Seattle, 7:05 p.m., 1st game
Toronto at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 8:11 p.m.
Cleveland at Seattle, 10:35 p.m., 2nd game
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Washington 13, N.Y. Mets 4 .
Milwaukee 13, St. Louis 5
San Diego at San Francisco, late
Today's Games
Chicago Cubs (Lilly 15-7) at Florida (Willis
9-15), 7:05 p.m.
Arizona (Davis 13-12) at Pittsburgh (Snell Toronto B
9-12), 7:05 p.m. Yankees'
Atlanta (James 11-10) at Philadelphia Yankees'
(Moyer 13-11), 7:05 p.m. Stadium il
Washington (Bergmann 5-5) at N.Y. Mets
(Glavine 13-6), 7:10 p.m.
Houston (Paulino 0-1) at Cincinnati (Bailey Blue J
3-2), 7:10 p.m.
9t: Louis (Looper 12-11) at Milwaukee NEW YC
(Suppan 10-12), 8:05 p.m. Yankees to
Colorado (Jimenez 4-4) at L.A. Dodgers
(Penny 16-4), 10:10 p.m. least, that's
San Diego (Tomko 4-11) at San Francisco The Yani
(Cain 7-16), 10:15 p.m. The Yan
Wednesday's Games spot pause
Chicago Cubs at Florida, 7:05 p.m.
Arizona at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. behind earl
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. watching T(
Washington at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. it
Houston at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. pitch the BI
St. Louis at Milwaukee, 8:05 p.m. NeW Yor
Colorado at LA. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. New Yorl
San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. postseason
MLB LEADERS with a Detr
AMERICAN LEAGUE Minnesota.
-BATTING-MOrdonez, Detroit, .358;
'Iirz.i., Seattle, .350; Polanco, Detroit, never quite
.39; Posada, New York, .335; Lowell, home gami
3gston, .324; VGuerrero, Los Angeles,
�23; DOrtiz, Boston, .321. and fell two
tVNS-ARodriguez, New York, 138; stn in ti
.Qranderson, Detroit, 117; Sizemore,Boston in t
PQeveland, 117; BAbreu, New York, 115; Alex Rod
tOrdonez, Detroit, 113; Rios, Toronto,
'109; Suzuki, Seattle, 109. Yankees' Io
,RBI-ARodriguez, New York, 147; albeit on a,
,MOrdonez Dei,,:.. 133; VGuerrero, Los
,,4reiI - :'Fe,-, Tampa Bay, 116; haJfway dov
',:.ston, 112; Lowell, Boston, 110; OSs was ju
5,plh i, Baltimore, 109; Morneau, l w JU
..-,,-,-...i, 109. 18 gam es.
HITS-ISuzuki, Seattle, 227; MOrdonez,
,Detroit, 208; Jeter, New York, 198; This was
,MYoung, Texas, 195; Polanco, Detroit, 25 rainout
-413' OCabrera, Los Angeles, 190; Rios, 1 I2,0 te
9 .:. 185. 12,000 peo
'DOUBLES-MOrdonez, Detroit, 51;
rtiz, Boston, 48; AHill, Toronto, 45;
iO3urrero, Los Angeles, 45; THunter,
lPfr:oi, .44; Markakis, Baltimore 43;
Rios, Toronto, 42.S t
TRIPLES-Granderson, Detroit, 22;
DeJesus, Kansas City, 9; Crawford, Tampa S
Bay, 9; CGuillen, Detroit, 9; Iwamura,
Tampa Bay, 8; MeCabrera, New York, 8;
Teahen, Kansas City, 8.
HOME RUNS-ARodriguez, New York,
52; CPena, Tampa Bay, 42; DOrtiz,,
Boston, 32; Thome, Chicago, 32;
Morneau, Minnesota, .30; Konerko,
Chicago, 29; THunter, Minnesota, 28.
STOLEN BASES-Crawford, Tampa Bay,
50; BRoberts, Baltimore, 48; Figgins, Los
Angeles, 40; ISuzuki, Seattle, 37;
CPatterson, Baltimore, 37; Sizemore,
Cleveland, 33; JLugo, Boston, 30. .a0
PITCHING (16 Decisions)-Beckett, O th n
Boston, 20-6, .769, 3.14; Verlander, y l
Detroit, 18-6, .750, 3.68; Bedard,
Baltimore, 13-5, .722, 3.16; Wang, New i
York, 18-7, .720, 3.72; Sabathia,
Cleveland, 18-7, .720,3.19; KEscobar, Los e
Angeles, 17-7, .708, 3.46; Carmona,
Cleveland, 18-8, .692, 3.03.
STRIKEOUTS-JoSantana, Minnesota, A
231; Kazmir, Tampa Bay, 229; Bedard, A
Baltimore, 221; Sabathia, Cleveland, 205;
JVazquez, Chicago, 204; Matsuzaka, A ST
Boston, 193; Beckett, Boston, 188. SAN '
SAVES-Borowski, Cleveland, 43; Jenks, Diego Pa
Chicago, 39; Putz, Seattle, 39;
FrRodriguez, Los Angeles, 38; TJones, on Mike i
Ditroit, 38; Papelbon, Boston, 36; Nathan, When (
Minnesota, 35. take a le
NATIONAL LEAGUE take t lei
BATTING-CJones, Atlanta, .341; on the neg
Hdlliday, Colorado, .337: Utley, I, ea
Philadelphia, .335; HaRamirez, Florida, ly really
.333; Renteria, Atlanta, .332; Wright, New swipe it.
York, .323; Pujols, St. Louis, .323; DYoung, While
Washington, .323.
RUNS-Rollins, Philadelphia, 132; their thi
HaRamirez, Florida, 118; JBReyes, New berthV, the
York, 116; Holliday, Colorado, 113; Uggla,
Florighda, 108; Wrightk,New York, 107; kind of
BPhillips, Cincinnati, 106.
RBI-Holliday, Colorado, 131; Howard, not celi
Philadelphia, 125; CaLee, Houston, 115; basepath
FelIder, Milwaukee, 112; MiCabrera, runways,
Flbrida, 112; Hawpe, Colorado, 106; Dunn,
Cincinnati, 106; Beltran, New York, 106. successful
HITS-HaRamirez, Florida, 205; Holliday, base atte
Colorado, 205; Rollins, Philadelphia, 203;
Pierre, Los Angeles, 189; Wright, New 90.4 perch
York, 187; JBReyes, New York, 186; ta woul
BPhillips, Cincinnati, 184; Rowand, that w
Phdiadelphia, 184. est perc
DOUBLES-Uggla, Florida, 48; Holliday, team sit
Colorado, 48; Utley, Philadelphia, 47;
HaRamirez, Florida, 45; Rowand, began in
PHiladelphia, 44; Church, Washington, 42; Of court
KGreene, San Diego, 42; AdGonzalez,
San Diego, 42; FSanchez, Pittsburgh, 42. set that
TRIPLES-Rollins, Philadelphia, 18; allowing,, ,
JBReyes, New York, 12; Johnson, Atlanta,
10; 'Pence, Houston, 9; Amezaga, Florida, rate. Pia;
9;'OHudson, Arizona, 9; DRoberts, San catchr/ i:
Francisco, 9. catcher i]
H6ME RUNS-Fielder, Milwaukee, 47; arm mad.
'toward, Philadelphia, 42; Dunn, hoat, Th�
Cincinnati, 40; Holliday, Colorado, 36;' goa. n
MiCabrera, Florida, 33; Braun, Milwaukee, Pizza nec
32; CBYoung, Arizona, 32. out runne
STOLEN BASES-JBReyes, New York,
78; Pierre, Los Angeles, 61; HaRamirez, Well, l
Florida, 50; Byrnes, Arizona, 47; Victorino, there are
Philadelphia, 37; Rollins, Philadelphia, 37;
Wright, New York, 34. nations f(
PITCHING (16 Decisions)-Penny, Los even won
Angeles, 16-4, .800, 2.93; Harang,
Cincinnati, 16-5, .762, 3.70; Peavy, San varying d
Diego, 18-6, .750, 2.36; Hamels, Manaan(
Philadelphia, 14-5, .737, 3.54; Billingsley,
Los Angeles, 12-5, .706, 3.09; BSheets, mer big ],


Milwaukee, 12-5, .706, 3.82; CVargas, when the
Milwaukee, 11-5, .687, 5.10.
STRIKEOUTS-Peavy, San Diego, 233; "Not a
Harang, Cincinnati, 205; Webb, Arizona, "I thinly
192; Smoltz, Atlanta, 189; RHill, Chicago,
179; CZambrano, Chicago, 173, Snell, that even
Pittsburgh, 171.
SAVES-Valverde, Arizona. 46; FCordero, get into
Milwaukee, 44; Hoffman, San Diego, 40; make pil
Saito, Los Angeles, 39; CCordero, from bei
Washington, 36; BWagner, New York, 34;
WVeathers, Cincinnati, 33. said. "0


East Division
GB L10
- 4-6
2 z-8-2
5 z-8-2
17� z-5-5
21 z-3-7


nents taking

percent of

?s vs. Padres

associated Press

)IEGO - The San
dres can't blame this
Piazza anymore.
opposing baserunners
ad and set their sights
xt base, odds are real-
good they're going to

the Padres chase
ird straight playoff
ey're closing in on the
mark that's generally
ebrated. With the
s looking more like
opponents have been
il on 179 of 198 stolen
;mpts this season, or
ent. With a week left,
d obliterate the high-
entage against any
nce divisional play
1969.
se, these same Padres
mark last season by
an 85.2 percent theft
zza was the primary
n 2006, and his weak
e him an easy scape-
joke then was that
eded a relay to throw
ers at second.
Piazza is gone and
any number of expla-
)r why the Padres are
se this year, as well as
degrees of concern.
er Bud Black, a for-
eague pitcher, winces
subject is raised.
good topic," he said.
k you can rationalize
n though runners do
scoring position, we
tches to keep them
ng knocked in," he
ur batting average


against is pretty good with run-
ners in scoring position. We
make quality pitches when we
need to.
"But nonetheless, we would
like that percentage to drop."
Catchers aren't always the
chief culprits. Opponents know
the pitchers who can't hold
runners. They're 39-for-39
against Chris Young, San
Diego's 6-foot-10 All-Star, and
35-of-37. against 41-year-old
Greg Maddux.
"I think every team's going to
give up stolen bases to Juan
Pierre and Rafael Furcal, and
the base stealers across the
major league landscape,"
Black said. "But we have a cou-
ple of starting pitchers who
have a little bit of a history of
having stolen bases against
them, most notably Chris
Young and Greg Maddux.
They're a bit slow to the plate.
Their natural delivery is such
that they're not as quick, just
the way their body works.
"But here again they do such
a great job of concentrating on
the batter that it doesn't come
back to haunt them, in most
cases. But as we move forward
toward the end of the season
and beyond, we need to do a
better job. We have to do a bet-
ter job."
Should the Padres clinch a
playoff spot and say, face the
New York Mets in October,
their weakness could get mag-
nified. The Mets have stolen
198 bases going into Monday's
schedule, far and away the
most in the majors. Jose Reyes
leads the bigs with 78.
Then again, Reyes stole five
bags against San Diego during
a three-game series at Shea
Stadium in August, and the
Mets had 11 overall, yet San
Diego took two of three games.
The Padres, by comparison,
have only 55 stolen bases.


Home
47-28
52-29
47-31
33-42
36-42


Home
40-35
43-32
44-37
40-41
33-45


Away
45-36
38-37
32-46
34-47
28-50


Intr
12-6
10-8
10-8
6-12
7-11


Away
47-34
42-39
38-37
30-46
33-45


x-Cleveland
Detroit
Minnesota
Chicago
Kansas City



Chicago
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Houston
Pittsburgh


Associated Pre
Blue Jays pitcher Jesse Litsch, right, tags out New Yor
Johnny Damon to end the fifth inning Monday at Yanke
in New York. Toronto won 4-1.

ays 4, Yankees I TORONTO NEW YORK
ab rhbi ab rh b


)RK - The New York
ok a day off Monday. At
how it looked.
kees' drive for a playoff
d, with Andy Pettitte falling
y and a smallish crowd
pronto rookie Jesse Litsch
ue Jays to a 4-1 victory.
k could've clinched a
I berth with a win, coupled
oit loss later against
Instead, the Yankees
woke up in their final
e of the regular season
o games behind idle
he AL East.
driguez drove in the
ne run for his 147th RBI,
dribbler that barely rolled
wn_ the first-base line. The.
st their fourth in the last

a makeup from an April
and there were only about
pie in the seats.


Jhnsonlf 4 01 0 Damon dh 4 0 0 0
Stairs rf 4 00 0 Jeter ss 4 1 1 0
Rios cf 4 11 0 BAbreu rf 4 0 1 0


4 00 0 ARod 3b
4 11 0 Matsui If
3 10 0 Posada c
3 11 1 Cano 2b
1 00 0 Mntkw lb
3 01 1 Giambi ph
3 01 1 MeCbr cf


Thmas dh
AHill 2b
Zaun c
Thgpen lb
Ovrbay 1 b
Luna 3b
JMcDId ss


Totals 334 6 3 Totals 34 1 6 1
Toronto 031 000 000- 4
New York 000 001 000- 1
E-Thigpen (1), Jeter (18). DP-New
York 1. LOB-Toronto 3, New York 7. 2B-
Johnson (12), Rios (42), Thigpen (4),
JMcDonald (18), Jeter (36), BAbreu (38),
Matsui (28), Mientkiewicz (9).
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
Litsch W,7-9 72-3 5 1 1 0 1
Janssen S,6 11-3 1 0 0 0 1
New York
Pettitte L,14-9 6 5 4 3 1 1
F3,,-i,:.:,r r, 1 0 0 0 0 0
r1 1- 0 0 0 0
or, ,.,:., 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Litsch (Posada).
Umpires-Home, Ted Barrett; First, Mark
Carlson; Second, Angel Hernandez; Third,
Derryl Cousins.
T-2:42. A-53,281 (56,937).


Central Division
Pct GB L10 Sti
.594 - 7-3 W-1
.541 8 z-5-5 L-1
.494 15/ 5-5 W-2
.436 24% z-6-4 L-1
.429 25% 4-6 L-2

Central Division
Pct GB L10 Str
.532 - z-8-2 W-4
.513 3 z-6-4 W-1
.468 10 z-4-6 L-1
.455 12 z-4-6 L-2
.436 15 5-5 L-2
.423 17 z-1-9 L-9


Home
51-29
43-36
41-40
34-41
34-44


Home
44-37
48-27
43-38
38-37
40-38
35-40


Twins 2, Tigers 0
DETROIT - Minnesota's Carlos
Silva shut down Detroit over 7 2-3
innings in a 2-0 victory Monday night
that put the Tigers on the brink of
being eliminated from the playoff race.
The defending American League
champions are one loss, or a New
York Yankees' win, from officially
being relegated to watching this post-
season. The Tigers have lost five of
their last seven games to speed up
the seemingly inevitable conclusion to
their season.
New York leads Detroit in the AL
wild-card race by 5� games.
Nick Punto's RBI single in the sec-
ond inning and Jason Kubel's run-
I scoring single in the ninth was all the
offense for Minnesota, which has won
five of seven to increase its chances
of finishing with a winning record for
the seventh straight year. The Twins
(77-79) had lost seven in a row
against the Tigers.
Detroit used its best lineup, but
couldn't score against Silva (13-14),
who gave up six hits without a walk
i and struck out one.
i Glen Perkins got the final out of the
ss eighth, with the potential tying run at
rk second. Joe Nathan allowed two run-
)e ners on in the ninth but got Ivan
Rodriguez on a groundout for his. 35th
save in 39 chances.


MINNESOTA DETROIT
ab rhbi


ab r h bi


Bartlett ss 4 01 0 Grndsn cf 3 0 1 0
Kubel If 4 01 1 Raburn cf 1 0 0 0
THnter cf 5 01 0 Planco 2b 4 0 0 0
Mrneau lb 3 01 0 Shffield dh 4 0 0 0
Cddyer rf 2 10 0 MOrdz rf 3 0 1 0
LeCroy c 4 00 0 CGillen ss 4 0 1 0
RoWhtedh 4 01 0 IRdrgzc 4 0 1 0
Tyner dh 0 10 0 TPerez If 3 0 0 0
Punto 3b 301 1 Casey lb 3 020
Casilla 2b 3 00 0 Maybin pr 0 0 0 0
Bscherph 1 000 RSntgoss 0 0 0 0
LRdrgz3b 0000 lnge3b 3 0 1 0
Totals 332 6 2 Totals 32 0 7 0
Minnesota 010 000 001- 2
Detroit 000 000 000- 0
E-CGuillen (25). DP-Minnesota 2.
LOB-Minnesota 10, Detroit 6. 2B-
MOrdonez (51). SB-CGuillen (13),
IRodriguez (2), Maybin (5). S-Punto.
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
CSilvaW,13-14 72-3 6 0 0 0 1
Perkins 1-3 00 0 0 0
NathanS,35 1 1 0 0 1 1
Detroit
Robertson L,8-137 3 1 1 4 6
Rodney 2 3 1 1 1 2
Umpires-Home, Mike Winters; First,
Bruce Froemming; Second, Mark Wegner;
Third, Brian Runge.
T-2:41. A-32,716 (41,070).

Rangers 8, Angels 7
ARLINGTON, Texas - The AL
West champion Los Angeles Angels
quickly lost a lead to the last-place
Texas Rangers and a chance to
move ahead in the other race
before the playoffs.
Just after the Angels went ahead
with a five-run outburst, Marion
Byrd hit a go-ahead, two-run homer
in the bottom of the fifth inning and
Texas held on for an 8-7 victory
Monday night.
While they already have the divi-
sion title, the Angels (92-65) are still
playing for the best record in the
American League and home-field
advantage through the playoffs.
Their 92 victories remained the
same as Boston and Cleveland the
other division leaders who were off
Monday.
A day after clinching their third
division title in four years in their
home finale, the Angels played
without Vladimir Guerrero and
Garret Anderson.
LOS ANGELES TEXAS
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Figgins rf 4 00 1 Kinsler 2b 4 1 1 0
OCbera ss 422 1 Lairdc 5 3 3 0
Ktchm dh 2 21 2 MYong ss 4 1 2 4
Morleslb 4 00 0 MBrd cf 4 1 1 2
Mathws cf 2 00 0 Blalock dh 2 1 2 0
JRivra If 3 11 2 Botts If 4 0 0 0
Hyns If 0000 DaMpy If 0 000
lzturis 3b 3 11 0 Cruz rf 4 0 1 1
Kndrck2b 4 12 1 Sltmca lb 4 1 1 0
Napoli c 3 000 Wlkrsn lb 0 0 0 0
Aybarph 1 00 0 Metcalf3b 3 0 1 1
Guzman pr 0 0 0 0
Vzquez3b 0 000
Totals 307 7 7 Totals 34 812 8
Los Angeles 000 050 020- 7
Texas 103 021 10x- 8
DP-Los Angeles 1, Texas 2. LOB-Los
Angeles 3, Texas 6. 2B-JRivera (1),
Kendrick (24), Laird (17), Blalock (16). 3B-
Laird (3), Saltalamacchi (1). HR-
Kotchman (11), MYoung (9), MByrd (10).
SB-Matthews (18), Izturis (7). CS-
Kotchman (3), Kendrick (4), Guzman (1).
IF-Fggn P H RERBBSO


Los Angeles
ESantana L,7-14 5


6 6 2 4


Bootcheck 1 2 1 1 1 2
Bulger 1 2 1 1 0 2
RThompson 1 0 0 0 1 2
Texas
Galarraga 42-3 4 5 5 4 4
White W,2-0 11-3 0 0 0 1 0
Francisco 1 1 0 0 0 1
MWood 1 2 2 2 1 0
Littleton S,2 1 0 0 0 0 1
WP-Bulger.
Umpires-Home, Jim Joyce; First, Jeff
Nelson; Second, Jim Wolf; Third, Tim
Tschida.
T-3:06. A-22,881 (48,911).


Away
41-34
42-36
36-39
34-47
33-45


Away
39-36
32-49
30-45
33-48
28-50
31-50


West Division
W L Pct gGB L10 Str Home Away Intr
x-Los Angeles 92 65 .586 - z-6-4 L-1 54-27 38-38 14-4
Seattle 83 72 .535 8 z-6-4 L-1 44-31 39-41 9-9
Oakland 75 82 .478 17 z-4-6 L-1 39-39 36-43 10-8
Texas 73 84 .465 19 4-6 W-2 45-34 28-50 11-7
x-clinched division z-clinched playoff spot z-first game was a win


Arizona
San Diego
Colorado
Los Angeles
San Francisco


Nationals 13, Mets 4
NEW YORK - The New York
Mets squandered a chance to
widen their lead in the NL East as
Austin Kearns hit a three-run homer
and Ronnie Belliard drove in three
more in the Washington Nationals'
13-4 victory Monday night.
New York's magic number
remained at five and its lead in the
division dropped to two games over
idle Philadelphia. The Mets play the
Nationals again Tuesday while the
Phillies host Atlanta in the opener of
a three-game series.
Carlos Delgado had two hits
and Moises Alou extended his
club-record hitting streak to 28
games with a sixth-inning double
for New York, which had won four
of five. Alou also committed an
error in left that allowed a run to
score in the fourth.
Matt Chico (6-9) pitched into the
sixth inning and Ryan Langerhans
hit a three-run homer in the ninth
for Washington, which did New
York a favor by beating the Phillies
5-3 on Sunday.

WASHINGTON NEW YORK


Jimnz ss
Lngrhn If
Blliard 2b
Zmrmn 3b
Batista 3b
Church If
Ayala p
Colome p
Kearns rf
Fick lb
Mxwell cf
Schndr c
Chico p
Rivera p
FLopez ss


ab rhbi ab r hbi


4 21 0 JBRyes ss
1 11 3 LCstillo 2b
6 12 3 Wright 3b
3 31 0 Beltran cf
0 00 0 Alou If
4 12 2 CDIgdo lb
0 00 0 LDucac
0 00 0 Gomez rf
4 22 3 Pelfrey p
5 01 1 Smith p
4 21 0 Conine ph
2 00 0 ShGren ph
2 00 0 Felicno p
0 00 0 Mota p
1 10 0 Gotay ph
DWIms p


4 001
5 1 20
5030
3 0 1 1
5 1 1 0
5 1 20
4 1 1 1
3 0 1 1
2 01 0
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
1 000
0000


Totals 36131112 Totals 37 412 4
Washington 000 232 033- 13
New York 010 002 001- 4
E-FLopez (21), Alou (4). LOB-
Washington 7, New York 11. 2B-Belliard 2
(33), Church 2 (42), Wright (41), Alou (18),
CDelgado (30), Pelfrey (1). HR-
Langerhans (6), Kearns (15). SB-FLopez
(23). CS-JBReyes (21). S-Chico. SF-
Beltran, Gomez.
IP H RERBBSO
.Washington
Chico W,6-9 51-3 9 3 3 2 0
Rivera 12-3 1 0 0 1 1
Ayala 1 0 0 0 0 1
Colome 1 2 1 1 0 0
New York .
Pelfrey L,3-8 52-3 5 7 6 5 3
Smith 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Feliciano 1 0 0 0 2 2
Mota 1 3 3 3 1 1
DWilliams 1 2 3 3 1 0
T-3:20. A-49,164 (57,343).


West Division
t GB L10
4 - z-6-4
3 2% z-7-3
3 4 8-2
3 8 z-3-7
2 19 3-7


Home
50-31
47-34
48-30
41-34
38-40


Away
38-37
38-36
36-42
39-42
31-47


Brewers 13, Cardinals 5
MILWAUKEE - Prince Fielder
hit his NL-leading 48th home run
and the Milwaukee Brewers
moved within three games of first
place, beating the St. Louis
Cardinals 13-5 on Monday night.
Brewers manager Ned Yost was
ejected for the second consecutive
day even though his team gained
a half-game on the Chicago Cubs
in the NL Central. But simply win-
ning in the final week of the sea-
son won't be enough to save the
Brewers' fading playoff hopes.
They'll need some cooperation
from the Cubs, who were off
Monday and finish the season with
six games on the road. Chicago's
magic number - the combination
of Cubs wins and Brewers losses
needed to clinch the division title
- remained at four.
But if the Brewers are going
down, they're going down swing-
�g. And so is their manager.
With Milwaukee leading 11-2 in
the sixth, Yost joined Fielder in
arguing a called third strike with
plate umpire Phil Cuzzi.


ST. LOUIS

Eckstin ss
Barden ss
Ankiel cf
Schmkr cf
Pujols lb
Reyes pr
Maroth p
KJimnz p
Ludwck rf
Tguchi If
Miles 2b
GBnntt c
Wnwrgt p
Cvos p
Brnyan lb
Ryan 3b


MILWAUKEE


ab rhbi
3 02 0 Weeks 2b
2 11 0 Hardy ss
4 11 1 Braun 3b
1 00 0 Fildr lb
3 00 0 CHart rf
0 00 0 Jenkins If
0 00 0 BHall cf
0 00 0 McCIng p
3 02 2 Dillon ph
4 01 0 Aquino p
4 11 0 DMiller c
4 12 2 Rivera c
2 00 0 Bush p
0 00 0 Nix cf
2 00 0
3 100


ab r h bi
3 320
5 221
5323
5 233
4 2 1 1
3 1 1 1
2 00 1
0000
1 000
0000
4 01 2
1 000
3 0 0 0
1 000


Totals 35510 5 Totals 37131212
St. Louis 000 200 300- 5
Milwaukee 400 053 01x-13
E-Eckstein (19), Ryan 2 (10), Braun
(23). DP-St. Louis 1, Milwaukee 2. LOB-
St. Louis 6, Milwaukee 7. 2B-Weeks (21),
Hardy (29), Fielder (34), DMiller (8'). HR-
GBennett (2), Braun (33), Fielder (48). SB-
CHart (23). CS-Taguchi (4). SF-BHall.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
WnwrgtL,13-12 5 8 9 4 2 7
Cavazos 1 2 3,2 2 2
Maroth': 1 1 0D., ,1 .
Jimenez 1 1 "1 1 1 0
Milwaukee
Bush W,12-10 62-3 9 5 3 2 4
McClung 11-3 1 0 0 0 1
Aquino 1 0 0 0 0 1
T-3:14. A--40,908 (41,900).


Cubs on the cusp



of MLB playoffs


Piniellas tirade

sparked current

run in NL Central

Associated Press

CHICAGO - Lou Piniella
called upon decades of baseball
knowledge when the Chicago
Cubs were scuffling for the first
two months. He watched intent-
ly, took mental notes and then
started swapping out the parts.
Finally, he used some theatrics
to literally kick-start his team.
Turns out, a dirt-kicking temper
tantrum against umpire Mark
Wegner on June 2 was just what
the Cubs needed, whether it was
premeditated or not, whether it
was the old Lou resurfacing in
the more mellow one.
"It's just evolved. I don't think
there were any turning points.
We had to do some things to
straighten ourselves out and just
let the guys play," Piniella said.
"If things aren't working - and
they weren't working earlier in
the year-you try to do different
things to shore things up."
-,, .


The Cubs fell nine games
under .500 that day after
Piniella was ejected, but are 61-
42 since June 3. Now, 3/2 months
later, Chicago is on the cusp of
clinching the NL Central. The
magic number is four headed
into the final week of the season
with three-game road series in
Florida and Cincinnati begin-
ning Tuesday.
The Cubs have a comfortable
working margin, but the fran-
chise has a long history of gut-
wrenching collapses, like in
1969 when they led by 9V2 games
in mid-August only to have the
Mets whiz by them.
Three years ago, they led the
wild card by 1/2 games with nine
games left before falling apart
in the final week, losing three of
four at home to the Reds and
missing the playoffs.
And four years ago, in Dusty
Baker's first season as manager,
the Cubs led the Marlins 3-1 in
the NL Championship Series.
With a 3-0 lead in the eighth
inning of Game 6, they were a
mere five outs from the World
Series. But Florida scored eight
runs after a fan interfered with
a foul ball, went on to win that
night and again in Game 7.


Chicago Cubs manager Lou Pinlella is poised to lead the franchise
into the National League playoffs in his first year at the helm.


dealing on Padres



rite an easy feat


SPORTS


Crnais Coumy (Fl.) CHRONICLE


i








TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2007 3B


LInu CR ouNIY (FL) CHRONICLE 7 "L 5--- - -


FOOTBALLL
Friday's late box
Dunnellon 43, Santa Fe 7
Santa Fe 0 0 7 0- 7
Dunnellon 13 7 0 23-43
SF DUN
First Downs 8 13
Total Yards 98 368
Rushes-yards 41-55 47-313
Passing 43 55
Comp-Att-Int 4-9-0 2-8-1
Fumbles-Lost 8-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 9-65 12-85
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING- (Attempts, Yards, TDs)
Santa Fe: Merricks 7-36-0; White 10-28-0;
Snead 4-20-0; Taylor 6-2-0; Tillman 1-0-0;
Mixon 2-(-20)-0; Scaff 10-(-23)-0.
Dunnellon: Black 13-110-2; Peacock 5-92-
2; McCray 7-47-1; Stichter 8-33-0; Cabrera
10-13-0; Young 3-11-0; Brown 1-7-0.
PASSING-(Comp, Att, yards, TDs, Int)
Santa Fer: Scaff 4-9-43-0-0; Dunnellon:
Stichter 2-8-55-1-1.
RECEIVING-(Catches, Yards, Tds),
Santa Fe: Snead 1-22-0; White 1-19-0;
Jenkins 1-11-0; Williams 1-(-5)-0.
Dunnellon: Milam 1-33-1; Quezada 1-22-0.
KICKING- (FG, FGA, XP, XPA) Santa
Fe: Mixon 0-0, 1-1. Dunnellon: 0-1, 5-6.
Top 25 Schedule
Friday's Game
No. 5 West Va. at No. 18 South Fla., 8 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. 1 Southern Cal at Washington, 8 p.m.
No. 2 LSU at Tulane, Noon
No. 3 Oklahoma at Colorado, 1:30 p.m.
No. 4 Florida vs. Auburn, 8 p.m.
No. 6 Cal at No. 11 Oregon, 3:30 p.m.
No. 7 Texas vs. Kansas State, 3:30 p.m.
No. 8 Ohio State at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
No. 9 Wisconsin vs. Mich. St., 3:30 p.m.
No. 10 Rutgers vs. Maryland, 3:30 p.m.
No. 12 Boston Coll. vs. Mass., 1 p.m.
No. 13 Clemson at Ga. Tech, 3:30 p.m.
No. 14 Kentucky vs. Fla. Atlantic, 1 p.m.
No. 15 Georgia vs. Mississippi, 1 p.m.
No. 16 So. Carolina vs. Miss. St., 12:30 p.m.�'
No. 17 Va. Tech vs. North Carolina, Noon
No. 19 Hawaii at Idaho, 5 p.m.
No. 21 Penn State at Illinois, Noon
No. 22 Alabama vs. Florida State at
Jacksonville, Fla., 5 p.m.
No. 23 Arizona State at Stanford, 10 p.m.
No. 24 Cincinnati at S. Diego St., 10 p.m.
No. 25 Nebraska vs. Iowa State, 2:05 p.m.


The AP Top 25
The Top 25 teams in The Associated
Press college football poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records through
Sept. 22, total points based on 25 points
for a first-place vote through one point for
a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
1. Southern Cal (43) 3-0 1,601 1
2. LSU (22) 4-0 1,580 2
3. Oklahoma 4-0 1,456 4
4. Florida 4-0 1,417 3
5. West Virginia 4-0 1,388 5
6. California 4-0 1,263 6
7. Texas 4-0 1,196 7
8. Ohio St. 4-0 1,193 8
9. Wisconsin 4-0 1,030 9
10. Rutgers 3-0 1,008 11
11. Oregon 4-0 944 13
12. Boston College 4-0 927 14
13. Clemson 4-0 807 15
14. Kentucky 4-0 708 21
15. Georgia 3-1 631 22
16. South Carolina 3-1 586 12
17. Virginia Tech 3-1 568 17
18. South Florida 3-0 539 23
19. Hawaii 4-0 471 19
20. Missouri 4-0 401 25
21. Penn St. 3-1 337 10
22. Alabama 3-1 265 16
23. Arizona St. 4-0 206 -
24. Cincinnati 4-0 164 -
25. Nebraska 3-1 134 24
Others receiving votes: Purdue 73,
Miami 72, Michigan St. 60, UCLA 27,
Michigan 21, Texas A&M 21, Arkansas 10,
Kansas 6, Florida St. 5, UCF 4,
Connecticut 3, Virginia 2, Tennessee 1.
USA Today Top 25 Poll
The Top 25 teams in the USA Today col-
lege football coaches poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records through
Sept. 22, total points based on 25 points
for a first-place vote through one point for
a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking:
Record Pts Pvs


1. Southern Cal (44)
2. LSU (8)
3. Florida (4)
4. Oklahoma (4)
5. West Virginia
6. California
7. Texas
8. Ohio State
9. Wisconsin
10. Rutgers
11. Boston College
12. Oregon
13. Clemson


1,481
1,438
1,347
1,336
1,260
1,137
1,103
1,092
1,026
901
881
878
767


14. Virginia Tech 3-1 585 17
15. Kentucky 4-0 545 23
16. Georgia 3-1 516 21
17. Hawaii 4-0 479 18
18. South Florida 3-0 451 24
19. Penn State 3-1 397 10
20. Missouri 4-0 369 25
21. South Carolina 3-1 335 14t
22. Nebraska 3-1 209 22
23. Michigan State 4-0 167 NR
24. Alabama 3-1 154 20
25. Arizona State 4-0 151 NR
tie. Purdue 4-0 151 NR
Others receiving votes: Cincinnati 84;
UCLA 69; Miami (Fla.) 52; Kansas 20;
Texas A&M 20; Boise State 18; Louisville
18; Michigan 17; Georgia Tech 10; Florida
State 8; Virginia 7; TCU 6; ; Tennessee 4;
Iowa 3; Air Force 2; Mississippi State 1.

MOVES
BASEBALL
Major League Baseball
MLB-Suspended Minnesota minor
league C Eli Tintor (Beloit-MWL) for 50
games following a positive test for a drug of
abuse.
American League
OAKLAND ATHLETICS-Exercised
2008 and 2009 contract options on Bob
Geren, manager, and 2B Mark Ellis.
National League
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES-Claimed OF
T.J. Bohn off waivers from the Atlanta
Braves.
SAN DIEGO PADRES-Acquired OF.
Jason Lane from the Houston Astros for a
player to be named or cash considerations.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS-Signed
G Troy Hudson.
MILWAUKEE BUCKS-Waived G Lynn
Greer.
WASHINGTON WIZARDS-Re-signed
G Roger Mason to a one-year contract.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
DETROIT LIONS-Signed TE Courtney
Anderson. Waived TE Rudy Sylvan.
GREEN BAY PACKERS-Signed WR
Shaun Bodiford. Released WR Chris
Francies.
TENNIS
ITF-Suspended Marcello Melo two
months, retroactive to Sept. 10, and dis-
qualified his results and money winnings
from The Artois Championships and U.S.
Open for testing positive for a prohibited
substance.


NFL
Continued from Page 1B

miserable game, got the ball
knocked away on the first play
of the fourth quarter--the sec-
ond of his four turnovers.
Brees threw four interceptions
and now has seven against one
touchdown pass.
Young seized on the Brees
fumble to drive Tennessee to
the decisive score.
The second-year quarterback
completed an 18-yard pass to
Roydell Williams, ran for 11
yards and capped the drive
with a 3-yard pass to Bo Scaife
that put the Titans up 24-14.
Prosecutor seeking
charges at Vick property
RICHMOND, Va. -The prose-
cutor in the county where Atlanta
Falcons quarterback Michael Vick
has admitted to bankrolling a
dogfighting operation plans to
present evidence to the grand
jury, Tuesday, that could possibly
lead to an indictment.
"Yes, I'm presenting matters to
the grand jury that involve dog-
fighting at 1915 Moonlight
Road," Surry County
Commonwealth Attorney Gerald
G. Poindexter told The
Associated Press in a telephone
interview Monday night.
Moonlight Road is the
address of the two-story home
on 15 mostly undeveloped acres
that has been host to "Bad
Newz Kennels" since 2001. It's
where dozens of pit bulls were
found in April, and where they
were trained, fought and brutally
executed.


rI
:siI


-~1


4~'i .~Z'.
~(l


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
BASEBALL
7 p.m. (66 PAX) New York Yankees at Tampa Bay Devil Rays.
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Chicago Cubs at Florida Marlins.
BOWLING
11 p.m. (ESPN2) PBAAII-Star Shootout- Second Round. (Taped)
11:30 p.m. (ESPN2) PBAAII-Star Shootout - Semifinal Match.
(Taped)
SOCCER
12 p.m. (FSNFL) English Premier League Soccer Chelsea vs.
Manchester United. (Taped)


Varsity Prep CALENDAR


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BOYS GOLF
3:30 p.m. Citrus, Lecanto, Springstead at Nature Coast
3:30 p.m. Crystal River at South Sumter
GIRLS GOLF
3:30 p.m. Vanguard, Trinity Catholic at Lecanto
3:30 p.m. The Villages at Citrus
3:30 p.m. Crystal River at South Sumter/West Port
VOLLEYBALL
6 p.m. Lecanto at Crystal River
6 p.m. Hernando Christian at Seven Rivers
7 p.m. West Port at Citrus





Lightning upend



Red Wings, 4-3


What's a compass format?


you've already marked
October 20 and 21 on
your calendar for the
third annual Crystal River Fall
Tennis Fest at Crystal River
High School. The event will be
benefiting the
Crystal River High
School Tennis
Program.
This year, a new |A .b
division has been
added: the mixed
doubles, in addition
to the men's and
women's doubles,
all in a Compass
T o u rna m e nt Eric-v
Format. Thi s a Hoo
non-elimination ON TE
format that is so
named because
players advance in four differ-
ent directions (compass direc-
tions) depending upon when
they lose their first match and
when they lose their subse-
quent matches. It also means
that players of all levels are in
one draw to start with.
How it's done: Seeding will
be used to place the strongest
players away from each other.
Seeds shall be drawn accord-
ing to the procedures used for
making a standard draw. After
each round, a new draw will
appear and there will be a total
of four draws at the end (East,
North, West and South).
Complications will develop if
there are byes in the draw.
Therefore it is best to limit
entries to 16.
A substitute list is helpful to
eliminate problems caused by
last minute withdraws. So if
you think you can not play both
days, the organizers still like
you to sign up on the sub list.
To explain further: At the end
of round 1, the winners go east,
the losers go west At the end
of round 2: the east losers go
north, winners keep going
east. At the end of round 3: the


I


DOC
Continued from Page 1B

on Jeff Stallnaker, Tom
Martone, Mike Loudy, Tim
Alexander and Mike
Stallnaker who recovered from
the earlier caution flag. When
the checkers flew, that's the
'way they finished but tech
inspection saw Tom Martone
take a disqualification for
'refusing to tear down and
.moved the rest of the field up
to round out the top five.
Only 14 Late Models made
the trip with the threatening
weather but it was quite a race
,for the win in their 35-lap main
event. Herb Neumann man-
aged to outrun five-time winner
Mike Bresnahan in the race for
'the flag that ended with a
green-white checker finish.
Daniel Webster took his new
Bill Kart ride to a third-place
finish over Dale Sanders.
This was only the eighth race
of the year for the Super Late
Models at Citrus, so the drivers'
race for the championship has
been very limited. Bresnahan


east losers go home, winners
are in the final; the north los-
ers go home, winners are in
the final; the west losers go
home, winners are in the final;
the south losers go home, win-
ners are in the final.
- At the end of
round 4: we have
. champions and run-
ner ups in four dif-
ferent compass
points (divisions).
The major prizes
go to the east win-
ner (who is unde-
n feated) and to the
n den east runner-up
gen (who has lost only to
'NNIS the east winner).
Next in order are
the winners and
runners-up from: north, west,
and south.
Monday Night Ladies
Doubles League
The league will resume Monday
October 15.
You may still contact the follow-
ing captains to sign up for their
team or as a sub for the league.
Judy Jeanette for Brooksville
Kick Butt, 232-0322;
Kooky Lucas for Black Diamond,
527-3654;
Vivien Amabile for Brooksville
Aces, 688-1571;
Susan Garrick for Bicentennial
Babes, 795-1450;
Antoinette van den Hoogen for
Sugarmill Woodsies, 382-3138;
Mary Jane Martin for Pine Ridge
Racqueteers, 527-3754;
Mary St. Clair for Love
Inverness, 726-8716.
For more information and to sign
up, contact Antoinette van den
Hoogen at 382-3138 or
hoera@juno.com
Citrus County Tuesday
Womens Tennis Leagues
USA Women Team Tennis
This league is geared towards


maintains the lead by 12 points
over Neumann with only two
scheduled races left for the sea-
son.
Sixteen Sportsmen went to
war in their race for the 2007
championship chasing Fred
Tuski for the crown. Mike
Veltman started the night off
with a heat win and then lined
up in the ninth starting spot for
the 20-lap feature run and pro-
ceeded to march to Victory
Lane for the second week in a
row and his sixth win of the sea-
son. Ernie Reed lost the lead to
Veltman but managed to hold
off 13th starter Fred Tuski in
the race for second followed by
point runner up Tom Posavec.
Twelve cars took on the 3/8th
of a mile track in the Mini Stock
20-lap main and Dan Smith
started third, locked onto the
point from the green flag and
never looked back for his first
win of the season. Mark Powers
mentioned several weeks ago
that he was in a slump after
recovering from a crash, but
took the win in the first heat
and chased Dan Smith to the
checkers for a solid second-
place finish. Don Faunce had


the 3.0 and 3.5 level players. Each
team consists of four players: New
players, regulars or subs, are
always welcome.
To sign up or for information
about this league, contact the
chairperson, Candace Charles, at
563-5859 or candacecharles@tam-
pabay.rr.com,
Senior Ladies
Tuesday 3.0 League
The league will start its new sea-
son on October 23rd. A captains
meeting has been scheduled for
today at the Riverhaven
Community Club at 10 am. The
league is geared towards senior
3.0 ladies from Citrus County.
Some teams are still looking for
players and there is also a sub list.
For information or to sign up as a
team, a player or a sub, contact
Sue Price 628-5620.
Thursday Morning Citrus
Area Doubles League
This league will start a full
schedule of play on October 4th.
The following teams have com-
mitted to play and are captained
by:
Sherri Stitzel for Bicentennial
Babes at
jstitzel@tampabay.rr.com;
Suzy Carney for Bicentennial
TNT at
sscarney@mindspring.com;
Jannice Lance for Citrus Hills
Aces at glance@tampabay.rr.com;
Claudia Williams for Citrus Hills
Swingers at cfw4u@yahoo.com;
Barbara Shook for Crystal River
Racqueteers at dshook@tam-
pabay.rr.com;
Joyce Shiver for Crystal River
Yoyo's at
jjshiver@tampabay.rr.com;
Marilyn Butler for Pine Ridge
Fillies at halb418@earthlink.net;
Mary Jane Martin for Pine Ridge
Mavericks at tennis99111@earth-
link.net;
Leah Stringer for Skyview at


his best finish of the season
winning out over point leader
Steve Griffin in the race for
third.
The 4-Cylinder Bombers
came on 18 cars strong and
Chris Harvey and Dan Haag
had a major match race for the
lead going on during the early
laps. Haag spun out and that
ended his run for the flag then
Chris Harvey had to contend
with Travis Hoefler and Jeff
Eberly as they battled for posi-
tion and the point lead. Hoefler
apparently lost power in the
final two laps, leaving Eberly
the opening to go around
Harvey for his fifth win of the
season. Harvey held out for sec-
ond followed by Phil Edwards,
Patric Conner and John
DeGeorge.
Pure Stocks had some heavy
traffic to contend with, starting
27 cars and losing about eight
cars before the checkers flew.
Mike Veltman continued his
winning ways motoring his way
from 17th to Victory Lane for
the second week in a row. Rick
Shahid started third and set the
pace for most of the race only to
fall to second when the check-


leahstringer@yahoo.com;
Willy Pouderoyen for Sugarmill
Woods Smashers at 382-3157.
Antoinette van den Hoogen for
Sugarmill Woods Oakies at 382-
3138 or hoera@juno.com.
Co-chairpersons for the
2007/2008 season are Maureen
Caruso at 352-270-9172, cell 678-
520-9366, or
maureen1894@aol.com or Joyce
Smith at 527-4239.
Citrus County Men's
Doubles League
On hold until further notice
becausethe league is in need of a
coordinator.
Yes, gentlemen, this was the
only organized men's league in the
county. We need to step up and
make things happen for men's ten-
nis in Citrus County.
The Friday Senior Ladies
Doubles 3.0 - 3.5 League
This league will start play again
in the fall.
For more information or to sign
up contact Jo Santo at 563-5848.
The Sugarmill Woods team is
looking for more players. Please
contact Vera Irish at 382-0188.
USTA Leagues
6.5 Combo Women: Sugarmill
Woods def. Harbor Hills, 2-1.
Record 1-1. Vicki
Bierczynski/Carol Hirsch won, 6-2,
6-1; Janelle Johnsoh/Sam Stiteler
won, 6-4, 7-6; Gail Sansom/Sara
Douglass lost, 7-5, 6-1.
Tournaments: October 20-21,
Fall Fest Compass Tournament at
Crystal River.
December 1-2, Chronicle/Pines
at Whispering Pines Park in
Inverness.
January 19-20, Crystal River
Open at Crystal River.


Eric van den Hoogen, Chronicle
tennis columnist, can be reached
at hoera@juno.com.


ers flew. Chad Markland outran
John Drye in the race for third.
It was Jesse Veltman follow-
ing in the family tradition with
his second consecutive win in
the V8 Thunder Stock Rookie
division. Twenty cars watched
him shoot from seventh to the
lead and put the rest of the field
to sleep before the checkers
flew. Another new arrival on
the rookie scene is Ed
Steinmann, who gave Veltman
some heat but had to settle for
second followed by Mike
Martin, Alex Wilder and Jeff
Eisenhower.
In Mini Cup action Devin
McLeod took the win in both
the heat and feature. Carlos
Nando see-sawed with Brady
Marshall in the race for second
spot followed by Brenton
Franklin and Mike Holt Mini
Cups will return on October 27
for Trick Or Treat night
This Saturday night will see
another eight division race
card featuring the Florida Pro
Challenge Racers plus Open
Wheel Modifieds, Figure 8's,
Sportsman, Mini Stocks, Pure
Stocks, V8 Thunder Stocks and
4 Cylinder Bombers in action.


Associated Press

TAMPA - Martin St. Louis
scored two power-play goals
to lead the Tampa Bay
Lightning past the Detroit
Red Wings 4-3 in a preseason
game Monday night.
St Louis tied it 2-2 on his first
goal, coming midway through the
first His second put Tampa Bay
ahead 4-2 at 14:39 of the second.
Andre Roy and Andreas
Karlsson also scored for the


Lightning. Karri Ramo had 20
saves.
Detroit got goals from
Jonathan Ericsson, Johan
Franzen and Brett Lebda, who
scored with 3:31 left in the third
to make it 4-3. Chris Osgood
played two periods and stopped
14 of 18 shots.
Most of Detroit's regulars did-
n't make the trip.
Tampa Bay was without
Vincent Lecavalier, who led the
NHL with 52 goals last season.


Associated rress
Tampa Bay's Andre Roy, right, lands a punch to the jaw of
Detroit's Aaron Downey Monday in Tampa.


GATORS
Continued from Page 1B

Cunningham had a sack
apiece, but both of them came
after Adams couldn't find any-
one open.
"We weren't that awful, but
we weren't that good, either,"
Cunningham said. "We're not
beating guys one-on-one like
we're supposed to do. We need
to get pressure on the quarter-
back to help the whole defense
out, not just the secondary.
"We have to find a way to get
to the quarterback It's been
frustrating."
The Gators have seven sacks
in four games, putting extra
pressure on a young secondary
that doesn't have the experi-
ence to handle it
"We've got to get a lot better
back there," Meyer said.
The defense did come up
with two big plays in the fourth


BUCS
Continued from Page 1B

Tampa Bay's rout of the Saints
two weeks ago.
He was 14-of-22 for 151 yards
during Sunday's 24-3 victory
over St Louis, content to spend
much of the second half hand-
ing off to running backs
Carnell "Cadillac" Williams,
Michael Pittman and Earnest
Graham.
The Bucs rushed for 182
yards and three touchdowns,
the last two by Graham, a sel-
dom-used backup who gained
75 yards on eight carries and
scored the first TDs of his
career after Williams fumbled:
to give the Rams a chance to
get back in the game.
Graham's success against St
Louis has Gruden's consider-
ing the possibility of increasing
the fourth-year pro's role.
Williams has been bothered
by sore ribs and is averaging
3.5 yards per carry. He has


quarter. Safety Tony Joiner
ended one drive with an inter-
ception, and the Gators
stopped a fake punt that essen-
tially sealed the victory.
Quarterback Tim Tebow did
the rest, keeping the defense
off the field for much of the
final 15 minutes. Tebow ran 27
times for 166 yards and two
scores, including 12 carries
for 71 yards in the fourth.
Meyer said Tebow ran the
ball too much, adding that the
sophomore was struggling to
throw the ball against
Mississippi's deep zone
defense.
Tebow finished 20-of-34
passing for 261 yards and two
touchdowns.
"I'm far beyond a little con-
cerned. I'm very concerned,"
Meyer said. "That's no one's
responsibility other than
mine. It wasn't all pre-
designed . quarterback runs.
He did not have a particularly
good game throwing the ball.".


scored three touchdowns,
though, and Gruden remains
committed to him as the fea-
tured back, .with Pittman con-
tinuing as his primary backup.
"He played pretty well
(against St Louis). He had.a
fumble, he had the touchdown.
He had two, three or four very
nice runs to start the second
half, on our opening drive for
the touchdown," Gruden said.
"I am not going to defend
him any more than I have to .:.
Obviously he has put the ball
on the ground, he's had some
issues with his ribs. We expect
a lot more because of what we
have seen him do in the past,
That's all I will say about it I
want him to get going obviously
quick, because we need him."
Garcia also has been
impressed with the progress of
a retooled offensive line that's
allowed four sacks in three
games and is beginning to
show signs of having the ability
to open the kind of holes that
enable running backs to wear
down opposing defenses.


sapc3re


/-11-1 11 "" , IT7T I . .












4B


TUESDAY
SEPTEMBER 25, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

During to receive
award from SAG
LOS ANGELES - Charles
During will be honored for
lifetime achievement by the
Screen Actors
Guild.
During,
84, will
receive the
award for fos-
tering the
"finest ideals
of the acting
Charles profession"
During during the
14th Annual
Screen Actors Guild Awards
show Jan. 27, the guild said
Monday in a statement
'Throughout his career, he
has epitomized the art and
grace of acting and brought
something special to every
role," SAG President Alan
Rosenberg said in a state-
ment "He is above all things a
great actor with the talent to,
which we all aspire: the power
to create indelible characters."
During received Oscar
nominations for his roles in
'To Be or Not to Be" and 'The
Best Little Whorehiouse in
Texas." His movie credits also
include "The Sting," "Dog Day
Afternoon," "'Tootsie" and "O0
Brother, Where Art Thou?"

Samantha Harris
delivers baby girl
LOS ANGELES -
"Dancing with the Stars" co-
host Samantha Harris has a
new star in her life: She gave
birth Sunday
to a baby girl,
her publicist
said.
Josselyn
Sydney Hess
weighed 6
pounds, 12
ounces and
Samantha was 20 inches
Harris long Both
mother and
child were doing well, publi-
cist Shara Koplowitz said.
It's the first child for Harris,
33, and her husband Michael
Hess, a financial wholesaler

Hudson went behind
camera for 'Cutlass'
NEW YORK-- Kate
Hudson went behind the cam-
era for "Cutlass," one of
Glamour magazine's "Reel
Moments" short films based
on readers' personal essays.
The goal of
- the competi-
tion, now in
its third year,
* . * is to empower
, women by
S 4 producing
* i female-
friendly short
Kate films and cre-
Hudson ating opportu-
nities for
actresses to direct This year,
the assignment was to cap-
ture the essence of happiness,
the magazine said Monday
The contest began earlier
this year with stories submit-
ted to Glamour The magazine
narrowed down readers' sub-
missions and asked Hudson,
Kirsten Dunst and Rita
Wilson to choose their
favorites.

Garner talks
about motherhood
NEW YORK-Jennifer
Garner, who stars in the
upcoming film, "The
Kingdom," says she's grateful
that she can balance her
career with
motherhood.
"My job is
great to have
as a mom,"
she tells
Marie Claire
magazine in
its October
Jennifer issue. "I get to
Garner take long
breaks and
then work hard in a really
concentrated way"
Garner wed Ben Affleck in
June 2005. Their daughter,
Violet, will be 2 on Dec. 1.
"She's pretty awesome.


We're in that sweet spot
before the 'terrible twos,"' the
35-year-old actress says. "We
definitely wonder what it
would be like to have another
- hopefully, knock on wood,
someday"


- From wire reports


Gay characters increase on cable loTRESi


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES - The num-
ber of gay characters depicted
on TV is falling on network
series but rising on cable, a
study by the Gay & Lesbian
Alliance Against Defamation
found.
In the 2007-08 TV season,
broadcast series will feature
seven regularly seen charac-
ters who are gay, lesbian, bisex-
ual or transgender, down from
nine characters in 2006 and 10
the season before, GLAAD
said. Most are on one network
-ABC.
The new figure represents
1.1 percent of all regular char-
acters on ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox
and CW, compared to 1.3 per-
cent in 2006, according to the
study to be released Monday. A
total of 87 comedies and dra-
mas with 650 characters were
analyzed.
By comparison, cable shows
will feature 40 gay characters
as series regulars, GLAAD
said.
"While we acknowledge
there have been improvements
made in how we are seen on
the broadcast networks, most
notably on ABC, our declining
representation clearly indi-
cates a failure to inclusively
reflect the audience watching
television," GLAAD President
Neil G. Giuliano said in a state-
ment.
The seven broadcast charac-
ters appear on five shows,
including "Brothers & Sisters,"
"Desperate Housewives,"
"Ugly Betty," "The Office" and
the new midseason series
"Cashmere Mafia."
ABC shows are home to six of
the seven, with one on NBC.


There were no lead or support-
ing gay or transgender charac-
ters set to appear on CBS, FOX
or CW, GLAAD found.
Last year, the characters
were spread among five net-
works. However, there will be
an additional 13 gay characters
seen occasionally on broadcast
TV shows this season, com-
pared to five recurring charac-
ters last year.
That increase "suggests that
producers and writers are
showing a guarded interest in
being inclusive without making
the characters lead or support-
ing," GLAAD said in a release,
noting that gay characters on
"Ugly Betty" and "Desperate
Housewives" first appeared as
recurring before being added
to the regular cast.
ABC, Fox and CW declined
requests for comment, while
NBC and CBS did not immedi-
ately respond.
The "real advances" in gay
depiction on TV are being
made on cable channels,
GLAAD said.
The 40 regular characters
depicted on 21 scripted shows
on cable channels including
HBO, Showtime and FX repre-
sents 15 more characters than
last year, the study found.
GLAAD has issued its "Where
We Are on TV" report on gay
characters for 12 years. For the
past three years, the organiza-
tion also has looked at represen-
tation of minorities, men and
women on broadcast TV
Whites make up 77 percent
of network series regular char-
acters, up 2 percent from last
year. Blacks remained steady
at 12 percent and Asian-Pacific
Islanders at 3 percent, while
Latinos dropped from 7 per-


Associated Press
This 2006 photo shows "Desperate Housewives" star Shawn
Pyfrom, who plays Andrew Van De Kamp, the gay son of one of the
ladies of the fictional Wisteria Lane. A study released by the Gay
& Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation acknowledges ABC for the
"improvements made in how we are seen on the broadcast net-
works." Overall, GLAAD's study found that the number of gay char-
acters depicted on TV is falling on network series but rising on
cable.


cent to 6 percent.
Male characters outweighed
females 58 percent to 42 per-
cent on network shows.
CW. although lacking gay


characters, ranked first in
overall diversity with ethnic
minorities making up 32 per-
cent of its series regulars, the
study found.


H ere are the
winning numbers
selected Monday in
the Florida
Lottery:
CASH 3
1-6-2
PLAY 4
4-3-8-2
FANTASY 5
9 - 22 - 29 - 35 - 36
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23
Cash 3:3- 5-7
Play 4:2 - 6 - 0- 5
Fantasy 5:1 -12 - 14-29 - 32
5-of-5 1 winner $190,594.82
4-of-5 215 $142.50
3-of-5 7,351 $11.50
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22
Cash 3: 8-6 - 8
Play 4:1 -6-9-3
Lotto: 1 -5-10-21 -27-38
6-of-6 1 winner $6 million
5-of-6 133 $3,013
4-of-6 6,551 $49.50
3-of-6 115,236 $4
Fantasy 5: 2-3- 19-26-35
5-of-5 1 winner $282,739.84
4-of-5 336 $135.50
3-of-5 11,959 $10.50
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21
Cash 3:1 -5-7
Play 4: 7-4-7-2
Fantasy 5:2 - 6 - 9 - 12 - 13
5-of-5 4 winners $65,683.65
4-of-5 417 $101.50
3-of-5 13,505 $8.50


INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially posted
by the Florida Lottery. On the
Web, go to www.flalottery
.com; by telephone, call (850)
487.-777.


'Resident Evil: Extinction' pumps up prey sn r
PPEHISTORY


KEVIN CRUST
Los Angeles Times

The third installment of
"The Adventures of Alice in
Zombieland," better known as
the "Resident Evil" franchise,
landed in theaters Friday with-
out benefit of press previews.
Movie summer may have con-
cluded with Labor Day and
official summer may have
wrapped with the onset of fall
on Sunday, but the single-mind-
edly escapist "Resident Evil:
Extinction" feels like the real
end of summer.
Milla Jovovich returns to her
signature role as the zombie-
butt-kicking genetic hybrid,
Alice, once again separated
from her clothing as often as
narratively possible and wield-
ing guns, knives and kicks with
aplomb. "Extinction" picks up
several years after the T-virus
from the earlier films has


spread around the world, turn-
ing those infected into the
walking dead, and even zombie
dogs and a sky full of zombie
crows dot the landscape.
The Umbrella Corp., an inter-
national pseudo-governmental
agency, has literally gone under-
ground as it works to reverse the
effect of the virus it originally
unleashed. lain Glen is once
again the lead baddie, Dr Isaacs,
desperately searching for Alice,
whose DNA holds the keys to the
virus and who has hacked into
Umbrella's satellite system and
successfully gone off the grid.
Now riding a motorcycle and
attempting to make it as a lone
wolf because people tend to get
killed when she's around, Alice
nevertheless hooks up with a
convoy of 30 or so souls led by
the straight-shooting Claire (Ali
Larter) that happens to include
'Apocalypse" survivors Carlos
(Oded Fehr) and L.J. (Mike


Epps). Desperately running out
of provisions and fuel, the group
heads for Las Vegas, which has
been reduced to a giant sandbox
w'itfh protruding hotels.
"Highlander" director Russell
Mulcahy takes the helm for
"Extinction." and though this
entry is not as high-octane as
Alexander Witt's more energetic
"Resident Evil: Apocal.pse,"the
screenplay by the series' original
director. Pa ul W.S Anderson,
provides enough continuity to
satisfy the flesh-munching crav-
ings of most tans Only a dis-
agreeable final act brings the
action to a thudding halt
Mulcahy tags "western" onto
the genre mix of horror and
action, mining the film's post-
apocalyptic desert setting for a
maximum amount of sweeping
vistas and makes visual refer-
ences to films as varied as
"LaVwrence of Arabia" and
"Planet of the Apes."


The story and characters are
surprisingly engaging, with fight
scenes and scares effectively
placed between plot turns.
Alice's encounter with the con-
voy, however, turns out to be little
more than an hourlong diver-
sion to set up her ultimate battle
with what can only be described
as the Barry Bonds of zombies.
As strange a point as it is to
make about a movie that is, after
all, about zombies, the ending
gets a little silly Alice's abilities
have developed exponentially
since we last saw her, and pre-
sumably the filmmakers felt it
necessary to beef up her opposi-
tion, but the climax seems to be
out of an entirely different
movie. And be forewarned:
Though "Resident Evil:
Extinction" is billed as the final
entry in the series, the film con-
cludes so open-endedly that it's
less a finale than a loss of trans-
mission.


Today is Tuesday, Sept. 25, the
268th day of 2007. There are 97
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
Fifty years ago, on Sept. 25,
1957, nine black students forced to
withdraw from Central High School
in Little Rock, Ark., because of
unruly white crowds were escorted
to class by members of the U.S.
Army's 101stAirbome Division.
On this date:
In 1919, President Wilson col-
lapsed after a speech in Pueblo,
Colo., during a national speaking
tour in support of the Treaty of
Versailles.
In 1956, the first trans-Atlantic
telephone cable went into service.
In 1973, the three-man crew of
the U.S. space laboratory Skylab 2
splashed down safely in the Pacific
Ocean after spending 59 days in
orbit.
In 1981, Sandra Day O'Connor
was swom in as the first female jus-
tice on the Supreme Court.
Ten years ago: President Clinton
pulled open the door of Central High
School in Little Rock, Ark., as he
welcomed nine blacks who'd faced
hate-filled mobs 40 years earlier.
Five years ago: American
schoolchildren escaped a rebel-held
Ivory Coast city that was under
siege as U.S. special forces and
French troops moved in to rescue
Westerners caught in the West
African nation's bloody uprising.
One year ago: British forces in
Iraq shot and killed Omar al-Farouq,
a leading al-Qaida terrorist, more
than a year after he embarrassed
the U.S. military by escaping from a
maximum security military prison in
Afghanistan.
Today's Birthdays: Broadcast
journalist Barbara Walters is 78.
Country singer lan Tyson is 74.
Rhythm-and-blues singer Joe
Russell is 68. Actor Robert Walden
is 64. Actor-producer Michael
Douglas is 63. Model Cheryl Tiegs
is 60. Actress Mimi Kennedy is 58.
Actor Mark Hamill is 56. Actor Colin
Friels is 55. Actress Heather
Locklear is 46. Basketball player
Scottie Pippen is 42. Actor Will
Smith is 39. Actress Catherine Zeta-
Jones is 38. Actress Bridgette
Wilson-Samrnpras is 34. Actor Chris
Owen is 27. Actor Lee Norris is 26.
Thought for Today: "It is as fatal
as it is cowardly to blink (at) facts
because they are not to our taste."
- John Tyndall, English physicist
(1820-1893).

REMEMBER WHEN
j For more local history, visit
the Remember When page
of ChronicleOnline.com.


Associated Press

BOSTON - More than 80
years after Nicola Sacco and
Bartolomeo Vanzetti were exe-
cuted in Boston, they still inspire
impassioned debate about
whether they were guilty of the
murders of two men during a
1920 payroll robbery.
But in a new exhibit at the
state's highest court, the guilt or
innocence of the Italian immi-
grants and committed anarchists
is not as important as the ques-
tion of whether they received a
fair trial.
"The Case of Sacco and
Vanzetti: Justice on Trial,"
explores not only the trial itself,
but the tension and political tur-
moil of the times. The exhibit
highlights the prejudice against
immigrants that was prevalent
then, particularly against for-
eigners who believed in commu-
nism, socialism or anarchism.
Sacco and Vanzetti were
arrested several weeks after a
payroll clerk and a security
guard were shot and killed dur-
ing an armed robbery at a shoe
factory in Braintree. Their
arrests came during the "Red
Scare," a period characterized
by a widespread fear of political


radicals, a series of bomb attacks
against U.S. government officials
and retaliatory raids in which
thousands of suspected radicals
were arrested and deported.
Their 1921 trial drew interna-
tional attention.
After they were convicted and
sentenced to die in the electric
chair, supporters, including polit-
ical dissidents, unionists and
Italian immigrants, staged
demonstrations across the
United States and Europe to con-
demn what they considered a
miscarriage ofjustice. Poet Edna
St Vincent Millay was among the
protesters arrested in Bostonr
The exhibit, which opened
earlier this month and will run
indefinitely, is displayed in a
small room in the John Adams
Courthouse, where the Supreme
Judicial Court hears appeals in
cases ranging from property dis-
putes to sensational murder
cases. Placards and photographs
guide visitors through the story
of the two men. There is also a
computer terminal where visi-
tors can link to the Web site of
law professor Douglas Linder
and read trial transcripts, state-
ments Sacco and Vanzetti made
at their sentencing and letters
they wrote from prison.


Associated Press
Volunteer tour guides Erna Lawrence, from left, Kent Lawrence and
Nancy Kurtz sit behind a display of memorabilia Sept. 18 at a new
exhibit covering the trial of Italian anarchists Nicola Sacco and
Bartolomeo Vanzetti at the John Adams Courthouse in Boston.


SJC Chief Justice Margaret
Marshall said the exhibit is part
of the high court's effort to give
the public opportunities to learn
about the legal system. It is open
for free to visitors during court-
liouse hours
"What I think they can take
away from this exhibit is that
they understand that we really
do live in a country where we try


our very best to make sure that
people receive a fair trial, but
that sometimes there may be a
perception that a mistake is
made," she said.
'This is a chance to go back
and look at the circumstances of
that trial and see if there's any-
thing we can learn that will teach
us about our system of govern-
ment"


High court puts



Sacco & Vanzetti


trial on exhibit


TAL











C
TUESDAY
SEPTEMBER 25, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


There's a pill for it


Diabetic decisions
Prescriptions for the diabetes
drug Actos are outnumbering
rival Avandia for the first half of
2007, unlike the last two years.
Diabetes drug prescriptions
Actos SM Avandia
15 million prescriptions
12 * Through June..............





02 03 04 05 06 07*
SOURCE: IMS Health AP


Avandia option,

Actos, looks to carry

fewer risks
LINDSEY TANNER
AP medical writer
CHICAGO - The widely used
diabetes pill Actos appears to
lower a patient's chances of death,
heart attack or stroke, unlike its
beleaguered chief rival Avandia, a
new analysis shows.
However, it also carries an
increased risk of nonfatal heart
failure, the analysis showed, con-
firming earlier studies. Heart fail-
ure is also a side effect with
Avandia. Such problems led one
diabetes expert to recommend that
both drugs be considered second
choices behind older, cheaper
pills.
TT --'I.. .. ," "


Heart failure is
a significant side
effect," said Dr.
Alvin Powers,
director of
Vanderbilt
University's dia-
betes center. "No
one would say that
you should be on
these drugs to prolong
He was not involved in
research.
Older drugs including
Glucophage are availab
ic form and can cost les
cents a day - 10 times
Avandia and Actos. Hoe
older drugs can stop wc
doctors may try newer
of having patients resort
injections.
When the older drug,
tiveness, Actos "is a dr
clearly I think is prefer
Dr. A Michael Lincoff,
authored the Actos stud
Cleveland Clinic collea
Steven Nissen.
Their research was p
a $25,000 grant from Ta
Research'& DevelopmE
Deerfield, Ill., division
maker, Takeda Pharma
of Osaka, Japan. Taked
Please see


STACIE FREUDENBERG/AP Photo
David Barish, right, a 49-year-old Chicago attorney with diabetes and heart disease, talks with a member of his
cycling club before a 50-mile ride Sept. 9 in Evanston, III. Barish's doctors switched him from Avandia to Actos,
which he says is good news in light of a new analysis that shows the blockbuster Actos diabetes pill appears to
lower risks of death, heart attacks or strokes, unlike its beleaguered chief rival Avandia.

Insulin plus drugs doesn't help many diabetics, say researchers


Los Angeles Times


ON THE Adding insulin injections to oral
NET diabetes drugs does not bring many
* JAMA: . patients with Type 2 diabetes into
0 JAMA: control of their blood sugar levels, -
ama.http:// according to early results from a
ama-assn major British study released Friday.
amaassn The study is the first designed to
.org determine which type of insulin
should be used initially in such
your life." patients and researchers concluded
the that a single daily injection of long-
acting insulin was better than shots
9g. twice a day or three times a day at
)le in gener- meals.
ss than 20 Disappointingly, however, only
less than about one-quarter of patients were
ever, the successful with the best regimen.
working and "This is showing us that to really
pills instead manage diabetes is a lot more com-
rt to insulin plicated than a lot of us had hoped
for," said Dr. Larry C. Deeb, a
s lose effec- Tallahassee endocrinologist and for-
ug that mer president of science and medi-
rable," said cine at the American Diabetes
who co- Association. "The best they got was 25
dy with percent That's scary."
gue, Dr. The results, added Dr. Rury. R.
Holman of Oxford University, "sug-
)aid for with gest that most patients are likely to
keda Global need more than one type of insulin if
ent, a they are to maintain recommended
of Actos' glucose levels in the long term."
iceutical Co. Holman presented the findings
a had no Friday at an Amsterdam meeting of
the European Association for the
PILL/Page 4C Study of Diabetes. They were also,


The best they
got was 25 percent.
That's scary. ..-

Dr. Larry C. Deeb
endocrinologist,
about the percentage of patients who
successfully managed their diabetes.
published online by the New
England Journal of Medicine and
will appear in the Oct 25 issue.
About 18 million Americans suffer
from Type 2 diabetes, in which body
tissues lose their sensitivity to
insulin. Patients initially are treated
with drugs such as metformin and
sulfonylureas, but most eventually
require increasingly larger doses of
insulin as well.
Numerous studies have shown that
tight control of diabetes is essential
to preventing complications of the
disease such as peripheral neuropa-
thy, diabetic retinopathy and cardio-
vascular complications.
But there have been no studies
about how the insulin regimen
should be started, Holman said.
He and his colleagues enrolled 708
patients who were taking the maxi-
mum doses of metformin and a sul-
fonylurea and whose glycated hemo-
globin levels were above 7 percent
Glycated hemoglobin levels are a


measure of average sugar levels in
the blood. Levels above 7 percent
indicate that the diabetes is not being
controlled adequately.
The team randomly assigned the
patients to receive either twice daily
shots of a form of insulin called
biphasic aspart 30, shots before
meals of a form called aspart, or a
single daily injection of long-acting
insulin.
At the end of one year, 23.9 percent
of those taking shots twice daily had
glycated hemoglobin levels of 6.5 per-
cent or lower, compared to 17 percent
of those taking it at meals and 8.1 per-
cent of those taking single daily shots.
But those taking two or three shots
daily had the most episodes of hypo-
glycemia - dangerously low blood
sugar - and gained the most weight
The team concluded that it is proba-
bly best to start patients offwith a sin-
gle daily shot of long-acting insulin.
The study provides a clear indica-
tion that the twice-daily shots and
shots at meals "are sub-optimal
choices for insulin initiation and
probably expose patients to an un-
necessarily high risk of hypoglycemia
without clinically important benefit,"
wrote NEJM editors in an editorial
accompanying the paper.
The study is sponsored by Novo
Nordisk, which makes all three types
of insulin used. All of the researchers
have received financial support from
pharmaceutical companies.


Voice disorders affect all jobs One year of support


Voice disorders affect millions of impair communication between elder-
Americans and, along with other ly spouses who may have, in addition to
communication disorders, are the voice problem, difficulty hearing.
being targeted for investiga- For convenience, we have
tion. A multi-discipline defined four levels of voice
approach including ear, disorders and voice usage.
nose and throat doctors and The first one is the elite
speech pathologists are vocal performer, Level I, a
being used to research and person in whom even a
develop more information slight problem may have
about the voice and voice serious consequences. Most
disorders, which even to this I singers and actors would fall
day are not completely into this category.
understood, despite the Dr. Denis Grillo Level II would be the pro-
advances of modern medi- fessional voice user. Thisis a
cine and science. EAR, NOSE person who may have mod-
Voice, which is not an & THROAT rate vocal dysfunction that
organ but rather a product would impair adequate job
or output of the vocal tract, can be asso- performance. An example of this group
cited with significant problems, but would include clergyperson, lecturers
most of the time is not And the most and phone operators.
common disorders resolve themselves The non-vocal professional, which is
spontaneously Level III, most commonly represents
the group including teachers, doctors,
The identification of an individual's lawyers, businessmen or possibly
vocal needs is the most important com- receptionists. This group could not per-
ponent in successfully treating vocal form their job very well if suffering
disorder. A voice disorder may prevent from vocal problems.


a singer from singing, a lawyer, cler-
gyperson or teacher from working, or


Please see GRILLO/Page 4C


Editor's note: This is part of a weekly
series of condensed excerpts from Dr.
Ed Dodge's new book, "Dan's Story:
One Man's Discovery of Personal
Health Power."
year after forming
their support group,
Dan, Judy and the "'
other members of the group
rewarded themselves by
holding a one-year anniver-
sary celebration dinner.
After a delicious dinner,
each person talked briefly
about the highlights of their Dr. Ed
year -'DA
Dan's talk was fairly typi- 'D
cal: "I have made more STO
progress this year than I
dared hope for when I
began. Having lost 37 pounds, I am
more than halfway to my weight goal.
My blood pressure and blood sugar are
so improved that my doctor has cut
back on my meds, and I feel great
Thank you guys! I couldn't have done
this without your help."
Everyone cheered. After everybody
had spoken, it was Dr Davis's turn.


"I congratulate all of you," he began.
"You have accomplished a lot, and it
shows. I wish we had before and after
pictures, because each one of you looks
great. I can't give you
enough credit for the sup-
port you have given each
That has been a key factor in
your success, but it is not the
only one. As you now know,
there are five major factors
involved in taking good care
of yourselves. Let's review
Dodge them.
Dodg "Wholesome nutrition,
N'S wholesome exercise, whole-
RY' some personal and commu-
nity hygiene, wholesome
relaxation, and wholesome
relationships are the five factors need-
ed to nurture truly good health. We
have spent the past year surveying
these major aspects of health, and you
have accomplished wonders as you
have worked at applying all of them.
"Unfortunately, many people concen-
Please see DODGE/Page 5C


I


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY



Importance

of cancer

prevention

new government
report on causes of
death in the United
States should serve as a call
to step up cancer prevention
and early detection efforts
in this country.
The report by the Centers
for Disease Control and
Prevention (CDC) shows that
the actual number of cancer
deaths in the United States
inched up between 2004 and
2005, from 553,888 to 559,300.
This bump in the wrong
direction follows two con-
secutive years where cancer
deaths declined. *
The drops in total number
of actual cancer deaths in
2003 and 2004 were truly
milestones and reasons to
celebrate our progress in the
battle against cancer.
However, the preliminary
data for 2005 show the
importance of continuing
our efforts in the fight, not
just simply sitting back and
congratulating ourselves .on
the progress we have made.
The report does, however,
contain some very encourag-
Please see BENNETT/Page 5C


Dr. Sunil Gandhi
CANCER
& BLOOD
DISEASE


Platelet

count

can show

trouble

Mr. Smith is a 78-year-
old gentleman. He
is very healthy and
active. One day he noticed
tingling and numbness on
the right side of his arm and
legs. This lasted for almost
one hour and then subsided.
He was worried about hav-
ing a stroke. He saw his
internist, who diagnosed it
as a TIA (transient ischemic
attack). This can be due to
temporary blood clots in
arteries to the brain. This is
also known as a mini stroke.
Workup involved a complete
blood count (CBC).
CBC results showed that
Mr. Smith had very high
platelets. Normal platelet
count is 150,000 to 400,000.
His count was more than 1
million. So the patient was
referred to me for further
management
Platelets are blood cells
just like red or white blood
cells. Platelets clot blood.
For instance, if you get a
small cut while shaving,
bleeding stops right away
and that is done by platelets.
At the same time, if you have
too many platelets (like my
patient), your blood can clot
without any injury and
cause a stroke or heart
attack or many other prob-
lems.
Please see GANDHI/Page 5C


.I








f~ �USDY SFT MBR25,20


ME1ATynriW )LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Applying caps a dentist's job Husband outdoes himself


9 When you apply a cap to a
* molar, do you personally
* apply the cap or does an
assistant usually do it? Thank you
and I enjoy your weekly articles.
A: Thanks for this question. .-,
Florida state law does not allow an �
assistant to place a cap or crown for
permanent cementation. Nor are ,
they allowed to make any adjust- Frank
ments to it prior to cementation. I D ran]
often hear from patients that come to SOL
me for a second opinion that the den- BIT
fist's assistant was doing things that,
as I understand the law, are illegal.
We also know that there are two sides to every
story, so who really knows?
This being said, Florida law does allow a lot
of things to be done by auxiliary staff. Being
trained in New York and having graduated in
1987, I do most of the duties during a procedure
inyself. I feel more comfortable this way.
* This brings up another topic. Just this week
my wife, Rita, a dental hygienist, received a let-
ter from the American Dental Hygienists
Association. The letter stated that there is a bill
in the works that, will allow assistants to take
and record periodontal probings, as well as per-
form a prophylaxis (cleaning), as long as they


U
r


stay above the gums. These are both
things that dental hygienists are for-
mally trained to do through two years
of intense study.
They are, of course, trained to do
many other tasks as well, but my
point is that they are formally
trained. Nowhere in this bill did I
read about training. I personally
V . .think this is wrong and could be a
cause for concern. As you may have
JND already figured out from my
ES columns, I take dentistry very seri-
ously and I feel like this would be a.
mistake.
If any of the readers of this column ever feel
as though the wrong person is doing something
to them, I would ask to speak to the dentist
responsible for their wellbeing. Do not feel bad
about asking direct questions, because it is your
health and wellbeing at stake. If you are not sat-
isfied with their response, consider your
options.

Dr. Frank Vascimini is a Homosassa dentist
Send your questions to 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa 34446 or e-mail them to him at
info@masterpiecedentalstudio.com.


F or the celebration of our four-
year anniversary, Patrick
decided to do something very
special for me. For the first time in a
long time, he planned a surprise trip
all by himself.
"I can't wait - but it better not
have to do with golfing, fishing or
gambling," I told him. He kind of
froze. I guess sometimes he can be a Shalyn
bit predictable. y
On Saturday, we took Emmy to a
pageant (which I will tell you about PL
some other time) and then headed
north out of Ocala. All I saw were Gator flags
blowing past us wedged in the windows of cars
- shoot! There was a Gator game that day. I for-
got to include "football games" in my list.
Anyway, he joked with me for a bit about that
scenario, and then he began to head east. I knew
it! We were going to St Augustine.
I hadn't really been to St. Augustine since that
elementary school trip we all take, so I didn't
know how much fun it could be for adults. And
Patrick had never been, so this was sure to be an
exciting trip for us.
We stayed at the Cedar House Inn, a beautiful
bed and breakfast overlooking Flagler College.


l
1
J


They had tea and cookies at three
o'clock, wine and cheese at five
o'clock, and breakfast in the morning
that included a fruit and yogurt
appetizer and homemade frittatas.
We shopped, visited the fort, had a
beautiful dinner on St. George
Street, and went to.the wax museum.
We even went on a "ghost tour"
Barker (which is more like a nighttime his-
torical tour of old legends, but enter-
ILL training nonetheless).
ETE The next morning after breakfast,
we went to the Ripley's Believe it or
Not Museum, and to the St John's Dog Track for
a bit of horse- and dog-race wagering and some
hamburgers. It was a great time.
On the way home, he said, "I don't know how
I'll top this next year."
I told him not to worry - "I'm sure you'll fig-
ure out a way."

Shalyn Barker resides with her husband,
Patrick, and daughter, Emmy, in the Beverly
Hills area. All three are lifelong residents of
Citrus County. She can be reached at
citrusamom@yahoo. com.


Health NOTES


* "Diagnosis and Treatment
Options for Peripheral Artery
Disease (PAD)" with Nagaraja
"RAJ" Sharma, M.D., from 3:30 to
5 p.m. today at the fourth floor
classroom of Hemando Medical
Center, adjacent to Oak Hill Hos-
pital at Entrance C. Free blood
pressure and blood oxygen level
checks also offered. 628-6060.
* Two-day volunteer orienta-
tion for the Citrus team of Heman-
do-Pasco Hospice (HPH) from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. both Wednesday
and Friday at 3545 N. Lecanto
Highway in Beverly Hills' Park
Plaza. Lunch provided. Pre-register
by calling Debi Shields at 527-
4600. www.hphospice.org.
* Citrus Partnership in Health
quarterly meeting, 8:30 to 11 a.m.
Thursday at the Lecanto Govern-
ment Building, Room 166, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path. Guest speaker
John Mannish, executive director
of United Way of Citrus County.
RSVP to Virginia Crandall, R.N., at
527-0068, ext 240.
* Catholic Charities DOSP has
openings in its respite program
for people in the early stages of
dementia due to Alzheimer's or
other illnesses such as stroke,
Parkinson's and the like. The pro-
gram is offered at Our Lady of
Grace Church, 6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
in Beverly Hills. It meets from
12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday
and the cost is $20 for the four
hours. The program is also in need
of male volunteers. Call Marie
Monahan at (800) 242-9012, ext.
;22.
:. * Free memory screenings
:from Alzheimer's Family Organiza-
tion, 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Friday in
,The Villages. Appointments only.
.Call (727) 848-8888 or toll free at
:(888) 496-8004.
:, * Luncheon event for Breast
Cancer Awareness, 11 a.m. Satur-
day at Bently's Restaurant in South
,Dunnellon, sponsored by Relay for
:Life along with Alma Tankersley of
the Longaberger Company. Tickets
;are $25. All proceeds will be donat-
:ed the American Cancer Society.
;For tickets, call Tankersley at (352)
:489-1660 or (352) 817-6169, or
'Sherry Roberts at (352) 489-2121
-or (352) 895-9414.
, * Free diabetes screenings,
'9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday and
'Tuesday, Oct. 2, at Walgreens,


4029 S. Suncoast Blvd., Hom-
osassa. Call (800) 713-3301, no
appointment necessary.
* Freedom From Smoking
Classes from 6 to 7:30 p.m. begin-
ning Tuesday, Oct. 2, in the
Administrative Annex (Old School
House) of Citrus Memorial Health
System, 502 W. Highland Blvd.,
Inverness. There is no charge for
the information/orientation session
on the first night. The total fee for
the remaining sessions is $20. Call
Tom O'Brien at the Citrus County
Health Department, 527-5560.lass-
es will run for eight weeks:
* Oct 2 - orientation.
* Oct 9 - Session 1.
* Oct 16 - Session 2.
* Oct 23 - Session 3 (Quit
Night).
* Oct 25 - Session 4 (48-hour
support).
* Oct 30 - Session 5.
* Nov 6 - Session 6.
* Nov 13 - Session 7 (end
session).
* Flu shot clinic, 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. Thursday, Oct. 4, at the Share
Club auditorium of Citrus Memorial
Health System, corner of Osceola
and Grace streets. No advance
registration. Flu shot, $30; pneu-
monia shot, $40. Check with your
doctor to see if you need a pneu-
monia shot before arriving at the
clinic. Bring all insurance and


Medicare cards with you.
* Flu shot clinic at B&W Rexall
Drugs in Inverness starts Oct. 9
from 10 a.m. until noon and then
from 1 to 4 p.m. in the pharmacy
on Tuesday and Thursdays.
Medicare and Medicaid will be
accepted. Preregistration will be
accepted. A form can be picked up:
in the pharmacy or diabetic shop


for preregistration.
* During September, Discover
Wellness Month, visit Russell
Chiropractic and Wellness center in
Inverness and receive a free copy
of "Improve Your Health
Proactively" book and tour our
clinic. Call Michelle today to
become one step closer to living a
wellness lifestyle, 726-0888.
* Diabetes classes are offered
from 9 to 10 a.m. Monday at the
Citrus County Health Department
in Lecanto. Classes are free. No
registration is required.
* More about meal.plans,
Monday.
* Medications and monitoring,
Oct. 8.
* Sick days, Oct. 15.
*Avoiding complications, Oct.
22.
Fasting blood sugars are offered
from 8 to 9 a.m. Monday through
Friday in all three Citrus County
Health Department sites. There is
a $10 fee for this service. No
appointment is necessary. Every
Monday before the Lecanto class,
anyone who would like to have a
blood sugar test should come fast-
ing.
Call Lynece Hand, R.N., 795-
6233, ext. 240, or Carol Burke,
R.D., 726-5222.
U ST. PETERSBURG- The
Leukemia & Lymphoma Society's


annual Light the Night Walk,
Friday at the Carillon Office Park in
St. Petersburg. Registration begins
at 5:30 p.m., walk at dusk. Monies
raised go for blood cancer re-
search and patient services. (813)
963-6461 or visit www.lightthenight
.org.
* SPRING HILL - Free PSA
blood draws and subsequent


physician digital rectal exams
(DRE) in October at Oak Hill
Hospital. Blood screenings from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. (closed noon to 1)
Monday through Friday, Oct. 1
through 15 at the ExpressLab.
Physical examinations by appoint-
ment only from 5 to 7 p.m. Wed-

Please see NOTES/Page 3C


Urology Center of Florida
in conjunction with the Cancer Treatment Center
is pleased to announce a


New Office
in Citrus County


Cal 746-5001


A 6th Annual Awards & Fundraiser



832 K2#'sDepulyDogs
Septe V, 2007 M'I"� to low
6 PM i 10 m Make a Differencel !o
West Ctrus Elk's Lodge
Homosassa, FL 'T-^b^sl~l fcae if^ _^.W


Dinner & Music
Awards & Prizes
Featuring our
Not-so-Silent Auction
Chance drawings

Tickets. -$35
available online at
wwdeputydogs.org
*bymail
832 K-9's Deputy Dogs
5162 S Manatee Tefr
Homosossa, FL34446
*by phone
(352) 302-8319


Over 70 Dogs

in Service

in 18 tes

and overseas


S AffAgouaf7gear[
Our Not-So-Silent Auction
Features fun and unusual items
Donated by sponsors for and widely
Chance drawing for one-week accommodations
In a beautiful Daytona Condo
Courtesy or www.oYton4awloomecente.com
Our foster parents make this the MOST
successful program Contact us to join today
Sponsored by: CH-QNMCLE
Kody Snodgrass Memorial Foundation, Inc
5162 S. Manatee Terr
Homosassa, FL 34446
(352) 302-8319
501(c)(3)


* - S



.... ..

A.J

li~


Seen on the road


irI "
N^


Special to the Chronicle
This picture, shared by Joe and Gay Vaughan of Crystal
River, was taken as they returned from their 50th class
reunion recently. They said they've seen motor homes
pulling a lot of different things, but this took the cake. A
helicopter? Perhaps it would be a great way to escape a
traffic jam!








--- -O'- (L)CROICEHE L H kLF TEDA, ETEBR-5,207-


Generic for Coreg heart


medication recently approved


Q I take Coreg for my heart Is
* there a generic available?
* A: The FDA recently
approved the first generic versions -
of Coreg (generic name carvedilol).
Coreg is a widely used medication
that is approved to treat high blood ,.
pressure (hypertension), mild to
severe chronic heart failure, and to --
improve heart function in people Richard I
who have had a heart attack.
Carvedilol is classified as a beta- ASK
blocker, which works by blocking a PHARIV
hormone (norepinephrine) in your
body that can raise blood pressure
and heart rate.
By reducing the effects of this hormone, beta-
blockers can lower blood pressure and heart
rate, which reduces the workload of the heart
and enables it to not pump as hard. In people
with weakened hearts and reduced function,
carvedilol also helps to lower the heart rate and
increase the heart's ability to pump blood and
better supply the body with oxygen. In addition,
for people who have had a heart attack that


H

'I


reduced how well the heart works,
carvedilol can take the strain off the
heart, helping to reduce the risk of
another heart attack
Coreg was the 30th top selling
brand name drug in 2006. As I've
S noted many times before, the FDA
,- Sapproves all generic drugs using
strict guidelines, including checking
offmann for the generic drug's chemistry by
evaluating its formulation, potency,
E stability, and purity. ,
IACLST The generic drug must also pass
bio-equivalency testing that com-
pares the delivery into the blood-
stream of the generic drug's active ingredient to
that of the brand name drug. Generic drugs are
less expensive than brand-name products, and
account for about 56 percent of prescriptions
dispensed.

Richard Hoffmann has practiced pharmacy for
more than 20years. Send questions to him at
1135 N. Timucuan Trail, Inverness, FL 34453.


Stages of Charcot foot


C harcot foot is classically char-
acterized as having three dis-
tinct phases, I to III. Diagnosis
is based on history, clinical expert-
ise, X-rays, infection scans and biop-
sy. Experts in Charcot foot deem MRI
unreliable in differentiating Charcot
foot from bone infection or
osteomyelitis.
Stage I is the acute phase. Injury Dr. David
and loss of sympathetic nerve supply Dr. David
and control in the foot results in the BEST
production of significant, severe FORM
swelling, redness, warmth and obvi-
ous foot deformity.
The foot typically appears as if the arch was
squashed and twisted out toward the little toe,
with little or no complaint of pain. Stage I is best
treated with no weight on the foot by using a
wheelchair for six to eight weeks or until the
swelling subsides. A special brace called a total
contact cast can be used, but I do not know of
anyone in Citrus or Marion counties who is
trained for this very technical cast application.
Inexperienced or improper application of
this tedious and technically difficult dressing or
cast can lead to severe complications - and
even amputation. So it is important that total


I
I


contact casting is performed by
someone well trained in this tech-
nique. In my opinion, off-the-shelf
braces do not work well for Charcot
foot
Stage II occurs when fractured
fragments begin to consolidate on X-
rays and the inflammation subsides.
Stage III is when complete healing
B. Raynorand consolidation of bone injury is
. Raynor clearly evident on X-rays and
FOOT swelling is non-existent Stage II and
WARD III Charcot benefit from orthopedic
shoes, but they are very expensive,
perhaps in the range of $1,000.
Persons with Stage III Charcot may be candi-
dates for surgical reconstruction, but I refer all
my patients with uncontrolled or non-respon-
sive stages I to III to tertiary care facilities, such
as Shands or Tampa General hospitals.
However, tertiary care facilities generally
screen patient referrals and may reject a trans-
fer of care request for any number of reasons.
----

David B. Raynor, DPM, is a podiatrist in
Inverness. He can be reached at 726-3668 with
questions or suggestions for future columns.


NOTES
Continued from Page 2C

nesday, Oct. 24. All screenings will
be conducted by appointment,
made through Sept. 30. 628-6060.
M A trained volunteer from
SHINE (Serving Health Insurance
Needs of Elders) will be on hand
from 9 a.m. to noon the first and
third Friday monthly at Seven Riv-
ers Regional to help Medicare re-
cipients understand and resolve
Medicare billing problems, appeal
denial of claims, choose Medigap,
Advantage and Long-Term Care
insurance and Medicaid entitle-
ments from the state. No appoint-
ments. Use the ambulatory surgery
entrance, sign in at the registration
desk, and wait in the lobby to meet
with the SHINE representative.
Free.
* Free vision, cataract and
glaucoma screening Wednesday,
Oct. 10, at the Crystal Eye Center,
U.S. 19 South, Crystal River. Call
795-0212.
* INGLIS - Hospice of the
Nature Coast seeks volunteers
who live in Inglis and Yankeetown.
Call Judy Knowlton, volunteer
program manager, at 527-6613 or
(866) 463-1385. Hospice of the
Nature Coast is a program of
Hospice of Citrus County.
www.hospiceofthenaturecoast.org.
* Donations of soft, relaxing


music or books on CD or cassette
sought for the Citrus team of
Hernando-Pasco Hospice (HPH)
for an audio library for patients and
family members. Drop off at the
HPH office between 8:30 a.m. and
4:30 p.m. weekdays at 3545 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, in
the Park Plaza. Call 527-4600.
* 12th Pastoral Care Educa-
tional Program for area clergy
from 8:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Wed-
nesday, Oct. 17, in the Gulf Room
of the Citrus Memorial Health
System's Administration Building
on Citrus Avenue. Call 341-6061 to
make a reservation and to reserve
a luncheon ticket.
* "Five Wishes" program from
5:30 to 7 p.m. on three consecutive
Monday beginning Oct. 22 at the
Central Florida Community College
Lecanto Campus, 3800 S. Lecanto
Highway, by Wings Grief Support
Team of Hospice of Citrus County.
To register, call Jonathan Beard at
527-2020 or (866) 642-0962.
For information about Hospice,
call 527-2020 or visit the Web at
www.hospiceofcitruscounty.org.
* SHINE Program volunteers
help elders make informed deci-
sions about Medicare and health
insurance.
Call Elder Helpline (800) 262-
2243 to leam more about becom-
ing a SHINE volunteer.
Comprehensive training provided,
travel-related expenses reim-
bursed.


Thyroid Panels T4, T3 uptake & TSH testing
m OPTIONAL........
Additional $55.00
Cardiac C.R.P. TEST Used to help predict
if a person is likely to have heart disease.
Medicare does NOT cover a full screening. If you
don't have medical coverage, this is your chance
to afford a complete blood screening.
CUT HERE - KEEP UPPER HALF AS A REMINDER -
SEND LOWER HALF WITH YOUR CHECK
PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED:
Pre-r-gistrallon is required no later than October 30, 2007.
Complete this form and return bottom
half with your check payable to:
Central Citrus Rotary Club
RP.O. Box 640610
S BeverlyHills, FL 34464
0 Blood Screening Test............$65.00 $____


[ Optional PSA- (men only)....$45.00
Additional Cot o Blood Screening Test
I Optional Thyroid Panels.......$50.00
Additional Cost toBlood Scrning Test
O Optional Cardiac C.R.P........$55.00
Additional Cost to Blood Screening Test


TOTAL $___


* Diabetes education program
from Citrus Memorial Health
System's Diabetes Center: tour
with a diabetes educator through
Publix to learn which foods will
effectively meet dietary needs and
how much can be eaten. Call Carol
McHugh at 341-6110.
* LifeSouth hosts Hot Dog
Wednesday blood drives from 9
a.m. to 7 p.m. the last Wednesday
monthly at the Inverness donor
center, 220 S. Pine St., and
Lecanto donor center, 1241 S.
Lecanto Highway. Hotdogs and
other lunch items will be served for
all donors. Donors will receive a
recognition item, and a cholesterol
screening. Call (888) 795-2707 or
visit www.lifesouth.org. Donors
must be at least 17 years old,
weigh 110 pounds or more and
have a valid photo I.D.
* Russell Chiropractic and
Wellness Center is available to do
school and sports physical
Monday, Tuesdays and Thurs-
days. Call Barbara at 726-0888.
* Free hearing evaluations,
open 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. first and
third Thursday monthly at the
Crystal River Health and Rehab
Center, 136 N.E. 12th Ave., Crystal
River, sponsored by Quality
Hearing Centers of Leesburg,
Ocala and Inverness. Call 228-
0918 to make an appointment.
* Free spinal scan and facility
tour with Dr. Russell Lewandow-
ski, who is also available to speak


Blood drawn by Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center
licensed phlebotomists and results reviewed by
Fernando Esclopis, M.D.
Pathology at Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River.
Please understand that you should discuss the
results of your tests) with your personal physician.


Central Citrus County Rotary Club's
12th Annual Blood Screening

SUse ONE REGISTRATION FORM per person please.
(Make photocopies if needed.)
X YOU MUST SIGN BELOW.
Name:
FIRST MInnDLEI N AL L AS


Social Security #:
Address:


City: State: ___ Zip:
Telephone: ( __ _
Birthdate: _ /_ /_ Age:_ O_ MALE O FEMALE


The patient Identified above consents to the procedures which may be
performed on an outpatient basis; limited to laboratory procedures.
The undersigned certifies that he/she has read the foregoing and is the patient, the patient's legal representative,
or Is duly authorized by the patient as the patient's general agent to execute the above and accept its terms.
PLEASE READ A SIGNEFORE SENDING IN.
NO RESERVATIONS.
FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED. ,- X__________________________
FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED. Patient/Parent/Guardian/Conservator/Responsible Party Date

If other than patient, indicate relationshipX -
,- Witness Signature Date


at community organizations. Call
Barbara at 726-0888. Visit www.
proadjusterbyrussellchiro.com.
* Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center's Web site is
www.srrmc.com.
* American Cancer Society's
"Road to Recovery" program
needs volunteer drivers. Call Cindi
Crisci, area patient services repre-
sentative at the American Cancer
Society, at (727) 812-7028.
* The Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization's Wanderers Identifi-
cation Program provides an iden-
tifying bracelet or pendant with a
code number and direct telephone
number to the participating sheriffs
office. Call toll free at (888) 496-
8004.
* The Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization's Respite Assistance
Program is available to all resi-
dents of Citrus, Pasco, Hemando,
Sumter and Lake counties caring
for an individual with dementia or
Alzheimer's disease. Call (727)
848-8888 or toll free at (888) 496-
8004.
* Citrus County Community
Support Services and Catholic
Charities offers a Respite Care
Program for people with early
onset Alzheimer's disease or other
dementia-related illnesses, from
12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday at
Our Lady of Grace Church, 6
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Call
Donna Atwell at 527-5932, Citrus


County Community Support
Services or Catholic Charities at
(800) 242-9012, ext. 22.
* The Doctor Ride program
helps with medical appointment
transportation in Citrus County for
those age 65 and older. Three or
four days' notice is required, and
only one ride per week is available.
To volunteer or ride, call John at
746-3796.
* Skillbank's volunteer pool of
drivers will chauffeur residents of
Beverly Hills who need a ride to
the doctor, pharmacy or grocery
store. Residents get one trip a
week and should call several days
in advance: 746-5001 from 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday.
* Telephone Friends service
confirms safety and imparts care
and concern, is available at no
cost. Call Nature Coast Volunteer
Center at 527-5950 or e-mail
ncvc@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
* The Citrus County Health
Department (CCHD) has a toll-
free information line, (877) 746-
3248. The CCHD Web address is
www.citruscountyhealth.org and
the Community Resource number
is 211.
* The Beverly Hills Lions Club
Inc. has a loan closet for wheel-
chairs, walkers, canes, bath chairs,
etc. Call Lion Warren Adams, 746-
1984.
* The Center For Independent
Living of North Central Florida


(CILNCF) provides four core serv-
ices in: information and referral,
peer support, independent living
skills education and advocacy.
It is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5
p.m. at 3774 State Road 44,
across from Cowboy Junction.
* The Citrus County Health
Department offers child safety
seat checks by appointment at the
Inverness office, 120 N. Montgom-
ery Ave. Call Sue Littnan at 726-
1731, ext. 242.
* Florida Elks Children's Ther-
apy Services provides free in-home
physical and occupational thera-
py to Florida children in need. For
information, call Invemess Elks
Secretary Walt Mabie, PDDGER,
at the Lodge office 8 a.m. to noon
Monday through Friday at 726-
2027.
* Citrus County Health Depart-
ment offers birth control services
to women of childbearing age.
These confidential services are
available at all health department
locations from a female provider
who specializes in women's health.
Call the office nearest you: Inver-
ness 726-1731; Crystal River 795-
6233; Lecanto 527-0068.
* A+ Healthcare Home Health
will be at the following locations to
offer free blood pressure screen-
ing. Call Mary Pearsall at 564-
2700.

Please see NOTES/Page 4C


SEVEN RIVERS bas
OUTPATIENT LABORATORY | novee0 d



Easy Access * Convenient Parking * No Appointment Necessary
352.795.1283 M-F 7:30a-5p
Seven Rivers Professional Center, 11503 \V. Emerald Oaks Dr.
Just North of the Hospital



C'Ai(


"Saluting Our Wounded Warriors"


Mail your registration form to
Citrus County Chronicle, c/o Veterans Appreciation Week
1624 North Meadowcrest Boulevard, Crystal River, FL 34429

For more information call Chris Gregoriou 795-7000 or the Citrus County Chronicle at 563-6363
-- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
R gistati FoDeadline to
Registration Form register:
Friday,
Yes, we would like to participate in the following Veterans October 19
Appreciation Week 2007 Events.


I Veterans Fair, November 3
E3 Post Office Dedication, November 5
1 Veterans Flea Market, November 7
Q IPS Veterans Program, November 9
U Veterans Fish Fry, November 9
U Veterans Day Parade, November 10


O Veterans Day Service, November 10
LI Veterans Day Luncheon, November 10
E Military Ball, November 11
($30 per person Call 382-0462 or 527-1557)
D Massing of Colors, November 11
L Commemorative Flowers (list dates and locations)


Organization:
Mailing Address.
Description of participation for (Parade, Fair, Massing of Colors) Please attach separate
sheet if necessary



Contact Name (Print) Phone
We, the above, release Citrus Publishing Inc. and the Veterans Appreciation Ad Hoc
Coordinating Committee from any liability that may be associated with Veterans
Appreciation Week events.


Authorized Signature


Date


Mail this form to: Citrus County Chronicle, c/o Veterans Appreciation Week 1624
North Meadowcrest Boulevard, Crystal River, FL 34429


We've Teamed Up

for Your Good Health...


S+ SEVEN RIVERS
9P REcIONAL MEDICAL CENTER


Are Proud to Announce the 12th Annual


Blood Screening


Comprehensive Testing at ONE DAY ONLY 1
DRASS1CAUY REDUCED PRICES Sat, Nov. 3, 2 0 0 7
-- Only $65.00*
Rotary Blood Screening Profile 6:30a.m. to 10:00a.m.
(Includes: CBC, Lipid Panel, and Chemistry Profiles at the
including liver enzymes, glucose, and potassium, etc.) Forest Ridge Elementary School
OPTIONAL .......inHernando
Additional $45.00 in Hernando
DO NOT EAT OR DRINK BEFORE YOUR TEST
PSA TEST (men only) - Test for Prostate Cancer ...nothing to eat or drink for 12 hours before
OPTIONAL ........ c and up to the test. Complimentary coffee,
Additional $50.00 juice and donuts will be served after the test.


^


TuEsDAY, SEPrEmBER 25, 2007 3C


IIF-&-LTi-i Sk ILIFIE


RTIC US COUNTY (FL LE


I


LAST


I


11








4C TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 25, 2007H E A L T H & LIFE Gnaws CoUNlY (FL) ~HRONICLL


NOTES
Continued from Page 1C

* East Citrus Community Cen-
,ter: 9 to 11 a.m. first Wednesday
,monthly.
* Brentwood Health Center: 10
to 11 a.m. second Tuesday month-
ly.
* West Citrus Community Cen-
ter: 9 to 11 a.m. third Wednesday
monthly.
* Inverness Community Center:
'9 to 11 a.m. third Tuesday monthly.
* Inverness Sports & Orthopedic
Rehab Team (SPORT) offers free
screening, by appointment, for
individuals with neck/back pain,
headaches, orthopedic injuries,
carpal tunnel, tennis elbow, osteo-
porosis and general fitness. Call
341-3740.
* Free HIV testing is available
at the Citrus County Health De-
partment: Inverness, 726-1731;
'Crystal River, 795-6233; Lecanto,
527-0068. Walk-ins accepted,
appointments preferred.
* Free hearing screenings by
All Children's Sertoma Therapy
Center from 9 to 11 a.m. Tuesday
.and Thursdays by appointment only



PILL
Continued from Page 1C

role in designing their analysis.
A third author, Cleveland
Clinic researcher Stephen
.Nicholls, has received consult-
ing fees from drug companies,
including Takeda. Lincoff and
Nissen also reported getting
.research funds from other dia-
betes drug makers and they
have consulted for several
drug companies. They said any
fees are donated to charity.
The review, which appeared
in the Sept. 12 Journal of the
American Medical Association,
is the biggest to date on Actos.
It pools results of 19 rigorous
studies involving more than
16,000 people.
Compared with patients tak-
ing other diabetes drugs or
none, Actos patients had an 18


GRILLO
Continued from Page 1C

Level IV is the non-vocal
nonprofessional. This includes
laborers, clerks and people
whose job does not require
communication. It is not to say
that they do not suffer from
vocal problems, but this does
not impair them and prevent
them from doing their job.
The vocal complaint is typi-
cally described as hoarseness,
but this is a very generic term.
There are many more prob-
lems than just hoarseness that
can affect the voice, such as
loss of voice, double tone qual-
ity to the voice, which affects
resonance, voice breaks, which
usually are depicted by
changes in pitch. Singers some-
times complain of reduction of
dynamic range, or vocal
fatigue, which is the most com-
mon chronic disorder. Lastly,
there are some patients who
complain of discomfort or pain
when speaking, although that


at 760 W. Hampshire Blvd., Suite 9,
Citrus Springs. Call 746-3300.

Support GROUPS

* Citrus County Multiple
Sclerosis Support Group meet-
ing will be at 1 p.m. Wednesday at
the Crystal River Presbyterian
Church. The guest speaker will be
Wendy Hall, who will discuss the
Pasco-Hernando Hospice
Program. For more information,
call Peggy Morisi at 344-4855.
* Alzheimer's Family Organi-
zation, serving Central Florida,
announces the following monthly
support group meetings. Public is
invited.
* 10 a.m. Thursday, Woodland
Terrace, 124 W. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Hernando. Call Pam
Pepitone at 249-3100.
* 2:30 p.m. Monday, Crystal
Gem Manor, 10845 Gem St.,
Crystal River. Call Elaine Heller at
382-2531.
* 2 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16,
Highland Terrace, 700 Medical
Court E., Inverness. Call Ellen
Mallon at 860-2525.
* 10 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 25,
Woodland Terrace, 124 W. Norvell


percent reduced risk of death,
heart attack or stroke.
The findings are important
because heart attacks are a
leading cause of death in dia-
betics, the authors said.
The same researchers wrote
-an analysis earlier this year
linking Avandia with increased
heart attack risks, and a drug
advisory panel is recommend-
ing stronger warnings on that
drug's packaging. The FDA has
not acted on that recommenda-
tion.
The agency is requiring label
warnings of the heart failure
risks for both Avandia and
Actos.
In the new analysis, death,
heart attack or stroke occurred
in 375 of 8,554 patients, or 4.4
percent, versus 450 or 5.7 per-
cent of 7,836 patients on other
drugs or no treatment
A separate analysis of four
Avandia studies in the same

is quite rare.
In general, vocal symptoms
are associated with certain bio-
mechanical problems involv-
ing the voice box, which most
everybody has heard of and
presents as vocal cord nodules
or cysts. But vocal fatigue and
voice breaks are also very com-
mon, and are an example of a
functional problem. That is,
there is no abnormality of the
anatomy of the voice box.
When a physician evaluates
a patient's dysfunction, he gen-
erally divides the problem into
two categories. One is called
organic and includes trauma,
as well as growth and gastroe-
sophageal reflux, which is a
condition in which acid comes
out of the stomach and irritates
the vocal cords. The second
classification is functional.
And as mentioned previously, it
presents just about the same
amount of time as an organic
problem.
Several examples of func-
tional problems include post-
operative voice problems as a
result of the breathing tube


Bryant Highway, Hernando. Call
Pam Pepitone at 249-3100.
* Free support group for care-
givers whose loved ones have
dementia or Alzheimer's disease,
by the Citrus team of Hernando-
Pasco Hospice (HPH) and the
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter of the
Alzheimer's Association, 3 p.m. the
first Thursday monthly at Cedar
Creek Assisted Living Facility, 231
N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River. Call
HPH Citrus at 527-4600.
* Support group meetings are
in the CMHS Administration Build-
ing unless otherwise indicated.
* Bariatric Support Group: 6:30
p.m. every three months, Cypress
Room. Call Claudia Blotz at 697-
0051 or Bette Clark at 860-0383.
* Breast Cancer Support Group:
noon the second Friday, Robert
Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Call
June O'Donnell at 527-8371.
* Citrus Cancer Support: 4:30
p.m. the third Tuesday monthly,
cafeteria meeting room. Call Carol
at 726-1551, ext. 6596 or ext.
3329.
* Diabetes Support Group:
11:30 a.m. the fourth Wednesday,
Cypress Room. Call Carol McHugh
Please see GROUPS/Page 5C


journal found heart attack and
heart failure risks similar to
earlier reports. Dr. Curt
Furberg, a co-author of that
analysis, reported that he
heads a government heart dis-
ease study that received a 2004
grant from GlaxoSmithKline
PLC.
Takeda's Dr. Robert Span-
heimer said the Actos analysis
adds "scientific validity" to
previous data on the compa-
ny's drug.
GlaxoSmithKline PLC,
Avandia's maker, said the new
report doesn't prove Actos is
safer than Avandia. The com-
pany added that the Avandia
review amounts to selective
analysis of old data.
An editorial in the medical
journal said the new informa-
tion underscores the need for
quicker regulatory action
when signs of trouble with new
drugs surface.

that is placed in the throat dur-
ing surgery, a very necessary
component of a patient's sur-
gery, but may result in some
problems with voice quality.
Also, post-viral hoarseness is
seen with flu, colds, etc. Lastly,
voice misuse, which is a very
common problem in today's
society. A good example of this
problem is witnessed at sport-
ing events where fans get quite
enthusiastic and try to out-
scream the rest of the people in
the stadium.
Diagnosis and treatment
starts with a good history and
physical exam. In some
instances, more sophisticated
testing is done. Cultures are
generally of little use. Once the
problem is identified, treat-
ment includes simple meas-
ures such as voice rest.
The next step is voice con-
servation, which is used in sit-
uations where patients must
communicate. Instruction is
given to avoid abusive vocal
patterns. A common myth is
that whispering saves the
voice. In actuality, it strains


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus Memorial Health System's Volunteer of the Month, Jaque Brown, started volunteering
in August 2004 and has given more than 1,500 hours of service. From left are: Iva Puckett,
auxiliary president; Brown; and Lee Glotzback, director of human resources. Brown serves in
the information desk, the auxiliary office and also attends all of the auxiliary meetings.



---- t elle]:1


Actos and Avandia each have
been used by more than 7 mil-
lion patients since they were
introduced in 1999. They
belong to a troubled newer
class of diabetes treatments.
Actos and Avandia control
blood sugar by improving the
body's sensitivity to insulin.
Avandia can increase levels of
LDL cholesterol, the bad kind;
while Actos can increase HDL
cholesterol, the good kind, and
can lower triglyceride levels -
effects that may help explain
the study results, Nissen said.
David Barish, a 49-year-old
Chicago attorney with diabetes
and heart disease, called the
new analysis reassuring. His
doctors switched him from
Avandia to Actos because of
safety concerns.
While Barish said he doesn't
feel any different on the new
drug, "it sounds like it's a bet-
ter risk"

more muscles and creates and
prolongs the problem with
voice disorder. In more compli-
cated functional problems,
speech therapy is implement-
ed. Believe it or not, retraining
a patient on how to breathe
and monitor his vocal behavior
can result in great improve-
ment.
Also, more severe problems
are reserved for treatment
with medications and/or surgi-
cal procedures if indicated.
Lastly, there are some chronic
conditions such as habitual
hoarseness and vocal abuse
syndromes that resist treat-
ment and response. This is best
dealt with when combining the
talents of the ear, nose, and
throat doctors, speech patholo-
gists, and sometimes psycholo-
gists or psychiatrists. A healthy
voice can be had in most
instances with a concerted
effort by health care personnel.


Denis Grillo, D.O., is an ear,
nose and throat specialist in
Crystal River. Call 795-0011.


III


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FREE Balance Screenings At Seven Rivers Rehab
Monday, October 1, 12:30 pm-1:30 pm
Seven Rivers Rehab & Wound Center, conveniently located in the Crystal
River Shopping Center (next to Sweetbay) at 1675 S.E.Hwy. 19. No
appointment necessary. Call 352.795.0534 for additional information.
Transitions Grief Support Groups
Tuesday, 3 and 6 pm
Hemando-Pasco Hospice presents ongoing grief programs every Tuesday
for anyone who has experienced the sudden loss of a loved one. A trained
bereavement counselor conducts the support group. Participants are
provided a workbook. Registration required. Call 800.486.8784.FREE
Caring for a Loved One With Alzheimer's?
Learn What to Expect and How to Cope
Tuesday, October 9, 10 am
This two-hour course will give an overview of dementia and Alzheimer's
disease, 10 warning signs and symptoms,Alzheimer's statistics, stages of
the disease, communication and behavior changes, caregiver concerns,
safety issues and local services available through the Florida Alzheimer's
Association. Presented by Jerry Fisher, MSW, Program Specialist with the
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter of the Alzheimer's Association. Reservations
requested. Call 352.688.4537.FREE
Are You At Risk For Heart Disease? Minimally
Invasive Diagnostic Options Available
Friday, October 12, 2 pm
Learn about the risk factors associated with heart disease and how to take
a proactive approach to reduce those risks. R. Prasad Potu,MD, board .
certified in cardiovascular disease, will address the importance of a heart
healthy lifestyle had explain how and when a procedure called coronary
CT angiography may be an appropriate minimally invasive diagnostic
alternative to a traditional cardiac catheterization. FREE
One-Day Childbirth Education
Saturday, October 13, 9 am-5 pm
E p4ciani ,ruplle wall'It ka.m j.,u I ,jt'., d:ill..:r, b. jr ..hiig .ini
Station e letin iqu.-ri e rc ri' ra"n , [.:v i:'m -I ,ns i. T l jnd

CBC, CMP, HDL-Alphabet Soup or A Prescription
for Blood Work?
Monday, October 15, 1 pm
Our Lady of Grace Pansh Life Center, Beverly Hills
All ihoise lIders-whjt dr d-e. mreai .nd why did mr Jd,.Aior oidc ficm'
loin Hugh kElihe. Direror LifLtI.b.,r,..rn Serirces ji Seeri n jicr-,
Rrenril ANldiLal Ctendr,, il he talh a oi c.m:niTi,:ri hluod 10 s [iJi
phI Ici.bU orde[ and the ilue of the inflormiron gured from iacuijil
lesi re.uhas.FREE
Breastfeeding
Monday, October 15, 6 30 pm-8:30 pm
Women's & Family Center
Provides ce.pei.inrt,.r new ml,tders ith effecure tehiqtues thaii mj1
help ihem uacrLeMfilh lhreasi'ed FREE
Good News About Knee and Hip Pain
Wednesday, October 17. 1 pm
11t ou arc over 55 and hae knee (r hip pamu, sutffness or s%,elhng.chancts
are you have arthniis of the kneef u hip The good rnes is nan)
iTijrrrj6 arc . , ailliblv.allo inr ,iu i., ,oiv'< eai .l and'. I ,:,ul pain
on0L ,ji.i FREE
SHINE for Seniors
October 19 am-12 pm
Seven Rivers Outpatient Laboratory
New L..taon' Vit Aith a SHINE iSer.ing Health Insurance Ntcil- .:1
Elderst vijlIuntmieer ai iue newly iclocated Sxen Rivers Outpatient
LibIrioryat i 5i1 ,'i- Emeraldaks Dr ii.id inihe Sci, Pi,,.

irn.urani.c qu.olors No dppuirntrrint n(t sa.I', alk- o,,. . tn ,
terdc ul a.mvlt Plcjt 'ign in it trri d &4 inr the Iobbhh ,i i r1' Sr c
Rieri Outpanenit Labordtor) FREE
A Woman's Image: Full-Field Digital Mammography
and DEXA Bone Density Index
Tuesday, October 23 12 pm, Lunch & Learn
ErijJy a dehln. u' lui,.h .;s B.uat,..i iuUirdc l i icil, 11 iiiOei i-r iphi
B[.1i I i fi J.vli 1':y .c. ,. 1 , ,r - , ,,Ti rri if idf ri-,,ii i, icd!u,1 I,,i:. ri,,. ,,
developing breast cancer and osteoporosis. Early detection is key in both
diseases. Learn how to get the most accurate results from a mammogram
and bone density test, as well as what the test results could mean. FREE
Diet Therapy for Diabetes
Tuesday, October 30, 6 pm
Having diabetes doesn't mean you can't enjoy tasty foods and meet all
your diabetic dietary needs. Join Kelly Niblett, dietitian, to learn tips on
meal planning. FREE
Childbirth-Related Education
Women's & Family Center
The Women's & Family Center offers a variety of additional free or low
cost childbirth-related education programs throughout the year including
Early Pregnancy, Sibling Preparation, Infant Care and Childbirth
Refresher. Please call the Women's & Family Center directly to make an
appointment, 352.795.BABY (2229).
Flu Shot Drive
Call NOW to Reserve Your Shot and Time Slot
Saturday, November 10, 10 am - 2 pm
Flu season is just around the comer and anyone can be a potential target.
Your best protection against the debilitating effects of this virus is to get a
flu shot. The flu shot is covered by Medicare Part B and several other
insurances. Bring your Medicare or other insurance cards. For those
without coverage, there is a $30 fee.
Health Information Resource
Looking for the latest health information? Visit www.srrmc.com for a
complete health library available 24/7.

@,SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
www.srrmc.com


CMHS Volunteer of the Month


Cnwus CouN7y (FL) CHRONICLE


AC TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2007


IP


14F-A]L-Fla 4& ]LIFE


�i


-








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GROUPS
Continued from Page 4C

at 341-6110.
* Parkinson's Support Group: 1
p.m. first Tuesday, Cypress Room.
Call Catherine Clark at 344-9630.
* ACS Man-to-Man Prostate
Cancer Support and Education
Program: 11:30 a.m. first Wednes-
day, Robert Boissoneault Cancer
Institute, 522 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. Call 527-0106.
* Respiratory Support Group:
Will not meet until further notice.
* Look Good ... Feel Better for
women undergoing radiation or
chemotherapy, at 3 p.m. the sec-
ond Wednesday monthly at the
Cancer & Blood Disease Center,
Lecanto, and 3 p.m. the fourth
Wednesday monthly at the Robert
Boissoneault Oncology Institute,
Lecanto..Call Mildred Roseberry
(746-7212) or the American Can-
cer Society (800) 395-LOOK
(5665) to register.
* Women's Breast Cancer
Support Group at noon the sec-
ond Friday monthly at the Robert
Boissoneault Oncology Institute,
522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Lunch included, donations appreci-
ated. Call Judy Bonard at 527-
4389 or June O'Donnell at 527-
8371.
* Beverly Hills Gay and Les-
bian Support Group at 7 p.m.
Tuesday at 10 N. Jackson St.,
Beverly Hills. Free, open to every-
one. Group organizer is Pamela-
Rae and co-organizer is Wayne
Thomas. Call PamelaRae at 746-
9839.
* Citrus Abuse Shelter Asso-
ciation (CASA), 112 N. Pine Ave.,
Inverness, offers three free weekly
women's domestic abuse support
groups:
* 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday (free child care avail-
able).
* 10:30 a.m. to noon Wednes-
days (no child care available).
Call CASA at 344-8111.
* Overcomers Group for peo-
ple recovering from addictions to
drugs, alcohol or other out-of-con-
trol habits meets at 8 p.m. Mon-
days at the Sanctuary, 7463 Gro-
ver Cleveland Blvd. Call Paul at
628-2874.
* Dunnellon Life Recovery
group for adults where addiction,
compulsion and co-dependency
are dealt with, at 7 p.m. Monday
at Rainbow Springs Village Church,
20222 S.W. 102nd St. Road
Dunneljn.,Q0aJ[,Char at (352) 465-
1644 or Nancy at (352) 794-0017.
* Al-Anon groups meet regular-
ly in Citrus County. Call (352) 697-
0497.
* Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S U.S. 41.
* Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m.
Tuesday, St. Benedict Catholic


Church, 455 S. Suncoast Blvd.
* Last Resort AFG: 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday, First United
Methodist Church, 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness.
* Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m. Thurs-
days, Unitarian Universalist Fellow-
ship, 2149 W. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Lecanto.
* Awareness Lunch Bunch
AFG: 12:30 p.m. Friday, St. Mar-
garet Episcopal Church, 114 N.
Osceola Ave., Inverness.
* Courage AFG. 8 p.m. Thurs-
days, First United Methodist
Church, 8831 West Bradshaw St.,
Homosassa. Room 102. Open
meeting. Call 270-3827.
* Alcoholics Anonymous: If
you drink, and want to stop, call
Alcoholics Anonymous Nature
Coast Intergroup at 621-0599.
Web site: www.ncintergroup.com.
* A.C. Ministries Recovery
Group 12-Step Recovery Work-
book meeting (scripturally based),
6:30 p.m. Tuesday at Church
Without Walls nondenominational,
nonprofit Christian fellowship. 3962
N. Roscoe Road, Hernando. Call
Laverne at 637-4563.
* Overeaters Anonymous:
* 3 p.m. Monday at the senior
center on County Road 491,
Lecanto. Call 746-5018.
* 1 p.m. Thursday at Our Lady
of Grace Parish Hall, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd, Beverly Hills.
* 7 p.m. Friday at Our Lady of
Grace Parish Hall, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills.
Call 746-7749 or 341-0777.
* CEA-H.O.W. for people who
have an eating disorder, at noon
Wednesday at the First Presbyter-
ian Church, 206 Washington Ave.,
Inverness. Call Judi M. at 726-
5882.
* Amputee Support Group
meets the last Thursday monthly at
Cinnamon Sticks Restaurant on
State Road 44 West, Inverness.
Call Donna at 344-1988 or Perry at
Sonlife Prosthetics, 344-8200.
* Reiki clinic meets from 7 to 9
p.m. most Wednesdays at the
Beverly Hills Community Center, 1
Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. Call Ann
Thonen at 795-5116 or Kristi
Kobler at 628-5537.
* Narcotics Anonymous is not
affiliated with any of the meeting
facilities listed. Information line:
382-0851.
* Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Monday
and Saturday, Lions,Den, U.S. 41,
Floral City.
* It Works How and Why, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Wednesday and Satur-
day and noon Sunday, YANA Club,
147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal
River.
* Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m.
Thursday, First Christian Church,
Grover Cleveland Boulevard,
Homosassa.
* Recovery on the River, 8 p.m.
Monday and Friday, Lecanto
Church of Christ, State Road 44
and County Road 491, Lecanto; 8


Hips go.


p.m. Sunday 797 S. Rowe Terrace,
Lecanto, east of County Road 491
and State Road 44.
* Narconon Need help with
addiction? Call (800) 556-8885.
* Nar-Anon: a support group
for the families and friends of
addicts, at 8 p.m. Wednesday at
Act II, 1065 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness. Call 344-5963 or visit
www.nar-anon.org.
* Depression and Bipolar
Support Alliance of Citrus County
at 7 p.m. Thursday in Bailey Hall,
First Lutheran Church, 1900 State
Road 44 W., Inverness. Doors
open at 6 p.m. Call 621-0165. The
National DBSA Association's num-
ber is (800) 826-3632.
* The Area 13 Family Care
Council from 10 a.m. to noon the
second Monday monthly at the
Wildwood DCF/APD office, 1601
W. Gulf Atlantic Highway (State
Road 44). Call Dominic
Christofaro, (352) 489-6279.
* Friends of the Blind meets
from 9 a.m. to noon the second
Friday monthly at the Church of the
Nazarene in Hernando. Call Butch
Shultz at 344-2693 or Bob
Johnson at 563-1890.
* FFRA (Families and Friends
of Retarded Adults) meets at 9
a.m. the second Friday monthly at
the Key Training Center in Le-
canto, in the Chet Cole Life
Enrichment Center. Call Stephanie
at 344-0288 Ron at 382-7819.
* Better Breathers Support
Group at 1:30 p.m. the third Friday
monthly at the Citrus County
Health Department Lecanto Office,
3700 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
Call Doris Kames at 860-1355.
* Alzheimer's Association-
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter sup-
port groups:
* Cedar Creek at Kings Bay
Assisted Living Residence, 231
N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, 3 p.m.
first Thursday monthly. Call Wendy
Hall at 527-4600.
* Our Lady of Fatima Catholic '
Church, 550 U.S. 41 S., Inver-
ness, 11 a.m. first Tuesday month-
ly. Call Wendy Hall at 527-4600.
* The Hepatitis C Support
Group from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. the- ,
fourth Monday monthly at the
Lecanto Health Department, 3700
W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto. Call
527-0068, ext. 253.
* Homosassa Springs Area
Cancer Survivors' Support
Group at 1 p.m. monthly at First
United Methodist Church. Call
Anna Cooley, 382-4132, or Earl
Cadaret, 382-1923.
* ACS Man to Man Prostate
Support and Education Program
meets at 11:30 a.m. the first Wed-
nesday monthly in the conference
room at the Robert Boissoneault
Oncology Institute at 522 N. Le-
canto Highway, Lecanto. Call 527-
0106.
* Hospice of Citrus County
support groups for 2007:
* Newly Bereaved Support


Knees go.


The only question is Wl'here will you go?


Don't let pain
interfere with your
everyday activities.
* Fracture Care
* SporIts edic,ne
* Hand Surgery
* Total Hpi and Knees
* Shoulder-.
* Arirroicpic Surgery


R Crane

Couch, D.O.
Ciruu Bonr and Joint Specialii * Orthopedic surgery
Reclaimingi Li'es
Offices in Lecanto & Ocala
Lecanto 746-0654
Ocala 237-9298
3264 W. Audubon Park Path. Lecanto
6075 SW 73rd Street Road. Ocala


STo our Columbus Day
VRemembrance Ceremony


- Monday, October 8 at 10 a.m.
S at Fero Memorial Gardens
.. Opening Praer and [ncaiion
Fr. ..tichel Su,im ns/i
b Faithful Friar, K ot C
Guesi Speakers
Sir Knihr' Dou!J.!.1 Alurrji
Col. Curt Ebitz, US. A.4mi) (Ret.
Honored Guets
Steve Ravnmond
Army Bajtan DeathAarch Sunr i or.
Purple Heart Recipient
Proclamation and PlIcing of Wreath
Sir Knight Robert DeSanti
Honor Guard & Taps
Marine Corps League. Citrus County
Detachment 819
Benediction
Fr. Michael Su5zi nsa


BENNETT
Continued from Page 1C

ing information. Although can-
cer deaths are up, the cancer
death rate, adjusted for age, is
still going down. The differ-
ence between the two statistics
is key. The age-adjusted death
rate is considered the most
accurate yardstick to measure
progress against cancer
The death rate looks at the
proportion of people who die of
cancer, out of every 100,000 peo-
ple in the population overall. By
that measure, the downward
trend is still on track. In 2004,
185.8 people out of every 100,000
died of cancer, while in 2005,
that figure dropped to 183.8.


GANDHI
Continued from Page 1C

Though normal platelet
count is 150,000 to 400,000,
excessive platelet count to
800,000 is not usually serious.
So do not get nervous if your
platelet count fluctuates or is a
little bit out of normal range.
We must remember that
platelets increase in blood due
-to many different reasons, such
as iron deficiency anemia,
chronic inflammation or infec-
tion, after removal of spleen,
and after bleeding.
Many of these conditions are
so common that platelet count
normally fluctuates throughout
the day. Sometimes platelet


DODGE
Continued from Page 1C

trate on only one or two of those
aspects as magic passes to the
kingdom of health. Please don't
make that mistake. A pitchfork
is a useful tool, but if it has only
one or two good prongs, it's use-
fulness is limited. Similarly, a
one- or two-pronged approach
to health is very limiting. A
wholesome approach to health
means being involved in the
whole range of healthful prac-
tices, as you have done so well
this year Keep it up, and you
will keep making good progress!
"But you have not reached
your goals yet, and that's what
we need to talk about at this
point The unspoken query you
face is whether you can achieve
all your health goals. I have
three cautions and three
secrets to share with you about
this significant question.
"My first caution is that, even


So what is the difference
between deaths and the death
rate? The age-adjusted death
rate takes into account the fact
that there are more people, and
more older people, in the U.S.
population each year, and can-
cer is more common in older
people.
As the baby boomer genera-
tion gets older and moves into
the age groups that are most
affected by cancer, we may well
see an increase in the number
of deaths, even if we continue to
make substantial progress in
the prevention, early detection,
and treatment of cancer.
However, readers must real-
ize that this latest CDC data is
still preliminary, and further
analysis of the data is ongoing.
A more detailed analysis of can-


counts increase significantly
because the bone marrow pro-
duces too many platelets. This
condition is called essential
thrombocythemia.
My patient had a bone mar-
row aspiration and biopsy
done in my office. For this pro-
cedure, I remove a small piece
of bone marrow under anes-
thesia from the pelvic bone.
The procedure takes less than
10 minutes and the patient
walks out of our office.
The patient has essential
thrombocythemia. I started the
patient on an oral medication
called hydroxyurea. This is
well tolerated and carries very
few side effects.
One of the most important
requirements is careful moni-
toring of the medicine by a

with the best of intentions, you
will suffer setbacks from time to
time. You may regain a little
weight, or you may hit a slack
period in your exercise pro-
gram, or you may slip a bit in
some other way. Never let any
setback become a matter of
despair The secret is to simply
pick yourself up and resume
the process of building your
health, bit by bit To be fore-
warned is to be forearmed!
"My second caution is that
you will never finish this proj-
ect - but don't let that be a mat-
ter of despair, either The truth
is that good health is a never-
ending project I have personal-
ly been practicing principles of
good health for over 40 years,
and I have not arrived yet.
Every year I learn some new
bits of information that are
helpful to bring into my health
practices, and every year I
learn to improve something I
have been doing. The secret is
to understand that achieving
good health is a wonderful jour-


cer deaths will be released next
year, once final numbers for
2005 are available.
Overall, progress is still, being
made, but we have a long way to
go, and efforts must continue to
be directed toward screening
and early detection.


Dr. Bennett is a
board-certified radiation
oncologist, past president of
the Citrus County Unit of the
American Cancer Society and
a member of the Board of
Directors and Executive
Committee of the Florida
Division of the American
Cancer Society. If you have
any suggestions for topics, or
have any questions, e-mail
him at cjbennett@rboi.com.


trained blood specialist.
Mr. Smith's platelet count
has come down to less than
half a million, as planned. Now
his risk of stroke or heart
attack or such other clotting
problems is not significantly
different than any other person
of his age.
He also benefits by taking
one baby aspirin a day.


Dr. Sunil Gandhi is a
hematologist and oncologist
He is the volunteer medical
adviser of the Citrus Unit of
the American Cancer Society.
Send questions or comments
to 521 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto FL 34461 or e-mail to
sgandhi@tampabay.rr.com or
call 746-0707.

ney, "not a final destination.
Keep on learning and never
abandon your health goals.
They are worthwhile.
"The final caution is that you
can never build your personal
health power by will alone.
Willpower is inadequate by
itself, which is why so many
health pathways are littered
with wrecked diet programs,
wrecked exercise programs,
wrecked hygiene plans,
wrecked meditation plans, and
wrecked relationships.
If knowledge and willpower
are not enough to build person-
al health power, what hope is
there? There is a good answer
to this question, but the best
way to tell it is with a story."


Dr. Ed Dodge is a retired
Inverness physician. Visit his
Web site, www.passion-
forhealth.info. Reach Dr.
Dodge through his Web blog,
Passion for Health, on the
Chronicle Web site.


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NOTICE OF ESTABLISHMENT
OR CHANGE OF A REGULATION
AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the City of Inverness, Florida and pursuant to Chapter 166,
Laws of Florida to hold a Public Hearing to adopt or change a regulation affecting the use of
land located with the City of Inverness municipal boundaries.
The City of Inverness City Council proposes to adopt the following ordinance:
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF
INVERNESS, FLORIDA, AMENDING LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE SECTION
2.5(D)(15)(F)(1)(b), TO AMEND AIRPORT AND AIRSPACE RESTRICTIONS;
PROVIDING FOR AMENDMENT OF LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE SECTION
2.5(D)(15)(1 TO PROVIDE CLARITY; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF INCONSISTENT
ORDINANCE S; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY AND INTERPRETING THIS
ORDINANCE; PROVIDING FOR INCLUSION INTO THE CODE OF ORDINANCES;
PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
A Public Hearing on the ordinance affecting the use of land will be held on Tuesday October 2,
2007 at 5:30 PM and a Second and Final public hearing will be held on Tuesday October 16,
2007 at 5:30 PM at City Hall, 212 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida.
Copies of the proposed ordinance will be available for inspection and/or purchase between the
hours of 8:00 AM and 5:00 PM, Monday through Friday in the Department of Development
Services, 212 West Main Street in the City Hall Building.
All property owners and interested persons are invited to inspect such proposed land
development code change and to be present at and participate in the Public Hearings by the
City Council of the City of Inverness.
Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the City Council with respect to any matter
considered at these meetings will need a record of the proceedings, and for such purposes,
may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is based. (Section 286.010 F.S.)
Accommodations for the disabled (hearing or visually impaired, etc.) may be arranged with
,,advanced notification of 7 days prior to the scheduled meeting. Pre-arrangements may be
initiated by dialing 352-726-3401 weekdays from 8 AM to 5 PM.
ATTEST: Deborah Davis
City Clerk
623o80


In loving memory of all those t ho
faithfully served this country

Fero Memorial Gardens
5891 Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills

For information call 382-0992


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Ci rRLIS C(--UNTN CHROCNICLEI-


Seminar geared to association boards


Special to the Chronicle
A seminar about the essentials for
serving on a community board of
directors will benefit any volunteer
serving on a community association
board of directors.
Jane Jarlenski, licensed community


association manager, will present an
informative learning session about:
the hierarchy of communities govern-
ing documents, tips for effective meet-
ings, financial reporting require-
ments, how to research the Florida
statutes, the Community Association
Institute and the resources available


with the touch of a mouse.
"This training would be good for
anyone that may be considering vol-
unteering to run for an open position
on their board of directors, at an
upcoming election," Jarlenski said.
Attendees will be provided with
information about how their commu-


nity can adopt the Rights and
Responsibilities for Better
Communities - 42 principles and
practices designed to help associa-
tion-governed communities promote
harmony, enhance communication
and reduce the potential for conflict.
The seminar will be at 10 a.m.


Tuesday, Nov. 13, at the East Citrus
Community Center at 9907 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness, next door to
the Gospel Island Fire Department
Cost for attendance is $18. For more
information or to reserve a seat, call the
East Citrus Community Center at 344-
9666 or call Jane Jarlenski at 726-6165.


News NOTES

Doll club ready
to start season
The Sugar Babes Doll and
Teddy Bear Club of Central
Florida will have its first meeting
for the fall at 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday. The place is the
Doll Museum at the Key Center
6n State Road 44 in Lecanto.
: The Doll Museum at the Key
Center was created to honor
Dolores Cole, mother of Chet
Cole, the Key Center adminis-
trator. Dolores was a doll artist,
and is well remembered for the
lively doll sets she created for
tOie Key Center Auctions. The
September meeting will be host-
ed by Francine Klug and Laurie
Painter. Lunch will be pizza,
Sdessert and beverage for $4.
The theme of the meeting is
':Summer Finds" (dolls we have
discovered over the summer
months). The public is invited to
share this meeting with us, meet
our members and enjoy the Key
Center Doll Museum. Call
Francine at (352) 794-0070 or
Barbara at 344-1423.
Chorale to kick off
with potluck
Fall is here when The
Chorale starts rehearsing for
their Concert with a seasonal
potluck kickoff at 6 p.m.
Thursday in Webster Fellowship
Hall at the First Presbyterian
Church in Crystal River.
Rehearsals are Thursdays
from 7 to 9 p.m. There is a
music theory class held each
week at 6:15 p.m., where mem-
bers can learn to read music,
S: count time signatures and identi-
fy music symbols and dynamics.
Anyone interested in partici-
' pating with the Chorale this year
is invited to the potluck -
spouses and guests included -
and no reservation is needed.
For more information call 697-
2309, 341-2323 or e-mail sugar
millchoraledirector@yahoo.com.
Kings Bay group
sets meeting
The monthly meeting of the
Kings Bay Association will be at
7-p.m. Thursday at the Coastal
Region Library, 8619 W. Crystal
* St., Crystal River.
SCall Dee Atkins, secretary, at
220-6058.
Radio control club
plans annual fly-in
The Tri-County Radio Control
Club will host its annual General
Chuck Yeager Warbird Fly-In,
Saturday at the Rainbow R/C
Park in Dunnellon. Go east of
Dunnellon on County Road 484
to Bridges Road and follow the
signs to the field.
There is a parking donation of
$2 for all non-flyers.
The proceeds of the fly-in will
be donated to the American
Cancer Society.
Come early and bring lawn
.. chairs, cameras and an
appetite. The cafe will be open.


Pet SPOTLIGHT

No stress


Special to the Chronicle
Lily was adopted in June and
lives with her owners, Dan
and Virginia, and also has a
big brother Charley, who was
adopted after Hurricane
Charley in 2004.


Church members


learn to grow peace


Recently, I attended a
"Growing Peace" semi-
nar in Clearwater with
Pastors David Gill and
Brandon Wise and members of
the Crystal River United
Methodist Church.
Led by Jim Van
Yperen, we were
guided through the
various steps of
peacemaking and
peacekeeping.
There were ample
opportunities for us
to interact with
other participants in
dialogue and the
sharing of experi- Ruth
ences we'd had in . ..:-
peacemaking within :. ',
the church and vari-
ous organizations.
Highlighting the importance
of connectedness, we agreed
that people seek out opportu-
nities for fellowship nurturing
as a growing process.
We learned that there are
three distinctive types of
leader. The representative
represents
opinions, needs
and concerns. Dialog
The interpre-
tive presents discov
issues and
needs and steps leader
forward and
says, "I believe. techn
I will walk with fosterin
you to make sterin
things better. way of
Let us make dis-
coveries togeth- things
er." The third
type is protec- good
tive, who some-
times uses
knowledge to control and pro-
tect
A bonding takes place seeing
understanding with others,
revealing something of us, fos-
tering peaceful solutions.
Starting with a small group
doing something exciting will
attract others to get involved,
leading only those who want to
change.
Dialogue and discovery are
leadership techniques, foster-
ing a new way of doing things
for the good of all.
Transformation in a church
or an organization is not for
sale. It is a gift honoring our
faithfulness in making changes.
The nature of humans is to
resist change, but it is as preva-
lent as the very air we breathe.
Reinforcing is nurturing,
understanding our limiting fac-
tors, overcoming the negatives
and being welcoming to change.
In a systematic change there
is leverage in proportion to the
need to change and thinking
through what is truly impor-


L


Fu
e

.r
i


f
f

0


tant in peacemaking. What a
privilege it is to see real
change, a transition, any new
light coming out of a crisis.
Along the way to peace, we
need to recognize that the
future form is consistent with
what has gone on
before and to honor
the past as we move
forward to some-
thing new as an
extension of the
past This takes time
and sensitivity. It is a
gradual transforma-
tion.
In order to lead
ievins change, we set the
stage for it to be last-
ing. We create a
sense of urgency
pulling together as a-
team. We decide what to do by
developing a vision and a strat-
egy. It happens when we are
understanding and accepting,
when we empower others to
act, producing short-term wins
and never letting up. It sticks
when we hold on tight to the
'new ways of
interacting until
ie and they become
our new culture.
.ry are The benefit of
a lasting peace
rship is not our ego. It
is how we want
ques, to be remem-
bered, our lega-
g a new cy. We can
doing model grace
and new under-
for the standing-part-
nership.
of all. Like-minded
committed peo-
ple need each
other living out our diversity
empowering each other, learn-
ing and listening, sharing our
gifts of time and creativity for
the common good. A great team
for peace is only as good as the
collective efforts of all.
It was a great and informa-
tive peace seminar, teaching to
move from the status quo to a
compelling and clear vision of
what will happen in changed
lives with peace.
Note: Just a clarification
regarding the recent column
that was written about La Te
Da's participation in the Alz-
heimer's Family Organiza-
tion's Charity Fashion Show.
Cheryl Harris-Kaylor is the
owner of La Te Da.
m
Ruth Levins participates in a
variety of projects around the
community. Let her know
about your group's upcoming
activities by writing to P. O.
Box 803, Crystal River,
FL 34423.


CMUG


slates


busy


week

Special to. the Chronicle
The September workshop of
Citrus Macintosh Users Group
is at 1 p.m. today at the Beverly
Hills Community Building for
instruction, help, minor tune-
up and software updates. Curt
Herrin, president of CMUG,
will review part one of this
month's Pages class. For infor-
mation or a request for a spe-
cific topic, call Bill Dean at
527-8405.
,or At Friday's meeting, member
John Engberg will present a
'demonstration of Printshop
software after the business ses-
sion in which the members will
nominate candidates for the
club's officers: president, vice
president technical, vice presi-
dent education, treasurer and
secretary. The election will be
at the October meeting.
CMUG's purpose is to help
members learn to use their
computers. To this end, club
membership includes: free
monthly lab/tune-up for help
from the club's tekki geeks;
monthly classes that cover soft-
ware use (members, $10; fami-
lies, $15; and nonmembers,
$20); free monthly magazine
online, in which members
share information on just
about anything Macintosh;
monthly workshops; special


Special to the Chronicle
Inverness Highlands South
and West Civic Association will
have a regular membership
meeting at 7 p.m. Friday at the
Inverness Highlands Civic
Center, Little Al Point,


JOHANNA FOSTER/Special to the Chronicle
Chris Dusombre, Citrus Macintosh Users Group librarian, installs a
battery in Pat Patterson's laptop during the April lab/tune-up.


Lab/tune-up sessions are free
lab/tune-up is Sunday.

CMUG ACTIVITIES
* 1 p.m. today -
September workshop at
Beverly Hills Community
Building.
* 6:30 p.mr. Friday -
September meeting at
Crystal Oaks clubhouse
* 1 p.m. Sunday -
September lab'tune up at
Crystal Oaks clubhouse.

interest groups (SIG), where
small groups of members can
meet about Macintosh inter-
ests not shared by the general
membership; monthly meet-
ings that have an informal
question-and-answer segment,
short business segment and
end with an informative and
often entertaining program;


to CMUG members. The next

and the annual March mad-
ness party that became a tradi-
tion at its first debut a couple
of years ago.
Annually, the club offers an
education scholarship oppor-
tunity to graduating seniors in
each of the county's three high
schools, with money from
annual club dues and money
donated to the club for house
calls by Bill Dean, the club's
'Mac doc.'
CMUG generally meets the
fourth Friday monthly, see the
calendar of events at cmu-
gonline.com, at 6:30 p.m. at
Crystal Oaks clubhouse. An-
nual dues are $20, individual;
$30, family; and $10, student
For more information about
CMUG, call Herrin at 341-5555,
or e-mail him at curtisher
ri@mac.com.


CFCC seeks volunteers for Foundation


Special to the Chronicle
OCALA- The Friends of the
Foundation at Central Florida
Community College invites
prospective volunteers to a
kickoff breakfast Wednesday.
The breakfast begins at 9 a.m.
at the Klein Conference Center,
Room B, on the Ocala Campus,
3001 S.W College Road.
To RSVP for the breakfast or
for additional information
about the Friends of the


Foundation, call volunteer
coordinator Lynda Peek at
(352) 854-2322, ext. 1592, or e-
mail peekl@cf.edu.
Friends volunteers share
time and energy to help the
Foundation support the college.
The Foundation was found-
ed in 1959 to help the college
carry out its educational mis-
sion to the community. Funds
raised by volunteers are used
for scholarships for area stu-
dents to attend CFCC and for


other projects benefiting CFCC
students and faculty.
Annual events include the
Performing Arts Series, Taste
of Ocala, Taste of Citrus and
the Dinner Theater.
Volunteers may also assist in
the Foundation office and at
receptions sponsored by the
Foundation.
Contact CFCC Marketing
and Public Relations Co-
ordinator Lois Brauckmuller
at (352) 854-2322, ext 1374.


Inverness. This is a call to
return to the business of the
association after a long hot
summer. The meeting is open
to the public. Come hear how
much time and effort it took to
hold on to our real estate tax
exemption. Fundraising activi-


ties that have been ongoing
will be discussed. We need
help with suggestions regard-
ing fundraising and volunteers
to give some relief to those who
have been working through the
summer. Refreshments will be
served.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but mul-
tiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crystal
River; by fax at 563-3280; or by e-mail to community@
chronicleonline.com.


* News notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day cannot be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than twice,


KCCB presents September award
.The Keep Citrus County
- Beautiful committee presented
the September Beautification
Award to Nature Coast Bank at
the Ted Williams Museum for
renovations to the building and
the landscaping the bank per-
formed at the Citrus Hills prop-
erty. From left are: Pete
;-Peterson, treasurer, KCCB; Joe
Turck, director, KCCB; John
L Quintas, director, KCCB; Josh
Wooten, executive director,
'KCCB; Mike Colbert, president,
KCCB; Walter Roberts, director,
KCCB; Paul Mellini, president,
Nature Coast Bank; Stan
Ellinwood, director, KCCB;
". Frank Yetner vice-president,
KCCB; Carl Flanagan, chief
lender, Nature Coast Bank; and
Robert Bonomo, branch manag-
er, Nature Coast Bank.
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle


Highlands association to meet


I -









TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2007 7C


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he PlusCode number printed next to each pro- PlusCode number, cable channels with the guide channel numbers using
gram is for use with the Gemstar VCR Plus+ sys- If you have cable service, please make sure that the convenient chart printed in the Viewfinder. This
tem. If you have a VCR with the VCR Plus+ fea- your cable channel numbers are the same as the procedure is described in your VCR user's manual.
ture (identified by the VCR Plus+ logo on your VCR), channel numbers in this guide. If not, you will need to Should you have questions about your VCR Plus+ sys.-
all you need to do to record a program is enter its perform a simple one-time procedure to match up the tern, please contact your VCR manufacturer.
The channel lineup for KLiP Interactive cable customers is in the Sunday Viewfinder on page 70.


Married daughter feels excluded by parents


Dear Annie: I am the only one of
my siblings who is out of the
house and married with chil-
dren. I live relatively close to my par-
ents. The problem is, I feel as if they no
longer consider me their
daughter. They don't visit or
invite us to come over, go | I
swimming, have dinner, etc. I
am usually the one who has
to call them. Dad rarely
phones, and Mom will call
only if I don't get in touch for
a few days. We only get
together for birthdays and
holidays.
My children have played
sports for several seasons,
and I've invited my parents
to watch them on numerous ANN
occasions, but they are MAIL
always too busy. When my
son graduated preschool, my parents
managed to find an excuse not to make
it.
My parents are truly missing out
when it comes to their grandchildren.
The really sad part is that I have a
younger brother who is close in age to
my children and they love to spend time
together, but it happens rarely
I've expressed my frustration to my
parents many times, but it doesn't mat-
ter. It really hurts when they exclude
me. Am I wrong to expect them to want
to have quality time with me and my
family? My children are too young now
to understand, but how will I explain it


I

L


to them later when they ask why
Grandma and Grandpa aren't interest-
ed in them? - AA
Dear AA: Your parents may feel they
are too young to be grandparents and
don't want to be reminded,
they could mistakenly
believe they are doing you a
favor by not being too
involved in your married
life, or they may be busy with
their other young children.
Regardless, you need to
make it clear that they are
doing damage they may not
be able to fix later - not only
S in their relationship with
their grandchildren, but also
with you. Please continue to
�E'S call and invite them to your
BOX children's events, but don't
expect too much in return.
(We hope your husband's parents are
close to your children.)
Dear Annie: I'm a foreign language
tutor and translator. I love my job, but
very often, when people find out what I
do, they ask me how to say something in
a certain language or they try to start a
conversation with me in one of my lan-
guages.
Out of the context of my work envi-
ronment, I feel. put on the spot. I usual-
ly have my mind on something else, and
I also don't want to appear as though
I'm showing off. What is an effective
response to these queries? - Put on the
Hot Seat


Dear Hot Seat: You wouldn't be show-
ing off to display your knowledge when
asked. However, if you are embarrassed
or annoyed by such questions, it's OK to
smile politely and say, "I'm off-duty now.
I hope you don't mind if we stick to
English."
Dear Annie: I read another letter in
your column from a woman who can't
seem to find a man to make her happy.
I'm 61, a widow, self-sufficient with two
beautiful daughters who have given me
seven wonderful grandchildren. The
men I have dated have been needy, self-
absorbed, selfish, egotistical, stingy,
lying, homicidal (he wanted to do away
with an ex), bombastic, pontificating
jackasses. What happens to men in
their 50s, 60s and 70s? Is it some sort of
by-product of global warming?
I spent the last few years of my 32-
year marriage trying to "fix" myself
with therapy and antidepressants,
while my husband continued to drink
his fifth of vodka, with no worries and
no job. Finally, one day I said, "Who
needs this?" and left.
Ladies, men will not make you happy,
only you can do that. Life is what you
make 6f it. If you happen to find that
rare specimen who makes you happy,
you won the lottery. I'm not bitter, just
wiser. - Peace in the 60s
Dear Peace: Not all men are like the
ones you've dated, but we agree that no
woman should believe she needs a man
to be happy Thanks for your words of
experience.


Today's HOROSCOPE -=


Your Birthday: You'll not be without
ample opportunities to advance your inter-
ests, especially in areas concerning your
work or career.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Use your
ingenuity and resourcefulness to fulfill your
more ambitious undertakings, and you'll be
surprised with the results.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - That
change in your state of affairs concerning
your social life is likely to occur. It could
develop quickly.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - You
won't mind if you devote your time to clean-
ing up lots of little incidental things you've
been putting off.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - Above
all, you won't want to get involved in any-
thing that would hamper your mobility, so
look for a variety of activities to engage in.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - Your
financial aspects look highly encouraging,
so if things haven't been profitable lately,
this might be the time to venture into some-
thing that is infused with new opportunities.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - There


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I AFTEC I


TOOSHE


www.jumble.com
JUDATS
.W ---r-- W-
, J^^ I ^^ _


isn't apt to be anything stodgy or boring
about you. In fact, your personality is likely �
to be a bit more avant-garde than usual.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - Nagging
hunches or intuitive feelings may be much
sharper than usual, so it is in your interest
to pay close attention.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - It
behooves you to keep your schedule as
flexible as possible because something fun
and exciting is apt to pop up that you'll want
to be part of.
Gemini (May 21-June.20) - If you can,
put off involvements with your conventional,
everyday endeavors because your artistic
juices will be flowing and you'll want to put
them to work for you in imaginative ways.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - You're
more than likely to find yourself dealing with
unorthodox issues and loving it.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - You'll enjoy
nothing more than tackling problems that
have appeared to be unsolvable to others.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - Don't hesi-
tate to let those little flashes of inspiration
guide you in your problem solving.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Henri Arnold and Mike Argirion


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A: IT L I I I I


Yesterday's AnJumbles:
Answer:


YODEL


(Answers tomorrow)
FILMY JUSTLY SNAPPY


How the hunter stalked his prey when he lost
his rifle scope - "AIMLESSLY"


Bridge


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
Arthur Ashe said, "Regardless of
how you feel inside, always try to
look like a winner. Even if you are
behind, a sustained look of control
and confidence can give you a
mental edge that results in victo-
ry.
That should apply at the bridge
table. Ooze confidence from every
pore.
But on some deals, it is impor-
tant to try to control trumps - as
in this deal. How would you play in
four spades after West leads a
heart, East winning with his king
and continuing with the ace?
The auction was difficult. On the
second round, South did well not to
rebid three no-trump. But three
diamonds put North in a quandary .
Perhaps he should have given pref-
erence with a three-spade bid. (If
North held three spades, he would
have raised to two spades, not
responded one no-trump.) But he
settled for raising diamonds. Now
South rebid his excellent five-card
suit, which North was happy to
pass. (Note that five diamonds is
poor, but five clubs, which is very
hard to reach, is good.)
Declarer will be tempted to ruff
the second heart and cash his
three top trumps. But then South
will be forced to shift to clubs. East


1 F
4 H
8 m
11 Nr
12 S
13
15 F
G
16F
18R
20 F
21 W
23 F


ACROSS 38 Sci. class
39 A Bobbsey twin
ast-food chain 40 Uncertain
Iolds gently 41 Marry
Hr. Parse- 42 Joule fraction
ghian 44 Sorenstam rival
Nlot me 47 Beneath
3harif of the 51 Lobster -
novies 55 Charlotte
lo different of "Bananas"
lute opposed by 56 Civil wrong
Gandhi 57 Fizzy
Fiesta bands beverage
remote 58 Future fish
Fire engine gear 59 Oompah- -
Vhiskey grain 60 Shoe part
Fix the table 61 Vim and vigor


24 Ordered
27 "- Zapata!"
29 Honor
society
letter
32 Porter and stout
33 Matured
34 Left in a hurry
35 Rear-end
36 Singer
Billy -
37 Talked into


DOWN
1 Actress
- Sedgwick
2 Farm
newborn
3 Stephen King
dog
4 Cozy
5 Ms.Thurman
6 Standard


North 09-25-07
S86
V J 10
* 8 5 4 2
4 A Q 9 8 3
West East
A 9 3 J 10 7 5
V Q 7 6 5 2 V A K 9.4 3
* K J7 * 103
4 764 4102
South
4 A K,Q 4 2
V 8
* A Q 9 6
4. K J 5
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both

South West North East
1 A Pass 1 NT Pass
3 * Pass 4 * Pass
4 4 Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: V 5

ruffs the third round and plays
another heart. After declarer ruffs,
he is out of trumps and has only
eight winners: five spades, one
diamond and two clubs.
At trick three, South should lead-
his remaining low spade, retaining
his high ones for later. The defense
takes the trick, but everything is
under control. If they play another
heart, it is ruffed on the board.
Declarer can draw trumps and
claim 10 tricks: four spades, one
diamond and five clubs.


Answer to Previous Puzzle
P RIO BY A MWO W
IONECIRAC K IDA'
PIT HI K ER NJIL
SLO GAINS ANGEL

RAVES YLATERAL
OBE Y AOK EGO'
BEE CBIS HAUIS
STRANDS AURAS
PAC ART
A B R K I SS ER S
LEA COND-fO Pup
OIRIBESHEEN ETA
EIVIE MIED EH S


7 Delhi
address
8 Cravat kin
9 Bleacher
shouts
10 Jacques' girl


GET MORE in the new "Just Right Crossword Puzzles"
series from Quill Driver. Call 800-605-7176.


9-25


14 Winding curve -
17 In front
19 Crude
metals
22 Sidestepped
23 Lithe
24 Fishhook part:
25 Kirghiz range
26 Promo tape .
28 1939 Lugosi
role
29 Faculty mem.
30 Two
quarters
31 Memorial Day
race
36 Steel
girder (hyph.)
37 Pisces or
Libra
41 Usefulness
43 Rustic
44 Slugger Mel -
45 Karate blow
46 Jealous god-
dess
48 Plummet
49 Icicle site
50 Gather in, as
crops
52 I, in Berlin
53 Mother
rabbit
54 Bullring yell


� 2007 bv NEA. Inc.


Cii-Rus CouN*iy (FL) CHRONICLE


ENTERTAINMENT








r SC TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2007


SEA50NLE55
S5ILE5 LET 'qOi
STg'ti iOW
WARDROBE SuDVGETT
A5 NEYJER 9UEOPE!








Sally.


Cmus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COMICSi

Garfield


For Better or For Worse

VII v-ir ENES,4uRLLN WE IDOI I 01

IWAS ON &FAPPA immS lI
CAGE ABOLYI His SMoKIGIJ&J


Beetle -....


The ,- ,, -. -:


GkTE ~ - I~WOUR�T5RP,E.OFFICE.
AE. BEST is LIKE GE-WIR&

500STE-K 5Kox!
FIE:L'


Rubes


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"WHATIP055 MRA./ILWN o . ALL NIGI4T
WI45N REGULAR FEOOl-5 ARF, SL55F'N79"


"Softballs aren't soft enough!"


SAS SOON A5
SOONr THY PORTT
NHAN FOR PUTY


90PFl


Frank & Ernest


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness
Box Office 637-3377
"Resident Evil: Extinction"
:(R) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30
p.m. Digital.
"The Brave One" (R) 1 p.m., 4
p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"3:10 to Yuma" (R) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Halloween" (R) 1:40 p.m.,
S4:40 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Mr. Bean's Holiday" (G) 1:45
p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Rush Hour 3" (PG-13) 7:40
p.m.
"Becoming Jane" (PG) 1:20
p.m., 4:20 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Sydney White" (PG-13) 1:10
p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:10
p.m. Digital.
"Resident Evil: Extinction"
(R) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50


p.m., 10:25 p.m. Digital.
"Good Luck Chuck" (R) 1:35
p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:50
p.m. Digital.
"Dragon Wars" (PG-13) 1
p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:45
p.m. Digital.
"The Brave One" (R) 1:20
p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:05
p.m. Digital.
"Mr. Woodcock" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:55 p.m.,
10 p.m.
"3:10 to Yuma" (R) 1:40 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:35 p.m., 10:205 p.m.
Digital.
"Halloween" (R) 2 p.m., 5
p.m., 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Balls of Fury" (PG-13) 1:15
p.m, 4 p.m., 7:15 p.m, 9:40 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and enter-
tainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


Arlo and Janis


The Born Loser


' '!.' Carlyle


Big Nate


. YouTu5T V,-Y')745
I 9AI,97P5y )7,FAl9Y 70
A59--WPY, ?VORT NO
PROOLM,






"N


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: H equals K




" B ANJBY RBK INC CN DNMV B EBL

JBY NYTV NP CASTV SY RVP DSXV,

CN EV CRBYHXWD XNP B INNL NYV."

- YNMVDSKC JBPFNPSV PBADSYIK

PREVIOUS SOLUTION - "They say nobody is perfect. Then they tell us
practice makes perfect. I wish they'd make up their minds." - Wilt Chamberlain

(c) 2007 by NEA, Inc. 9-25











563-5966

Classifieds
In Print
and
Online
All
The Time


Fax:(352) g635665. . ..lllFr I:.(888) !,522340H.Im.I.II ll..lJ ..c�IJ.. w c l c


EARLY 60'S Active Lady
Loves conversation,
people, current events,
travel, small towns,
community involve-
ment, reading and the
outdoors. Seeking
gentlemen. Eastern
Citrus County. Reply
Blind Box 1380-P
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 106 W. Main
St., Inverness, FL 34450




RENTAL FINDER
Swww.chronicle
Srentalfinder.com




$$CASH WE BUY TODAY
Cars, Trucks, Vans - rt
SFREE Removal Metal,
Junk Vehicles, No title
OK 352-476-4392 Andy
Tax Deductible Recelot

TOP DOLLAR
"| For Junk Cars
S$ (352) 201-1052 $
-----
$$$ ATTENTION $$$
I WANT YOUR JUNK
CARS, TRUCKS, ETC.
Tommy 352- 302-1276
CASH PAID! No title ok
$$ CASH PAID $$
Having Code
Enforcement problems
w/ Junk vehicles in your
yard? (352) 860-2545
$ CASH $
PAID FOR
Unwanted Vehicles
352-220-0687
COMMUNITY SERVICE
The Path Shelter is
available for people
who need to serve
their community
service.
(352) 560-6163 or
(352) 746-9084
Leave Message
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
Free Removal - Scrap
Metal, Appl.'s A/C,
Mowers, motors, etc.
Brian (352) 302-9480
ROTTWEILER
Pure, 2 Years old,
Great with Kids!
(352) 621-4789
The Path Shelter
will pick up your
unwanted vehicle
Tax deductible
receipt given
(352) 746-9084
Yellow Labs, 1 Male &
1 Female, outside
dogs. Free to good
home. (352) 726-9570
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645




CAT - 1YR. OLD MALE,
all grey, "Mischief". W.
Highland Blvd. Inv.
(352) 341-3499
CELLPHONE
Inverness off Marathon
& Anna Joe on
Saturday 352-795-3977




SCOTTISH TERRIER
Unneutered Male, Lite -
Grey, Blue Collar, VIC.
Mason Creek 9/23
352-422-5580



-E
r FORCES
BANKRUPTCY
- *Name Change I
*Child Support
I - Wils
I We Come To You I
637-4022.795-5999
:.79.5-.99




Youy�world first

Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?

This area's
#1
employment
source!

CHIpNICLllE
Classifieds


BUY or SELL!
Receive Quality
Customer Care!
FLRealEstateSale.Com


- -
TERI PADUANO,
REALTOR
C21 JWMorton
(352) 212-1446
Hablo Espanol
FREE Home Warranty
& Visual Tour
ON ALL MY LISTINGS





GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over items from
your Garage sale?
We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95

The week after your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902


Humane Society
of Inverness
offers Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Service

Appointments avail.
Cat Male $40,
CatFemale $50,
Dog Male $60,
Dog Female $70.
Prices including spay
or Neuter, 3 Yr. Rabies
shot Annual Vaccines
Nail Clipping, Micro
chipping &
Micro chip reg.
Call for appt.
(352) 344-5207

Humane Society
of Inverness
offers Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Service
Starting at $20,
Low cost vaccines,
Heartworm test,
Heartworm treat-
ment,
Cat Declawing. Call
for prices and appt.
(352) 726-8801







www.adoota
rescued pet.com
View available pets
on our website or call
(352) 795-9550
Need help rehoming
a pet - call us
Adoptive homes
available for small
dogs
Requested donations
are tax deductible

Pet Adoptions
Thursday
September 27
12pm - 2pm
Merchantile Bank
- Rt. 44, Inverness

MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY






rA4

ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM


HORSE BOARDING
State Forrest Acces.,
lit arena, $300/mo
SCENIC TRAIL RIDES
$35; LESSONS $25
(352) 628-1472

r RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com
--- --- EL
SSOD SOD * SOD*
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032
CAT ADOPTIONS


Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open 8:00 A
M till 4:00 P M
Monday-Friday.
Week-end and
evenings by
appointment.
All Cats and Kittens
are altered, tested for
Feline Luk and Aids.
Up to date on vac-
cines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.httfspha.org.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant
Ave. Corner of 44
and Conant.
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw prints.




HAIRCARE in your home
by Licensed Hairdresser
Curts/Perms/Wash/Style
Call Gail 352-422-6315





and read

1,000's of Items sold
everyday using the
Chronicle classified.
Call today and we'll
help you get rid of
your unwanted stuff.


CHR)NICLE
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-1441


EXP. TEACHERS
Quality childcare hiring.
(352) 795-5862


Su d o k u ** '* 4puz.comrn








8 5 4 6


! 346 5 13

. -'I I "-''
6




5 71 2 3





3 2 416 5 9 7

Fill in the squares so that each row. column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


SECRETARY. F/T
Strong computer
& organizational skills
necessary. Construction
office experience
desirable. DFWP/EOE
Winkel
Construction, Inc.
Fax resume: 860-0700
SECRETARY/
Real Estate Asst.

RE Uc. required. Must
have computer skills.
Hourly salary & bonus.
Kingsbay Realty
(352) 795-8080

































F/T-P/T, Immed.
openings Call Sue
352-628-0630

STYLIST
Now taking applica-
tions, in Hernando
for Opening mid Oct.
(352) 746-0335
WANTED
STYLIST/BARBER

For immediate position.
High commission pd.
No weekends req'd.
(352) 201-6017




Billing Specialist

. F/T, Experience
necessary, computer
literate, benefits
Fax Resume
352-726-8193
CNA or CMA

With phlebotomy �xp.
fuoltime position
Fax Resume
(352) 564-4222

EXP. BILINGUAL
OFFICE MANAGER

Needed for MD
practice. Please CV
c/o Box 1378M
Citrus Publishing
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, Fl
32229.
EXP'D MEDICAL
RECEPTIONIST/
FRONT DESK

F/T position.
Computer literate.
Benefits. Reply to:
P.O. Box 207,
Crystal River, FL 34429

LPN NEEDED

Must have strong
computer skills for
clinical research
, position.
Research experience
desirable,
Please call
(352)563-1865 or
email rwood@encore



Experienced,
Caring & Dependable

CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
Flexible schedules
offered. $10.00/hr.
CALL LOVING CARE
(352)860-0885





water J .

NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
at Life Care Center
of Citrus County

You have the
Improve your career
and your life when
you join our team.
By offering
competitive pay
and benefits,
including excellent
PTO time and
insurance,
We make YOU
our first priority.

RNs/LPNs
Full-time positions


3 pm.-11 p.m.
& 11 p.m. - 7 a.m.
CNAs
PRN positions
available for all
shifts.


Apply in person:
Contact:
Hannah Mand
3325 W Jerwayne Ln
Lecanto, FL 34461
Visit us online@
www.LCCA.com8
EO Job # 1181


EARN AS YOU LEARN
CNA Test Prep/CPR
Continuing Education
341-2311/Cell 422-3656
NURSE RECRUITER

Requires a Bachelor's
degree (additional
coursework in
Human Resources
Management,
Business
Administration or
Psychology
preferred). Ideal
candidate must be a
Registered Nurse or
Licensed Practical
Nurse with current FL
licensure; and be
proficient with
computer
applications. A
minimum of 2 years
recruiting experience,
preferably in an
acute setting
required. Please
apply online at
www.citrusmh.com.
CMHS is an equal
opportunity employer
PERSON NEEDED

To care for 86 yrs. old
lady In exchange for
home & $$. Must drive
& have own car. Need
Ref. 352-795-0496 eve.
352-564-8333 days

RN, LPN, CNA,
CMA NEEDED
A ALL STAR -A
Professional
Staffing Services
352-560-6210

SRN/LPN
CNA/HHA'S
Interim Health Care
(352)637-3111





BOOKKEEPER

Needed. Permanent
position. Computer
literate. Familiar with
Accounts Receivable
& Accounts Payable.
Good communica-
tion skills. Must have
experience. Pay
depends on
experience & ability.
Send Resume to:
PO Box 426
Crystal River, FL 34423

OFFICE
MANAGER

For Homosassa.
Prefer experience in
a Healthcare/Social
Services setting.
Marketing exp.
also desirable.
Requirements: AA
Degree (BA Degree
Pref'd) in business or
related field. Also
requires up to 6 mos.
Apprenticeship @
Home Office in
Leesburg. Pays
$400/wk. salary
+ commission &
benefits.
(352) 314-0500

SITE MANAGER

P/T, Candlewood/
Knollwood, Inverness,
FL FAX RESUME TO:
(727)447-5516
jobs@flynn
management.comrn
SUBSTANCE ABUSE
COUNSELOR
Provides in-home sub-
stance assessment and
counseling services to
at-risk families in Her-
nando County; pos-
sesses knowledge of
chemical dependency,
AA/NA 12-step philoso-
phy, community CD re-
sources and Marchman
Act; 2 yrs relevant sub-
stance abuse treatment
experience and a MA in
Human Svcs. required.
Licensed and /or CAP
preferred. Apply
LifeStream Behavioral
Ctr. 515W. Main St.
Leesburg or online at
www.lsbc.net

Tax Accountant

For Crystal River area.
Permanent position.
Computer literate.
Must have income
tax experience.
Pay depends on
experience & ability.
Send Resume to:
PO Box 426
Crystal River, FL 34423





Bartender & Cook
Apply In Person
9a - 3p, Mon - Fri
HICKORY ISLAND
RESTAURANT
Inglls (Old Port Inglls
Restaurant) Hwy.. 19
COOK
Line Cook/Prep Cook
Exp. nec. Apply Tues.-
Frl. at Black Diamond
HR, 3073 W. Shadow
Creek Loop, Lecanto,
FL. EOE DFWP
F/T Bartender
Nights & Wknds.
Sports knowledge
a plus. Also need.
Cocktail Server
Experience a plus.
Apply In person.
Manatee Lanes,
Crystal River DFWP
OPENING SOON


*SERVERS
*BARTENDERS *COOKS
Call for interview with
David (352) 628-4311
PT COOKS
Open at 5:30am
Sab/na's Diner & Ice
Cream (352) 637-1308


$$ GOT CASH $$
Earn great money by
setting appts. for busy
local company.
Call Steve:
352-628-0187

*" Great *
"Opportunity"
Local Company
needs Highly
Motivated Sales
People w/strong Ph
Skills. In office
Mon-Fri. 9-5.
NO Wknds. On Job
Training provided.
Career Minded
applicants only.
Phone weekdays.
1Oa-12por 1 p-4p.
1-866-777-1166 or
352-560-0056

ATTENTION
Real Estate Agents,
Brokers, and
Salesmen of all fields.
Are you fired of long
hours with no
compensation?
My agents make
$5,000 to $7,000
a month. We have
joined a national
effort to assist in the
enrollment of the new
Medicare Advantage
plans for Retirees on
Medicare
You will work In
Pharmacies,
Senior Centers and
Local area.
My Agents enjoy
* Monthly Bonuses
* We take trips all
over the world
* We advance Ist
commissions
* Vested Renewals
* We have Preset
appointments
* TV Leads
* Seminars
* Pre approach letters
Please call Mr. Buck
at 1-352-726-7722
for an interview or
Fax Resume to
1-352-726-6813

Crystal Motor Car
Company
of Homosassa &
Inverness

Are Looking for
experienced Sales
Professionals. If you
are self motivated
with a proven track
record and desire
a position that offers
more than just an
average living,
JOIN OUR TEAM
TODAY. We offer paid
Auto Sales Training for
qualified individuals,
Medical/Dental, 401 K
and a Holiday savings
plan. EOE/DFWP.
Please call Diane at
(352)795-1515
or Fax resume to
(352) 564-1952

Exp. Sales Person
NEEDED
Sun Country Homes
Rapidly Becoming
the areas, premiere
dealer of manufac-
tured & modular
homes, Is seeking,
an exp. Sales Person.
Competitive com-
"pensation & benefits
plan,
Fax Resume or Apply
in Person DFWP Fax
352-794-7310
SUN COUNTRY HOMES
1710S.Suncoast Blvd.

LOCAL PLUMBING
WHOLESALER

Looking for inside
Counter/Sales person.
Plumbing & computer
knowledge a plus.
401K & Insurance
Apply in person @:
Morgan Bros. Supply
7559 W. Gulf to Lake
Crystal River

SALES ASSISTANT
For model
home sales center,
Saturday required.
No experience
necessary. Must be
personable, eager to
learn, able to follow
directions, aggressive,
energetic and
conscientious
Salary plus bonus.
Email resume to
izahringer@acme
homesfla.com
or fax to 352-382-4514





AUTO BODY
WORK/PAINT
Exp'd, must have Drivers
lic. 352-613-4532


CABINET BUILDER/
FINISHER
Custom wood cabinet
shop, Exp, top pay,
drug free. Call anyday
352-489-9072 or fax
resume 352-465-6098

DUMP TRUCK
DRIVERS
Class A CDL needed
for local contractor.
Call (352) 726-3940
EXP. FRAME
CARPENTERS
(352) 634-0432

LOCAL
UNDERGROUND
UTILITY CO.
Exp'd Pipe Crew
& Laborers
Croft Contracting,
Inc. 2271 N Hwy 41
Hernando.
(352) 860-1202
DFWP

r PLUMBERS
I ONLY
I Experienced I
1 Rough Tubset Trim
Service.
SIf not don't apply
6 621-7705
>"--- - - J
TOWER HAND
Starting at $9.00/hr
BIdg Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits, OT,
352-694-8017 Mon-Fri




$$ GOT CASH $$

Earn great money by
setting appts. for busy
local company.
Call Steve @
352-628-0187

Exp. Construction
Laborers Wanted
Must be 18 or over,
Transportation
preferred. Call for
Interview, 860-2055










FRONT DESK
Hotel experience
required. Great
benefits. Full-time,
Apply in person:
BEST WESTERN
614 NW Hwy 19,
Crystal River.




INGLIS DELIVERY
ROUTE AVAILABLE
Must have two
vehicles available
and able to work
early morning hours
7 days a week.
Call 563-3201
-and leave, name,..
phone number and
the best time to call.


CHiRON1CLE

LAWN CARE
Experienced help
only, F/T, year round.
Pay based on exp.
Must have own
transportation.
Leave voice mail
(352) 212-1684


CllKON10CL

TEMPORARY
DISTRIBUTION
ASSISTANTS
Needed. Must have
reliable vehicle. Able
to work odd days
and early morning
hours. Must work
weekends,
Call 563-3256

Ci Vi i(;I1E





CLEANING
POSITION
Inverness. Exp'd w/ ref.
Will train right person,
Must have trans. DFWP
352-637-0611 10a-2p
Evangelical
Church
Looking for Volunteer
Accompanist.
Reply to Box 1377P
c/o Citrus Publishing
.1634 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crys. Rvr, FI 34429








-


NOW HIRNG
LOCALLY
Large national
l organization. I
Avg. Pay $20/hr.
Over $55K annually.
I Including full
benefits & OT, paid
training, vacation.
i FPTRieP/T I
1-866-515-1762
benfit & T, ai


America's Fastest
Growing Business
Be your own Boss.
Earn $50K - $250K/yr
Investment Required.
Call Now:
(888)238-1635 24/7Fcan




ESTABLISHED SALON
FOR SALE. Exc. location.
352-341-5043 or
352-212-0514/637-5078
LAWN SERVICE
Established 23 yrs.
w/ 1990 F450 Dump,
2007 Toro mower & all
lawn equip. + chain
saws, hedge trimmers,
approx. 75 accounts
make your money
back in less than 2 yrs,
will train, $87,900 Cash
(352) 637-6718


COMMERCIAL LOANS
Prime, Sub-Prime, Hard
Money, REHAB, Private.
Also, equip. loans.
Mark (352) 422-1284




ALL STEEL BUILDINGS



25x25x7 (2:12 Pitch)
1- 9x7 garage door,
2 vents,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED-$15.995
25x30x9 (3:12 Pitch)
Roof Overhang
2-9x7 garage doors, -
2 vents, entry door,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED- $16.495
Many Sizes Avail.
We Custom Build
We Are The Factory
Fl. Engineered Plans
Meets or Exceeds
Florida Wind Code
METAL STRUCTURES
LLC.COM
1-866-624-9100
metalstructuresllc.com

FACTORY DIRECT
METAL BUILDINGS
CARPORTS, SHEDS
Custom Installation,
Upto 140MPH
Wind Rating
Gulf to Lake Sales
(352) 527-0555

LOCALLY MFG.
30 X 30 X 9
Vertical Roof w/(2)
8 X 7 Garage Doors
& (1) 36" Walk Door
& 4" slab.
Installed $14,995
(352) 489-9397




"LIVE AUCTIONS"
www.charliefudge.com
For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-542-3877
Antique Safe
First $175. takes it
(352) 341-5247
UNIQUE DOLL IN
CARRIAGE, 2' TALL
Composition Head,
moving eyes, $500
Call for details.
(352) 637-6310




VINTAGE TOASTERS
Irons, Cassette Player,
National Geographics,
some tools. All $75
Beverly Hills
352-257-3793

-S

SPA-HEATER - GAS
Teledyne LAARS I series,
good working cond.
$200/obo
(352) 503-3973




A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
-' 2 Ton $780.00
-* 2-'/2ton $814.00
- 3 Ton $882.00
*Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Also Available
Free Delivery!
Call 746-4394
ABC Briscoe Appliance
Refrigerators, washers,
stoves. Service & Parts
(352) 344-2928
AC SYSTEMS
HEAT PUMPS, MH UNITS
ALL SIZES, 13 SEER, FROM
$475. 352-400-4945
DRYER (GE)
WASHER (Maytag)
$125/set
Older, but works great!
(352) 249-9275
Elec. stove, 30" white,
3 yrs old, self cleaning
oven with manual, like
new, $250.
(352) 586-1566
GE CHEST FREEZER,
energy saver,
27"WX48LX34"H
$80; GRANDFATHER
CLOCK, 6'. Resin, $70.
(352) 341-0787
KENMORE 21CU. FT.
side by side, water &
Ice in door, white, good
clean cond. $150.
352-621-4721
KENMORE 36",Side by
side, water & ice in
door, 36 cu. ft. White
showroom clean,
$550
(352) 464-0602
REFRIGERATOR
Bottom Freezer, White
$75;
STOVE 30" Electric
White $75
(352) 726-1868
WASHER & DRYER
Both run well
$150.
(352) 344-4182
WASHER & DRYER
GE, White, Newer
Super Capacity.
$275/pr. Inverness
(919) 538-2933 Cell
WASHER & DRYER
Hotpoint. New
$350/pr.
(352) 503-6099
Washer/Dryer
Kenmore,
Good condition $275
352-350-3731


CLASSIFIED


BR SET California KG
Waterbed, Triple
Dresser, Hi-Boy, Lighted.
Solid Oak. Pd. $4,000
$400. 352-503-6169
Cell 453-6362
BROYHILL WOODEN
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
65"LX22"WX51"H, fits 32"
TV, 3 drawers, 4 shelves
in glass cabinet. $400.
SMW (352) 382-4795


"LIVE AUCTIONS"
www.charliefudge.com
For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-542-3877
On Site Estate
Auction
Thursday 9/27
9am
Dir: From Hernando,
Go N. on SR200 , Rt.
on Delight, Left on
Gloria to Sale on Left.
Living Estate of CR
Northcut - WWII Pilot,
Alaskan Hunting
Guide & Men's Sr
Gold Medalist Archer]
Game Mounts, Books,
Sterling Set, Misc. Any
& All Furn. + House-
hold Items, John
Boat, Mower & Misc
Items
see photos @
www.dudlevsauction,
corn
AB166712BP 2dsc chk




Sander
Rigid, oscillating,
edge/belt, spindle
sander, $150.
(352) 628-6335
WHEEL OF A
DEAL









GUARANTEED
RESULTS FOR
ONLY $63.95
Sell your car today
with a Wheel of a
Deal Ad. Run a 30
day ad and we will
continue to run your
ad every month until
you sell the car.

(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902
*Ad will not be
automatically
scheduled. The
customer must call
each month to
reschedule.





Magnavox 26"
older TV
$50.
(352) 621-3131
PANASONIC 27"
PIP TV Amazing Picture!
Guest Bedroom TV.
Hardly used. $125
(352) 344-3485




FIREPLACE
New Adobolite Chimenea
type w/18' chimney pipe
kit. Use inside or on lanai:
Paid $4500 will sell for
$2800. 352-344-4811
MH Roofover Kits Avail.
do it yourself , will deliv.
Used roofing material
also avail 352-746-1600




Citrus County
Computer Doctors
Repairs In-Home or
Pick-Up, Delivery. avail.
Free quote, 344-4839
Dell Computer
model Dimension
L600CX, incl. monitor,
printer, speakers, good
working cond. $75.
(352) 795-4908
DELL DESKTOP
COMPUTER, LCD flat
screen WinXP camp,
like new $400. DRESSER,
solid oak was $795 sell
$200. (352) 726-5310
DIESTLER COMPUTERS
Internet service, New &
Used systems, parts &
upgrades. Visa/
MCard 637-5469
htffp://www.rdeeii.com
FAST12000MHZ
HP-60GB H/D CD Burn,
K/B, Mouse, Spkrs
W/ Win XP $290 w/
CD's (352)613-2958




4 Rattan Bar Stools
$80.
4 matching chair $50.
Must See.
(352) 621-0300
5 PC. BEDROOM SET
Triple Dresser, Hdbd,
Hi Boy, Nt. Stands $350
EXECUTIVE OFFICE
FURNITURE (New)
Buttermilk/Cherry Top
$400 (919)538-2933 Cell
PRE OWNED FURNITURE
Unbeatable Prices
NU 2 U FURNITURE
Homosassa 621-7788
3PC STANLEY WALL UNIT
Solid, light colored
wood. Exc. cond. S250/
obo. SECT. CORNER
COUCH lyr old. Exc.
cond. $250
352527-8578/464-4133
BEDROOM SET
2 nightstands, chest.,
dresser, mirror, armoire,
blanket chest. $500
obo, 352-795-7322
BEDS *.* BEDS .* BEDS
The factory outlet store!
For TOP National Brands
Fr.50%/70% off Retail
Twin $119 Full $159
Queen $199 / King $249
Please call 795-6006


TWIN BEDS, COMPLETE
& Bedding, $200;
DR SET, table w/4 up-
holstered chairs. $200.
(352) 228-7775
WOOD FUTON
full size $125. Wing back
chairgold. $25.
352-220-4270 or
726-5708.


TUESDAY, SiEPTEMBER 25, 2007 9C

Lz 6 68'S 97iT Z E,
S 17 IT 6 9 L 8
9 � T -Z 8a 1 s 6
� z 17!6 Z 8 S 1 9,
8 Z. 9 S T 6 t Z
I S 69 t7? Z 8 �
97 Z9 -7 6 SE 8 T
t7 8 iL I ZT9Z 6 S

6 6 T S,8 Z Ii 9 V
.....21


Bedroom Set,, king, 6
pc. solid maple $450.
Black sofa & love seat
$225. excel. cond.
(352) 621-0300
CHERRY OFFICE DESK
w/topper. 62"L X23"W
$150. (352) 726-9183
CHINA CABINET
Older, solid wood $100
VINTAGE 50'S HI-FI
$25
(352) 344-4580
CITRUS HOME DECOR @
Wal-Mart Plaza,
Consianment, like new
furniture (352) 621-3326
Coffee & 2 end table
set, Cherry wood color,
$50. Glasstop coffee &
sofa table set, $70
(352) 270-8178
CURIO 5 glass shelves,
mirrored back, 3 glass
sides, locking door.
$200.
(352) 464-0602
CURIO CABINET
3 Glass Shelves
72X23 $75
Very Good Cond.
(352) 726-9684
CURIO CABINET
White Oak
w/5 glass shelves.
72" X15" $175 obo
(352) 637-9575
Din. Rm. Table &
4 Chairs, beautiful
traditional oak,
Queen Anne style legs
$600.obo
(352) 503-3144
DINING RM. SET
8 upholstered chairs, 7'
table w/leaf & glass
top. $150.
(352) 527-9876
Dining Room Hutch
Solid oak, led glass
doors, lighted top
EXCELLENT COND.
$650 OBO.
(352) 527-1399
DINING ROOM SET
Dark Pecan Set,
oval table with
6 chairs, server $250
352-249-1132
DINING ROOM SET
Mahogany, table w/
2 leaves and 6 chairs,
w/ large Hutch
$800.
(352) 746-9470
DINING ROOM SET
Table w/ 4 chairs. Solid
wood, drop-leaf. Extra
leaf & pads. $225
(352) 464-4694
DINING ROOM SET
Table w/4 side chairs
$250
(352) 560-3279
DRAFTING OFFICE
CHAIR, $50;
LEATHER
OFFICE CHAIR $40
(352) 726-9183
KING SIZE RESONIC
Memory Foam Pillow
Top Mattress
w/boxsprings. $350.
(352) 795-6241
KITCHEN SET
Round glass top table
with four chairs.
Asking $300.00. Call
400-1331
La Z Boy Recliner,
$35.
Book Case
$15.
(352) 341-5247
La-Z-Boy Leather
Reclining Loveseat
hunter green,
retail $2,100.
Asking $450.like new
(352) 746-2842
La-Z-Boy Recliner/
Rocker, like new,
antique map pattern,
$380. Computer
desk/hutch/ filing table
set, $150 (352) 270-8178
Loveseat
6 mos. old, burgundy,
leather, $450.
Dining Set, Iron & glass,
like new, must see. $400
(352) 527-4488
LOVESEAT, rocks &
reclines, teal/brown
tones, like new, $75;
TABLE w/2 chairs, sides
extend, It. brown, $60
(352) 634-2592
Poplar wood writing
desk, $50. Kroehler
American Signature
kakhi green sofa,
loveseat, 2 side tables.
slip covers, set, $500
(352) 270-8178
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40
Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
QUEENSIZE BED
inflatable. $65. Dinette
set w/4 chairs.$75.
220-4270 or 726-5708.
Rattan Glass top table,
$25.
Full sz. box spring &
mattress
$25.
(352) 341-5247
----- Eu
r RENTAL FINDER.
www.chrbnicle |
Srentalfinder.com
fc---- - �J
. ROLL-AWAY BED
Twin size w/cover. $45;
WICKER CHAISE .
W/CUSHIONS $35.
Exc. Cond.
(352) 746-0488
ROLLTOP DESK
Solid oak, $300.
(352) 382-0817
SOFA
16ft, Corner Sectional
Pullout Bed, Each End
is recliner chair,
good condition,
$480. (352) 746-7127
Solid pine natural and
cream dining set, $250
Cream & burgundy
La-Z-Boy recliner
rocker, $150.
(352) 270-8178
TAN LOVESEAT
W/SLEEPER 6'
Exc. Cond. $75;
RECLINING GREEN SOFA
7'6" Good Cond. $50
(352) 795-9878
The Path's Graduates,
Single Mothers,
Needs your furniture.
Dining tables, dressers
& beds are needed.
Call (352) 746-9084















BACKPACK BLOWER
"Echo" new in 2004 for
$300. Will sell for
$175/ obo. Perfect,
Cond. Used little.
(352) 746-3971
Craftsman ZTR, 40" cut,
15H, All attach., $1,100.
Yard Machines, 42"
$450. (352) 362-7832
Dyna Mark Rider
older model
8 HP, B&S eng., 36" cut.
$150. (352) 302-6069
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
HUSQVARNA
Rotary Mower, power
propelled, $100
10 HP CHIPPER/
SHREDDER, $250.
(352) 795-9873
MULCH 5-6 Yrd. Loads
$95 Deliv'd. Citrus Co.
Gravel $75 + Materials.
352-563-9979/400-0150
, TRACTORS (2) Int. Cub
SLowBoy belly mower.
$1,400; 414 Int. Diesel
w/loader. $2,000
(352) 726-6864


10C TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2007


"LIVE AUCTIONS"
www.charliefudge.com
For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-542-3877


ii


HERNANDO
Estate Sale RV, Boats,
Furn, frzr, 352-489-3035




3 Various sizes area
rugs, burgundy print,
$50. Others $25 each
(352) 270-8178

2007

SPECIALS
6 lines - 10 days
Ltems totalling
$1-$150...........$7.95
$151-$400......$12.95
$401-$800......$17.95
$801-$1,500....$22.95
CALL CHRONICLE
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
726-3983 OR
563-5966
Two general
merchandise items
per ad,
private party only.
(Non-Refundable)
Some Restrictions
May Apply


300 ft. roll of Bubble
Wrap & 11 bundles
of brand new
packing boxes, $380.
(352) 746-5293
9,000 lb. WARN WINCH
$500;
37 gal. Aux. FUEL TANK
$100
(352) 302-2254
AWNING - NEW
Cost $395 Now $150
7' quarter moon on iron
frame. Fax Machine,
$20 (352) 382-1191
Carpet Factory Direct
Sales * Install * Repair
Laminate, tile, wood Sr.
disc. (352) 341-0909
CHRYSLER PACIFICA
Towing Hitch, $65.
12HP, KOHLER Cl
Horizontal Shaft, $75.
(352) 795-6639
DIGITAL SLR PKG
Nikon D70s,1G,Tamron
18-200
$800. 634-1315
Electric Fire Place, new
in box w/ accessories
$550. Running Boards
new in box use for
Truck, SUV or Van,
$375. (352) 465-6558


ELECTRIC HUSKY
5 cu. ft. Cement mixer.
Like new. $200
NEW CB WEATHER
Alert Radio, $35.00
(352) 795-9873
GOLF CART BATTERIES
THE BATTERY MEDICS
36V & 48V Sets were
$245 Now $200 Pricing
Extended till 9/30.
Contact Mark @
727-375-6111
HOME SECURITY SYSTEM
"Laser Shield"
Advertised on Limbau
talkshow & Circuit City.
Still in box. Cost $200/
Sell $75(352)382-1088
Kenmore canister
sweeper, exc. cond.,
$25. Sears electric
typewriter, $25 obo
(352) 746-0559
KENMORE FLAT TOP
ELECTRIC RANGE
$175/obo GLASSTOP
DINNETTE SET w/4 chairs.
$100/ obo. Both nice
cond. (352) 746-7689
Round Pool
24 x 52, filter, pump,
ladder & access.
$600.
(352) 464-0602


ROYAL KENT, Poland
Very pretty!
Service of 8. Mint Cond.
Platters, Veg. Bowls,
Cream, Sugar. $125
8a-3p (352) 621-3696
SALON HAIR
CUTTING CHAIR
$150.
(352) 464-1513 or
(352) 382-2662
SOD. ALL VARIETIES
Bahia, $80 pallet,
St Augustine, $150
pallet. Install & Del.
Avail. 352-302-3363
The Spot Family Center
Needs Donations
For Community
Family/Youth Events
, Land, Storage Racks,
Containers, Folding
Tables, Event Tents, Bus,
Box Truck. Please call:
Brian (352) 220-0576
Wheelchair,
lightweight,
excel, cord. $150.
Ladder, aluminum
32' extension
$175. (352) 746-9012
Wicker Tables
& Planter, 36" TV,
Refrigerator,
(352) 726-7159


CITnus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BURN BARRELS
Heavy duty wl out tops
$7.50 EA (352) 344-9752




& Misc. store Items.
$300
(352) 422-5985



BRAUN
WHEELCHAIR LIFT
Side mounted, fits full
sz. van. $750/obo
(352) 382-8970 Lv. Mess.
INVACARE
WHEELCHAIR
Good Cond. $75
(352) 628-6901
LEGEND SCOOTER
$425,00.
SHARP RIDER
$375.00
(352) 628-9625
PRIDE GOGO 3 WHEEL
SCOOTER like new,
used very little,
Cost $949.
Sell $395/obo
(352) 726-7537


� LaughingStock International Inc/dist. by United Media, 2007


"What does he want to eat, a bowl of ants?"

729523


A/C Tune up w/ Free
, permanent filter +
- Termie/Pest Control
Insp. Uc & Boned Only
$44.95 for both.
(352) 628-5700
caco36870




ADVERTISE YOUR
BUSINESS IN THE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
TODAY!
S$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
Its Less than
Pennies per day
$$per household.
S$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
IF WE DON'T HAVE
YOUR BUSINESS
CATEGORY.
JUST ASK.
WE CAN GET
IT FOR YOUI!

CALL TODAY
(35 A3-ROAA5


sra Generation Service
Fencing, Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,
Lawn, Trees, Landscap-
ing, FREE Est., 10% off
any job. lic 99990257151
& Ins. (352) 201-0658
-----
AFFORDABLE,
I HAULING CLEANUP, I
PROMPT SERVICE
Trash, Trees, Brush,
SAppl. Furn, Const. I
SDebris & Garages
352-697-1126
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
I Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
. DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272
FREE CONSULTATION
To hurricane ready your
trees. Prof. Arborist,
Action Tree 726-9724
R WRIGHT TREE SERVICE,
free removal, stump
,grind, trim, Ins.& Lic
#0256879 352-341-6827
7 TREE REMOVAL
I Stump grinding, land I
I clearing, bushhog.
352-220-5054
L u



Your' world first.
Et'en D i


CHlI'ONICLE
1: .-I ..,v, ,i ,


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd friendly
serve. Lowest rates Free
estimates,352-860-1452




All Computer Repairs
We come to your home
or office. 21 yrs. exp.
7 days (352) 212-1165
ATLAS
COMPUTER
Over 15 Years Expl
NEVER Diagnostic
Fee! NO Charge if NO
Repair! Senior Disc,
This Week FREEBIE
1 Gig USB Drive!
MICROSOFT CERT.
Free Pickup /Delivery!
586-3636
Citrus County
Computer Doctors
Repairs In-Home or
Pick-Up, Delivery, avail,
Free quote, 344-4839




REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch * Installation
Call for Fast Service
C &R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-1728




VChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
fully coated. 30 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Ins. Lic#00 1721
352-795-6533/464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
3rd GENERATION SERV
fencing, Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,
lawn trees, & landscap-
ing FREE Est., 10% off
any job. lic 99990257151
& Ins. (352) 201-0658
CHEAP/CHEAP/CHEAP
Husband & Wife DP
Press.Cleaning & Paint-
ing. Lic.&lns. 637-3765
A# 1 L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too small 24/7
Lic3008 352-341-1440






George Swedlige
Painting- nt./Ext.
Pressure Cleaning- Free
est. 794-0400 /628-2245
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Uic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Dave Rodgers Painting
20 + yrs, exp., int./ext.
satisfaction guarantee
lic./Ins. (352) 726-5698
* RUDY'S PAINTING *
Int./Ext., Free Estimates
Pressure Wash., Lic./Ins.
24/7, (352) 476-9013


Sci\ing All ofCtiluI Count0
Boulenicen

CCC025464 QB000218B
& SUPPLY INC.
Family Owned & Operated

NEW ROOFS - REROOFS - REPAIRS
FREE ESTIMATES
I, ,1


$100i OFF
COMPLETE RO


l(352) 628-5079. (352) 628-7445 j


INs.OMAION


L business

Ad!


Affordable Boat Maint.
& Repair, Mechanical,
Electrical, Custom Rig.
John (352) 746-4521
DOCKS, SEAWALLS,
Boat Lifts, Boat Houses,
New, Re decks, Repair
& Styrofoam Replace.
Lic.CBC060275. Ins.
(352) 302-1236

-U

AT YOUR HOME Res.
mower & small engine
repair. Lic#99990001273
352-220-4244




BATHTUB REGLAZING
Old tubs & ugly
ceramic tile is restored
to new cond. All colors


FREE ESTIMATES
FREE P.U. & DELIVERY
Furniture & Cornices
(352) 628-5595




ASSISTANCE FOR SRS.
Driver, shopping, appts.
meals, laundry, respite
relief. 352-746-5666
FT ADULT CARE IN
Private home has
opening. $4.50 hr. Eden
Alternative Practice,
Please call 563-0434
HEAVEN SENT
Prvt. rm. of home. 1 on
1 care. CNA & Med.
Tech. (352) 621-3337




ACCEPT 1 Child in my
home, lots of TLC & exp.
Off US 19, Wkee Wach./
Homa. 352-263-1860
New In Home Mother �
& Daughter Day Care
in Citrus Springs,
caring environment
352-302-3105, 489-2709
, REG HOME DAY CARE
Openings NOW FT/PT
0 Infants Welcome f0
- 352-726-5163 u




v/Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
fully coated. 30 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Ins. Lic#001721
352-795-6533/464-1397




FINAL DETAILS, LLC
CLEANING SERVICES,
New Const.,Vacant
Prop.,Offices, Residen-
tial 352-400-2772 Lic. Ins.


HAUTER & CLARK
HANDYMAN & MORE
Home, Office & Floor
Cleaning, Lawn Serv.
Pressure Washing,
(352) 860-0911
HOME CLEANING
Homosassa, Lecanto
& Crystal River
Weekly, bi-weekly,
1 time cleaning,
moves, rentals, real
estate sales /models.
Ryanna, 586-7919
Licensed, Ins., Ref.
House Cleaning
Call Mary
(352) 503-6300




Spiffy Window Cleaners
Special Introductory
offer 20% Discount
lic. & Ins. (352) 503-3558




DOTSON Construction
25 yrs. in Central FL. Our
own crews! Specializing
in additions, framing,
trim, & decks.
Lic. #CRC1326910
(352) 726-1708
PRICE Finish Carpentry
Wood moldings & doors
30+ yrs. Lic. 17510184057
352-860-0675/302-4389
ROGERS Construction
New Homes,Additions
Florida Rooms.
AAsIA . `I?(-1o9DaTon


FL RESCREEN
352-563-0104/257-1011
1 panel or comp cage
Family owned & oper'd
Screen rms,Carports,
vinyl & acrylic windows,
roof overs & storm
panels, garage screen
doors, siding,
soffit fascia, Lic#2708
(352) 628-0562




CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
A# I L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too smallI 24/7
Uc3008 352-341-1440
AUGIE'S PRESSURE
Cleaning - Quality
Work, Low Prices. FREE
Estimates: 220-2913




#734025092
86.-0085


Dethatching Lawns
Vacuum Leaves & Thatch,
Tree Trimming

(352) 637-3810 or (352) 287-0393
FREE ESTIMATE Licensed & Insured


PICARD'S PRESSURE
CLEANING & PAINTING
Roofs w/no pressure,
houses,driveways. 25 yrs
exp. Lc./Ins. 341-3300
* ROLAND'S *
PRESSURE CLEANING
Mobiles, houses & roofs
Driveways w/surface
cleaner.Nosoratreaks!


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash & Gutters
Lic.5863 (352) 746-0141
1 Call does it All No lob
toosmll Remod., Home
Repairs, Press. Clean.,
etc. CRC1326431
(352) 746-9613
Andrew Joehl
Handyman. General
Maintenance/Repairs
Pressure & cleaning.
Lawns, gutters. No job
too small! Reliable. Ins
0256271 352-465-9201
3rd Generation Service
Fencing, Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,
Lawn. Trees, Landscap-
ing, FREE Est., 10% off
any job. lic 99990257151
& Ins. (352) 201-0658
A# I L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too small 24/7
Lic3008 352-341-1440
Ip-- --- = m=
AFFORDABLE,
I HAULING CLEANUP, I
PROMPT SERVICE
STrash, Trees, Brush,
SAppl. Furn, Const, I
SDebris & Garages
352-697-1126 *

ALL AMERICAN
HANDYMAN Free Est.
Affordable & Reliable
Lic.34770 (352)302-8001






FAST AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE! Most repairs.
Free Est., Lic # 0256374
(352) 257-9508
HANDYMAN
If its Broke , Jerry
Can Fix It. Lic#189620
352-201-0116,726-0762
HAUTER & CLARK
HANDYMAN & MORE
Home, Office & Floor
Cleaning, Lawn Serv.
Pressure Washing,
(352) 860-0911
Inside Out Handyman
Service, Inc. Home re-
pairs, remodeling & Rm.
additions #CRC039323
352-220-8136
NEW IN AREA
Ask for Jim or Iv. msg.
352-344-5213
217-201-2962 Lic34868


FULL ELECTRIC SERVICE
Remodeling, Lighting,
Spa, Sheds Lic. & Insur.
#2767 (352)257-2276.
MALLEY's Elect. Service
Resid. & Comm,
Ins. & Lic. #EC0001840
Rob @ 352-220-9326
Mel 352-255-4034



-----
r -AFFORDABLE,
HAULING CLEANUP, I
I PROMPT SERVICE
= Trash, Trees, Brush,
AppI. Furn, Const. I
Debris & Garages
352-697-1126

A-1 Hauling cleanup,
garage clean outs,
trash turn. & appl. Misc.
Mark (352) 344-0034
All of Citrus Hauling/
Moving items delivered,
clean ups.Everything
from A to Z 628-6790
C.J.'S TRUCK/TRAILERS
Furn., apple, trash, brush,
Low $$$/Professional
Prompt 7 day service
726-2264 /201-1422
WE MOVE SHEDS
266-5903




Carpet Factory Direct
Sales * Install * Repair
Laminate, tile, wood Sr.
disc, (352) 341-0909




All kinds of fences
JAMES LYNCH FENCE
Free estimates.
(352)
527-3431

ROCKY'S FENCING,
Serving Citrus Co. for 25
yrs. "Call the Best, Forget
the Rest." Free Est., Lic.
& Ins., 352 422-7279
3rd GENERATION SERVE
fencing, Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,
lawn trees, & landscap-
ing FREE Est., 10% off
any job. lic 99990257151
& Ins. (352) 201-0658
25 Years In County
Free Est., Res./Comm.
FENCES BY DALLAS
Lic./Ins (352) 795-1110
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing.
All types.Free estimates
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BARNYARD II FENCING
Serving Citrus Co. Since
1973. Free Estimates
(352) 726-9260
GARY JOE ROSEBERRY
Fence Company
Specializing in vinyl
(352) 621-0929


New & Re-Roofs * Flat & Low Pitch
* Roof Repairs Commercial * Residential
Shingle - Metal - Built Up Roof
Torchdown - Shakes









Lucksroof.com
Roof Inspections Available Drug Free Workplace
zState Certified Lic. #CCC1327843




Handyman Tom
* All Phases of Home Repair
* Window and Door Replacements

* Drywall Repair
SPressure Wash
* Deck and Dock Repair
* Interior Trim
* Painting

637-7250 or

(352) 442-7772
713968 Lic. & Ins.


#1 in Service
Hise Roofing
New const. reroofs &
repairs. 25 yrs. exp. leak
spec. #CCC 1327059
(352) 344-2442
John Gordon Roofing
Rea Rat Free est. Proud to
Serve You.
ccc 1325492.
795-7003/800-233-5358
RE-ROOFS & REPAIRS
Reasonable Rates!!
Exp'd, Lic. CCC 1327843
Erik (352) 628-2557
ROOFOVERS - MH
2" insul, lifetime warr. no
leaks, colors avail. Do it
yourself kits avail. Lic
1983. 352-746-1600




All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. FREE EST.
Lic#2579 /Ins. 746-1004
Concrete Slabs, Pavers
Remove & Haul Debris
Demolit. 352-746-9613
Lic# CRC 1326431
Concrete Staining,
Garage & Driveway,
House pressure washer,
Free Est., 20 Yrs. Exp.
(352) 422-8888
CONCRETE WORK
Sdevwd, Driveways Patios,
skabs
Free est. Lic. 2000. Ins.
795-4798
Decorative concrete,
River rock, curbs, Stamp
concrete Fuston's River
Rock (352) 344-4209
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
driveways & tear outs


ALL AMEKILAN
HANDYMAN Free Est.
Affordable & Reliable
Lic.34770 (352)302-8001
DOTSON Construction
25 yrs. in Central FL. Our
own crews! Specializing
in additions, framing,
trim, & decks.
Lic. #CRC1326910
(352) 726-1708
FASTI AFFORDABLE!
RELIABLEI Most repairs.
Free Est., Lic # 0256374
(352) 257-9508
Inside Out Handyman
Service, Inc. Home re-
pairs, remodeling & Rm,
additions #CRC039323
352-220-8136
W. F. GILLESPIE
Room Additions, New
Home Construction,
Baths & Kitchens
St. Lic. CRC 1327902
(352) 465-2177
www.wfgillespie.com


We do it ALLI Big or Sm.I
Additions, BA & Kitch.,
Drywall,Crown molding,
Demo. CRC1326431
(352) 746-9613




CERAMIC TILE INSTALLER
Bathroom remodeling,
handicap bathrooms.
Lic/Ins. #2441 795-7241
CUTTING EDGE Ceramic
Tile. Lic. #2713, Insured.
Showers. Firs. Counters
Etc. (352) 422-2019
STONE MASON
Outdoor Fireplaces,
Waterfalls & Ponds,
Walks & Patios, Etc.
(352) 592-4455




ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cert. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs,
Texture, Additions,
Homeowners, Builders
Free est. (352) 220-9016
Lic.#SCC131149747




FILL, ROCK, CLAY, ETC.
All tyoes of Dirt Service
Call Mike 352-564-1411
Mobile 239-470-0572
AFFORDABLE Top soil,
fill, mulch,rock. Tractor
work. No job too small.
352-302-7325 341-2019
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
FLIPS TRUCK & TRACTOR,
Landclearlng, Truck &
Tractor work. House
Pads, Rock, Sand, Clay,
Mulch & Topsoil.
(352) 382-2253
* TOP SOIL SPECIAL *-
Screened, no stones.
10 Yards $150; 20 Yards
$250 352-302-6436




All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
LANDCLEARING
I Site prep, Tree Serv., I
I Dump Truck, Demo
352-220-5054
M.H. Demolition &
Salvage. Land clearing,
tree brush removal
(352) 634-0329
TRACTOR SERVICE
Tree/Debris Removal
Driveways/Demolition
Line Rock/Fill Dirt
Sr. Disc. 352-302-4686
TURTLE ACRES
Bushhog, Grading,
Stumpgrinding,
Removal No job too
small. (352) 422-2114


Bathtubs +Tiles+ Sinks* Counter Tops


All can be Resurfaced at a fraction
of the cost to replace! - 5yr Warr

Brand New Look = HUGE $AVING$

call for FREE -SALE-
Estimate or Info i :$22500i
most std tubs
352-797-5597' reg. $250.00
SExj . . 10/31/07_'


BATH L-"WRKS
RE rinIl :11l C( , 728338 Residential / Commercial - Insured




AT HOME 'Mnil

ELDERLY yand --

SERVICES, LLC
Providing a helping hand to our seniors

Offering ALL Services
In ALL surrounding areas.

Reasonable Rates

(352) 586-4265

72..334 or 637-1123


3rd Generation Service
Fencing, Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,
Lawn, Trees, Landscap-
ing, FREE Est., 10% off
any job. lic 99990257151
& Ins. (352) 201-0658
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272
B SOD * SOD * SOD-
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032




"El Cheapo" cuts $10 up
Beat any Price. We do
it All. Call 352-563-9824
Or 352-228-7320
3rd Generation Service
Fencing, Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,
Lawn, Trees, Landscap-
ing, FREE Est., 10% off
any job. lic 99990257151
- & Ins. (352) 201-0658
A TROPICAL LAWN
Family owned & oper.
Satisfaction Guaran.
352-257-9132/257-1930
ANDERSEN'S YARDMAN
SERVICES, Mowing, Pres.
Washing, Trash Hauling,
Low rates!352-277-6781
C & R LANDSCAPING
Lawn Maintenance
clean ups Mulching,
We Show Up
352-503-5295, 503-5082
G. Nelson & Son, Lawn
Service, mowing, trim-
ming, etc, dependable
lic. & ins. (352)563-2118
Lawn Patrol of Citrus
Lawn maint. Sm. Land
Clearing. Sign 12 mo.
Get 13th Mo. Free.1
Free est. (352) 464-3343
LAWN SERVICE
We do re-sodding
and patching.
Free Estimate 795-4798.
Steve's Lawn Service
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Uc. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166




POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Acrylic Decking
A 352-464-3967
A POOL LINERSI
* 15 Yrs. Exp. *
Call f ree estimate
a (352) 591-3641
POOL REPAIRS?
Comm. & Res., & Leak
detection, lic. 2819,
352-503-3778 302- 660




WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs on all makes
& models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard


DOG GROOMING
In your home or mine.
10 yrs. exp. Stephanie
@ (352) 503-3435
Doll Repair done in my
Home, Pick up/delivery
avail, prices quoted
(352) 464-1399
WILL DO ERRANDS
For Elderly & Others
Call for Details
(352) 628-1036

MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY





F7- 1


ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM



F---

BUYING OR
SELLING? CALL
ME FOR RE-
SULTSI


Call Me
PHYLLIS STRICKLAND
(352) 613-3503
eller Williams
Realty





0 RAINDANCER 0
6" Seamless Gutter
Best Job Availablell
Lic. & Ins. 352-860-0714

ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
Quality Price!
6" Seamless Gutters H
Lic & Ins 621-0881





Gopher Gully Sod Inc.
Farm Direct Rolls
Sod Installation
Seeding & Mulching
352-812-4345/817-4887


Douglas L. Bruns Services



(all makes and models)



Lawn Maintenance
Cal o fr10 iscount


352-220-9492
728317 Reasonable Rates Lic. & Ins.





Roof Cleaning Specialist
The Only Company that can Keep Mold & Mildew Off
Siding - Stucco - Vinyl - Concrete Tile & Asphalt Roofs

GUARANTEED!
Restore * Protect Beautify - Residential & Commercial

Suncoast

Exterior
Restoration Service Inc.

877-601-5050 * 352-489-5265


CLASSIFIED


r77~P~

N ~

tel- ~
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r~La


S,. .


9-25


!I


1I










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


aUYINre US LCUIN
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676




A Model Rover
Mandolin
Acc/Elec. w/case,
perfect cond.
$150; (352) 746-4063
AMPLIFIER/SAMPSON
10 Channel, Pwrd.
Mixer, 910 watts, studio
quality/stereo, EQ for
mains/EQ for monitors,
effects. New in box!
$450 (352) 628-7251
(352) 586-8503 Cell
Baldwin Piano
$350.
(352) 615-6146
after 3pm
Hammond
Console Organ
$1,000.
(352) 476-3355




HOME GYM
Weights and Aerobic
Conditioning. Wiener
Master Trainer, $65.
(352) 489-5355
PRO-FORM EXERCISE
MACHINE, with all
gadgets, like new,
exc. cond. Only $300.
(352) 382-0022
Treadmill
$300.
Exercise Bike
$10.
(352) 628-1739
TREADMILL
Uke new, $300 firm.
(352) 746-1060




2 SETS USED GOLF
CLUBS, exc. cond.
(1) Hogan Apex- Edge
CFT w/steel shafts.
(2) Callaway Steel
Head X-14 pro series
w/rifle-lite shafts, both
3-PW $250 each obo
(352)564-1717
'02 7X12 Trailer w/ramp
gate, 15" Mich. $800; '97
Gas Golf Cart, runs
great $1500 795-4770
8' POOL TABLE
Custom built 8'. 1"
Slate. New Felt. Ex.
Cond. $1195.
228-2608.
BERETTA SEMI-AUTO
AL391 URIKA, 12ga, 28"
RBL, Chokes, Case, NIB
$795.00 (352) 382-3948
BOW FLEX SPORT
Home Gym
$400
(352) 563-0043
FIREARMS
Cabinet, Sate, Cases,
Misc. ID req.
(352) 637-1617
*FREE REMOVAL OF-
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts, We sell
ATV parts 628-2084
Glock 9 Millimeter,
G 26 model, brand new
2 clips, ammo & case
$540.
Bring ID & Cash
(352) 465-0721
GOLF CART BATTERIES
THE BATTERY MEDICS
36V & 48V-Sets were
$245 Now~ 200 Pricing
Extended till 9/30.
Contact Mark @
727-375-6111
GULF CLUB SET ,
AMF Hybrids w/bag
used twice, like new,
$325. (352) 795-4405
HUNTING DUCK
DECOYS
24 Blue Bills w/lead rope
& anchors. 7 Mallard/
teals. Camo Decoy
Tote Bag; 352-563-1814
$100. Will split up.
MARLIN 336RC
Lever Action, 35 Rem.,
4X Weaver Scope, Hard
Case, VG Condition,
$275.00 (352) 382-3948
On Site Estate
Auction
Thursday 9/27
9am
Dir: From Hernando,
Go N. on SR200 , Rt,
on Delight, Left on
Gloria to Sale on Left.
Living Estate of CR
Northcut - WWII Pilot,
Alaskan Hunting
Guide & Men's Sr
Gold Medalist Archeri
Game Mounts, Books,
Sterling Set, Misc. Any
& All Furn. + House-
hold Items, John
Boat, Mower & Misc
Items
see photos @
www.dudlevsauction,
AB166712BP 2dsc chk
Smith & Wesson
357,4 inch barrel,
excel shape, highway
patrolman $450.
(352) 795-0818
Tennis Racket Stringing
Machine, Prince P200,
$300; Full Set of Golf
Clubs w/Bag & Bag
Boy, $75.
(352) 746-4063
WE BUY GUNS
On site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




10' X 5' HEAVY DUTY
MTL. FRAME / WD.
FLOOR/VG CONDITION
$750 OBO 352-795-6693
6' x 12'
single axle trailer
$750.
(352) 465-2271
PACE AMERICAN
'04 Journey, 6 x 12
Single Axle Cargo Sport
Trailer. Safe, durable,
EZ to tow. $2,000obo
(352) 270-3304


Trailer Frame
e 28 ft., electric brakes,
dual wheels,
$400.
(352) 726-3182
TRAILERS (2)Tandem Util.
' Trlr. 16' $900; Tandem
SEquip TrIr. 6 tn. $1 A00
(352) 726-6864



4-.
CRIB, Blonde Wood
Rainbow Fish Set, Pooh
Swing, Reclineable Seat
w/music, Activity
Walker, Playpen/Bass./
Changing Table (Pooh)
Infant Car Seat.
All like newl $250
(352) 860-2585


t:AKBAULHEK
Evenflo Exersaucer,
rarely used, $40
352-794-3081




BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676
Travel Trailer
for Storage, Urgent
I will remove Insides
(352) 341-3071




NOTICE
Pets for Sale
In the State of Florida
per stature 828.29 all
dogs or cats offered
for sale are required
to be at least 8 weeks
of age with a health
certificate per
Florida Statute.
2 LOVEABLE
FERRETS
& 3 Cages $250
Moving Up Northi
(352) 302-2254
CHIHUAHUA Puppies
10wks, long & short
haired, M & Fern. shots
$225-$250..
352-628-3959, 586-0124
DACHSHUND - 1 male,
neutered, pie cream,
7 mos., Microchipped,
shots. $250.
(352) 621-4553


--At Nw .---

GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over items from
your Garage sale?
We have the
Answer for Only
'$12.95

The week after your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.

(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902

GERMAN SHEPHERD PUP
Male.
(352) 489-7031
Humane Society
of Inverness
Has a New Vet
Who Has Joined
Our Team
We offer Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Starting at $20,
Low cost vaccines,
Heartworm test,
Heartworm
treatment, Cat
Declawing, Call
for prices and appt.
(352) 726-8801

Humanitarians
of Florida
Low Cost Spay &
Neuter by Appt.
Cat Neutered $20
Cat Soaved $25
Doa Neutered &
Spayed start at $35
Low cost shot clinic
Tues, Weds & Thurs
1st & 3rd Saturdays
10am-4pm
(352) 563-2370
Japanese Chin, 1 yr.
old not registered but
can be, trade for Mal-
tese puppy, female or
for sale (352) 564-0387
MASTIFF, English
Male,. AKC, 15 mos. Big
Boned Beauty! Pick of
the lifter! MUST SELLl
$800 (352) 621-0848
MINI DACHSHUNDS
Reg., Shots, Health
Cert., MUST SEE! $400
(352) 563-1479
PETS
Breeding parakeets
$40 pr; 1 pr canaries
$150;2 finches w/cge
$50; many cages
628-3393
PIT PUP
$150.00 white female
4 mo. call 4 info
352-854-9663
POODLE - Tiny Male
CKC, Apricot, 8wks.
Health Cert. Shots,
adorable. $550
(352) 422-4500
Quality Home Raised
Pups Maltese, Yorkie,
Chihuahua, poodle,
Designer breeds,
Pekingese/Chin
Cavaller/poo,
Yorkie/poo, malte/poo
Maltese/shih tzu
352-347-5086
ROTTWEILER
Male, 14 mos. AKC, in
tact, beautiful dog.
Pick of lifter. MUST SELL!
$500 (352) 621-0848
SHIH TZU PUPPIES
10 wks, CKC reg. Brwn
& wht. Male $450,
Female $500. Health
Cert. (352) 564-2865
SIAMESE KITTENS
Seal Pt., blue Pt..
chocolate, pure bred,
consumers warranty
shots, $200-$250
(352) 228-1906
YORKIE PUP
$350, parents on
premises.
352-400-4913/476-1208




FISH AQUARIUM
NEW 55 GALLON
With cabinet stand, 2
filters, all accessories.
$300/obo.
(352) 302-7725


CIRCLE Y
WESTERN SADDLE
Exc. Cond. Pad &
Stand Incl. MUST SELL!
$450obo (352) 860-2491
or 464-0161 Cell
HORSE BOARDING
State Forrest Acces.,
lit arena, $300/mo
SCENIC TRAIL RIDES
$35; LESSONS $25
(352) 628-1472
HORSE SHOEING/
TRIMMING, AFA, Cert.
Farrier, Richard Iversen
(352) 628-9186
Nice Registered
4 yr. old App. Gelding
15H, been traill ridden
up to date on everyth-
ing
$1,200. (813) 967-5580


BULLS 5-6 mos. old
White Face Hereford &
Red Angus,
(352) 344-5895




5 BDRM HUD $37,5001
Only $298/mo! 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
1 BR Furn. Carpt Scrn
rm. $550: 1BR unfurn.
$400 1 BR RV furn $325.
No pets. 628-4441
3/2 $199/mo HUD Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr, For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
BANK FORECLOSURE
4BR, $46,000. 2BR
$12,000. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5714
BEVERLY HILLS
Furnished,1 BR, IFuIl BA
Park Model, incl. util. &
basic cable, $165. wk.
sec. dep (352)465-7233
CR Riv./HERNANDO
Rent/Sale 1 & 2 BR's,
1st. last, sec. no pets,
(352) 795-5410
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 BR Sm. Trir., Free
Electric, Satellite, fncd,
No pets/No smoking,
$100/Wk, or $450/MO.
$250. dep 352-563-1465
CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR $475/mo incl cable,
1BR mini $425/mo incl
electric & cable, 55+,
352-795-9049
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
$400/mo. 1st, last, sec.
352-585-3264
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 $450; NO PETS!!
(352) 563-2293
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, Large Shed,
Cen. Air, fenced yard,
no pets, $575. mo $600.
sec. (352) 795-3605
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, Large Shed,
Cen. Air, fenced yard,
no pets, $575. mo $600.
sec. (352) 795-3605
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2, nice lot, $700mo
No pets. 1st, lost & Sec.
(352) 697-2432
HERNANDO 1/1
No smok/pets, $475+
Ist Ist. sec 352-746-6477
HERNANDO
12 X 60 unfurnished,
2/11/, 4219 E. Lake Park
Dr. No Pets, ref. needed
$500 mo., $500. dep.
352- 795-9475/586-7540
HERNANDO
3/2 on 11/4 Fenced Ac.
Ist/last/sec. $550/mo.
(352) 422-7137
HERNANDO
Inv. area. SW 2/2 Newly
dec, Priv pk. $550/mo.
1 st, 1st, sec 813-468-0049
HOMOSASSA 1/1
& 2/1 Ist/Ist/sec.
352-634-2368
HOMOSASSA
1/1, furn., elect. &
cable, Washer, scrnd
prch, shed inc.1 person
only. No pets. $500 mo.
Ist/last (352) 621-9173
HOMOSASSA
1908 S Colonial Ave.
2/1, Furnished, Super
neighborhood, nice
clean older home.
$550mo, 603-860-6660
HOMOSASSA
7311 Grover Cleveland
3/2, Deck & prch, Older
but clean. Could be
Commc, or residence
$750mo, 603-860-6660
HOMOSASSA
Lg 3/1/2, strg bldg, 1/2ac
$850mo (352) 560-3355
HUD HOMES 4 BR
$366/mo. 5%down,
20yrs. 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5711
INVERNESS
2/1 Furn, nice quiet, no
pets, on canal $550/mo
1 st/lst/sec 352-860-2452
INVERNESS
55+ Lakefront park
Exciting oppt'y, 1or 2BR
Mobiles for rent. Screen
porches, apple , water
incl. Fishing piers.
Beautiful trees
$350 and up.
Leeson's 352-476-4964
LECANTO
2/1 new, free cbl. $625+
Sec. 352-287-9588
LECANTO 3/2/1

+ sec. (352) 795-5685




5 BDRM HUD $37,500.
Only $298/mo! 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $199/mo HUD Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%opr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
BANK FORECLOSURE
4BR, $46,000. 2BR
$12,000. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5714
BUY AT INVOICES
All 2007 Horton/Dynasty
Models @ Invoice.
Modular &
Manufactured.
New Cape Cod
Modular Was $163,900
NOW $148,900 Call us
@ Impressive Home
Builders (352) 746-5912
HUD HOMES! 4 BR
$366/mo. 5%down,
20yrs. 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5711
INVERNESS
55+ Lakefront park
Exciting oppt'y, 1or 2BR
Mobiles. Scr. porches,
apple , water incl. Fishing
piers. $7,000-$15,000.
Leeson's 352-476-4964
Lake Front
OPEN HOUSE 11A - 3P,
8618 E. Gospel Is. Rd.


Lot 59, Beautiful DW,
2/2, on Lake Front Lot,
totally remodeled, scrn.
porch, lots of extras,
mostly turn., Sr. Park,
$50,000. (352) 560-7893
NEW CONDITION 4BR,
Paved Rd. Rockcrusher
area, F. Place, reduced
$78,900.(352) 621-9181
Cell (352) 302-7332
SUN COUNTRY
HOMES And
PALM HARBOR HOMES
Names you can Trust
for Manufactured,
Modular and
Two Story Homes
Save Thousands
GREAT Financing
Complete Set Up
Packages
SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
ALL Sizes ALL Prices
1710 S Suncoast blvd.
352-794-7308


SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
NEW 5BR - 3 BTH
Large Designer
Kitchen, $73,900
SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
ALL Sizes ALL Prices
1710 S Suncoast Blvd.
352-794-7308





RENTAL FINDER
www.chronlcle
rentalfindercom




3/2 Manu. Home
2003 on .44 Ac.
(352) 726-7533
www.Reliance-RE.com
Reliance Realty
3/2 On 1.2 Acre
Eat-In Kitchen, Beautiful
lot. $2,450 Down
and $680/mo,
(352) 795-8822
3/2 SW on Two V2 AC
Lots. Scrn porch.
BY OWNER, $44,500
1592 S Lookout Pt
2 blocks off US 19
352-503-4142
3/2 DW Hrdwd Floors
New kit & appli's. Cvrd
prch, huge inground
scrnd pool 21/2 ac. lot
w/fruit trees, 1600sf
wrkshp. Fenced. $179K.
Crawford 352-212-7613
4/2 On V2 Acre
Game Rm., Wet Bar,
Many Extras, $3,500 Dn.
and $895/mo.
(352) 795-6085
4/2, 2280SF on 1'/2AC
Pool, Trip. wd. HOLDER,
Horse Corral, Close to
bike/ horse trail. Many
upgrds, Scrn in sunrm.
$119,000. 352-522-1901
BUY OWNER+
2005 4/2 MFG Home,
2356SF, 2 wooded ac.
Many amenitlesi
$199,900/reas. offer
(727) 457-9567
By Owner, 2 '/ Acres,
2000, DW, 3/2,
Homes of Merrit
$120,000. obo
(352) 621-3974
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2 SW on 1/2 Ac. FlRm.,
Scrnd Frnt Prch, 10 X 14
Wrkshp, Roof-over,
3010 Deerhaven. $46K
obo (813) 792-1355
CRYSTAL RIVER 5/2
Bonus room, FP, wood
floors & tile, /2" drywall
thruout, 9x42 scm.
country prch. on lac.
$115,000 (352) 200-8897
FAMILY
HOME CENTER
September Onlyl
Free Set-Up on
Any Lot Modell!!
(352) 795-1272
HOMOSASSA Lg. 3/1/2
strg bldg, o2ac, fenced.
Concrete drv, above
grand pool, $69,900.
Owner fin. w/15% down
(352) 560-3355
LAND & HOME
2 Acre Lot
with 2000 sq. ft.,
3/2 NEW HOME
Garage, Concrete
driveway & walkways,
Carport. Beautiful
Must See 10% down
No closing cost
$848.90/mo
WAC
Call 352-621-9182
LAND & HOME
Move In Now!!
5 HOMES
For Sale from
$79,900. to$149.900
CALL
352-621-9181
NEW JACOBSEN
2008 MODEL
28 X 48, 3/2, 2 x 6 con-
struction 18" ceramic
tile, 30-19-11 insulation
$10,000 in upgrade
options, buy for only
$49,900. delivered
& set up on your lot
352-621-3807
No Money Down!
FHA
Land & Home
3/2 on Fenced 1/2 Acre
Deck, Nice Trees
and Quiet
Only $769.90/mo. P & I
WAC
Call 352-621-9183
Real Estate Auction
Oct.4 @ 11am
3/2 Manu. Home
(352) 726-7533
www.Reliance-RE.com
Reliance Realty




4 NEW MODELS
Excellent Amenities
Gated Community
5 * , 55+
RESALES
$64,900.-$ 100,000.
Phone 352-795-7161
2006 DW IN INVERNESS
55+ park. 2/2 strge
shed. C/H/A, Furnished,
Inci. all appliances. Like
new cond. $75,000
352-344-1002 or
207-732-3743
2007, 3/2, 1,056 SF.
Lg. Screen Rm.
Decorative Drive-Way
Paintlng.Private Setting.
Low Lot Rent. $65,900
(352) 422-2187
3/2 $199/mo HUD Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704


BIG PINE ACRES, 55+
Pool, 2/1/Carport
Screened Porch, Shed,
2 ACs, W/D, Sm. Pet OK,
$8,800 obo
(352) 212-6706
CRYSTAL RIVER VILLAGE
Fully furnished, 2/2
dollhouse, must see.
Large double carport.
REDUCED $75,000.
(352) 795-6895
STONERIDGE LANDING
2/2/2 DW, Newitems:
Ceramic Tile, Carpet,
2 decks, Sunporch,
Bathrm fixtures, appil's
Move in cond. on
Lakeside (352) 634-4360
WALDEN WOODS
2003 DW, 3/2, vinyl
Fl. Rm., new berber car-
pet. $62,500
(352) 382-2356
WALDEN WOODS
55+ park, 2yrs. old, DW
2/2, carport, porch, util
shed, Exc. cond.
$58,000. (352) 697-2779


.e


CHASSAHOWITZKA
Waterfront Doublewides
2/2 Dixie Crt $155,000
2/2 Bounty Crt $159,000
2/2 Peacock $165,000.
3/2 McClung Lp$169900
Houses
2/1 Tropical Ln, $89,500
3/1 Tropical Ln, $99,000
Owner Finan.10% Down
Or Rent 2/2's @ $600 mo
Onr/Agnt 352-382-1000

RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalflnder.com





Property
Management &
Investment
Group, Inc.
Licensed R.E. Broker
a Property & Comm.
Assoc. Mgmt. is our
only Business
j Res.& Vac.
Rental Specialists
a Condo & Home
owner Assoc. Mgmt.
Rabble Anderson
LCAM, Realtor
352-628-5600
info(@property
managmentaroup.
corn

0 RENTAL FINDER
Swww.chronicle
rentalfinder.com
SUGARMILL WOODS
BRAND NEW 4BR/2B
HOME
$1000 MTH + DEP.
CALL 813-994-7762




CRYSTAL RIVER
Newly Renovated
1 bedroom efficiencies
w/fully equip, kitchens.
No contracts
necessary. Next to
park/ Kings Bay
Starting @ $35
a day for a week or
more. (Includes all
utilities & Full Service
Housekeeping)
(352) 586-1813
CRYSTAL RIVER
NICELY FURNISHED 1/1
Great neighborhood.
No pets. 7 months
minimum. 352-795-7261
FLORAL CITY
Lakefront 1 BR. Wkly/Mo
No Pets, (352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA Canal
1 BR w/boat dock, scm.
porch, until. incl. $700/
mo.+ sec.(352)628-6537
SUMTERVILLE
Small efficiency
1-person apt, sat TV,
pool, patio, quiet, , i
prvt, secure Ist/last/sec'
(352) 793-8298




3/2/2 Rent-to-Own
New Home Citrus Spgs.
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (407) 227-2821
Apts./Studios Inglis
$350-$550 All utilities.
(352) 447-2240

CANDLEWOOD
COURT
APARTMENTS
1 & 2 BR Apartments
now available.
Please call
(352) 344-1010
307 Washington Ave.
Wed., & Fri.
8am to 5pm
Equal Housing
Opportunity




Cs P mm - E
Crystal Palms Apts.
I & 2 Bdrm IstMo.FREEI
Crystal River. 634-0595 '
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 BR, laundry/premises,
$500 mo.+ sec. deposit.
352-465-2985
CRYSTAL RIVER
Seven Rivers Apts.
1 & 2 bedrooms,
clean, quiet. Close to
mall & hospital.
Complete laundry
facilities.
No application fees.
(352) 795-1588
SEqual Housing
Opportunity
FLORAL CITY
2BR MH, just 150 yards
from fishing dock, $370
+ $200 dep. Quiet
forested area, near
Floral City, 10 min. from
Inverness. Trails End
Camp 352-726-3699
INVERNESS
1/1, Water &Trash incl.
$500. mo. 352-726-3849
INVERNESS 2/1
$575mo. $862 sec. Call
9am-6pm 352-341-4379
INVERNESS 2/1
W/D, quiet, no smoking
/pets. $575/mo. 1st/last/
sec. (352) 212-4661
INVERNESS
2/1, prch, $395 mo. 1st,
last, sec No smoking.
352-726-4521 before 7p
INVERNESS
2/1, W/D hkup, Great
Neighborhood. $575
+ Sec. 352-628-4282
INVERNESS
2BR, Washer/Dryer
Corner 581 & Anna Jo,
No PetsNo tso smoking,
$600./mo, 1 yr. lease,
credit check req'd.
ALL CITRUS REALTY INC.
(352) 726-2471
INVERNESS, 2nd Fir.
Near hospital & dwntn.
2/1 Comp. remod. &
spacious, all apple. Inc.
Prvt. parking & ent.
$1,075/mo. Ist/lst/$500
sec. No smoking/pets.
(352) 726-8512 x. 2808

r KNOLLWOOD 1
I TOWNHOUSES


Corner of Druid Rd.
&581. 1 &2BR
available starting
@$485. For more
Information call
(352)a344-1010
Or apply @
307 Washington Ave. I
Wed. & Fri. 8 to 5
Equal Housing
Opportunity



I :- � * :I





Crystal Palms Apts.
1 & 2 Bdrm 1st Mo. FREEl
Crystal River. 634-0595


cc6mBus


CRYSTAL RIVER
Centrally located.
Professional Office
For Rent, 700 sf.
352-563-2550
CRYSTAL RIVER
Share Office Space
with high profile estab-
lished Real Estate Co.
Great Location. To In-
quire call broker/owner
352-422-7925
Lecanto Tree Tops
Plaza, 1661, W. Hwy 44
Retail-Office-Storage
1,000 to 1,125 sq. ft.
Store front/ Warehouse
$800. mo. 954-609-2780




BEVERLY HILLS
Lakeside Villa, 2/2/2. FL.
Rm & deckover-looking
lake. Unfurn. or part.
furn. 55+ No smoking.
$800/mo. Sale or Ls.
Opt. 352-726-0811
CITRUS HILLS 2/2
Greenbriar l1Mst fir. furn.
Near pool. $113,500
$1,000mo. 352-249-3155
CITRUS HILLS
2/2, den, Fully furn.
W/D, $800/mo.,.st/Ist/
sec. (352) 344-4464
CITRUS HILLS
2BR, 21/ BA Townhouse
Furnished $800/mo.
352-697-0801
HOMOSASSA UNFURN
$815- Sugarmill Woods
2/2/1/2 Atrium Villa, Ig.
lanai; 2/2 End Condo
River Links Realty
628- 1616/800-488-5184
INVERNESS
Townhome at the
Landings 2/2/1,
commun, pool & boat
dock, Maint. free, $700.
mo. (352) 400-0731
LAKESIDE VILLAGE
2/2/1 Furn. Comn. Pool
55+ 6 mos min
(352)697-0741




CITRUS SPRINGS
New, 2/2, all apple ,
W/D $650,-$700.
(954) 557-6211
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 & 3/2 Clean $625-
$650/mo. 352-228-0525
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2 CHA, until rm, trash
$500. 382-1344/422-2242
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1 $750/mo.
2/1,$575 mo., 1st/sec.
(352) 464-3522
INVERNESS
2/1, $550. mo.,
No pets,, last + sec.
352-344-8389, 860-2418
LECANTO 2/2/1
New Unitl Fully turn.,
Short term lease
excepted $900. mo.
352-344-2155 ext. 305




HERNANDO 1/1
Comp. furnished.
$500 moves you in.'
352-465-0871/344-8268
INVERNESS, Ist Fir.
Near hospital & dwntn.
Camp. remod,, W/D
stack, until. incl. (except
phone & cable) $585/
mo. Ist/Ist/$500 sec.
No smoking/pets,
(352) 726-8512 x. 2808




2 GREAT LOCATIONS
Lg. 2/2/1 Ing. Pool, Lg.
2/1/1. BOTH: Fl. rms.
spotless, Lots of xtras.
Furm/un352-302-1370
5 BDRM HUD $37,500!
Only $298/mo! 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $199/mo HUD Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
BANK FORECLOSURE
4BR, $46,000. 2BR
$12,000. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5714

CONDOS, HOUSES
SEAS,RMONTHLY Furn
& Unfurn. Heated
pool. All newil


oCRYS RIVER 3/2/2
Pool, Lease/OTB. $1300
Avail 10/1 352-563-9913
CRYSTAL RIVER
Small 2/1- $170/week
Incl. util. $1,010 Moveln
3/2 Mobile, Util. Inc.
$250/wk. $1,350 Moveln
(352) 628-1062
CRYSTAL RIVER
Very priv. 3/2. 7 Rivers
Golf Crs. area. Please
call 352-257-1034
HUD HOMES 4 BR
$366/mo. 5%down,
20yrs. 8%. For listings '
800-366-9783 Ext 5711
INVERNESS
New townhomes from
$750mo. 3/2/2, $875
mo. For more info.
352-860-1981


| www.chronicle |
= rentalfindercom

Rentals COUNTYWIDE!
GREAT AMERICAN
REALTY
Calh:352-422-6129
or see ALL at
www.chooseaar.com
SUGARMILL WOODS
Spacious New Homel
4/2/2 Scn. lanai, DR,
No smoking; Sm. pet
okay. Ref., $975./tmo,
Ready NOW,
(386) 569-6777


5 BDRM HUD $37,5001
Only $298/mo! 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $199/mo HUD Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
BANK FORECLOSURE
4BR, $46,000. 2BR
$12,000. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5714
BEVERLY HILLS
A very nice, totally
furnished, Pool House
In Oakwood Village,
Seasonal or long term
avail. (352) 586-8288
cesbetsplace@aol.com
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5,Garb.,H20,cable,el
ec. $1,100/MO.
(352) 527-0260


iLf�


area. Meadows Deed
Rest. Comm. Credit/
Ref. No Pets. (Sec 8 OK)
352-686-0539
HOMOSASSA 2/2
Near River $700+ dep.
(352) 628-0919
HOMOSASSA
2/2/2 Lrg yard, new air
& appl's. $825 mo Must
See. (352) 628-7526
HOMOSASSA 3/2
Country Home. FP,
water & sewage.
$950/mo, negot.
(352) 628-5752
HOMOSASSA
Fresh 3/2/den, . Shed
$850/mo (352) 302-4057
HOMOSASSA
Nice 2/1 $550/mo
INVERNESS
Exceptional 3/2 $800/
mo (352) 341-3131
INGLIS 5/2 +DEN
10.59 acres, wrkshp.
$1400/mo,
Broker/owner
352-422-7925


CLASSIFIED


HOMAS. 2/1, MH Util.
incl. Nice clean, quiet
park. short/long term.
$695 (352) 628-9759
HUD HOMES 4 BR
$366/mo. 5%down,
20yrs. 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5711
LECANTO 3/2/2
Upscale, furn./unfurn on
2'2 park like Ac's, $1,000
FURN. APT. 2/1
CRYS. RVR $500.
(352) 795-2204
SUGARMILL WOODS
2/2/2 +Lanai, cul de
sac. furn. 1600 sq.ft.
$1,100mo + util. Owner/
agent Short or long
term. (727) 804-9772




3/2/2 Rent-to-Own
New Home Citrus Spgs.
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (407) 227-2821
BEV. HILLS 1/1/1
Fam. Rm.2 E. Golden St.
$600/mo 1ST/LAST/SEC.
(352) 795-8888
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1/crpt. Glass Rm.
Clean & Cony. Area
$550 (352) 746-3700
BEVERLY HILLS
10 N.Desoto 2/1
$650.mo
8 N.Fillmore 1/1
$625.mo
CRYSTAL RIVER
9 N.Candle 2/1
$550.mo
INVERNESS
237 N.Croft 2/2
$750.mo
352-637-2973
BEVERLY HILLS
18 N. Osceola, 2/11/2/1
& carport. New inside
$650 mo. 1st., Ilsst, dep.
& 33 Murray St. 2/11/2.
Ig shed & fence
$550. mo. 1st, last. dep.
352-795-3000
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 First Mo. FREE. C/A.
$700/mo (239) 776-6800
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1.5, CHA, shed. New
carpet, tile, etc. W/D.
$650/mo. 8 Illinois.
(352) 795-7374
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, FI.Rm., Scrn. Rm.,
CH&A, W & D, fenced
& shed $650. mo., $750.
dep. (352) 795-9060
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1CG+ fm.rm.,
LARGE, CHA $675 +
$1,000. dep. 795-1722
BEVERLY HILLS
2Br/2Ba/Gar + xtra rm
Newer side of town. Very
clean. New Tile/Fresh
paint l/S+out. 4 SJ Kellner
$725/mo 352-302-4006
BEVERLY HILLS
Cozy 2/1, quiet
cul-de-sac. Over-
looking pond. $625/mo,
(352) 257-9378
BEVERLY HILS
1,2 & Poss.t3 Bedroom
Houses. All C/H/A, FIRST
MQ-REEi 352-422-7794
CITRUS HILLS
3/2/2 w/pool. Pets OK
$1,250mo 352-860-1245
(954) 600-9395
CITRUS HILLS/HERN.
3/2/2 home on /2 Ac.
on CH G.C. Rent to
own poss. $850/mo.
dep., first & last. Myriam
(352) 613-2644
CITRUS SPRINGS
Many Available
$800.- $875. mo. 2 -4 wks
FREE Rent if Qualify.
(352) 795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investment LLC
CITRUS SPRINGS
New 2/2/1,tile firs, spac
kit., din.,scrn. porch,
$725.mo. 352-465-7563
CITRUS SPRINGS
Santos Dr. 1/1, $550. +
sec. CHA, scrn. rm.,
w/W/D, super clean
352-489-2266/489-4940
352-817-5017 Cell
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/1, fam. rm., water,
gar. & pest, incl. $800.
+ sec. (352) 464-2716
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $850/mo
352-795-6299/697-1240
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/1, $750. mo. 1st
& sec. 352-795-5126
CRYSTAL RIVER
4/2/1,2,400 sf., fncd.
yrd. Centrally located
off Hwy 44. Avail. Oct. 1
$1,000 mo Call Alan
(352) 584-1584
CRYSTAL RVR 4/2/2
Pool, 7 Rvr. G.C, $1,800
mo. neg. (813)299-9959
DUN/Rainbw Spg
REDUCED $1501l
Rent-Buy-Lease Opt.
Lg. exec. styled 2/2/2
Treed 12 Ac. G-course
view. Lg. FP Spotless!
$895. 352-527-3953
352-427-7644
FLORAL CITY
2/2/1, $800 mo., 1st,
last, sec. (352) 637-4106





Forest Ridge Village
2/2/2 $825.00
Please Call:
(352) 341-3330
For more into. or
visit the web at:
citrusvillages

HOMOSASSA
$595 2/1/1 Refurbished;
Meadows 3/2/2 $695up
River Links Realty
628-1616/800-488-5184
HOMOSASSA
2/1A/2 $650 1st & Sec.
Tiled, W/D HU Screen


0( 2 Ui it rFe tuu oynudiate, inc.

Thanks and $10 to
Rachel Neuman of
Plainview, NY for
#3. Send your entry
to this newspaper.


7. Chirping insects' dense growths of bushes (2)


SMXIjH.L SlOfl01 LIG('IOH HH(I'flOHS '9 SaIWWVHAM SAWNVS *9
lOd3I OdV-HO 't ST'IOA SHO'I" AVUH HODIIIM' 5A l arT
9-25-07 SH3aStV


INVERNESS
2/2/2, Fl. Rm. appil's
Highlands W. $750/mo
352-860-0464
INVERNESS 3/2/2
Lake Area, $820/mo.
(352) 341-1142
INVERNESS
55+ Lakefront park
Exciting oppt'y, 1 or 2BR
Mobiles for rent. Screen
porches, appl., water
incl. Fishing piers.
Beautiful trees. $350
and up. Leeson's
352-476-4964
INVERNESS
Country Cottage, 1/1,
+ extra rm. secluded,
$500 mo., 1st, last sec.
(352) 637-4534
INVERNESS
Lg. 2/2/2 pool, smok/
pets ok. Golf comm.
$1400/molst. last, $1000
sec. (607) 351-2258
INVERNESS
Modern clean 2/1.
Fenced backyard
-carport $625, mo. 1st/
last/sec. Some pets ok.
352-302-8046
a- NO CREDIT CHECKII
RENT TO OWN
352-484-0866
visit jademission.com




SMW
UPSCALE 2/2/2
SALE/ LEASE, scm. lanai
$900. mo 352-592-9811




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, fully turn, floating
dock, boathouse, no
bridges, minutes to
Gulf, $850 wk, $2500
month, includes utilities.
Call 352-266-1346
CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/2 condo.
Beautiful waterfront
view w/dock. Recently
updated, partially
furnished. Pool, tennis
cts., cable TV. $900/mo
(414) 690-6337
INVERNESS
2/2 Villa $750/mo. 1st.
sec. Seas. also avail.
Contact Kimberly
Miner at (352) 586-9549
INVERNESS, 3/2
1 acre, dock, clean
$850 (352) 586-1505




3/2/2 Rent-to-Own
New Home Citrus Spgs.
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (407) 227-2821
Bev. Hills, Seller Finan.
2 to choose from EZ
terms, low DP, Starting
at $85.K 352-201-0658
BEVERLY HILLS
Lakeside Villa, 2/2/2. FL.
Rm & deckover-looking
lake. Unfurn. or part.
furn. 55+ No smoking.
$800/mo. Sale or Ls.
Opt. 352-726-0811
*
FISHING IN FRONT
YARD
3/2 ON 10.8 Acres!l
Detached 14 X 28
office, pool, fncd., pond.
$325K Ownr. Finan.
(352)621-3135

INVERNESS
2/2 CONDO $94,000
OR $650/MO + deposit.
(352) 461-6973
Lake Panasoffkee
Cty. Rd. 481,2 story, 3/2,
scrn. prh. Fenced
bkyard. Strg. bldg.
Ready to move in, Only
$699/mo. (352)669-2253
OTHER HOMES AVAIL
SALE OR RENT
SMW OAK VLG. SOUTH
Very Nice, near new.
3BR+ Den or 4 BR
$186K or $1000-1500/mo
Furnished or Unfumrn
(813)781-1341




CRYSTAL RIVER
$350, Share elec.
No smoking/drugs.
(352) 634-0708




r CONDOS, HOUSES
SSEAS, MONTHLY
Furn & Unfurn.
SHeated pool.AllI
= newil 352-302-1370
m 1m ---
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5,Garb.,H20,cable,el
ec. $1,100/MO.
(352) 527-0260
FLORAL CITY
2/2 Mobile home, Scr
porch, nice lot, no pets,
no smoking. Long or
Short Term352-344-8213
HOMAS. 2/1, MH Util.
incl. Nice clean, quiet
park. short/long term.
$695 (352) 628-9759
WATERFRONT 2/2
Crystal River Condo
Furn. $1600/mo
See it now at
wwwvrbo.com #126616
Broker/Owner
352-422-7925


I RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com








PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes It illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention, to make
such preference, limi-
tation or discrimina-
tion." Familial status
includes children un-
der the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18,
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings
advertised in this
newspaper are avail-
able on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777, The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.









MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY,








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM





Every Sunday 11-2
Price Reduced Again
$485k 5/4/2/3
3645 W. Brazilnut Road
Go to www.lcpi.com\fl




COMMERCIAL LOANS
Prime, Sub-Prime, Hard
Money, REHAB, Private.
Also, equip. loans.
Mark (352) 422-1284




CRYSTAL RIVER
2,300 sf. Zoned GNC.
4/2/1(AC garage), 2 Liv.
Areas. Perfect for sm.
business/live-in
residence: Drs,
Real Estate, etc.
$1,500 Contact Alan
(352) 584-1584
Lt. Industrial 2.89 Acres
Level Lot
Survey Available
$95,000. (352)464-1585




FIX ME UPI $72K
4/2 SFH Block
Must Sell for CASHI
John (352) 228-7523
INVESTORS
Palm Harbor Modular
Homes from $53 sf,
Finished on your lot.
3 Color brochures.
Call John Lyons
863-860-3062




$139,900 W/100/. FIN,.
AVAIL. New const 3/2/2
1344sfla, Kit w/brkfst bar
Util. rm.On bike tri. near
School. 8115 N Merri-
mac Way. Call Gerry
Realtor (352)816-0010
3/2/2 Rent-to-Own
New Home Citrus Spgs.
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (407) 227-2821
3/2/2 CITRUS SPRINGS
AREA. New Home
under construction.
Can move in within 90
days. Pick your own
colors. For more info.
Call Pastore Custom
Bldrs. (352) 684-1500
Lic. # CRC057945
3/2/2 HOME
Built 2005. Priv fence,
scr porch, upgraded
kit. 7955 N. Galena Ave.
$155,00 or OBO.
352-302-3103


BEING TRANSFERRED
MUST SELL
3/2/2, Cathedral
ceiling, open floor plan
on 13th hole. Split plan,
W/l closet. Fncd. yrd,
sprinkler, Ig. srnd: Fl. Rm.
Below mrkt @ $220K
(352) 489-1055
LOOK NO MORE!
A Fantastic Value!
Reduced to $144,900.
2/2/2,Fam. Rm, DR, LR,
hardwd firs. Ready to
move in! Must seel
Call 352-464-2094
PRICED TO SELL NOWI
Beau. Mercedes 3/2/2
Built '06. Lg corner lot,
2000sf Upgrades -
Appliances Near trail,
$162,900 (727) 793-4948
STILT HOMES
Molular Stilt Homes
140 mph. zoning.
We build, sell, deliver -
We do it alll
Eliminate builder
mark-up. Call the
factory. John Lyons
800-622-2832 xt. 210,


-H

3/2/2/2, Screen Pool
5310 Yuma
$245,900.
(352) 302-6025
I BETTY MORTON


Lic. Real Estate Agent
20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission

ReJtyecta

(352) 795-1555
Every Sunday 11-2,.
Price Reduced Again
$485k 5/41/2/3 _-:
3645 W. Brazilnut Road
Go to www.lcoi.com\fl







1/1 Lg Fam Rm, Carport
Rec. Renovated. All
appli's $75,900. 5 Donna.
t. 352-212-9783
$99,90011 2/1; 1,100 sf.
9 Polk Lease Opt. or '
Owner Financing Avail.,
Greg Younger,.
Coldwell Banker 1st .
Choice. (352)220-9148

















w- NO CREDIT CHECKIL
RENTTO OWN
352-484-0866
visit jademission.com




3/2/2 CRYSTAL GLEN
$179,900 SELLER WILL:-
PAY $5KIN CLOSING
COSTS Ron Egnot Ist
Choice Coldwell Bnkr.
352-287-9219
4/3/2 POOL HOME
Crystal Oaks 2,075 sf.,
Prof. Remodeled!
Everything NEWIS. S..
apple , granite $299,900.'
727-254-2534/492-6619


BONNIE PETER-
SON
Realtor, GRI "

Your SATISFACTION

(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC, -
NICE MINI FARM 2/2 on'.
3.69ac. Barn and Out
buildings Incl. just bring
your horses. $229K'
Alex Choto, Fl. Realty &
Auction. (352) 628-0968.
NO EXPENSE WAS
SPARED on this beautiful:
3/2 custom built home;
featuring stacked stone,
in/out, gas FP. gourmet.
kit, granite & all wood
cabinets, 10' ceilings,
alarm & sprinkler sys.
2 built-in 220 gal saltwtr.
fish aquariums. 2 story,
barn, 2 car detached,
garage, Too many ex-
tras to listil $449,00',--
Owner/Agent call for'.
appt. 352-302-2300> ',


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2007 11C0


WORDY GT BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
Every answer is a rhyming
. Allow a pet doctor (1) pair of words (like FAT CAT
1 0 and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
they will fit in the letter
2. Put celeb chef Rachael on a scale (1) squares. fit in the number after
I Itlll definition tells you how many -
3. Chap's yellow parts of eggs (1) syllables in each word. To win
3.Ch s ellowpa f e (1) $10, sendyour original rhymes
S i aio ( with your definitions to this
4. Inexpensive bus or train station (2) newspaper. All entries become
I-IIIII-1 - I the property of UFS, Inc.
I I Ll I '0F'- CC) V I h Vi -i'Jrta RlueaiwI.d Mr.


5. Evil of Rat Pack member Davis,Jr. (2)


6. Sling for the top of an arm (2)
1 1 I1 1 1 I 1 1 0 l1 l l









CITRus COUNm'Y (FL) CHRONICLE


12C TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2007


BY OWNER - VILLA 3/2/11/2 Screen Room 3/2/2 on 1.3 ACRES
2/1/2/1 New Roof 2005 6224 W. Pinedale Cir. Borders State Park
New carpet & Pergo Connell Hghts. $139,900 7102 Smith Ter., HOLDER
floors. Great amenities. (352) 302-6025 ForSaleByOwner.com
Priced to sell $137,900 3/2/2 CEMENT BLCK. Listing # 21030419
(352) 257-1431 1700sf. Renovated.new $219,900, 352-465-5233
appll's, 2/2ac, beau. BANK FORECLOSURE
parklike setting 4BR, $46,000. 2BR
w/lg. oak trees. $12,000. For listings
9701 Northcuft Ave. 800-366-9783 Ext 5714
$180,000 352-795-4770
BRENTWOOD VILLAGE 4/2/2, 2100 SF.$139,900 BUYING OR
MOTIVATEDI For Sale By Beautifully remodeled. SELLING? CALL ME
Owner. No monthly New oak cabs, wood FOR RESULTSI
maint. fees. Camp. floors, timberline roof, RSLI
updated. Lots of tile, fireplace, 2 min. from
new appl.. & much water. (352) 688-8040
more. Don't miss outl
$154.900(352)422-4086 BETTY MORTON
MEADOWS G.Course I E e
POOL HOME 3/2/2.5
12 X 20 S.C. Pool
Many upgrades
Memb. Avail. $264,900
MU$13EEI352-270-3536
TERRA VISTA/HILLSIDE
SOUTH - 1800sq ft. 3/2/2
10,000sf lot. i ranCall Me
Possible Lease/Option PHYLLIS STRICKLAND
$279,900. 617-816-1230 Lic. Real Estate Agent (352) 613-3503
S20 Years Experience Keller Williams
2.8 % Realty
ndol BCommission l t

-- FISHING IN FRONT
SPOTLESS 2 BDRM. 2BA FSIGN YARD
HOME 2 car gar, caged SAwTA 312 ON 10.8 Acresll
in-ground pool, situated D d 14 X 28
on 2.5 ac. landscaped (352) 795-1555 Detached 14 X 28
estate____enced__for_ office, pool, fncd., pond.
estate. Fenced for $325K Ownr. Finan.
horses & spotted w/ (352)621-313 wnrFan.
mature oaks. Everything
new. If you are looking
this is a must see! FIX ME UPI $72K
(VACANT - MOVE TO- . 4/2 SFH Block
DAY) Asking $269K Must Sell for CASHI
Contact D Crawford for John (352) 228-7523
details. (352) 212-7613 HOME FOR SALE
$ 1,0On Your Lot, $110,900.
SBONNIE PETERSON 3/2/1 w/ Laundry
BONNIE PETERSON Atkinson Construction
3 3 Realtor, GRI 352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685
0 DOWN TO BUYII Your SATISFACTION
$720/mo. + taxes & Is My Futurell HUD HOMESI 4 BR
insurance. 3/2/2 $366/mo, 5%down,
located in Highlands (352) 586-6921 20yrs. 8%. For listings
Large home, very clean or (352)795-9123 800-366-9783 Ext 5711
Needs nothing.
(352) 601-5600 Charlotte G Realty
1006 Princeton Ln & Investments LLC
$119,900 3/2/2, IHW,
2,000 sq.ft. under roof, FISHING IN FRONT YARD
upgraded kitchen & 3/2 ON 10.8 Acresil
bath, minor TLC Detached 14 X 28
352-563-4169 office, pol, fncd.,
pond. $325K Ownr.
Finan. (352)621-3135

KINGS BAY DRIVE . ,
4/2/2 on canal, immac. Michele Rose
Pool home, separate REALTOR
3,500 La, 5,000 Total Sf suite, ated, $825,000 "Simply Put-
4.8 Ac. Adj. 4.8 Avail. (35h) 634-1805 I'll Work Harder"
3/2.5/2.5 Near all REDUCEDI 3/2/2 352-212-5097
amenities. Priced well Fncd. Acre, Custom, thorn@atlantic.net-
below appr.@ $399KI S.S. Appliances Craven Realty, Inc.
(352) 726-0321 $250,000 Sharon Levins, 352-726-1515
Rhema Realty
2/2/1 INGROUND POOL (352) 228-1301 NEW 2/1, FP, Lg. Deck
F Rm, Scrn prch, Quiet, Dock, Canal front, $18K
clean, must see! Priced 2 o below appraisal.
to sell. (352) 637-9591 $162,500 352-422-0294
3/2/2 BRYANT ST. SELL YOUR HOME
2050 Living area - 2 car '01, Jacobsen Modular Place a Chronicle
attached garage. Home 1891 sq. ft., on Classified ad
Separate detached /2 Ac. fenced 2, sheds 6 lines, 30 days
garage Incl. Fenced in $132K Buyer Pays $51.95*
w/decorative entry Closing Cost
way. $225,000 352-628-4513 Call
(352) 637-4138 Good Family Home 726-1441
3/2/IGospI Is. $169,900 3/2 SW on Two r12 AC 563-5966
>1,80f. Fl. Rm., Scrnd Lots. Scm por h. Non-Refundable
PorcWUtil. Big. on ap- BY OWNER, $44,500 Private Party Only
prox. 3/4 Ac. Room to 1592 S Lookout Pt "S per additional Ine
build pool or add. 2 blocks off US19 (Some Pesincitons
home on inc. adj. lot. 352-503-4142 May apply)
(352) 726-3481 3/2/2 CAGED POOL
Great Deal in Great Vic McDonald
BETTY MORTON Communityl New Appl. (352) 637-6200
$169,900 Harley Hough,
EXIT Realty Leaders pW . 5% d ."w
352-400-0051
BUY OWNER
20054/2 MFG Home,
2356SF, 2 wooded ac. . .
Many amenities.
$199,900/reas. offer
(727) 457-9567

Lic. Real Estate Agent Realtor
20 Years Experience My Goal is Satisfied
2.8 .o OCustomers
Commission ,

Water fro, Glf REALTY ONE ;
Slocationsta ndng Agets
(352) 795-1555 Outstandsing ulIs
o 1 E 8-- xt(352) 837-6200
CHARMING 2BR/2BATH 3
HIGHLANDS, corner lot, . MR CITRUS
circular driveway, COUNTY REALTY
prequailified only _
Must See. $124,900 Dg P
(352) 201-1663
FSBO 3/2 CARPORT
CBS with alum. siding,
new roof '07, new tile, .
throughout '07 Irg. Homoass;Sping
corner lot, city water, HomosassaSprings
sewer, 418 Hunting WOWI 2/2 CHA, Fncd
Lodge Dr. $115,000- yard. 2 lots. Near
(352) 341-0583 shoppIng; $750/mo. ALAN NUSSO
(352) 613-0937 (352) 302-3319 Iv. msg. 3.9% Listings
HOME FOR SALE INVESTORS
On Your Lot, $110,900. RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
Atkinson Construction (352) 422-6956
352-637-4138 BUY OWNER - 3/2/2, ANUSSO.COM
Uc.# CBCO59685 Pool Home, approx.
Reduced, Moving 3/2/2 location, plus bonus
New roof, FP tile, 25X25 computer room, open
LR, Immac. cond. floor plan. Built 2003. 14
21005F. Was $176K, now x 28 Heated Pool w/ ex-
lUY OWNER T.P.A.61665 $242.000, No agents Oy at98%.
MLS313017 (352) 382-8914 800-366-9783 Ext 9845

Place a Chronicle NEW 4/3/3 + BONUS 3/2 $199/mo HUD Home
Placea Coicd ROOM, POOL, 5% down 20yrs at
Classified ad WOODED LOT. 8%apr. For listings call
6 lines, 30 days GOURMET KITCHEN, ALL 800-366-9783 Ext 5704
$51 .95 UPGRADES $414,000 3/2 $199/mo HUD Home

726-3983 - New 800-366-9783 Ext 5704
563-5966 Sugarmill Special
Non-Refundable Spacious, 2380 Ilv., BANK FORECLOSURE
Private Party Only 4/2/2, Home, scrn. 4BR, $46,000. 2BR
"35 per adaitlnaol Dna lana, pe vof many $12,000. For listings
May apply) $209,900. Owner, CUSTOM





The boater in you wil 5 BDRM HUD $37,500! acres. Located in
love this location! Only $298/mol 5% dwn. Rolling Hills
S 20yrs. at 8%. For listings Subdivision. 3142 sq.
John Malsel III Exit 800-366-9783 Ext 9845 ft. paved circular
Realy(352) 302-5351 drive. Home security
R1 $10,000 Cash Back system, built-in 50" TV,
GREAT HOME ON 1 AC.I At closing gas fireplace in living
2/2/2, new roof, renov. Brand new homes, rm. Must see home..


in 2004. Open floor, Only $995. down. Please call and leave
w/spllt plan $179,900 Call (352) 694-2900 message
Terr Hartman Crossland @352-572-3079 and
Realty (352)726-6644 3/2 $199/mo HUD Home we will get right back.
5% down 20yrs at Asking $375,000. Way
PRICE REDUCED 1/1 8%apr. For listings call below appraisal.
Fixer upper on nice lot. 800-366-9783 Ext 5704

PRICE REDUCED FISHING IN FRONT
PRICE REDUCED YARD
MUST SELLI Well 3/2ON 10.8Acresll
maintained home, Detached 14 X28
great location. 3/2,. Detached 14 X 28
great location. 3/2office, pool, fncd., pond.
new C/H/A & roof $325K Ownr. Finan.
$139,900. 352-860-2075 (362)621-3135

(32 R --HUD HOMES 4 BR
BONNIE PETERSON $366/rno. 5%down,
Realtor, GRI 20yrs. 8%. For listings
1 AC MOL 3/2 800-366-9783 Ext 5711
20 X 30 det. Garage. Your SATISFACTION
Close to Power Plant. IMyu~tell
$89,900 (352) 302-9351
3/2, 2 Car Detach Gar. (352) 586-6921
2 yr. old AC, new re- or (352)795-9123 5 BDRM HUD $37,5001
model. bthrms. Close to Only $298/mol 5% dwn.
shopping. Good Areal Charlotte G Realty 20yrs. at 8%. For listings
$130K (352) 302-0246 & Investments LLC 800-366-9783 Ext 9845


= -q ,. --_


I
or


L '


BANK FORECLOSURE
4BR, $46,000. 2BR
$12,000. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5714
HUD HOMES 4 BR
$366/mo. 5%down,
20yrs. 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5711



5 BDRM HUD $37,500!
Only $298/mol 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $199/mo HUD Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
3/2 $199/mo HUD Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
BANK FORECLOSURE
4BR, $46,000. 2BR
$12,000. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5714
HUD HOMES 4 BR
$366/mo. 5%down,
20yrs. 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5711




5 BDRM HUD $37,5001
Only $298/mol 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $199/mo HUD Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
BANK FORECLOSURE
4BR, $46,000. 2BR
$12,000. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5714
HUD HOMES 4 BR
$366/mo. 5%down,
20yrs. 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5711




2/21/2,
On water,
Make offer-
Call (352) 560-7251
CITRUS HILLS 2/2
Greenbriar 11,1st fir. furn.
Near pool. $113,500
$1,000mo. 352-249-3155







Hiawassee, Georgia
Nestled into the edge
of Chattahoochee
National Forest.
Stacked Stone Cabin &
Lot packages starting
as low as $199,000. For
more information call
(866)429-4703
www.soapstonep
reserve.com
Fcan
NORTH CAROLINA
Extraordinary Riverfront
& River Access sites on
the Broad River
Starting at $39,900.
828-652-8700
UPSTATE NY
Country Estate
Liquidation.
46 acres- $59,900.
Beautiful hilltop setting
w/ woods, incredible
views, so, exposure!
Just off teh Thruway!
Owner terms! Hurry!
(877) 854-5263
Fcan



/2/1 WOODLAND EST.
Fixed dock w/gulf
access. 1yr. old AC, DR,
Fm.Rm. Scrn'd Garden
lanai. $369,000
(352) 564-0759
4/3.5/2 In YANKEETOWN
3,514 sf. Formal areas,
French Drs. gazebo &
guesthouse.$1,285,000
Nancy Lewis, EXIT
REALTY(352) 302-6082
I BETTY MORTON I


r $ $ $ $$ $ $ $ $
TOP DOLLAR
$ For Junk Cars
$ (352) 201-1052 $
CASH BUYER-No Junk
for Trucks, Vans & Cars
Larry's Auto Sales
Hwy 19S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333





*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645


1-15 HOUSES WANTED
Cash or Terms
John (352) 228-7523
www.FastFloridaHouse
auyerLcam
Im A Private Investor,
Looking to Buy, Res. or
Commercial Properties
for CASH (305)542-4650
WE BUY HOUSES
CaSh........Fast
352-637-2973
Ihomesold.com




0.5 - 2.5 Zoned for MH
or home. Priced to sell
By Owner. Ownr fin.
avail. Low dwn, flex
terms.Se Habla Espanol
(800) 466-0460
LOT FOR SALE
1 AC. in Citrus Spgs. 185'
frontage, 250' deep.
Flat-great for building
$39,990. (352) 302-3103




Lots. Scmrn porch.
BY OWNER, $44,500
1592 S Lookout Pt
2 blocks off US19
352-503-4142
FARMS
&
WATER FRONT

Fre -!


""4 Wate rf ro nt
n
cc Homes

r


Licensed R.E. Broker
WaterfrontGolf Ik
Investment, Vacanjte'
n
Land and Relocation
.'r Citrus, Marion and t
Hernando
352-628-55001
www.silverking
properties.com
-"Here to Help you
Through the Process"


S.otuiiy


AREAS LARGEST
SELECTION
OF PONTOONS
& DECK BOATS
Crystal River
Marine
(352) 795-2597
COMPAC 16
Sailboat, new bottom
paint, complete rigg-
Ing, extras, dinghy, tdr.
great starter boat,
$2,500. (352) 563-1327
(352) 795-0678
LOWE
17' Bass Boat/Trailer
50HP Yamaha engine
$6500. (352) 795-9873
Nature Coast Marine
New, Used &
Brokerage
We Pay Cash for
Clean Used Boats
www.BoatSuper
352 794-0094









NEW T-TOPS &
CUDDY CABIN
TOPS
Super Closeout Salel
Won't Last Longi
Call for Pricing
Mon-Fri. 9am-5pm
(352) 527-3555

NITRO 18'
1994, 150 Mercury
w/Traller. Ready to fish!
$6,500 0B8
(352) 465-7209
POLAR 2300
2005, Twin 150 Yamaha
4 strk, all electronics,
$43,000
(352) 302-2240
PONTOON
24' 1999 Landau DX-24
w/75HP Yamaha OB
BImini, PortaPotti, Lad-
der $6900 352-564-1049
Pontoon Boat
18 ft. Crestliner Sport,
refurbished In '07, 40HP
Honda, live well, GPS,
Dep. find. port a pottle,
VFH Radio & more.
Will send picture by
email. (352) 382-4909
PONTOON BOAT
25', 85 HP Yamaha,
New tandem axle trir.
$4,300 obo,
813-695-8428
352-634-4021 EVE
PROLINE
'04, 24 ft., 225 Hondo,
Donzi Hull, black, low hrs.
lift kept, NICE $32,000.
(352) 795-1598
ROW BOAT 12'
ALUM. V-HULL
Bimini top, 14' ProULne
Trir., 3 hp. OB, Extras.
$1,500 (352) 382-1193
Wanted: Boats in Need
of Repair, also motors
and trailers, Cash Paid
(352) 212-6497





A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the
*2 weeks Onllnel
*Featured in Tues.
"Whees" SectionI
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
"$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
FOUR WINDS 31'
'04, Slide out, levellers,
backup cam, V-10 Ford
No smink/Pets. Loadedl
$40K (352) 422-7794
GULF STREAM '04
Ford BT Cruiser, 28' Tow
pkg, 13K ml 1 slide, walk
arnd qn. bd. very clean
$44,000. (352) 344-5634
THOR Windsport
'00, 31 FT., V10 Ford,
like new, no pets, no
smoke, 16k mi. $28,000.
(352) 621-1655




COLEMAN
1993 Pop-up, air,
awning, needs some
canvas work, $600.
SMALL BOAT $165.
(352) 346-8668
I BUY RV'S
Travel Trailers, 5th
wheels etc. Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
PALOMINO PONY
Pop-Up. Sleeps 5,frig.,
AC, stove for Inside/
outside. Good Cond.
$3,000(352)746-0839




4 CORVETTE ZR-1 Style
Chrome wheels & tires.
9'X 17" wheels, 275/40
ZR17 Kumho Tires, will fit
'88-'96 Covette. $500/
obo. (352) 489-8120
CARGO CARRIER
Roof-top
$75
(352) 382-1193
GOOSE NECK
HITCH
For Chevrolet dually.
$150
(352) 302-5698
TOW Dolly
Stehl, 2003, like new
$700.
(352) 628-6335


r --= u- " DODGE
02, Mazda Tribute 1965 Dart 440 6pack,
Great 0Gasaver 500 HP, auto trans.
$10,980. I Tubbed rear, way too
866-838-4376 a much to list, $13,500.
Must seel Will trade
I (603) 860-6660
'98 CHRYSLER SEBRING LXI DODGE
20Ro, osaed,Lowt..$6,995 '71, Dart Swinger, 6 cyl.
'99 HONDA CIVIC EX auto, daily driver $2,950
Auto, S , Loaded .....$7,995 obo (352) 447-3842
'02 TOWN & COUNTRY VAN (352) 978-0658
V6, DuasiLoaded.........$7,995 FORD
'64, Galaxy, 4 DR. all
original, runs good,
---- $4,500. (352) 344-8401,
r -IICadaI miI ill Cell (352)476-4496
'98,Cadiliac Sedan
Deville Custom Grille MERCEDES 1984
+ Morell! Low Miles 380SL, 69K orig. ml. 2
$6,990. tops w/stand, garage
1-866-838-4376 kept. $13,500
L.---.. a (352) 302-5698
r erc rradd MG MIDGET
99Mercury Grand 1978, mint, low mile-
Marquis i age, red. All Original
Don't Hesitate 7500. OBO.
Won't Last $3990. (352) 302-5321/John
1-866-838-4376
-. �i .i.i PONTIAC
'85 FIERO GT-V-6, Auto,
A WHEEL OF AC, 97K ml., Great
Cond. & Starter Collect.
A DEAL $3,900obo352-628-5513
5 lines for only $500! Police Impounds
S .For sale! Cars from
$37.95* $500! For listings call
*2 weeks In the 1-800-366-9813 ext 7374
Chroniclel
*2 weeks Onllnel -c
*Featured In Tues.
"Wheels" Sectioni
Cal Today L
(352) 726-3983 r o,-MC Sa7 oma
or (352) 563-5966 X-Cab, Auto,
For details. 47K org. miles.
$5 per additional line i $4,990.
Some Restrictions 1-866-838-4376
May Apply L - - - - - m
ACURA MDX '04 '02, FORD F-150,S XLT
Sport w/ navigation, 59K I SUPERCAB Sportside I
mi. Exc. cond. Garage I $11,990.
kept. $24,800 1-866-838-4376
352-746-7402, Iv msg. L i - - i
T - --? U* �05,Toyota Tacoma
ALL SAVE AUTO ii Low miles I
I AFFORDABLE CARS 1 Owner, MUST SEE!!
I 100+Clean $199. mo. WAC
Dependable Cars 866-838-4376
FROM $450- DOWN - - L --- - -l
30MIN. E-Z CREDIT
S1675 US HWY19 A WHEELOF
1 HOMOSASSA
I 352-563-2003 A DEAL
116 - - J- I 5 lines for only
* AUQTOMOBQDILE* $37.95!*
DONATIONS *2 weeks In the
Tax Deductible Chronclel
Maritime Ministries .2 weeks Onlinel
43 year old *Featured in Tues.
Non-reporting "Wheels" Section
501-C-3 Charity. Cal Today
(352) 795-9621 (352) 726-3983
Tax Deductle* or (352) 563-5966
-For details.
BIGSA$5 per additional line
D' isshSome Restrictions
? lNET llUSA I May Apply


A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.951*
*2 weeks in the
*2 weeks Onlinel
*Featured in Tues.
"Wh Is" SectionI
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
'$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
DODGE
'98 Raml500, Ext. Cob,
V-8, topper. 100K, 1
owner. Well maint'd.
$6,990 (352) 302-5698
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374



E-----
SHonda Odyssey
LX, #1 Van In
America, Better
Hurry, Only 47K org. I
I miles $8,990.
-866-838-4376 I

S '03 Kla Sedona
Mini Van Bring |
the Family,
$7,990.
866-838-4376
"6-'3'-"'7
CHEVY
Lumina, '94, 118K mi, 4dr,
2nd owner,
Asking $2,500
(352) 628-0029
DODGE
'88 Ext. Van, Just Tuned
Up, Rear Brakes, new
tires. Asking $2,000obo
352-341-4848/400-1327
DODGE
'94, Ram 250.
AM/FM/CD, V8,
runs good, $1,200.
(352) 746-9012
FORD WJNDSTAR
2000 SEL, All options!
Leather Interior
$2,500 firm
(352) 257-1864
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$500! For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
SUZUKKI,.DIRT BIKE,
80cc, very good shape,
runs great, $750.
4 WHEELER, SUZUKKI,
185, runs great, $750.
(352) 302-5321/John




518-1009 TUCRN
2007-CP- 179 Estate of
Sophie M. Hedgecock
Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO, 2007-CP-179
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SOPHIA M. HEDGECOCK,
DECEASED.
NOTICE OF ACTION
(Formal notice
by publication)
TO: CAROL ANDRUS
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that'the adminis-
tration of the estate of
Sophia M. Hedgecock,
Deceased, File Number
2007-CP-179, Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of
which is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, FL 34450. The estate
is testate and the date of
the decedent's Will is


www.cmssland

Crossland
Realty Inc.
Since 1989
(352) 726-6644
Lecanto, Centrally
Located, 2 cleared
.52 ac. lots. Desirable
neighborhood, paved
roads, city water, huge
oak trees, corner lot,--
$35,000. Interior lot,
$32,500. W Laurel St.
Owner Agent
352-302-2300
TERRA VISTA HILLSIDE
GOLF COURSE LOT #9
Skyvlew CC, $77,000
Call (352) 638-0905




HUNTING LAND IN LEVY
CO., 10 Acres of Hard-
wood trees & pine, bor-
der Wacassa Preserves
600ft. on Hwy. 19,15
min. N. of Inglis, owner
fin. w/30% down. asking
9i., unnn f7.'AA\OAJnnn


I e-e% I


a _


ff ccC4
cN31IM=otorccles


1.15 Ac, Crystal Manor
Hi & Dry. Briar Patch.
Surveyed. $55,000
352-795-2567/228-3747
CITRUS LOTS PRICED TO
SELL FINANCING AVAIL.
1-800-840-4310
letsaolandllc.com
LECANTO /2 Ac +
Well, septic, power
pole. Impact fees pd.
2775 Rennet Ct,
$25K obo(813)792-1355
Sugarmill Woods, Oak
Village Lot 28, Iberis Ct.,
Homosassa, Build your
Dream home, culdesac
lot 1/4 Acre $49,900.
(352) 504-6371




BEST DEAL ON WATER
Halls River, 2 WF Lots,
side by side, deep
canal. Parklike setting.
Cleared & ready to
build. $89,900. ea.
Owner/agent
(352) 302-2300




r-- --mwi
RENTAL FINDER
Swww.chronicle
rentalfindercom
�=----- =�



4 Mud Tires,
44 x 18.5 x 15 Tires,
$400. obo
(352) 279-4860
7.5 Johnson Outboard,
runs excel.
great shape, $300.
25HP Mariner,
foot. froze up $150.
(352) 279-4860
15HP Merc. '07 Outbrd.
4 strk. Elec strt. Long shft
Brand new in box $1800
352-302-0100/563-2459




YAMAHA
'96 Wave Venture, 3
seat, low hrs. Exc. cond.
Lk Nw trir new batt/cvr.
$2995. (352) 563-6080




AIRBOAT 16'
Panther, Alum. w/trlr.
New prop & motor.
$5,500
(352) 489-3440
ALUMINUM FISHING
BOAT 14'
Boat, 18 hp. mtr. & trlr
$999 OBO
(352) 726-2286
Area's Largest
Selection of
Clean Used Boats
THREE RIVERS
MARINE



(352) 563-5510


CHEVY
'96, 10, LS, PU,
ext. cab, 84k mi.,
call for particulars
352-476-3355
CHEVY
'97, 1500 Silverado, 3 dr.
fiberglass bdcvr., 120K,
auto, power windows.
$4,400 (352) 795-5735
CHEVY
Chevy Silverado 2006
Like new! Club Cab,
V8, Leather, Dual Ex-
haust, Loadedl Hard
Cover Bed. Chrome
Rims, 32K Mi, $20,999
OBO Call 352-464-1411
DODGE
'01 Dakota, LST4X4
Quad cab. exc. cond.
59,000 ml. too many ex-
tras to list! $12,500/obo
(352) 795-4410
DODGE
1984 Power RAM, 4x4,
LB, 140K mi. no radio,
A/C, strong work truck
$1,000 firm 212-8211
DODGE DAKOTA
'01 SLT
44K, $8500, Tinted Glass,
Bedliner, Exc Cond,
Call 352-726-0156
DODGE
Dakota '96, Std. cab.
Topper, 128K, gd. cond.
Nice bodyl $2,700/obo
(352) 527-4590
FORD
'04, HD 4 WD, crew
cab, Duramax diesel,
94k mi., $21,000. firm
(352) 634-2462
FORD
'90, F250, 4 X 4,302,
V8, cold AC, grannylow
4 spd, $2,500. obo
(352) 560-7324 aft: 3pm
FORD
'91, F150, 4 wheel drive,
runs good, lots of
new parts, $1,500.
(352) 216-1211
FORD
'99 E-350 Box Truck
AC, Ramp. $4,000 obo
352-341-4848/400-1327
NISSAN
'03, Frontier, 43k mi.,
stereo, CD, tinted win.,
tow pkg, alarm, $14,500
(352) 257-1173
NISSAN
Frontier XE '04, Ext. Cab,
auto, cruise, 1 Owner.
Exc. Cond.
$9,500 (352) 302-7073
$500! Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374





SLeather and MORE
Low miles




SYou Can Tow Melli
S $229. mo.
866-838-4376
CHEVY Blazer S10
'88, 4.3, Low miles, A/C
Sr. owned, very sharp.
$2,700.00 (352)
465-07210
FORD
'97 Explorer Sport. 2 dr.
V-6, Auto, All Pwr., AC,
$3,495
(352) 382-7632
FORD EXPLORER
97 XLT, V-8, 129K ml.,
Exc. Cond. $4,000 obo
(352) 563-2399
FORD EXPLORER
SPORT '02, AC, runs
great. 57K mi., exc.
cond, $10,000/obo
(352) 637-2582
JEEP .
2004 Wrangler, low
miles, 4 X 4. Gator logo.
$14,500
(352) 795-4920
TAHOE LT
LT 2002 Loaded.
Leather, Sunroof, All
Power. $14,900 OBO,
352-228-2608


BUICK PARK AVE.
'86,4dr, V-6, auto, AC,
fully loaded, Sr. owned.
Ither Int. Great cond.
$1300. (352) 249-8059
CADILLAC
1996 DeVille, 119K mi.
Minor TLC, $599.
(352) 563-4169
CADILLAC
'97 Sedan Deville,
signature series, 25mpg,
north star, beautiful
$ependable 90k mi.
$4,700. (352) 795-7876
CUTLASS
OLDS 1999
Only 66k miles, One
Owner, Excellent
Condition, Great Gas
Mileage, $5100 - Call
352-344-1646
DODGE
'02, Intrepid,
Low mi., white,
Make offer, Call
(352) 560-7251
DODGE
1987 CONQUEST 2.6,
turbo, 5spd. runs very
good. $1500/obo.
(352) 795-8968
FORD
2005 Taurus, 21K ml., -
Like New! Sunroof,
$11,000 Citrus Hills.
(352) 746-1321
FORD
'93 Taurus GL Station
Wagon, Loaded! $3,300
OBO (352) 563-1181
(813)244-3945
HONDA ACCORD
'99, EXL, 6 cyl., very low
miles. Pristine Cond.
$11,000 (352) 634-5665
INFINITY G35 '06
Coupe, 10K mi. Blue/,
creme, beautiful &
perfect $30,800
(352) 860-1239
� ==ra --= =I




MERCEDES
1987, 560 SL, 126K,
White, Both tops,
New tires, $10,500
352-586-6805/
382-1204 1
I= ---. - -= i. =
MITSUBISHI
'90, Mirage, cold AC,
49K mi. New tires. A-1
Cond. 40+ MPG $2,500
(352) 344-9141
OLDS AURORA
2001, ;V-6 Sedan, 48K,
Exc. Cond. Leather,
Dual Pwr Seats/Wndws/
Drs., Radlo/Cass./CD,
Chrome Wheels,
Pearl White. $10,995
(352) 746-2001
SATURN
'99, 4 Dr. 5 spd,, w/
complete, BlueOx tow
set up, leath erover
71k, $3,500, 746-5477
TOYOTA CAMRY LE '96,
Exc. Cond./All pwr.,
Mntc. Rcds., Grgd.
$3,500 (352) 422-5685
Your Donation of
A Vehicle
Supports Single,
Homeless Mothers
& Is Tax
Deductible
Donate your vehicle
TO THE PATH
(Rescue Mission for
Men Women &
Children)
at (352) 527-6500
$5001 Poice pounds For
Cas from $50 For i rgscd
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




24ft. Proline
S10 Pick Up,
Race Car
(352) 621-3420
CHEVY
'84, Stepside. Many
new parts, V-8, A/T, AC
$4,500 (352) 447-0909
CHEVY EL CAMINO
'65 $8,500. worked 350,
turbo 350 tranny. Needs
some finishing touches.
352-489-8633


I


r-I


CILASSIFIIIEIDS


A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.951*
.2 weeks in the
Chronicle
*2 weeks Onlinel
*Featured In Tues.
"Wbeels" Sectionl
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
"$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
DAELIM
ROADWIN 2005 125CC
Great starter street.
bike. Low ml. Clear title,
$2200/obo 352-628-7442
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
HARLEY CHOPPER
Will Turn Heads! '71 Old
School Iron Head
Springer. All redonel
A steal @ $5,500
352-308-2570/586-1917
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'07, Heritage Softail, 18
mo. left on warr. Low
miles. Exc. cond.
$16,900
(352) 560-7168
HARLEY DAVIDSON
SPORTSTER 883
'99, Loaded w/extras,
low miles. Mint Cond.
$4,500(352) 634-5450
HARLEY HERITAGE
CLASSIC '04
Too many extras to list!
Low miles $18,000 obo'
(352) 634-5665
HONDA
2005, CRF 150, runs
good, but smokes, looks
new, $1,000. obo
(352) 422-3113
HONDA
'98 Shadow 1100. Amer-
Ican Classic Edition
Tourer, New tires, $5,000
Loaded. (352) 344-3898
HONDA SHADOW
'06, 750,2,600 Ml.,
Gray Flame, CB, BR.
Like Newl $5,000
Ed. (352) 465-1124
KAWASAKI '04
Vulcan, 2000cc, mint
cond. Many extras.
$8,500/obo
352-628-7403
MOTO GUZZI
BREVA 7501E 2004
12,000, $4,900.00 Beauti-
ful silver bike, garage
kept, touring wind-
shield, hard bags, low
profile seat. Great Ride.
(352) 637-6345
Scooter
New 150CC,
Road Legal,
Call (352) 201-6008
850-242-9343
SUZUKI
2003 Burgman 400
Scooter, Royal blue,
14,900+mi. $3900
(352) 419-0053
SUZUKI
650cc, 1980.
$800/obo
(352) 572-7984
YAMAHA
'02, Warrior, 1700 CC,
4,900 mi.,
Like New! $6,900
(352) 726-6128
YAMAHA
'04, V Star 650, Siverado'
windshield, sattlebags,
many extras, like new
2,060 mi. $4,795.
(352) 422-4335
YAMAHA
'05, Roadstar Silverdo,
650 CC, 7,400 mi.,
Like New! $4,900
(352) 726-6128




November 16, 1990. You
are required to serve a
copy of your written ob-
jections, if any, on
petitioner's attorney,
whose name and address
are:
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY,
P.A.
Michael Mountjoy, Esquire
209 Courthouse Square
Inverness, FL 34450
on or before November
30, 2007, and to file the
original of the written ob-
jections with the clerk of
this court either before
service or Immediately
thereafter. Failure to serve
and file written defenses
as required may result In
Judgment or order for the
relief demanded, without
further notice.
Dated' on' September 11,
2007.
BETTY STRIFLER
As Clerk of the Court
By: M. Davis
As Deputy Clerk
Published four (4) times In
Citrus County Chronicle
September 18, 25,
October 2 and 9, 2007


Deb Infantine
EXIT REALTY LEADERS
(352) 302-8046
CRYSTAL RIVER
WATERFRONT
Spacious 4/3/1 on deep
water canal with Gulf ac-
cess, many updates in-
cluding new electric, roof,
central a/c, insulated win-
dows, appliances, hot
water heater, gorgeous
tiled shower in master,
and so much more FSBO
$285,000 352-795-4932

FISHING IN FRONT
YARD
312 ON 10.8 Acresll
Detached 14 X 28
office, pool, fncd., pond.
$325K Ownr. Finan.
(352)621-3135

KINGS BAY DRIVE
4/2/2 on canal, Immac.
Pool home, separate
suite, gated, $825,000
(352) 634-1805
LET OUR OFFICE
GUIDE YOUI








Plantation Realty. Inc.
(352) 795-0784
Cell 422-7925
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner
See all of the listings
in Citrus County at
www.plantation
realtvinc.com


523-0925 TUCRN
Advanced Towing
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: ADVANCED TOWING gives No-
tice of Foreclosure of Lien and Intent to sell these vehi-
cles on 10/08/2007, 8:00 a.m., at 4875 S. Florida Ave..
Inverness, FL 34450, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of
the Florida Statutes. ADVANCED TOWING reserves the
right to accept or reject any and/or all bids.
1FACP52U6PG313647 1993 FORD
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle,
September 25, 2007.

524-0925 TUCRN
City of Crystal River Public Hearing
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Hearing Date: Thursday. October 4. 2007
The City of Crystal River Planning Commission will hold
a public hearing on Thursday, October 4, 2007 at 6:30
p.m. In the City Council Chambers (123 NW Highway
19, Crystal'River, Florida) to consider the following case.
PC#07-013: Request for Variance of Landscape Plan for
property located at 1101 NE 5th Street, Crystal River.
(New Orange Bank)
PC#07-012: Doggie Dining Ordinance.
Pursuant to the provision of Chapter 286, Florida Stat-
utes, Section 286.0105, Ift a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Planning Commission with
respect to the matters considered at this public hear-
ing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, at
that, for such purpose he/she may need to ensure that
a verbatim record of the proceedings Is made, which
record may Include the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal Is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the City of Crystal River, Building
and Zoning Office, 123 NW Highway 19, Crystal River,
Florida 34428, (352) 795-6511, at least two (2) days be-
fore the meeting.
The Commission invites comments from concerned citi-
zens either in person or by submitting written comments
to the City of Crystal River. For more Information call
(352) 795-6511.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle,
September 25, 2007.








R


0


N


C


A weekly advertising supplement of The Citrus County Chronicle


September 25, 2007


INSIDE
Hybrids are
,,.getting larger
, Page 2D


Fi ve things
. -. sh euld
know
LJage 3D


Basic rules
keep riders
,safe
Page 3D




,Mat .

D ialA Deal
Auto Mart
0 4D
5D-


S equare co

to being cool
P age D


Newcars
rolling out
Pa 6.D


Bricklin's
dream
Page, 9p


Select RV
insurance

Page D


Get better
gas mileage
Page 14D


As with all I

things

Mercedes-

Benz,

the specially

built

Transporter

exuded

class,

comfort

and speed

MALCOLM GUNN
Wheelbase Communications

T he idea was as preposterous as it
was pricey. Construct a special
vehicle to carry a racing car to
and from events throughout
Europe and make it the fastest and most
recognizable transporter the world. had
ever seen.
Only the perfection-driven minds at
Mercedes-Benz could conceive of such a
project, much less carry it through to com-
pletion.
But what could possibly possess the
company to invest vaults of money and
countless hours in the design and con-
struction of such a one-off commercial
carrier? Wouldn't any existing large van
suit the purpose?
The story behind the transporter's cre-
ation is a blending of pride, passion and
practicality.
Before the Second World War,
Mercedes-Benz had been locked in fierce
competition with the German Auto Union
racing teams. Mercedes' 3.0-liter V12-
powered W 154 proved the car to beat,
however, as it won 12 of the 17 events
leading up to the war.
It wasn't until 1952 that Mercedes-Benz
management made the decision to return
to Grand Prix racing, beginning with the
1954 season.
To trumpet its comeback, Mercedes-
Benz decided to build a special truck to
haul its all-new W 196 racer, a car that was
piloted by Argentine ace Juan Manuel
Fangio.
The carrier had to look unlike any other sedan,
on the road while being instantly recogniz- rior fi
able as a company-designed vehicle. It Beti
also had to be faster than all similar-sized e
rigs as well as most of the cars that plied fender
the highways of western Europe (not to tires, '
mention the no-speed-limit German toolsZ
Autobahn). the rac
Why? Getting the car to the race track The
faster and sooner meant more preparation in facd
and practice time. It also meant that a dam- just an
aged racer could be returned to the plant It w
for repairs and returned to action in record fully 1
time. 6,600
Technically, the transporter incorporated more t
the best that Mercedes-Benz had to offer. by tod
The extended X-shaped frame was based The
on the automaker's full-sized 300 S sedan road i
while the 3.0-liter SOHC six-cylinder immed
engine and four-speed manual transmis- Europ
sion were similar to those installed in the Ameri
automaker's 300 SL gullwing sports cars. In f
However, by far the transporter's most that fkt
unusual feature was its breathtaking body- than tl
work. Many of the steel panels were based race ca
on, or modified from models that existed Mer
at the time. The doors and front glass, for from rn
example, were borrowed from the 180 events


MSRP 2007 Pontiac G6 ~i.u ~ z J-9
*1$77,905 *~J~CMC ii TjLA in401
From 12.75 S. Suncoast Blvd., (U.S. Hwy. 19) Homosassa

67Z9'-5 4m800 s* 1m'88~4~59EGEucu~a
~de~tfeicswi~~p ear ban tokle'i~er,~cwy ILre p.ceAar eatae t ig , 6e-l 'iae, d dop~rnsandeaie ie'af $4991,AlO i







CIrnus CouNrY (FL) CHRONicu1,


With SHARON PETERS


Hybrids growing


in size, availability


M EMORY


LAN


B Sleek and Streamlii


(Brian I. 'Bissiu


Ron Jefferson is the
original owner of a 1970 Dodge
Charger, which he actually bought
new in early 1969.'
What is special about Ron
Jefferson's Charger is that it has
not been restored. The only thing
that has been changed is the seat
covers. The Charger is completely
original, and the car is driven
often. The
Charger is W1 P&A
usually driven
for fun times
out on the
town for
dinner with
his wife. The .
classic lines of
the 1970 Charger are to be
admired. It is sleek and streamline.
There are a lot of things
that Ron Jefferson might take pride
in. Especially since he bought the
car brand new and has kept it
original. "My favorite part of my
'girl' is that I am the original
owner and I still have the original
title and bill of sale. I have held on
to this car for 37 years and she
drives as good today as the day I
brought her home."
I have always enjoyed
being around older classic or
muscle cars. When I step back and
see the results of my hard work, I
have a feeling of self worth and
traveling back in time. I plan on


keeping her in my family and
perhaps one day my two grown
sons will take
as much
pleasure in her
as I do. I am
also planning to
start the
process of
stripping her
down and
giving her a
custom paint
job.

When
asked what is the
nicest vehicle
that you have
Seen or your
dream car? Ron
replied, like
most, "That's a
hard one to answer. I have seen
many spectacular restored vehicles.
However, I would like to say my
dream car is the one sitting in my


garage now next to my "girl"- the
Charger- my Magnetic Red C6
Corvette".
Needless to say over his 37
years of ownership of his 1969
Charger Ron has had a great


number of fond mem
favorite memory of














the dash pad. He bit
an impression in the
day, that impression
Every time I get into
think of all the happy
the last 37 years bec;
indentation.
That dash wi
replaced."







memories to share. P
own a muscle car tha
and joy. Are you a cl
who would like to sh
story? Feel free to e-
bbisson@chronicle
would love to get so:
pictures and stories t
Wheels section.
So you can s
enjoy the ride down
Lane.


aed"

nories. His
all is one that
any person ,,
can
appreciate.
"When my
son was
around two
years old,"
Ron said,
"my son was
in the front
seat and he
proceeded to
bite down on
so hard he left
dash. To this
is still there.
the car, I
y memories of
ause of that

ill never be

Maybe
you're a
restoration
enthusiast
and have
some
perhapss you
at is your pride
ub member
rare your
mail
online.com We
me great
to use in our

sit back and
Memory


Q. Why is hybrid technology
offered on only a few vehicles,
with the vast majority of them
being little ones?
A. Hybrid versions of an
increasing number of vehicles
are being offered up, including
some larger ones such as the
Mercury Mariner and Toyota
Highlander.
And very soon there will be
lots more hybrids available,
many of them of the much larger
variety.
Full-sized hybrid Chevrolet
Tahoes and GMC Yukons will be
rolled out at the end of this year;
next year there will be a hybrid
Cadillac Escalade SUV.
Chrysler has even announced
plans to do the hybrid thing with
its much-admired Hemi engine.
Next year a hybrid Hemi will be
offered in the Dodge Durango
and the Chrysler Aspen SUVs.
Hybrid technology was,
indeed, limited to small cars
when it first appeared. There
were a few reasons, but the most
compelling was the early-on
assumption that it would interest
primarily those people who were
already conservationists, envi-
ronmentalists or otherwise
green. And they sure wouldn't
buy a larger hybrid vehicle that,
even with improved mpg, would
be using more fuel than a small-
er car of the traditional sort.
The technology
has proved to be rel-
atively problem-
free, interest in it has Tt
widened, and so tecnn
drivers of all manner
of vehicles, includ- has imr
ing larger ones, are to be re
now 'more inclined
to consider a hybrid problem
version, even if it
provides only six or
eight miles a gallon
more than they're getting now.
Q. You mentioned a while ago
an air freshener with a new-
car smell. Where can I pur-
chase this? I
A. Hmmmm. I think you're con-
fusing me with someone else
who writes about cars. I'm not
much of a fan of sprays and
chemicals in vehicles. And that's.
for a couple of reasons.
It's such a tight little environ-
ment, I try to avoid filling it up
with un-pronounceables, even
though I'm not fundamentally a
fanatic about always using all-
naturals.
Also, I am not all that crazy
about artificial scents or per-
fumey odors, and when you go
the air freshener route you some-
times wind up with something
that smells a little sickening and
can take a long time to go away.
So please allow me to offer
some alternatives.
If what you're aiming to do
away with is the usual aroma of
human use, I recommend stick-
ing an uncovered container of
baking soda, fresh coffee (which
is what flight attendants use to
soak up even the most revolting-
ly odoriferous calamities in
flight) or vinegar in the vehicle
for several lours with the win-
dows closed.
If you go the vinegar route,
you'll need to open windows for
a few minutes so it doesn't smell
like a mobile salad. But you'll be
amazed at how these products
absorb odors and leave the vehi-
cle smelling, well, just, neutral.
Another approach is cutting
up a couple of raw apples and
putting them in the car
overnight. This, too, will absorb
odors. Just don't leave the apples
pieces there for days, or the odor


you had before will be replaced
by the even-more-unappealing
stench of rotting fruit.
If the odor you want to get rid
of is more intense (smelly dog,
putrid gym stuff, spills, etc.), I'm
a great fan of getting a bag of
volcanic rocks, also known as
lava rocks. They're sold in little
mesh bags at home-center stores
for about $10. And they absorb
odors (even of the litter-box
variety) in small spaces very
efficiently. You've got to set the
bag out in the bright sunshine
every few weeks to reactivate
the stench-absorbing capability.
Search the Internet for the terms
"lava rock" or "volcanic rock"
plus "odor" and you'll find
scores of options.
You also can insert three or
four dryer fabric sheets under
the seats for a couple of days, to
absorb the odor. You'll be left
with a carryover scent for a cou-
ple of days, but that will go away
with time.
I also like Windex Vinegar and
Water Formula sprayed on the
appropriate surfaces. I've found
that cleaning all the insides of
the windows (great repositories
of little-hand crud and doggie
slime) rids the vehicles of often-
overlooked stinkiness. It leaves
behind a nice, just-cleaned scent
that isn't overpowering.
Another approach is sticking a
half-unwrapped bar
of soap under a seat
(where kids and ani-
he mals can't get at it).
ology Intensely scented
soaps like Irish
proved Spring will quickly
relatively dissipate even tough
odors but may have
m-free a little too much
"personality" for
some noses. Still,
when I've got a
stubborn odor to deal with, I'll
sometimes put Irish Spring in
the vehicle overnight.
But generally I just keep a
milder soap under the passen-
ger's seat to soak ,up whatever
scents find their way in. I got a
bar of homemade soap at a
farmer's market last summer,
and every two or three weeks I
carve about 1/4 inch off the end
of it to let loose the trapped
scent.
My vehicle smells pretty
darned good all the time, against
all odds, considering the
humans, animals and gear I haul
around.
When you need a heavy-duty
odor fighter, buy an auto arp-
matherapy diffuser at a health-
food store (it plugs into the ciga-
rette lighter) and a bottle of
essential oil (peppermint is a
good one, or tea-tree oil).
You'll definitely smell it while
you're in the vehicle, especially
when it's running, but there's no
perfumey, lasts-almost-forever
afterscent. And this approach
really absorbs odors. I even had
success getting rid of dead fish
stench that materialized (along
with the fish) after a comedy of
errors associated with a camping
trip.
If after all this you think you
really have to have the spray-it-
on new-car scent, there are a
few. Most auto-supply stores sell
at least one version.

� CTW Features
What's your question? Sharon
Peters would like to hear about
what's on your mind when it
comes to caring for, driving and
repairing your vehicle. E-mail
Sharon@ctwfeatures. cornm.


Take A Ride Down

Memory Lane
If you have memories of a classic,
vintage, or muscle car that you would
like to share, we want to hear from you.
Contact us at:
bbisson@chronicleonline.com or
cbonanno@chronicleonline.com


Take the Teen Driver Challenge!

Car crashes are the #1 cause of death for teens.
The Citrus County Sheriff's Office is now offering a
12-hour driving course designed to save lives.
To register your teen for the class, call the Sheriff's Office at 726-4488
or visit our website at www.sheriffcitrus.org
Your teen will practice driving exercises to include:
* Off Road Recovery 0 Evasive Maneuvers 0 Figure 8 E Threshold Braking
* Forward/Reverse Serpentine N Cornering N Backing 0 Skid Pad Work


jg" I UFSDAY, 3EPTEMBPR Z70, Ickiv / --.- --I


!21M TFTYZ..-T)AY- SFPTEMBFR 25. 2007


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Five things women need to know about cars"


You are driving alone down a
country\ road when you get a flat
tire. You have zero bars on your
cell phone and not a soul in
sight. \Vhai do you do?
Wait for someone to come
along and pray they are not a
serial killer?
Walk back a few miles hoping
to pick up cell service
Hope that really was a house
you saw a few minutes before
your tire went flat?
Knowing what to do in case of
an auto emergency can mean the
difference between getting back
on the road quickly and not get-
ting back on the road at all.
As recently as ten years ago
auto shop was a regular fixture in
high schools. However with the
complexities of today's newer,
computerized engines and the
decline of vocational education
in the public schools, the idea
that the average person, man or
woman, can fix their own car
becomes more and more remote.
Despite this trend however of
taking our car to the shop for
everything from oil changes to
installing new wiper blades,
there are five important things
every woman should know about
their car. While you may never
have a flat tire, having a working
knowledge of your car and what
do to when the check engine
Jight comes on can save you both
time and money in the event of
an auto emergency.

Know how to
change a tire
Flat tires are the number one
cause of auto emergencies.
Whether a blowout at 70 mph on
the freeway or a slow leak
caused by a nail imbedded in the
rubber, a flat tire will derail your
trip faster than you can say,
"what happened?"
The key to changing your own
tire is to have the proper equip-
ment. Most importantly, keep
your spare tire properly inflated
and know where to find the jack
and iron. In cars with trunks
these tools are usually found
there. Many models have a hid-
den compartment in the trunk or
cargo area where the spare, the
jack and the tire iron are neatly
stored without taking up valu-
able cargo area.
You should always loosen the
lug nuts on your tire before you
raise the car with the jack. It will
be easier to exert force on the nut
while the car is planted firmly on
the ground. Not sure which way
to turn? Just remember the say-
ing "lefty loosy, righty tighty."
Turn the nuts to the left to
remove them and to the right to
tighten them up.
Here's a tip: this rule applies to
just about anything you are try-
ing to loosen or tighten. In the
event your car has a hub cap that
hides the lug nuts, keep a flat
head screw driver in your cargo


area as well. Practice using the
screw driver to remove the hub
cap so that if you ever have to
change your tire, you are not
struggling to find the lug nuts.
Learn where to place the jack
in order to properly lift the car.
Your owner's manual should
have both a description of the
process and an illustration.
Putting the jack in the right place
makes all the difference when
you begin to lift. Follow the
directions in your manual and
you will be surprised at how eas-
ily you can raise the car to the
right height.
After you have removed the
damaged tire and put on your
spare, tighten the lug nuts as
much as you can with your hands
and then give them a little turn
with the tire iron. Follow a star
pattern when tightening instead
of going around the tire in a cir-
cle. This will help balance the
tire and prevent one side from
being over-tightened. After you
have secured the tire, lower the
car slowly to the ground. Once
on the ground; use the tire iron to
tighten the nuts as much as pos-
sible. Return your damaged tire,
jack, iron and any other tools
you used to their proper storage
area and now you're on your
way.
If yo# spare tire is smaller
than your other three tires and
only intended to be used as an
emergency spare, it is important
that you follow the directions in
your manual and only drive at
moderate speeds until you have
the full size tire repaired and
placed back on your car. If you


had trouble fully tightening your Have it checked by the proper
lug nuts, find the nearest service technician as soon as possible.
station or automobile repair shop By knowing what your dash
and ask someone to check to gauges mean and how to inter-
make sure they are completely pret them using the owner's man-
tightened. ual you can catch problems
before they become serious, sav-


Read gauges and
owner's manual
The second most common
auto emergency is a warning
light on your dash board.
Examples of warning lights
are the Check Engine light, Oil
light, ABS brake light, or Airbag
light. A sudden illumination of
any of these lights can mean a
serious problem is occurring and
you should have your car
checked as quickly as possible.
However, with the modern
computers in vehicles today
sometimes the lights come on
without a serious underlying
problem. Sometimes the lights
come on due to a faulty switch in
the dash or a circuit that isn't
properly functioning.
The most important thing to'
remember about warning lights
is that they are your car's way of
talking to you and you have to be
able to understand what it is say-
ing. Read your owner's manual.
Review the section on trou-
bleshooting. Familiarize your-
self with what the different
warning lights look like when
they are illuminated. Know that
when the ABS light comes on
you might need to have your
brake fluid checked. Know that
when the Airbag light comes 6n
you could be driving with the
risk that your airbag may not
deploy in the event of a collision.


ing yourself moneyand potential
lost time in the process.

Check the oil
and radiator fluid
Keeping your engine running
smoothly is often as simple as
making sure it has enough oil
and radiator fluid. Automobile
engines are made up of lots of
little parts.
These parts move interchange-
ably against each other thou-
sands of times a minute and
build up friction. Motor oil keeps
those engine parts lubricated and
functioning properly. Radiator
fluid, or engine coolant as it may
be called in your owner's manu-
al, does a similar job.
Like any machine, an automo-
bile' engine gets warm through
the constant moving of its many
parts. Radiator fluid cools the
engine down so that it doesn't
overheat, allowing it to keep
working even on the hottest
days. Find where the dip sticks
are for both engine oil and
engine coolant.
In many cars they are yellow
in color and marked with a pic-
ture of either a drop of oil or
some sort of liquid.. Using your
owner's manual, determine the
proper levels for both fluids. To
get the most accurate reading,
have your engine running when
using the dip sticks.


Check your fluids once a
month. In warmer weather you
may need to check it twice a
month. Always have a minimal
amount of motor oil or radiator
fluid on hand in your garage in
case your levels are low and you
need to add some.
While it is normal to lose
some fluid periodically between
oil changes, if you find yourself
having to add oil or engine
coolant regularly to your car you
should have it checked by a tech-
nician as soon as possible. This
can be a sign of a more serious
problem and having it repaired
quickly will prevent further
damage to your car's engine.

Know how to
jump the battery
Ever leave your dome light on
accidentally?
How about leaving the glove
box open all weekend? If so you
have probably experienced a
dead battery and have had to
jump start your car. Jumping
your battery requires jumper
cables and another car that can,
start its engine.
The key to jumping your car is
to know that there is both a pos-
itive and negative cable which
corresponds to the positive and
negative posts on your battery.
The posts are usually covered
with a cap however once you
remove the cap, the posts are
marked with a + sign or a - sign.
The cables will be marked as
well. With both engines off,
clamp the positive cable to the
positive post and the negative
cable to the negative post.


Do this to both cars. Start the
engine of the other car. Wait a
minute or two to allow the
charge from the running engine
to flow through the cables into
your battery and then try arid
start your car. If it doesn't tutn
over at all, wait another minute
or two and then try again. If it
starts to turn over, wait a few
seconds and then try again.
Once your car starts you can
disconnect the cables and close
the hood. Allowing your engine
to run for about thirty minutes,
or driving to your destination,
will recharge your battery and
you shouldn't have trouble start-
ing it again. However if you find
yourself stranded more than
once and cannot find evidence 6f
a light left on or other drain on
your battery's power, have your
battery checked by a technician.
It may need to be replaced.
Don't own a pair of jumper
cables? For around $30 you can
purchase a good set that store
conveniently in your trunk or
next to your spare tire. Even if
you never have to use them, yQ'u
are guaranteed to save the day
for one of your friends or neigh-
bors.

Change the
wiper blades
Depending on the area you
live in, having properly function-
ing windshield wipers can be
critical to safe driving. Getting
caught in the season's first rain-
storm with dry or brittle wiper
blades can happen to anyone.
Knowing how to change your
own wiper blades however can
get you quickly back on the road.
Again, reading your owner's
manual is key. Many models
have different size blades for
each window. Determine wlat
size blade you need and keep in
extra pair on hand at home. The
manual will also tell you how fo
remove the wiper blades aid
replace them.
Some models simply snap on
and off, blade and wiper all in
one unit. Others need to be
threaded across the length of the
blade and are more tedious. Just
because your manual calls out a
particular kind of wiper blade
doesn't megn that \ our cr don'tt
function \0'th a different'onhe
If your car has a %\\iper blade
that is difficult to change, ask at
the auto parts store if there are
compatible models. Often the
customer service technicians
there are able to help you find a
product that works just as well as
the dealer specification.
Whether your car is five days
or five years old, spending time
getting to know the ins and outs
of the owner's manual, practicing
some basic maintenance tech-
niques, and purchasing just a few
basic tools and supplies will
keep you safer and your car on
the road longer.


Tips keep cyclists safe


Whenever you ride always
wear your proper riding gear
which includes a helmet (DOT
approved or better),
eye protection (face shield,
goggles or shatter resistant full
coverage glasses), long sleeved
shirt or jacket, full fingered
gloves, long pants (denim or
leather), and over the ankle
boots or sturdy shoes with non
skid soles.
You'll be more comfortable,
safer and ultimately enjoy rid-
ing even more.
At night, be careful not to
override your motorcycle's
headlight.
And take extra care to be
seen by other drivers by wear-
ing reflective clothing and
using reflective tape and decals.
In addition to the pre-ride
inspection you should know
how to do minor maintenance
and service on your motorcy-
cle, especially important on
long rides and trips. Be sure to
read your owner's manual and
" follow the directions.
When \ ou brake, use both
brakes together.
Generally speaking, when
conditions are good, the front
brake accounts for as much as
2/3 of the bike's stopping
power. How much brake pres-
sure to use


depends on your abilities,
you bike's capabilities, and the
environment.
Slow down before going into
a curve. Look through the curve
and gently accelerate as you
enter and drive through the
curve. This gentle acceleration
creates stability but cannot be
accomplished without
the proper braking prior to
entering the curve.
Mud, sand water and other
foreign debris on the road take
special handling. Before reach-
ing a slippery surface, slow
down and avoid directional or
speed changes as you ride
through the hazard.
Remember that the first few
minutes of a rain storm are the
most dangerous as the water
mixes with the oil and fluids on
the roadway.
Avoid riding during this time,
if possible. If you must ride try
to ride in the tracks of the other
vehicles in front of you as they
force away the water and oils.
Standing on the pegs can
help you keep control of your
cycle when riding over obsta-
cles or rough surfaces.
Keep your knees and elbows
bent, look past the hazard in the
direction you want to go and
maintain a steady speed.
Always plan ahead - you


never know what kind of prob-
lems may be coming up. Know
what you'll have to do if you
suddenly skid, have a blowout,
or loose clutch or throttle con-
trol.
Riding with a passenger
makes balance and control of
your bike a great challenge.
Make sure your passenger is
wearing all of the proper riding
gear, knows where and how to
sit, where to put their feet and
hands and how to lean through
turns.
Tell them to look over your
shoulder in the direction of the
turn.
Remember that the passenger
is "your" responsibility and
should be properly educated,
prepared and ready to ride.
Never ride if you have con-
sumed any drugs, alcohol, pre-
scription, or otherwise.
Your best weapon on the
bike, your judgment, becomes
impaired and your ability to
reaction time is slowed.
When you. carry loads, be
sure to fasten them securely to
the motorcycle and keep the
heavier objects low and toward
the center of gravity of the bike.
Never secure loads where
they will affect your steering,
handling, or site of the road
ahead.


I


TUESDAY, SE.PTEMBFR 25, 2007:tD


CiTRus CouN-ry (Fl.) CHRoNicLE









4l TITET)AYV SEPTPMRFR 25 2007


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795-6800


_ 15.638


2006 PONTIAC SOLSTICE
4 CYL., 5 SPEED, AM/FM STEREO
& CD PLAYER, CHROME
WHEELS, LEATHER INT.
795-6800 *24,877


2008 PONTIAC VIBE
4 CYL., POWER WINDOWS,
POWER LOCKS, CRUISE
CONTROL, CD PLAYER.
795-6800 *1


9,002


1999 SATURN SL2
4 CYL, TWIN CAM, AUTOMATIC,
P/L, ADJUSTABLE LUMBAR
SEATS.
795-6800 '6,087


ONLY 25,000 MILES, SUNROOF,
LEATHER INTERIOR.
527-0129 '14.91


2007 SUZUKI LTZ 250 - ATV 2002 SUZUKI V-STROM
DIRECT DRIVE, MANUAL TRANS. GIVI BAGS, NEWTIRES, ASK FOR
ASK FOR ALLAN POPE ALLAN POPE
$0 DOWN, $49/MONTH WA.C. $0 DOWN, $49/MONTH WA.C.
564-2453 *2,988 564-2453 '4.688


ADVERTISE YOUR



CAR HERE


Its' hip to be


A wave of new vehicles is

straightening out the curves

for the sake of added utility


JIM GORZELANY
CTW Features

"Longer, lower, wider," is a
common.,automotive design dic-
tun with- flo ing -lines- and
gracfiil cures being the norm
among today's automobiles.
Yet a new generation of boxy-
yet-practical models is adopting
a taller, slab-sided approach to
maximize interior room and help
break the mold in a world of sim-
ilar-looking styling.
The Honda Element was one
of the first of the new wave of
boxes-on-\\heels ,,.when it
debuted for 2003 as a uniquely
str led alternate to convention-
al sport utility3 vehicles. The
Element continues to feature a
squared-off tall-roof design,'
dent-absorbing plastic body pan-
els, low step-in height and rear-
hinged "suicide" back doors. Its
rear seats flip to the side or fold
flat, to afford added cargo stor-
age, and a long list of tailgating-
oriented accessories are avail-
able.
Best of all. if you spill any-
, thing, the Element's urethane-
cbated cargo and passenger-
compartment floors simply can
be hosed off.
It was followed to market a
year later by the unabashedly
boxy Scion xB, which is sold by
Toyota's youth-oriented divi-


sion.
Offering hip small cars to
attract buyers who otherwise
wouldn't consider a Camry or
Corolla, Scion boasts the
youngest -owner body in the
industry, though the cars also are
popular among some older driv-
ers who simply prefer compact
vehicles that neither look nor
feel cheap.
Just released for an early-2008
makeover, the second-generation
Scion xB takes on a more-mus-
cular - and menacing - appear-
ance than before, and rides on a
longer wheelbase with larger
wheels and tires for enhanced
handling.
Its new 2.4-liter four-cylinder
engine generates a stronger 158
horsepower; buyers can choose
either a five-speed manual gear-
box or, for the first time, a four-
speed sequential-shift automatic
that can be operated manually. A
generous assortment of standard
features includes vehicle stabili-
ty control, front-side and side-
curtain airbags, keyless entry
and a premium audio system
with full iPod integration. As
before, myriad accessories
afford ultimate customization.
The Jeep Wrangler remains
the modern-day descendant of
the original military-derived
SUV, and though it's been com-
pletely redesigned for 2007, it


THE
FORD
FLEX


remains as boxy as ever.
Brand-new, four-door, long-
wheelbase Wrangler Unlimited
models have fast become a sales
success. Wider and roomier, the
redesigned version nonetheless
retains the classic Jeep styling
cues, including a seven-slot front
grille, round headlamps and an
upright rectangular windshield.
Multiple window and door con-


figurations are available, and
buyers can specify either a soft
top or a novel three-panel
removable roof for open-air
enjoyment.
The Wrangler comes powered
by an all-new, 202-horsepower,
3.8-liter V6 engine that can be
mated to either a six-speed man-
ual transmission or a four-speed
automatic.


Riding on a more-rigid struc-
ture with a smoother ride than
before, a choice of two different
offroad 4x4 systems are offered;
stability control with an
Electronic Roll Mitigation func-
tion help keep the Wrangler on
track while on the pavement, as
well.
Side-impact airbags are
optional for added safety, as is a
new satellite navigation system
for the directionally challenged.
A minivan is the ultimate boxy
vehicle, and the original people
mover - the Dodge
Caravan - will be
recast for 2008 as
what the automaker Thi
calls a "family room inside
on wheels."
Coming wrapped box i
in fresh-yet-familiar latest
styling, with a
choice of three six-
cylinder powertrains
and a wealth of safe-
ty-minded technology, the
Caravan - along with its corpo-
rate cousin, the Chrysler Town &
Country - promises an unprece-
dented array of family-friendly
features.
Primary among them will be
what the automaker calls its
Swivel 'n Go seating. Here, the
second-row seats can pivot 180
degrees to face the third row,
with a removable table that
installs between them for play-
ing card or board games.
Other noteworthy additions
include pinpoint LED reading
lights, a dual DVD system that
can play different media at the
same time, real-time traffic and
navigation, iPod-like hard-drive
media storage, anti-stain/anti-


odor cloth seats and a built-in,
110-volt power inverter.
The Caravan and Town &
Country will also debut the new
Sirius Backseat TV system that.
delivers three channels of satel-:
lite-beamed kids' programming
for in-vehicle use.
While Ford is discontinuing its
Freestar minivan, it will be
replacing it with the stylish new
Ford Flex early next year as a
2009 model.
A crisply rectangular alterna-
tive to either a minivan or
crossover SUV, the
Flex will likewise
feature multi-con-
iking figuration seven-
e the passenger seating,
and add its own
s the assortment of accou-
trend trements.
These will range.
from an interior
refrigerator that can,
keep up to seven 12-
ounce cans or four half-liter bot-
tles cool, to footrests for the sec-
ond-row seats, an expansive
multi-panel sunroof, a voice-
activated communications and
entertainment system that
includes onboard storage for
2,300 songs and seven-color pro-
grammable ambient "mood"
lighting.
The Flex will come powered
by a 3.5-liter V6 engine that
drives the front wheels via a
sophisticated six-speed automat-
ic transmission.
A host of safety features will
include stability control with
Roll Stability Control, a rear
back-up camera and front-side
and side-curtain airbags.
� CTW Features


10


,I


p-


n
jo
h,


L '--.


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2007 5D


CerRUS COUNTY (FL E


k.


Amam.


anc4m










SD TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2007


CAR * BOAT * TRUCK * RV * CAR * BOAT * TRUCK * RV 0


I '- Bri ht-N-Shiney i


< Motile. 'etaili.ta 0




10%OFF

with ad


S(352) 344-0320 >

Talk to your friends and co-workers ":
Quantity Discounts Available o
7,2�, Basic Service Starting at $25.00 -
CAR * BOAT * TRUCK * RV * CAR * BOAT * TRUCK * RV


endar, but a new crop of
2008 cars and trucks
already is being harvested
nad shipped to dealerships.
These range from the most fuel-
efficient, full-sized sport utility
vehicles on the road to the quick-
est sport models, poshest luxury
cars and everything in between.
Here's a quick look at a few of
the models that are new or
redesigned for 2008:
0 Cadillac CTS. Updated with
added style and substance, the
midsize CTS luxury sedan offers
bolder exterior styling, with a
richer interior that's trimmed in
hand-cut and sewn leather sur-
faces. A new 3.6-liter V6 power
plant generates 304 horsepower
and can be mated to either a six-
speed manual or a six-speed
automatic transmission. All-
wheel-drive is newly available,
as is an array of high-tech
amenities that includes a USB
port for connecting digital music
devices to the audio system.
* Chevrolet Tahoe Hybrid.
"Along with its GMC equivalent,,
the Yukon, the full-size Tahoe
Hybrid SUV packs an all-new
hybrid drive system that promis-
es a 25 percent fuel-economy
boost (about 21 city/highway
mpg). A 320-horsepower 5.3-
liter V8 is the primary source of
power, and the Tahoe can oper-
ate solely on, or in any combina-
tion of, electric and gasoline
power. For added efficiency the
engine deactivates half of its
cylinders when not otherwise
needed. The same technology
also will be offered in the 2008
Chrysler Aspen Hybrid and
Dodge Durango Hybrid SUVs.
* Dodge Viper SRT10. Now
pumped with 600 raging horse-
power, the revamped 2008
Dodge Viper SRT10 is muscular
-to the extreme. A re-engineered
-8.4-liter, aluminum-block V10
:engine is able to rocket the two-
-seater to 60 mph in less than four
:.seconds. While the overall look
.upgrades reside below the sheet
:metal, which include a new six-
:speed gearbox, upgraded brakes
-and a speed-sensing, limited-slip
-differential. Again offered in
:both closed coupe and open-air
-,oadster models, a race-bred
:Tully independent four-wheel
suspension helps the car hold the
:corners tenaciously.
0 Jeep Liberty. The redesigned
"midsize Liberty SUV offers a
-fresh. appearance, added cargo
-available industry-first Sky


NISSAN ROGUE
Slider full-length canvas roof
that affords a convertible-like
effect. A 210-horsepower V6
engine is standard with a choice
of a five-speed manual or four-
speed automatic transmission
and two separate four-wheel-
drive systems. Side-curtain air
bags, Electronic Stability
Program, Electronic Roll
Mitigation, all-speed Traction
Control, and anti-lock brakes are
all standard; an optional MyGig
navigation/entertainment system
includes a 20-gigabyte hard
drive for storing digital audio
files, movies and photos.
* Nissan Rogue. The automak-
er's first entry into the compact
crossover SUV market, the
Rogue is both stylish and practi-
cal. A 2.5-liter four-cylinder
engine teams with a gearless
CVT transmission for good
economy and power. Vehicle
Dynamic Control with Traction
Control, four-wheel antilock
disc brakes and both front- and
side-curtain airbags are included
for safety's sake. Interesting
touches include a fold-flat pas-
senger's seat to accommodate
long cargo items, an oversized
glove box, dual-level center con-
sole and an available one-touch.
foldable cargo organizer.
* Saab 9-3. Redesigned ver-
sions of this midsize Swedish
delight offer more-assertive
styling and added amenities.
Available in sedan, station
wagon and convertible versions,
the new 9-3 offers a choice of
turbocharged engines: a 2.0-liter
210-horsepower four-cylinder or
a 2.8-liter 255-horsepower V6. A
five-speed manual transmission
is standard, with a five-speed
automatic available with the
base version and a six-speed ver-
sion offered with the V6-pow-
ered Aero.
E Toyota Highlander. The latest
generation of the midsize
Highlander SUV is larger,
roomier and more powerful than
before, with added refinement. A
new 3.5-liter V6 engine gener-
ates a strong 270 horsepower
and is mated to a five-speed
automatic transmission.
Meanwhile, a hybrid version
packs a 3.3-liter V6 engine and
an electric motor/generator to
produce the equivalent of 270
horsepower, yet boasts 31-
city/27-highway mpg. No less
than seven airbags are included,
as are center-row captain's
chairs, which can be easily con-
verted into a three-passenger
bench seat.
* Volvo XC70. Highlighted by


burly SUV-like styling cues, the
XC70 station wagon comes
powered by a 3.2-liter inline six-
cylinder engine, and offers just
about every safe feature in the
industry. These include a colli-
sion warning system, adaptive
headlamps that pivot to light the
way through curves and the first-
ever height-adjustable built-in
child booster seat.
� CTW Features


1 *Choicle


11q
'1g..~' ~.-


In Print

and

Online


All
rolI rr.


-. i r li ZrP~
a .~. - -* , -The-.T'


YAMAHA
'96 Wave Venture, 3
seat, low hrs. Exc. cond.
Lk Nw trir new batt/cvr.


AINRBUA 16'
Panther, Alum. w/trlr.
New prop & motor.
$5,500
(352) 489-3440
COMPAC 16
Sailboat, new bottom
paint, complete rigg-
ing. extras, dinghy, trir.
great starter boat,
$2,500. (352) 563-1327
(352) 795-0678
GRADY '89
24' Offshore. 2000-225
Yamaha, trailer. Exc.
$18,000
352-628-3551/302-7816
LOWE
17' Bass Boat/Trailer
50HP Yamaha engine
$6500. (352) 795-9873
NITRO 18'
1994, 150 Mercury
w/Trailer. Ready to fish
$6,500 OBO
(352) 465-7209
POLAR 2300
2005. Twin 150 Yamaha
4 strk, all electronics,
$43.000
(352) 302-2240
Pontoon Boat
18 ft. Crestllner Sport,
refurbished in '07, 40HP
Honda, live well, GPS,
Dep. find. port a pottie,
VFH Radio & more.
Will send picture by
email. (352) 382-4909


Your world first.
Everv Dayv

CH NIC i
0,1,7;. *ii


PROLINE
'04, 24 ft., 225 Honda,
Donzl Hull, black, low hrs.
lift kept, NICE $32,000.
(352) 795-1598


-g a


FOUR WINDS 31'
'04, Slide out, levellers,
backup cam, V-10 Ford
No smk/Pets. Loaded
$40K (352) 422-7794
GULF STREAM '04
Ford BT Cruiser, 28' Tow
pkg. 13K ml 1 slide, walk
arnd qn. bd. very clean
$44,000. (352) 344-5634
THOR Windsport
'00,31 FT., V10 Ford,
like new, no pets, no
smoke, 16k ml. $28,000.
(352) 621-1655



PALOMINO PONY
Pop-Up. Sleeps 5,frig.,
AC, stove for Inside/
outside. Good Cond.
$3,000(352)746-0839



ACCENT -HYUNDAI
1999, AC, AM/FM Cass.
5spd. well maint. Gas
saver, 35/45mph. $1900
obo. (352) 860-2517
ACURA MDX '04
Sport w/ navigation,
59K ml. Exc. cond.
Garage kept. $24,800
352-746-7402, Iv msg.
SLL SAVE AUTO
AFFORDABLE CARS
100+ Clean
Dependable Cars
FROM $450- DOWN
30 MIN. E-Z CREDIT
I 1675 US HWY 19
| HOMOSASSA
352-563-2003
L-- J-- m il


CADILLAC
'97 Sedan Deville,
signature series, 25mpg,
north star, beautiful
dependable 90k mi.
$4,700. (352) 795-7876
FORD
2005 Taurus, 21K mi.,
Like Newl Sunroof,
$11,000 Citrus Hills.
(352) 746-1321
HONDA ACCORD
'99, EXL, 6 cyl,. very low
miles. Pristine Cond.
$11,000 (352) 634-5665
INFINITY G35 '06
Coupe, 10K ml. Blue/
creme, beautiful &
perfect $30,800
(352) 860-1239

I-- - .... -


MERCEDES'
1987, 560 SL, 126K,
White, Both tops,
New tires, $10,500
352-586-6805/
S382-1204 m .A
MITSUBISHI
'90, Mirage, cold AC,
49K mi, New tires. A-1
Cond. 40+ MPG $2.500
(352) 344-9141
OLDS AURORA
2001, V-6 Sedan, 48K,
Exc. Cond. Leather,
Dual Pwr Seats/Wndws/
Drs.. Radio/Cass./CD,
Chrome Wheels,
Pearl White. $10,995
(352) 746-2001
SATURN
'99, 4Dr. 5 spd., w/
complete, BlueOx tow
set up, leather cover.
71k, $3,500, 746-5477
TOYOTA
'98, Camry LE, 146K,
Hwy. mi., 1 own., SpIr.,
Grn./Slvr. ext., Lth. Int.
Ally whis, Great Cond.
$3,200. (352) 794-0054


24ft. Proline
S10 Pick Up,
Race Car
(352) 621-3420
CHEVY
'84, Stepside, Many
new parts, V-8, A/T, AC
$4,500 (352) 447-0909
CHEVY EL CAMINO
'65 $8,500. worked 350,
turbo 350 tranny. Needs
some finishing touches.
352-489-8633
DODGE
1965 Dart 440 6pack,
500 HP, auto trans.
Tubbed rear, way too
much to list, $13,500.
Must seel Will trade
(603) 860-6660
DODGE
'71, Dart Swinger, 6 cyl.
auto, daily driver $2,950
obo (352) 447-3842
(352) 978-0658
FORD
'64, Galaxy. 4 DR, all
original, runs good,
$4,500. (352) 344-8401,
Cell (352) 476-4496
MERCEDES 1984
380SL, 69K orig. mi. 2
tops w/stand, garage
kept. $13,500
(352) 302-5698
MG MIDGET
1978, mint, low mile-
age, red, All Original
$7500, OBO.
(352) 302-5321/John



CHEVY
'96,S 510, LS, PU,
ext. cab, 84k mi.,
call for particulars
352-476-3355
CHEVY
'97, 1500 Silverado, 3 dr.
fiberglass bdcvr.,, 120K,
auto, power windows.
$4,400 (352) 795-5735


DODGE
'01 Dakota, LST 4X4
Quad cab. exc. cond.
59,000 ml. too many ex-
tras to llsti $12,500/obo
(352) 795-4410
DODGE
Dakota '96, Std. cab.
Topper, 128K. gd. cond.
Nice bodyl $2,700/obo
(352) 527-4590
F-150 XLT '97
Super Cab, 4wd, auto,
exc. cond. $7,495.
(352) 302-3048
FORD
'04, HD 4 WD, crew
cab, Duramax diesel,
94k mi., $21,000. firm
(352) 634-2462
FORD
'90, F250, 4 X 4, 302,
V8, cold AC, gronnylow
4 spd, $2,500. obo
(352) 560-7324 aft. 3pm
FORD
'99 E-350 Box Truck
AC. Ramp. $4,000 obo
352-341-4848/400-1327
NISSAN
'03, Frontier, 43k mi.,
stereo, CD, tinted win.,
tow pkg. alarm, $14,500
(352) 257-1173
NISSAN
Frontier XE '04, Ext. Cab,
auto, cruise, I Owner,
Exc, Cond.
$9,500 (352) 302-7073



CHEVY Blazer Sl 0
'88,4.3, Low miles, A/C
Sr. owned, very sharp.
$2,700.00 (352)
465-0721
FORD
'97 Explorer Sport. 2 dr.
V-6, Auto, All Pwr., AC,
$3,495
(352) 382-7632
FORD EXPLORER
'97 XLT, V-8, 129K mi.,
Exc. Cond. $4,000 obo
(352) 563-2399


TOYOTA Highlander :
'05 Limited. Wht, 10K,';.
Loaded, warr. Exc. New:
$36K Now $24K Firm
352-341-4313/212-0615,




DODGE 1500
'97 Magnum, Ext. Cab,
5.9 L, Loaded! After
mkt. Chrome.
$7.500firm352-422-7279
DODGE
'98 Ram1500. Ext. Cab.
V-8, topper. 100K. 1
owner. Well maint'd.
$6,990 (352) 302-5698



DODGE
'88 Ext, Van, Just Tuned
Up, Rear Brakes, new
tires. Asking $2,000obo
352-341-4848/400-1327
FORD WINDSTAR
2000 SEL. All options!
Leather Interior
$2,500 firm
(352) 257-1864



DAELIM
ROADWIN 2005 125CC
Great starter street.
bike. Low mi. Clear title,
$2200/obo 352-628-7442
HARLEY CHOPPER
Will Turn Heads! '71 Old
School Iron Head
Springer. All redone!
A steal @ $5,500
352-308-2570/586-1917
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'07, Heritage Softail, 18
mo. left on warr. Low
miles. Exc. cond.
$16,900
(352) 560-7168


HONDA
'98 Shadow 1100. Amer-
ican Classic Edition
Tourer, New tires, $5,000
Loaded. (352) 344-3598
HONDA SHADOW
*06, 750,2,600 Ml.,
Gray Flame, CB, BR.
Like Newl $5,000
Ed. (352) 465-1124
KAWASAKI '04
Vulcan. 2000cc, mint
cond. Many extras.
$8,500/obo
352-628-7403
Scooter
New 150CC, ;
Road Legal,.
Call (352) 201-6008
S'850-242-9343
SZUKI
'05, S83':1400 CC,
.*no ;. Foll ,-' 3.-)" e
", *^.r, d u r., ../,
.r,,j 1 '.rsl S5,000:
takes all 345,-3.82-04n3*
SUZUKI
2003 Burgman 400
Scooter. Royal blue'f
14.900+mi. $3900
(352) 419-0053
YAMAHA
'02, Warrir., 1700 CC
4,900 ml., .
Uke NewI $6,900
(352) 726-6128
YAMAHA I
'04, V Star 650, Siverao
windshield, saftlebae
many extras, like net,
2,060 ml. $4,795. iA
(352) 422-4335 g
YAMAHA
'05, Roadstar Silverd
650 CC, 7,400 mi.,l
Like New! $4,900 .
'..(352):726'6128 -.f#


563m5966


w-


Ct'nuis Coumy (M.) CHRONICLE





TUESDAY, S FIrrrIMIWi 25, 2007 7D


SUZUKI

SUMMER
SELL-DOWN
D 8 w8
in...%


'All pamerns based on4S2DOO cash at trade eguf4 i Wan. pius Lax 1394 liiia1110 SQq Weater ff*e must qualh mfom orpcliImw (rxominei losifoall rebates and lncernthes to dealer Cu~l'2nt m QW1 ur ulfv fo all relales and
nlncerihes Indud~n iiffmir n wIcqe grad and Ln'.iriplirm tionrs di~trull tr-i [Droon 9 financing 0w1 �dtcl anis~rh %Usrrirotd ULMII $I.(*) linmr1- u~ilaiilet: mA ~require %ub~ian1Iaiditmalpasmrm nlandclar wiur 'bawd
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CITRUS CoNnTY (FL) CHRONICLE_'


AMERICAS #1 WARRANTY
100,000 MILES/7 YR * NO DEDUCTIBLE * FULLY TRANSFERABLE






SD TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2007


-UM


w -M

CASH *

DOWN


AMBCAN RELTION

ftUPM N


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i 1i Starting at i4Ji --I wp


HMr BUS: SMILVIEK RAJL0O
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Im\&?AL :RArJL


Startling at .... 63,7 0 Starting at 20 3 eV flfl
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Starting at a.
*Prices/payments include a factory rebates and incentives, 6% tax, tag transfer, title, dealer fee (399.50) and dealer ads plus 20% down (Cash or trade equity). Payments are based on 7.54% APR @ 84 months. WA.C.'
Not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. 0% down with approved credit. cOn select models and years. W.A.C.


CRYSTAL PRE-OWNED


-Open 24 hours a day at
www~crystgiautos.comI


I Free ARFAX
Vehicle History


- /
-J


2006 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER
3836P
$10,983t



2005 DODGE STRATUS SXT
3835P
$12,988t


2005 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER
J70054A
$11,276t


2005 FORD EXPLORER
B70303F
$13,298t
I I.^^ j,. .


2004 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER 2004 NISSAN SENTRA
B70294A 3834P
$11,888t *11,981 t


2006 MITSUBISHI RAIDER LS 2006 DODGE CARAVAN SXT
B70452A J70099A
$13,588t $14,921t
n^ a < ^-A-a


2005 DODGE RAM 1500 REG CAB
B70465A
$12,231t


2006 NISSAN SENTRA 1.8 S
B70318A
$12,867t
3cip-"AW -iI


2006 FORD CROWN VICTORIA LX 2007 DODGE CALIBER SE
3724A 3632A
$14,988t s15,288t
h^^jM~A~rP


2006 FORD F150 REG CAB
D0368C
$12,965t
rai~tjjUL.^fc- --3e-.


2007 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER
B60800c
$15,948t


2005 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING 2003 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB 2005 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
B70266A B70067A 3775A
$15,987t s17,821t $17,982t


2005 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB 2003 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB 2007 DODGE MAGNUM SXT 2007 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY
B60699A 3802A J70187A 3817P
$18,978t $18,988t s$19,438t $19,821t


2008 DODGE AVENGER
3832P
$20,421t


2006 CHRYSLER 300
J70430A
$21,988t


2006 CHRYSLER 300
B70407A
*21,988t


2007 JEEP WRANGLER X
3784L
$22,188t


2004 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD 4X4
B70275A
$22,467t


2006 CHRYSLER 300C HEMI
B70427A
$27,321t


2006 CHRYSLER 300C HEMI
B601468 '... -!-.
$27,321t


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Homosassa, FL


Iv(


Open 24 hours a day at
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Vehicle History


(866) 434-3065

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CrORus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Starting at


Starting at I
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- . I








14 rRUS~ LOUNTYI (FL) C E~~'~


CHRO1N -CL


SECTION 2


Is there anything



that could have



saved Malcolm



Bricklin's dream?


alcolm Gunn
* abase Communications

fiberglass-bodied
hatchback with a
burbling V8,
pop-up head-
lights and "gull-
wing" doors sounds like a high-
performance exotic that can't
miss.
However, the car in question
is the Bricklin SV-1, a quirky,
yet affordable-for-the-time
Canadian-built coupe that last-
ed less than two years before
disappearing under a deluge of
debt and disappointment.
Much has been said and writ-
ten about just how big a failure


the Bricklin
turned out to be. But the
idea behind this GT-style sports
car was actually ahead-of-its-
time brilliant. It was in the exe-
cution that things went awry.
Malcolm' Bricklin conceived
his namesake in the early 1970s
as an inexpensive two-seater
that could withstand significant
collision damage and protect its
passengers in cocoon-like safe-
ty (the model designation SV-1
stood for Safety Vehicle 1). The
front and rear bumpers were
built to absorb a 10 m.p.h.
whack without hurting the
fiberglass body and the bolt-on
body panels hid a protective
safety cage with side guard rails


FBI NCE LIN ES
BRICKLIN SV- 1


that were built to withstand
rollovers and side impacts.
Some of these features are con-
sidered normal today, but they
were ground-breaking 30 years
ago.
Bricklin, a former building-
supply chain-store mogul and
North America's first Subaru
importer, was actually on to
something with his concept.
The Bricklin SV-1 made its


public debut on June 25, 1974
in New York City, with produc-
tion beginning shortly after.
Along with its safety fea-
tures, the Bricklin's skin was
made using an advanced vacu-
um-forming process that mixed
the paint into the gel-coat in
much the same way boats and
personal watercraft are made.
The body was then bolted to a
steel frame that could be easily


detached for quick repairs, if
necessar...
For the sake of simplicity,
Bricklhns %ere only available in
five exterior shades: red;
orange: green; white; and tan,
all using the 'safety' prefix. An
eight-inch-w ide black strip was
painted along the bottom of the
doors and fenders, supposedly
to make the car appear lower
and to hide stone chips and
'assorted road grime.
Inside its electrically operat-
ing s\\ing-up doors, the only
trim color to be found was
beige.
The Bricklin was actually
similar to the Chevrolet
Corxerte in most key, dimen-
sions and, with its rear hatch-
back, promised greater practi-
cality compared to the stowage-
star ed plastic Chevy.
EBen before the Bricklin
entered production, enthusiast
publications began gushing
over the car. One popular auto-
motix e magazine proudly trum-
peted that "...Bricklin will have
no trouble selling all the cars
than he can build..." and went
on to refer to it as "a tangible
threat to the Corvette."
First-Near 1974 cars, 780 in
total, used a 220-horsepower
360-cubic inch V8 and related
automatic transmission and sus-
pension components supplied
by American Motors
Corporation (an available four-
speed gearbox, however, came
from Chrysler). The 2,117 '75
SV-Is came with Ford's 351-
cube Windsor V8 that generated
.175 horses and used that com-
pany's automatic transmission.
Regardless of powerplant, all
Bricklins were fully equipped
with air conditioning, tilt steer-
ing wheel, AM/FM stereo
radio, digital clock, tinted glass,
front disc brakes and alloy
wheels. The only key item lack-
ing was a spare tire, a potential
disaster well before run-flat tire
technology and cellular phones
had been invented.
The actual production vol-
umes were nowhere near


Malcolm Bricklin's pie-in-the-
sky plans of 12,000 units to be
built in the first year, 30,000 in
the second, 50,000 in the third
and 100,000 by the end of
1977.
Problems immediately sur-
faced when the first batch of
cars arrived at dealer show-
rooms. Most had second-rate
door and hood-panel fit, miss-
ing weatherstripping, electrical
problems and a host of other
glitches. What was to be a lead-
ing-edge Grand Touring
machine seemed more like a
poorly constructed kit car.
Price also became a bone of
contention. Originally, dealers
were told that each Bricklin
would sticker for around
$6,500, $2,000 below the
Corvette. But the final list was
closer to $10,000, further
negating the SV-l's competitive
edge.
The Bricklin plant teetered
along until September of 1975.
By that time, the tiny Canadian
province of New Brunswick,
which had sunk millions of dol-
lars into the project, finally had
enough. Funding was cut off,
the company placed into
receivership and hundreds of
employees were suddenly out
of work.
Some Bricklin die-hards
argue that, with a bit more time
to get its act together, the car
could have become a financial
success. That's doubtful, since
there never was, nor will there
ever likely be, a high demand
for the kind of two-seat fun-
mobiles that Malcolm Bricklin
envisioned.
Its safety legacy lives on, but
lacking sufficient quality, prac-
ticality and the necessary price-
point advantage, the Bricklin
dream was destined to become
a nightmare.

1i Malcolm Gunn is
Wheelbase Communications'
chief road tester and historic
writer. Wheelbase is a world-
wide supplier of automobile
news, reviews and features.


111 [ Ad, -4 i- .ix03iJi[g l f!1:14141~i-l *7II NIPA-


Tui�sDAY, SrPTEmBFR 25, 2007 9D


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER )2, .UU / J..



RV 1010: Half of all RV owners may not have the right insurance


(BUSINESS WIRE)--If you
bought a tractor-trailer or an air-
plane, you probably wouldn't put
either on your car insurance pol-
icy, since both are specialty vehi-
cles and require specialized cov-
erages and claims handling,
right?
Then why, when asked, do
more than half of RVers sur-
veyed report having added their
RV to their car insurance policy?
"We don't know why, but we
do know why they shouldn't,"
said Cathy Pelfrey, RV product
manager, The Progressive Group
of Insurance Companies, a lead-
ing seller of RV insurance in the
U.S. "There are vast differences
in coverage and services avail-
able from companies that spe-
cialize in recreational vehicle
insurance that RV owners need
to be aware of - we recommend
they check with a local inde-
pendent insurance agent or do
research online to find out what's
available so they can make the
decisions that are right for


them."
For example, what if...
Your RV breaks down on a
trip?
While a lot of car insurance
policies offer Roadside
Assistance, your policy may not
offer it for your RV. And, even if
it covers some roadside expenses
for RVs, it may not cover them
all. For instance, it may pay for
towing but only up to the amount
it would typically cost to tow a
car; RV tows can cost three times
more, which means out-of-pock-
et expenses you'll be responsible
for paying.
Specialty insurers will gener-
ally also offer "emergency
expense" coverage that will pay
for temporary living quarters if
the RV breaks down far from
home. This kind of coverage will
also generally cover the cost to
return an RV home from a wreck
or breakdown that happens more
than 50 miles from home.
Your RV is stolen or totaled?
Your auto policy will likely


pay Actual Cash Value (ACV)
for your RV-that's the market
value as determined by third-
party sources. However, most
specialty insurers will offer you
a choice of how you'd like this
kind of claim handled. Some will
offer you the choice of an agreed
value settlement, that is, you and
the insurance company agree, up
front, what the RV is worth. If
the RV is stolen or totaled, that's
the amount you'll receive, less
whatever deductible you chose
when you bought the policy.
Specialty insurers may also offer
you Total Loss Replacement
coverage that will provide you
with a new RV in the event your
RV that's five years old or less is
stolen or totaled.
Your RV is involved in a
crash?
Your auto insurance company
will typically have someone who
normally handles car insurance
claims come look at your RV.
But, if you insure your RV with a
specialty insurer, your claims rep


will be trained in how to look for
damage and estimate what it will
cost to repair. Specialty RV
insurers also work with repair
facilities that know how to repair
an RV and guarantee their work.
The stuff in your RV is stolen?
You may keep things inside
your RV that you never would in
your car, like jewelry, binocu-
lars, VCRs, laptops, camcorders
or outdoor gear. Your auto policy
won't pay to replace these items
if they're lost, stolen or damaged
but specialty insurers offer "per-
sonal effects" coverage that will
pay to replace them if they're
used in conjunction with your
RV.
Someone gets injured at your
campsite?
When you park your RV at a
campsite, you may be liable for
the area around your RV. This
means that if someone trips and
falls you could be responsible
for their injuries, which general-
ly won't be covered by your car
insurance policy. If you insure


your RV with a specialty insurer,
injuries can be paid for under
Vacation Liability coverage,
which pays up to the limits that
you selected when you bought


the policy for injuries you're
legally responsible for as a result
of an accident that occurs while
the RV is being used as a tempo-
rary vacation residence.


Motorhome, travel trailer, fifth wheel, pickup camper or park model?


Modem RVs are as varied as
the RVers who own them. But one
thing is for sure, there is no right
or wrong choice. Each type KXV
"has features that are attractive to
some RVers,.,and less attractive to'
oteh [It's really not a matter of a
1ow - is bener than a motor-
ized. or \'ice %ersa, rather, it's a
nianticr ,0o \hat'\ill fit best \ith
3our RVing lifestyle..
Below you will find descrip-
tions of the various RV types both
motorized or towable. Within
each of these main categories
you'll then find subcategories.
MOTORIZED RVs


driving
Disadvantages:
- Most owners find it too cum-
bersome to drive the motor home
for shopping, sightseeing or run-
ning errands. So. many owners
tow a small car.
- Can't back up while towing
most cars.
- Fewer places to get engine
\\ ork done.
Size: 21 to 45 feet.
Cost: Prices range from
$50,000 to $500,000, with an
average retail value of $117,500.
Class B Camper Van
The van camper is defined as a


To be considered a motor home panel type truck to which the RV . - -
a unit must provide at least four manufacturer adds any.two of the - .
of the following permanently following conveniences: sleep- -
installed living systems: cooking, ing, kitchen and toilet facilities, Disadvantages:
refrigeration or ice box, self-con- 100-volt hookup, fresh water - Tend to be smaller with lower
trained toilet, heating or air condi- storage, city water hookup, and a GVRWs.
tioning, a portable water system top extension to provide more - Smaller and fewer cargo com-
including water tank, faucet and headroom. apartments.
sink, separate 100-125 volt elec- Advantages: Size: 20 to 32 feet
trical system, sleeping facilities - Retains the versatility of a Cost: Prices range from
and LP gas supply. large family car or SUV but pro- $45,000 to $75,000, with an aver-
Except for its larger size and vide many of the self-contained age retail value of $56,770.
longer stopping distance, a motor motor home attributes as it's big- TOWABLE RVs
home responds much like a car ger brothers. Recrational Trailers are
and learning itol e oe 4 ad antages: ..desgned io be tloed bv a motor-
ea,\ to most., *' ""- i-mall size ard relative high ized vehicle. and v.hichgs of a
Class A Motpr Home cost. You can often buy a larger size ihat does not require-a special
SlaW motor homes- can be Class C for the same price. high'aa permit, h is designed to
detindda..an R\, that is built on. Size: 16 to 21 feet pros ide temporary li\ ing quarters
or as n .jbteral part of, a self- Cost: Prices range from for recreation, campingand travel
propellftnimotorized chassis: The $35,000 to $65,000, with an aver- use, and does not require perma-
conventional Class A is one age retail value of $56,520. nent on-site hookup. The catego-
whose living unit has been entire- Class C Motor Home ry is broken down into the fol-
ly constructed on a bare, special- Class C motor homes, often lowing:
ly designed motor vehicle chas- referred to as mini motor homes, Fifth Wheel trailers
sis. are defined as RVs that are built These units can be recognized
Bus conversions are motor on, or as an integral part of, a self- by a raised forward section. The
homes built from intercity buses. propelled motorized chassis. fifth wheel trailer's raised neck
They tend to be the most expen- But what differentiates the section, sometimes called a
sive motor homes since the cost Class C from the Class A is the gooseneck, rides over the bed of
of the bus is included in the total unit's attached cab section. On the the tow vehicle where it connects
price. Class C, the RV manufacturer to the special fifth-wheel hitch.
Bus-styled motor homes look completes the body section con- This overlap reduces the overall
like bus conversions, but are built training the living area and attach- length of the two vehicles.
on a conventional Class A chassis es it to the cab section. Having the trailer tongue weight
and are therefore less expensive. Advantages: over the rear axle of the tuck con-
Advantages: - Class Cs offer most of the tributes to improved traction and
- Relative ease of driving same comforts, conveniences and handling.
- Does not require a second even living spaces as their larger Advantages:
vehicle Class A counterparts - Better handling than conven-
- Single level floor plan - Generally less expensive than tional trailer.
- can use the living space while a class A - Over all length of trailer and


truck combo is shorter for the
same trailer length.
- The raised gooseneck section
allows for a large storage area
designed underneath the raised
part of the floor.
Disadvantages:
- Higher profile than conven-
tional trailer
- Fifth wheel hitch limits use of
truck bed.
- Spin letel tloor.plani ..
- Can't be to, edb3 car 'or ans
Size: 21 to 40 feet.
.Cost: Prices range from
$12,800 to $97,000, with an aver-
age retail value of $23.790.
Conventional Travel Trailers
Typically, the conventional
travel trailer, also called travel
trailer, ranges from 15 to 35 feet
in length and is towed by means
of a bumper or frame-mounted
hitch attached to the rear of a tow-
ing vehicle.
Advantages:
- Single level floor plan which
is desirable to many RVers.
- Lower profile than fifth wheel
trailers.
- If towed by pickup allows use
of truck box.
- Can be towed by a car or van.
Disadvantages:
- The larger the trailer, the more
sway and handling becomes a
problem.
- Somewhat more difficult to
hitch than fifth wheel type trail-


ers.
Size: 12 to 35 feet.
Cost: Prices range from $9,500
to $63,000, with an average retail
value of $14,700.
Pop Up Trailers
Pop-up trailers also called
camping trailers or tent trailers
have collapsible walls made of
canvas or fiberglass. Today's
models provide many of the
amenities found in other RVs.
Galleys provide sinks, multi-
burner stoves, and both ice boxes
or refrigerators. Holding tanks are
sometimes available but are usu-
ally small. Sleeping facilities can
accommodate up to eight people.
These trailers tow as small low
profile units but expand into
roomy accommodations upon
reaching the campsite. Once
erected, they can extend to twen-
ty feet in length; depending on the
model.
Advantages:
- Low profile and light weight
saves on gasoline, provides
greater stability when towing, and
decreases buffeting by wind and
passing vehicles.
- Sleeps up to eight, people
"(depending oh model) ? . :.
-.- Combines the .experience of
open-air tent camping with the
comforts, conveniences, and
weather protection found in other
RVs
Disadvantages:
- Necessity to set up and take
down the tent.
- Often require using the bath-
room facilities at the RV park or
campground although some mod-
els do offer a shower and/or bath-
room.
- Small holding tanks if any.
Size: 15 to 23 feet (when
opened) 8 to 15 feet (when
closed)
Cost: Prices range from $3,600
to $11,600. The average retail
value of a folding camping trailer
is $5,230.
Park Models
Park Model trailers while tech-
nically recreational vehicles are
used primarily as destination
camping units rather than travel-


ing camping units and are not
generally self-contained. When
set up, park models are connected
to the utilities necessary to oper-
ate home style fixtures and appli-
ances.
At one time, these trailers qual-
ified as eight-foot-wide RVs.
They were normally pulled infre-
quently, usually to and from an
owner's summer and winter
haunts. Now, with some excep-
tions, they have evolved into
miniature mobile homes, some-
times 12 feet in width. And are
never moved once set up.
Park models are popular with
people who return to the same
place for the season year after
year.
Advantages:
- More space than typical RVs
and a more home-like feel.
- Home style appliances, fix-
tures and furniture.
Disadvantages:
- Ladk of mobility.
- Not usually self contained.
Pickup Campers
Pickup campers, also called
slide-on campers or truck
campers, are defined as a recre-
ational camping unit designed to
be loaded onto, or affixed to, the
bed or chassis of a truck. Modem
truck campers offer most of the
features of larger RVs including
slide outs.
Advantages:
- Load on and off a standard
pickup truck with relative ease
- Popular among weekend
RVers who use their truck for
work during the week.
- RVers choose truck campers
because they want to tow a boat
or other recreational equipment
or the relative small size of the
unit and 4 wheel drive available
on pickups allows them access'to
remote locations.
Disadvantages:
- Relatively small size versus
cost.
- Small holding tanks.
Size: 18 to 21 feet
Cost: Prices range from $4,500
to $21,900, with an average retail
value of $13,380.


25 top tips to do before going offroad


1. Check all your fluids -coolant/anti-freeze, oil,
windshield washer fluid, brake fluid, ATF, differen-
tials, etc. Make sure there are no leaks, everything
is at the proper level, and carry extra fluids just in
case. Also, this should go without saying, but we'll
say it anyway: If you know of any mechanical or
electrical problems with your rig, repair them first.
By the way, check your air filter,too.

2. Check your shock absorbers for signs of
leakage or damage.

3. Check your tires for pressures and condition,
including the spare. Make sure the tread is appro-
priate for the terrain you will be traveling.

4. Jack up the front of your rig and make a quick
check of all ball joints, tie rods ends and wheel
bearings. Grab the tire at the top and bottom, and
check for any excess movement by rocking the
wheel in and out. Do the same by rocking the tire
side to side. Any excessive free play should be
checked out by a qualified mechanic. Do the same
at the rear

5. Plan your trip! File a "flight plan." Let some-
one know where you are, when you are leaving
and when you'll be back. Let then know when they
should start to worry if they haven't heard from
you, and whom to contact. You should have a map
of where you are going, and so should someone
staying behind.

6. Check the weather forecast. Bring appropri-
ate clothing and protective gear (hats, sunglass-


es, lip balm, sunscreen). Pack extra clothing in
case you get wet or it gets a little colder than
expected. If there's room, throw in at lease one
sleeping bag (preferably one for each member of
your party), even if you don't plan to spend the
night.

7. Pack a roll of toilet paper in a zip-top plastic
bag and put it behind the seat right now. I promise
you that someday you'll thank yourself

8. Pack a fully charged cell' phone and car
adapter, if you have one. You'd be amazed where
you may find a signal. You may have to climb a
tree or hike to the top of the ridge, but that could
mean the difference between spending the night
in your own bed or in the woods.

9. If you have a GPS, don't forget it! If you don't
have one, buy one. There are reasonably inex-
pensive, hand-held units that are easy to operate.
This could be the best money you ever spend,
should a real emergency arise. Bring spare bat-
teries in a zip-top baggie and a car adapter, if so
equipped.,

10. If you can, get a pair of handheld family
radio service (FRS) walkie-talkies. Just like the
GPS, they are common today and are reasonably
inexpensive. In case you need to temporarily split
up the party: (in search of a cell signal, for
instance) you do no want to be out of touch, even
if you are out of sight. And don't separate beyond
the range.


11. Bring something to eat and drink. Even if it's
only a short trip, bring something. Sports drinks,
bottled water, energy bars, and dried fruit are
good ideas. Items that don't need to be refrigerat-
ed are best. Avoid salty foods, unless you have
lot's to drink. If things go awry, it's easier to think
'clearly if you have a little something in your stom-
ach. And never travel without a cooler, even if
space is at a premium.

12. Fill the gas tank on every trip. It's amazing
how many people forget to do this. Always
remember the One-Third/Two-Third Rule: Only
use one-third of a tank to get where you are going
and save two-thirds for getting out, unless you
know there's fuel at your destination. If your fuel
tank doesn't have the capacity, carry extra fuel or
re-think your route.

13. Always carry your extra fuel outside the
vehicle. Fuel containers have vents, and not only
are gasoline fumes explosive, they are toxic

14. Step up and buy good jumper cables with
heavy-gauge wire and quality connectors.

15. Bring a tow strap.

16. Check all belts and hoses, and carry spares.
The lower radiator hose is the one that usually
gets damaged while off-roading, so ensure that
you have a spare. Alternator/water-pump belts are
the most important. Newer vehicles often use ser-
pentine belts. While much less prone to failure,
they can be pains to change. They are expensive,


but carry one if you can afford it.

17. Make sure you have a working jack and
know how to use it.

18. If you have room, carry a second spare
wheel and tire. Nothing is worse than getting a
second flat tire on the same trip.

19. Check the weather forecast. If there is even
the remote possibility of snow, or if you will be at
high altitude, carry tire chains for all four wheels
and know how to install them. Don't forget the
chain tensioners, which look like big rubber bands
with hooks. Remember that the chain tensioners
will deteriorate over time, so check them periodi-
cally for cracks and splits.

20. Carry a tool kit

21. Carry a first-aid kit.

22. Carry an emergency kit

23. Carry a flashlight and an extra set of fresh
batteries

24. Bring a few scraps of plywood, about 10 to
12 inches square. You may need them to support
your jack if you have to change a tire on the
uneven ground.

25. Make sure your headlights, taillights, and
brake lights all work. It's a good idea to carry
spare bulbs.


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to serve you
with oll your
Purchase and
service needs.
WE ARE CITRUS
COUNTYIS
HOMETOWN
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IA


'S


H PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
98 Olds Cutlass 05 Suzuki Verona 04 Chrysler Sebring
Only 69k miles...............................................$5 ,995 LX, 4 door..................................................$10 ,995 Touring convertible.......... .....................$14 ,995
03 Rio Cinco 02 Buick Lesabre 07 Kia Optima
Fabulous!........ ..... .............................. $6,995 Only 34k miles........... ......................... $11,900 Low miles................ ............................ $15,995
02 Saturn SL2 05 Kia Sedona 05 Ford Explorer
Super clean....................................................$7,995 7 passenger, LX............................................$11,995 clean SUV . $15,995
03 Kia Sedona 04 Pontiac Montana 05 Chevy Colorado
Family transportation.......................................$7,995 Extended, loaded.........................................$12,995 Crew cab ...........................................$15 995
02 Pontiac Grand Prix 06 Kia Spectra 05 Ford F-150
Low miles..................................................... $9,450 door, SX................... .......................$13,780 Ex.cab, 2WD ........................................ $16,995
02 Nissan Altima 04 Kia Amanti 06 Toyota Camry
4 door sedan............. ...........................$9,695 Leather, loaded...........................................$13,995 Very clean, 22kmiles.............. .......... .....$17 ,995
04 Chevy Cavalier 04 Ford Ranger 06 Hyundai Azera
Bright yellow.... .......................... $9,725 Super cab, Edge............ .......................$14,350 Top of the line ............................................$17 995
03 Ford Focus 05 Pontiac Aztek 07 Kia Sedona
Station wagon................................................$9,99 All wheeldrive............................................$14,730 passenger ....................................... $18,995
05 Hyundai Accent 06 Pontiac Vibe 07 Chevy Trailblazer
Automatic, 2 door ..........................................$9,995 Power package .............................................$14,995 8,000tendermiles........................................$22 995
03 Mistubishi Galant 06 Hyundai Elantra 05 Lincoln Town Car
nly 23kmiles........................................$....10,365 Only 29kmiles........................$11......38 Signature Limited.........................................$22,650

.-,_,, " . -"' -' . ' -! - " " "ePower to surpriset , .
a. . . .. . .. . -. , . .E E N T S C L U B
*Worranty iso lImited powerrain warranty. For details, see retailer or go to kda.com.


Citrus KIA


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TUI.'SI)AY, SI 'TiiMmlin 25, 2007 13D


CrnIus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-INOL


? 'tw LINCOLN MERCURY


2008 MERCURY MILAN L 2008 MERCURY MARINER
'1 "0-.q9 rr, .:.-: 'I. _" i -ri ,-.'j r , i ue i l t .yrr.irrr q n-, "H,1 0 .: a 'tr,b b 5,: u rj..,iii, .'.s,.-i.'. E,, e.:lu.iu d 'ae , i,,- ari,. li.:^,- l - _

.i m.uI LAST ONE [TWO LEFT!"


2007 LINCOLN
TOWN CAR


Hurry while they last!


rrZ


MOUNTAINEER


2007 MERCURY MILAN


2007 LINCOLN MKX


MARINER SABLE MKZ NAVIGATOR


2007 LINCOLN MARK LT 2007 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR


gw '08 GRAND MARQUIS GS


Keyless entry system, keyless remote cruise control. power windows/locks, AM/FM
stereo w/CD player, 8 way power driver seat, Michelin tires, tilt steering wheel


01 FORD FOCUS
WAGON
Blue auto loaded
#FR32534
$6,995.


Uz MEtLNUKY
SABLE WAGON
ltiite weather interior
#RP31264-
$8,995.


hfl~h


u0 r-uiRu
MUSTANG CONV.
IrI . Icrlth top le-ather
,nt 6C". changer #., 971
sI1,995.


I rnr3~.#a~eGV t5tW'flAwp~ I F


04 GRAND
MARQUIS LS
Leather intenor
4991284-1
$15.995.


06 FORD TAURUS
SEL
iA Toonrocf leather
#R3224
S14,995.


07 GRAND 07 GRAND
MARQUIS LS MARQUIS LS
Burgundy leather Gold 14 L000 miles
#P3261 #PR360
$18995. 9 8995.


05 LINCOLN TOWN
CAR
A ' c..n roof Slter
22 000 m,,leI #9 7 3014

124,995.


07 FORD
MUSTANG GT-CS
California Special
9 00-0 m,,le P32 4
$25,995.


04 MONTEREY
VAN
Potter side doors
leather #P3216-

$15,995.



2005 TOYOTA
CAMRY XLE
3old moon root leather
interior 24 000 miles
$18,995.


b .d . o e - .'a 3


S K . -y . - -7-'' ;*
04 LINCOLN
TOWNCAR
Blue 26 000 miles
uP32.48

$19.995,


06 LINCOLN
MKZ
lthite mo.-nr.-o f leather
5 0i.0 'ri mle, I/P326-
126,995.


04 MERCURY
SABLE
Leather carnage rcof
19000 mOies #P 1(;'�
S12,995.


05 FORD
RANGER XLT
BlacAi \ 6 auto I -P
miles ttR3208i
$ 15,995.


07 FORD FIVE
HUNDRED
S rai tlided nld I S
miles ,rie o o ner #'"1
$18,995.


04 MERCURY 03 MERCURY GRAND
SABLE LS MARQUIS LS
llhite leather ,loaded Green leather int
#P327" fP.3269
1I2,995. *12,995.


06 MERCURY
MILAN V6
Loaded tight greer)
13 000 mals #PF'264
$16.995.


07 MUSTANG V6
Auto leather red
#P3274

$18,995.


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~~iImrnaI


04 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER
G.,,ld moonroot 3d seal
orn t 26 i' miles ttf 322
$20,995.


06 TOWN CAR
Lt green only 18 000
mile leather /X909

*27,995.


07 FORD
FREESTAR
Leather gold 14 000
mle. tflPz 268
$20,995.


06 FORD FIVE
HUNDRED
Light green 7 000
miles leather #897114
S18,995.


SLY


04 FORD
F150 XLT
Ped 26' miles
#P3205;
$21,995.


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07 LINCOLN
TOWN CAR SIG.
11 000 miles sitter
#P8,92895.
$28,995.


07 LINCOLN TOWN
CAR SIGNATURE
Pearl t white 9 00,"
miles /#P.26 I
30,995.


u4 UnAnu
MARQUIS GS
lhlrl'e cloth 30LI 0L
n129es #90995-4

I12,995.


06 MILAN
-4 cW premier leather
I lt miles
tfP32664
$ 17,995.


05 FORD
FREESTYLE SEL
Gold leather 23 000
miles #R3265
$ 18.995.


05 LINCOLN LS
20 000 miles . 18 spori
1or 5 #tP32' -

s21,995.


07 LINCOLN
TOWN CAR LTD.
14 000 meles st ler
moon rootf P3287
$30,995.


07 FORD
FOCUS SE
Auto CD player Cold
21' miles #P.3-52


06 MERCURY
MONTEGO
Gold onl) 12 000
m1les #R<228.
418.995.


05 FORD F150
XLT
iL \he supercrert
trailer toil #P .'32.� .
$22,995.


05 FORD
T-BIRD
Gold one ouii er .ci.t
m il-s
$33,995.


07 FORD TAURUS
*13i995 ull I.Je

$ 13,995.


06 MERCURY
MARINER
, i"tu . 'pplr. J f lear ter tenor
600, rles
$18.995.


06 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER
Sil eri leather 20 000
mdle . tP3254


06 LINCOLN
NAVIGATOR 4X4
Ai loon roof gold
1 0,'0 miles #R3263
134,995.


I t J PROPER VEHICLE I
S' WO MAINTENANCE IS KEY
SI FUELSAVER TO MA XIMUM FUEL
I PACKAGE EFFICIENCY!
V Motorcraftl Premium Synthetic Blend j
Soil and filter change
SRotate and u
S inspect four tires l
I1' Check air $ 6 I
e and cabin air filters
V / Inspect brake system
'' /Top off all fluids
j | Test battery
V. Check belts and hoses
SUp to six quarts of Motorcrafth oil. Taxes and diesel j
vehicles extra Hybrid high voltage battery test not
l included. Disposal fees not included in some locations
See Service Advisor for vehicle applications and details.
S ffepr vlid with c nnn Expnres 9q30/0'7 .CCC


FACTORY AUTHORIZED I
A/C SYSTEM
CHECK
V Inspect system components I
V Perform electronic 2 i ,
inspections S95

V Leak test system I
with Ford -
authorized service equipment,
Refrigerant extra. See ServiceAdvisor for vehicle
applications and details Offer valid with coupon.
E 9... 30/07. CCC


COOLING SYSTEM
SERVICE




$3995
Part of Ford Motor Company-required maintenance
Inspect radiator for leaks Check hoses, clamps and
belts. Pressure test system for leaks Drain and refill
radiator. Includes up to one gallon of coolant Taxes and
diesel vehicles extra Disposal fees not included in some
S , ,- : i , ,,, ', ..... . .


iMOTORCRA.T PREMIUM WEARINDICATOR I WHEEL BALANCE, MOTORCRAFT"
i WIPER BLADES TIRE ROTATION AND BRAKES, INSTALLED!
BRAKE INSPECTION Engineered for
Your vehicle. I

S$1995 ,' $245 $8995
I$I4i95


WITH WEAR INDICATOR THAT
SIGNALS WHEN TO REPLACE
Motorcraff wiper blades with wear indicator per pair,
installed See Service Advisor for vehicle applications
and details. Offer valid with coupon
ExEires 9/30/07 CCC"


Computer balance four wheels Inspect brake friction
material caliper operation rotors drums, hoses and
connections. Inspect parking brake for damage and
proper operation Rotate and inspect four tires. Dual-
rear-wheel vehicles extra Taxes extra See Service
Advisor for vehicle applications and details Offer valid
with coupon Ex ires 9/30107 CCC


I I I
I Dealer-installed retail Motorcraft" or Genuine Ford I
brake pads or shoes only limit one redemption per axle
Pads or shoes only on most cars and light trucks Front
or rear axle. Excludes machining rotors or drums. Taxes
extra Exires 9/30/07 CCC


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.14D TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2007


How to improve your gas mileage


How to Improve Gas Mileage
Whether you are shopping for a
'new car or just trying to maintain
the one you have, you can take
some steps to get the best mileage
put of your gas purchases. The
Federal Trade Commission
(FTC), the nation's consumer pro-
tection agency, offers these tips to
use fuel efficiently:
On the Road: Drive More
Efficiently
" Stay within posted speed lim-
its. Gas mileage decreases rapidly
at speeds above 60 miles per
hour.
Stop aggressive driving. You
can improve your gas mileage up
to five percent around town if you
avoid "jackrabbit" starts and
stops by anticipating traffic con-
ditions and driving gently.
Avoid unnecessary idling. It
wastes fuel, costs you money, and
pollutes the air. Turn off the
engine if you anticipate a wait.
Combine errands. Several short
frips taken from a cold start can
use twice as much fuel as one trip
covering the same distance when
the engine is warm.
Use overdrive gears and cruise
control when appropriate. They
improve the fuel economy of
your car when you're driving on a
highway.
Remove excess weight from


the trunk. An extra 100 pounds in
the trunk can reduce a typical
car's fuel economy by up to two
percent.
Avoid packing items on top of
your car. A loaded roof rack or
carrier creates wind resistance
and can decrease fuel economy
by five percent.
At the Garage: Maintain Your
Car
Keep your engine tuned.
Tuning your engine according to
your owner's manual can increase
gas mileage by an average of four
percent. Increases vary depend-
ing on a car's condition.
Keep your tires properly inflat-
ed and aligned. It can increase gas
mileage up to three percent.
Change your oil. According to
the U.S. Department of Energy
(DOE) and Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA), you
can improve your gas mileage by
using the manufacturer's recom-
mended grade of motor oil.
Motor oil that says "Energy
Conserving" on the performance
symbol of the American
Petroleum Institute contains fric-
tion-reducing additives that can
improve fuel economy.
Check and replace air filters
regularly. Replacing clogged fil-
ters can increase gas mileage up
to ten. percent.


At the Pump: Use the Octane
Level You Need
Your owner's manual recom-
mends the most effective octane
level for your car. For most cars,
the recommended gasoline is reg-
ular octane. In most cases, using a
higher octane gas than the manu-
facturer recommends offers no
benefit. Unless your engine is
knocking, buying higher octane
gasoline is a waste of money.
In Advertising: Check Out
Claims About "Gas-Saving"
Gadgets
Be skeptical of claims for
devices that will "boost your
mileage by an extra 6 miles per
gallon," "improve your fuel econ-
omy up to 26 percent," or the like.
EPA has tested over 100 sup-
posed gas-saving devices -
including mixture "enhancers"
and fuel line magnets - and found
that very few provide any fuel
economy benefits. The devices
that work provide only marginal
improvements. Some "gas-sav-
ing" devices may damage a car's
engine or increase exhaust emis-
sions. For more information and a
full list of tested products, check
www.epa.gov/otaq/consumer.htm

In the Showroom: Consider the
Alternatives
Alternative Fuel Vehicles


(AFVs) operate on alternative
fuels, such as methanol, ethanol,
compressed natural gas, liquefied
petroleum gas, electricity, and
others designated by the DOE.
Using these alternative fuels in
vehicles may reduce harmful pol-
lutants and exhaust emissions.
FTC Rules require labels on all
new AFVs to give the vehicle's
estimated cruising range and gen-
eral descriptive information. Find
out how many miles a new AFV
travels on a tank or supply of fuel
because, gallon for gallon, some
don't travel as far as gasoline-
powered vehicles.
Hybrid Electric Vehicles offer
another option for car buyers.
According to DOE and EPA,
these vehicles combine the bene-
fits of gasoline engines and elec-
tric motors and can be configured
to achieve different objectives,
such as improved fuel economy
and increased power.
For more information on alter-
native fuel vehicles, call the
DOE's toll-free National
Alternative Fuels Hotline, 1-800-
423-1DOE, or visit DOE's
Alternative Fuels Data Center
website at www.afdc.doe.gov.
More information about both
hybrid-electric and alternative
fuel vehicles is at www.fuelecon-
omy.gov/.


Aflte rma rkeflac

X-Beam "geared" to you
If you use a "normal' set of combination wrenches, you know how
sore your fingers and palms become from pulling on that thin-piece of
metal Last week, for example, the Parts Dept. gang disassembled a
set of three-piece wheels, each with 40 bolts covered with thread-
locking compound. Talk about sore palms as the location of each nut
wouldn't allow a standard socket to fit in to break them loose. With
five bolts to go and a whole lot of finger pointing as to who was going
to finish the job, one staffer found the correct-sized X-Beam ratcheting
wrench from Gear Wrench. What a difference. Your palm rests on a
much broader surface to give you more comfort and pulling power.
Yes, that's the advertising hype, but it's also fact. The box end uses
Gear Wrench's ratcheting drive that allows access to nuts found on
bolts of any length: no more deep sockets. For now, there's a stan-
dard nine-piece set and a 12-piece metric kit. Visit
www.gearwrench.com, which goes into graphic detail on the benefits
although we just need to show the bruises on the palms of our hands.
Look to spend about $50 per set to start.

2,500-plus horsepower?
We seriously doubt that you'll rush out and buy it, but it's truly interest-
ing to know that someone out there actually sells parts to get you to
2,500 horsepower. Look how far technology has come when just
about anyone can go and make the kind of power that was almost
impossible to make, by anyone, 10 years ago. Procharger offers a
variety of bolt-on superchargers, in fact the Parts Dept. crew wit-
nessed a Chevrolet V8 in a 1969 Camaro street car making close to
1,300 horsepower. At the extreme upper end of the scale is the new
$5,500 Procharger F3-139 model that the company says will bring the
right engine to 2,500 horsepower. The key here is the "right" engine
that's built to take the stress and has the right combination of com-
pression ratio, cylinder heads and fuel system. However, Procharger
has many kits that are made to bolt onto stock vehicles such as
newer Mustangs and Corvettes. While they won't make 2,500 horse-
power, we've seen gains in some applications of more than 100 per
cent. Take the 1969 Camaro, which made "just" 600 horsepower with-
out a Procharger. Visit www.procharger.com for the details or call 1-
913-338-2886.

How about 5,000 watts?
Also at the extreme end of the scale is the 18-pound UL12 subwoofer
from Critical Mass out of Long Island City, N.Y. There's a good reason
the number "5000" is imprinted on the carbon-fiber cone of this 12-
inch bad boy since that's the peak power rating. Aside from its obvi- '
ous power-handling benefits is its light weight. According to the manu-
facturer, subwoofers from other companies with the same power rat-
; -ing weigh as much as 55 pounds, more than three times the weight of
'the UL12. Even better, the UL12 (there's also a 10-inch version) is
made to play in a small box (not included) of just 1.2 cubic feet to
save space. Critical Mass says that two of its subwoofers, including
enclosures, would save about 100 pounds over a pair of competing
subwoofers with similar power handling. The secret seems to be in
the special magnet that generates 20 times energy of competing
magnets of the equivalent size. With a suggested retail price of
$2,000, this isn't the cheapest subwoofer on the market, but Critical
Mass says that the UL12 has been rated the best. You can find out
exactly what they mean at www.criticalMASSaudio.com or call 1-718-
752-9764.

Protect your (diamond) back
If you want a thoughtful box cover that's as shiny as it is tough, then
you've come to the right place. The DiamondBack HD consists of two
high-strength diamond-plate aluminum panels that can support 1,600
.pounds of weight on top when folded flat. That's enough to handle a
couple of all-terrain vehicles, while the box remains available for
secure storage. Installation is surprisingly simple with clamps holding
the center section to the bed rails. Each panel can be raised,
clamshell style, for quick access or they can be quickly removed if
need be. According to Diamond Back, it takes one person about 10
minutes to detach the entire apparatus to move to another truck. The
panels include heavy-duty locks and 12 six-inch-tall anchor cleats.
Neat features include stainless-steel outer hardware, a center rain
gutter that channels away water when the two panels are raised and
a compression seal to keep water out of the bed area. A lighter-duty
model holds 400 pounds on top and has four cleats instead of 12.
The HD model, pictured here, retails for about $1,500. Visit diamond-
backcovers.com to see more and to find a dealer near you.


Car



Care



Myths:




Changing


your oil


When does your car's oil
really need to. be. changed?
SIt seems that I am the sucker
that is constantly panicking
when my car has reached its
allotted mileage recommended
by Jiffy Lube. You know that
little sticker in the left upper
comer of your windshield indi-
cating when your next oil
change is due; it says some-
thing like 37,659 miles or
whatever yours say s.
Whenever I hit this number I
am panicking. I am racing on
in to that Jiffy Lube because in
my mind my engine is going to
fry if I don't get in and get the
oil changed!
Obviously, somebody was a
marketing Genius, because in
doing a little research it seems
that most cars virtually never
need their oil changed every
3,000 miles, which incidental-
ly is when the next change is
recommended by all the lead-
ing chains.
Here are a few comments
from car care professionals
who give us some insight into
the reality, rather than the myth
of when bur oil really needs to
be changed.
Consumer Reports had this
to say on the subject:
Myth: Engine oil should be
changed every 3,000 miles.
Reality: Although oil compa-
nies and quick-lube shops like
to promote this idea, it's usual-
ly not necessary. Go by the rec-
ommended oil-change sched-
ule in your vehicle's owner's
manual. Most vehicles driven
under normal conditions can
go 7,500 miles or more
between oil changes. Some
models now come with a mon-
itoring system that alerts the
driver when the oil needs
changing. Depending on driv-
ing conditions, these can
extend change intervals to
10,000 ors15,000 miles.
This was from an interesting
article I found on MSNBC on
the subject....
Tom and Ray, the hosts of
Car Talk on National Public
Radio, recommend an oil
change every 5,000 miles,
although they admit knowing
when to change the oil is not an
exact science.
"It may be too soon for many
people and too late for a few,"
they say, "but for the vast
majority, 5,000-mile oil
changes will help your engine
last to a ripe, old age."


WtLUNt t international Autol roSs.
a puzle dedi':ald Ico Ire automobile enthusiastic '
Au:,C'~An .ls,.., y iur I N T E R N A T I 0 N .
kn cfwle,, o, h c lr:'.-I d, nal S a '
aulo-related people from all over the world Good luck'
a


JDOW


I1 Accident injury
3. Mixes with fuel for combustion
5. Shift-gate cover
7. Not in gear
0 8. British toadsterorbike"
11, Drag racer Bernstein
13. DeLorean home
15. 1950s Ford transmission option
16, 1950s Porsche ragtop
17. Barrs-built Monkee-mobile
S20. Carb maker
2021. Brake part
24. Sang 409's praises
25. Electrical-system component
27. Boost creator
3929. Measure of piston travel
30. "Stretched" Mercedes limo
X 3 3834. Brake slang
35. Before CTS
36. Mass - . Sensor
38. Speed checker
40. Insights classification
41. Steering-wheel slang
43. Auto-Union became this
-r0


ACROSS
1. a.k.a. rear spoiler
2.1950s two-door Chev wagon
4. Braking-assist feature
6. Race-winning movie star
9. Edsel model or Ford truck
10. A wrench in London?
12. Outlaws track surface
14. Auto ambulance
18. Chevy minivan
19. Sporty Triumph
22. Engine detonation
23, Before Grand Cherokee
26. Light blockers
27. _-angle valve job


28. Brooks Stevens exotic
29. Former F1 driver, team owner
31. Pinto model
32. Sporty VW hatchback
33. First FWD Dodge
35.442 platform
37. Four-wheel slide
39. Dacia's home
41. Starsky and Hutch ride
42. Father-of-the-Bride car
44. Whisky heir ran GP team
45. Minority Report car
46. Days of Thunder M.D.
47. Original wagon trim
48. Runs "Driving Experience"


COPYRIGHT WHEELBASE COMMUNICATIONS


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Crnius CotjNiy (FL) CHRONICLE


WELCOME I A C






Corrmrc fr moTrv ry /PT ) EHRPoNi5T F


-IN. 207F5


or


CASH BACK
AND


Concerned about
Ford Motor Company recalls?
Call the service
department with your
ID # and see what your
recall status is with any
Ford, Mercury or Lincoln.

726-1231


'3.50 rebate and !$1 .000 lde,,alencentives


11


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First Annual North Central Florida Mustangs All Ford Powered
Car and Truck Show
Presented by the North Central Florida Mustangs


Saturday September 29th * Nick Nicholas For
2901 Highway 44 West * Inverness
Awards for "Best of Show", "Best H Proceeds to Benefit
r., - Paint", "Best Interior", "Best e . - Local Charities
- ':.-:? Engine", and a Special Award ' f-4 Food, Fun, Prizes,
"Dealership Choice" Live Music, 50/50 Raftle


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TuiisDAY, SEPTEM13FR 25, 2007 15D


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Cu-IwS CoIINJlY (Jb j(2fI1RONICLE


D TUF.SDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2007


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LIFETIME POWERTRAIN WARRANTY
_- �$SO DEDUCTJIBL-
2007' 2007 k
pDODO RAM 1500, DODGE
REG CAB, CALIBER
MSRP


V-W i P'U -Starting at 4 l


20O1 2OOT7
DODGE DODGE
T"rA CLB CAB' CHARGrER
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^^^)fW^$24o795


MStinRPg at
Starting at


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:20-8I 2007
DODGE ORAND: CHRYSLER
CARAVAN 300 M8RP


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JEEP i
LIBER-TYi
SPORT,
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Starting at i 9 6
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JEEP
GRAND
C"IER KEE


#J70317


AC 5 I I | MRP
Starting at ='I Starting at 9% =A-
*Prices/Payments include all factory rebate, incentive, owner loyalty, 6% tax, tag transfer, title, dealer fee ($399.50) and dealer adds plus 20% down (Cash or trade equity). Payments based on 7.54% @ 84 months.W.A.C. Not responsible for typographical
errors. Pictures are for illustration purposes only.�Not available on SRT, Diesel, Sprinter, Ram Chassis or Fleet vehicles. Restrctions apply, see dealer for copy of limited warranty and compliance details. ** On select makes and models W.A.C.


CRYSTAL PRE-OWNED


Open 24 hours a day at
www.crystalautos.com


Free CARFAX
Vehicle History


1999 JEEP CHEROKEE SPORT 4X4
D70318A
$6,888t


2000 NISSAN FRONTIER
J70217A
$7,488t


1999 DODGE RAM 1500 VAN
J70197C
$7,488t


2000 MAZDA MPV ES
3806P
$7,988t
j^A.M


1999 CHEVY TRACKER
27508B
$8,488t


2002 CHRYSLER SEBRING LX
27243B
$8,988t


2002 PONTIAC GRAND AM SE
3765A
$9,4881


2004 MITSUBISHI LANCER
27461B
$9,988t


2001 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY LXI
AN07066B
$9,988t
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2001 CHEVY VENTURE 1999 DODGE RAM 1500 2006 DODGE STRATUS SXT i999 CHEVY SILVERADO C1500 EXT CAB
N7014B J70472A DO-3809L 27298A
$9,988t $10,488t $10,488t $10,988t
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2001 FORD F150 SUPERCAB
s11,988t
rv~s00a


2001 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX GT 2002 FORD EXPLORER SPORT TRAC 2007 DODGE CALIBER SXT 2004 CHRYSLER PACIFICA 2005 DODGE DURANGO 2005 MAGNUM RT 2006 JEEP WRANGLER SPORT
J60547A 3847P DO-3797L 00125 3827P 060377A D C "14A
$11,988t $12,988t $13,888t $14,888t $16,888t $17,888t $1 8,888t


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2007 DODGE NITRO


2007 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER


2005 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY LTD,


2005 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD


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2002 JEEP COMMANDER


DO-3743A 3839P D-D70143A D80034A D-D70346A
$19.988t $20.488t $20.888t $209888t $21.888t


2006 JEEP COMMANDER
D70220A
$22,488t


2006 DODGE CHARGER/RT
D-J70414A
$SAVEt


1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD., HOMOSASSA
2077 HIGHWAY 44 WEST, INVERNESS
1-866-434-3064
1-877-MY-CRYSTAL
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CRYSTAL
AUTO M OT I V E


VISIT US 24/7 @ CRYSTALAUTOS.COM


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TUESDAY, SF.I'ErMiBi R 25, 2007 17D


WE GUARANTEE NO OTHER DEALER CAN BEAT US!


IXCUIIVIY OFF1R 1 Cl Vou


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WE WILL GUARANTEE TO BEAT ANY OTHER SUZUKI
WE WILL GUARANTEE TO BEAT ANY OTHER SUZUKI


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BEST PRICE
AND FINANCE
GUARANTEE


DEALERS PRICE ON A NEW SUZUKI AND


GET YOU FINANCED OR WE'LL GIVE YOU $5,000 CASH!


BRAND NEW


2008
SUZUKI
FORE NZA'S


SIMILAR
SAVINGS ON
;ALL SUZUKI
MODELS


FROM$$7498
Why buy usFROMed?
', Why buy used?


, YOUR CHOICE OF
,i,. ',-- &- e*'-- -o. : * o ;',� .: ,..*^^-i.-, � ..-" - ';- --* '*_ ,-:-,. ... -* .... . . .-.... . .. ,__*


NEW SUZUKI'S


15265 Cortez TOLL FREE
(s.R.s) SUZUKI I-866-32-SUZUKI
J ust East of SUMMER1-8 -SUU
Suncoast y SUMMER 352-799-9999
Exit 46 SELL-DOWN
flRmnivIIO*


-- - -v 1 We're just minutes from anywhere in Citrus County!
All offers with approved credit. No limit on $500 customer cash offer, Best price and finance guarantee; Best price customer must present bona fide signed buyers order from competitive dealer on exactly equipped same make/
model. (We reserve the right to purchase said vehicles from other dealer). Some vehicles may require factory order. Order yours today. $0 Down/$199 month on select models. 84 mos. @ 8% apr. All prices and payments include
$499 dealer delivery fee. All prices and payments based on dealer retaining all program rebates and incentives that customer must qualify for. $5000 finance guarantee on select models and may necessitate substantial down
payment or trade equity. $6997 Forenza price based on $3999 down or trade equity, plus tax, tag, title, All offers for Citrus County residents of 18 years or older with valid drivers license and proof of insurance. Test drive offer limit
one per family per 6 months. See dealer for complete details. All offers expire 10/2/07.


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Ch-Rus Cowry (FL) CHRONICLE __








CD TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2ITRUS COUNr (FL) CHRONICLE
1SD TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2007




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